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Thursday, February 1, 2018

Late Medieval Publishing Culture In Japan During The 14th And 16th Centuries

Colloquium | February 1 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 3401 Dwinelle Hall


Sumiyoshi Tomohiko, Keiō Univeristy

Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures, Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)


Books printed in Japanese Zen monasteries during the medieval period are known as Gozan-ban or “Five Mountains” editions. Originally, Gozan-ban were printed for the self-education of Gozan monks who were expected to imitate the latest Chinese scholarship and act out another culture in Japan. At this time, in the 13th to 14th centuries, Chinese Zen masters visited Japan very often, while Japanese...   More >

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

From Saliva to Saints: (m)oral Hygiene in the Middle Ages and the Case of Late Medieval Villamagna

Lecture | February 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)


Trent Trombley, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

Archaeological Research Facility


Human dentition and the accompanying oral cavity is a dense source of biocultural information and has enjoyed a long history of anthropological fascination. Analyses have ranged from establishing biological affinity in archaeological communities via dental metric and non-metric traits, to larger evolutionary questions of morphology. However, dental tissues have seldom been analyzed for their...   More >

Thursday, February 15, 2018

A Medieval Gospel Book from Genocide to Restitution: Toros Roslin’s Zeytun Gospels, 1915-2015

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall


Heghnar Zeitlian Watenpaugh, Associate Professor of Art History, UC Davis

Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program


The destruction of art, especially religious art, is one of the components of the genocidal phenomenon. Claims for the restitution of surviving religious and artistic objects form part post-conflict processes of survival or reconciliation. The widespread destruction of religious art is a well known dimension of the Armenian Genocide, yet its has rarely attracted critical attention. A rare example...   More >

Monday, February 26, 2018

Transcending Institutions: A Medieval Way to Individual Freedom.: A talk by Gert Melville, Feb. 26th 2018

Lecture | February 26 | 5 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall


Gert Melville, Technische Universität Dresden

Medieval Studies Program


"Transcending Institutions: A Medieval Way to Individual Freedom."

Gert Melville, Senior Professor of Medieval History and Director of the Research Centre for the Comparative History of Religious Orders at the Technische Universität Dresden.

26 February 2018
5:00 pm in 3335 Dwinelle

Monday, March 12, 2018

The Italian ‘Commercial Revolution’: An Archaeological Reading?: A talk by Chris Wickham, March 12th 2018

Lecture | March 12 | 5 p.m. |  Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union


Chris Wickham, Oxford University

Medieval Studies Program


“The Italian ‘Commercial Revolution’: An Archaeological Reading?”

Chris Wickham, Chichele Professor of Medieval History emeritus at Oxford University and Fellow of All Souls College

12 March 2018
5:00 pm in Pauley Ballroom East, MLK Center.

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

The Princess and the Prayer Scroll.: A talk by Leslie Brubaker

Lecture | March 13 | 308A Doe Library


Leslie Brubaker, University of Birmingham

Medieval Studies Program


"The Princess and the Prayer Scroll."

Leslie Brubaker, Professor of Byzantine Art emerita & Director of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham.

13 March 2018
5:00 pm in Doe Library 308A



Friday, March 16, 2018

The Child in Medieval Scandinavia: Challenging the Ariés Thesis

Lecture | March 16 | 4-6 p.m. | 3205 Dwinelle Hall


Eva Österberg, Professor Emerita, Lund University

Paula S. Fass, Margaret S. Byrne Professor Emerita, UC Berkeley

Department of History, Department of Scandinavian


Eva Österberg is a scholar of the middle ages, and the early modern period, but her works also include the 19th and 20th centuries. She is particularly interested in Norbert Elias' concept of a civilizing process, Aron Gurevitj's ideas about medieval mentality, Philippe Ariès on childhood, and William Reddy and Barbara Rosenwein on emotions.


All Audiences

Monday, April 9, 2018

Towards a Subaltern History of the Crusades?

Lecture | April 9 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall


Christopher J. Tyerman, Oxford University Professor of the History of the Crusades

Department of History, Medieval Studies Program, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion


Christopher J. Tyerman is Professor of the History of the Crusades at Oxford University. His research considers the cultural, religious, political and social phenomenon of crusading in medieval Western Europe between the eleventh and sixteenth centuries. He has published widely on various aspects of the crusades and on crusade historiography from the Middle Ages to the present day. Recent books...   More >

Monday, April 16, 2018

The Aesir and the Anthropocene: Ecology and Catastrophe in Norse Mythology: A talk by Professor Chris Abram

Lecture | April 16 | 5-7 p.m. | UC Berkeley Campus, Geballe Room at the Townsend Center


Chris Abram

Medieval Studies Program


“The Aesir and the Anthropocene: Ecology and Catastrophe in Norse Mythology.”

Chris Abram, Associate Professor of English, University of Notre Dame

Monday, April 16, 2018 at 5:00 pm in the Geballe Room of the Townsend Center.