One Belt, One Road: Remaking Eurasia?

Panel Discussion: Center for Chinese Studies: Institute of East Asian Studies | April 18 | 3:30-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Deputy Consul General Ren Faqiang, Deputy Consul General of the Consulate General of the PRC- SF; Vinod Aggarwal, Political Science, UC Berkeley; David Roland-Holst, Agriculture and Resource Economics, UC Berkeley; Lowell Dittmer, Political Science, UC Berkeley; Yves Tiberghien, Director of the Institute of Asian Research, University of British Columbia

 Consul Wang Dong, Consulate General of the PRC- SF; Peter Lorentzen, Political Science, UC Berkeley; Consul Li Yi, Consulate General of the PRC- SF; Consul Sun Jia, Consulate General of the PRC- SF

 Kevin O'Brien, Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

China's "One Belt, One Road" is one of the most ambitious infrastructure plans of the past century. PRC Deputy Consul General Ren Faqiang will introduce China's Belt and Road Initiatives, followed by a panel of political science and economics specialists engaged to discuss the plan, its goals, and its potential effects with delegates from the Consulate General of the PRC-SF.

Agenda:

Welcome Remarks
Kevin O’Brien (Moderator)
Deputy Consul General Ren Faqiang, Consulate General of the PRC- SF

Presentations:

The “One Belt, One Road Project”: An Introduction
Deputy Consul General Ren Faqiang, Consulate General of the PRC- SF

The Impact of China’s Belt and Road Initiative on Asian Regional Integration and Global Governance
Yves Tiberghien, University of British Columbia

"One Belt One Road" and Trump's Asia Policy
Lowell Dittmer, Political Science, UC Berkeley

Liberal Trading Under Assault
Vinod Aggarwal, Political Science, UC

“One Belt, One Road”: Opportunities and Challenges
David Roland-Holst, Agriculture and Resource Economics, UC Berkeley

Roundtable Discussion:
Consul Wang Dong, Consulate General of the PRC- SF
Peter Lorentzen, Political Science, UC Berleley
Consul Sun Jia, Consulate General of the PRC- SF
Li Yi, Consulate General of the PRC- SF

Participant Bios:

Vinod AGGARWAL, Political Science, UC Berkeley

Vinod (Vinnie) Aggarwal is Travers Family Senior Faculty Fellow and Professor in the Department of Political Science, Affiliated Professor in the Business and Public Policy group in the Haas School of Business, and Director of the Berkeley Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Study Center (BASC) at the University of California at Berkeley. He also serves as Editor-in-Chief of the journal Business and Politics, and Co-Chair of the U.S. Consortium of APEC Study Centers. From 1991-1994, he chaired the Political Economy of Industrial Societies Program at UC Berkeley.

He has held fellowships from the Brookings Institution, Rockefeller Foundation, Council on Foreign Relations, East-West Center, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and was a Japan Foundation Abe Fellow. He has also been a Visiting Professor at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, the University of Geneva’s IOMBA program, INSEAD, Yonsei University, NTU Singapore, and Bocconi University. He is also an elected lifetime member of the Council on Foreign Relations and founding member of the U.S. Asia Pacific Council.

Dr. Aggarwal consults regularly with multinational corporations on strategy, trade policy, and international negotiations, including Sutherland Global Services, Merck, Russell Investments, the Investment Management Consultants Association, Cisco, Statoil, ING Clarion, Genentech, Hewlett Packard, Qualcomm, Herman Miller, Italcementi, ARCO, and Nestle. He has been a consultant to the Mexican Government, the U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Defense Department, U.S. State Department, World Trade Organization, OECD, the Group of Thirty, FAO, IFAD, the International Labor Organization, ASEAN, and the World Bank. In 1990, he was Special Adviser on Trade Negotiations to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and has worked with the APEC Eminent Persons Group. In 1997, he won the Cheit Outstanding Teaching Award at the Haas School of Business for PhD teaching; in 2003 he was first runner up for the Cheit Award for MBA teaching and won first place for the MBA program in 2005.

Lowell DITTMER, Political Science, UC Berkeley

Professor Dittmer received his Ph.D. from The University of Chicago in 1971. His scholarly expertise is the study of contemporary China. He teaches courses on contemporary China, Northeast Asia, and the Pacific Rim. His current research interests include a study of the impact of reform on Chinese Communist authority, a survey of patterns of informal politics in East Asia, and a project on the China-Taiwan-US triangle in the context of East Asian regional politics. Professor Dittmer's recently published books and monographs include Sino-Soviet Normalization and Its International Implications (University of Washington Press, 1992), China's Quest for National Identity (with Samuel Kim, Cornell University Press, 1993), China Under Modernization (Westview Press, 1994), and South Asia's Nuclear Crisis (M. E. Sharpe, 2005).

