Upcoming Events

Sunday, May 19, 2019

Music Department Commencement

Reception | May 19 | 1:30 p.m. |  Hertz Concert Hall

 Department of Music

Monday, May 20, 2019

Analysis and PDE Seminar: Concentration and Growth of Laplace Eigenfunctions

Seminar | May 20 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Jeffrey Galkowski, Northeastern University

 Department of Mathematics

In this talk we will discuss a new approach to understanding eigenfunction concentration. We characterize the features that cause an eigenfunction to saturate the standard supremum bounds in terms of the distribution of $L^2$ mass along geodesic tubes emanating from a point. We also show that the phenomena behind extreme supremum norm growth is identical to that underlying extreme growth of...   More >

Friday, May 31, 2019

Hard Songs conference

Conference/Symposium | May 31 | 250 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

“Artifice and complexity” is the phrase commonly used to characterize the aesthetic world cultivated by fifteenth-century composers. Their music employs dense contrapuntal structures, extensive intertextuality, and elaborate transformations like retrograde and mensuration canons. Viewed from the vantage point of the sixteenth century (following the advent of music printing and the religious...   More >

Hard Songs

Performing Arts - Music | May 31 | 8 p.m. |  Hertz Concert Hall

 Department of Music

Four of the world's best singers of early music perform monstrously difficult polyphony that hasn't been heard since the fifteenth century. The concert is part of a symposium on the concept of difficulty organized by UC Berkeley Professor Emily Zazulia.

Cut Circle recaptures the gritty, intense experience of singing early music. They embrace confident singing and strong contrasts and take...   More >

 $25 General Admission, $20 Senior, Student (non-UCB), UCB Faculty/Staff, $10 UCB students

  Buy tickets online

Saturday, June 1, 2019

Hard Songs conference

Conference/Symposium | June 1 | 250 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

“Artifice and complexity” is the phrase commonly used to characterize the aesthetic world cultivated by fifteenth-century composers. Their music employs dense contrapuntal structures, extensive intertextuality, and elaborate transformations like retrograde and mensuration canons. Viewed from the vantage point of the sixteenth century (following the advent of music printing and the religious...   More >

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