Consul LI Yi, Consulate General of the PRC-SF

Consul Li Yi has worked in the Chinese Consulate General in San Francisco since December 2014. He acts as Head of the Press and Public Diplomacy section. Previously, he worked in the Department of North American and Oceanian Affairs of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of China from October 2009 to December 2014. From March 2008 to September 2009, Consul Yi worked in the Chinese Embassy in Greece, and prior to that, from August 2005 to March 2008, he worked in the Chinese Embassy in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. He holds a Masters degree of International Relations from Beijing University.

Peter LORENTZEN, Political Science, UC Berkeley

Peter Lorentzen studies the political economy of development and authoritarian governance, with a focus on China. He has written on authoritarian media control strategies, the role of entrenched economic interests in blocking environmental governance reforms, the management of popular protest, and the rise of rights consciousness in China, among other topics.

He is currently completing a book on how the Chinese Communist Party manages political participation in order to gather crucial information that improves its capacity for effective governance and social control, while also taking steps to mitigate the spread of that same information from citizen to citizen that could undermine its rule.

His research has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, the China Quarterly, Genetics in Medicine, the Journal of Economic Growth, the Journal of Politics, the Journal of Theoretical Politics, Modern China, and the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, and new research is forthcoming in World Development. His research has also attracted attention from mass media outlets including the Boston Review, California Magazine, The Diplomat, the New Yorker, the New York Review of Books blog, and Slate.

He earned his PhD in Economic Analysis and Policy from Stanford University Graduate School of Business and his BA in Asian Studies from Dartmouth College. He has also studied at the London School of Economics, Beijing Normal University, National Taiwan University, and on a Fulbright Scholarship at Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Kevin O’BRIEN, Political Science, UC Berkeley

Kevin O’Brien is the Alann P. Bedford Professor of Asian Studies and Professor of Political Science. He is also the Director of Berkeley's Institute of East Asian Studies and the Walter and Elise Haas Professor of Asian Studies. A student of Chinese politics in the reform era, he has published nearly 50 articles on topics such as legislative politics, local elections, fieldwork strategies, popular protest, policy implementation, protest policing, and village-level political reform. He is the author of Reform Without Liberalization: China's National People's Congress and the Politics of Institutional Change (Cambridge, 1990) and the co-author of Rightful Resistance in Rural China (Cambridge, 2006). He is the co-editor of Engaging the Law in China: State, Society and Possibilities for Justice (Stanford, 2005), Rural Politics in Contemporary China (Routledge, 2014), and Grassroots Elections in China(Routledge, 2011), and the editor of Popular Protest in China (Harvard, 2008). His most recent work centers on the Chinese state and theories of popular contention, particularly as concerns the policing of protest and types of repression that are neither "soft" nor "hard." He has won various grants and awards and serves on the editorial or advisory board of ten journals.

Deputy Consul General REN Faqiang, Deputy Consul General of the Consulate General of the PRC-SF

Deputy Consul General Ren Faqiang was born in 1971 in Shandong province. He has worked at the Chinese Consulate General in San Francisco as Deputy Consul General since August 2015. From 2011 to 2015, he worked at the Chinese Embassy in Sri Lanka as Deputy Chief of the Mission and Political Counselor. Previously, from 2003 to 2011, he worked as Deputy Director and Director at the Department of North American and Oceanian Affairs of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of China. Prior, he served as Vice Consul at the Chinese Consulate General in Chicago from 1999 to 2003. From 1996 to 1999, Deputy Consul General Faqiang served as a US Affairs desk officer at the Department of North American and Oceanian Affairs of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of China. He is currently married with a daughter. Deputy Consul General Faqiang graduated from Shandong Teachers’ University and Foreign Affairs College in Beijing.

David ROLAND-HOLST, Agriculture and Resource Economics, UC Berkeley

David Roland-Holst is adjunct professor of agricultural and resource economics in the College of Natural Resources at UC Berkeley. He is an expert on the Chinese economy, international development, and environmental economics. Roland-Holst has authored six books and more than 100 professional journal articles and book chapters. He has also served in academic posts in the United States, Europe, and Asia, and conducted research in more than 40 countries, working with such institutions as the Asian Development Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), World Bank, and several United Nations agencies, as well as governments in Asia, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and the United States. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from UC Berkeley.

Consul SUN Jia, Consulate General of the PRC-SF

Mr. Sun Jia, born in Beijing 1983, is a Consul of Press and Public Diplomacy office of Chinese Consulate General in San Francisco from July 2015. He received education in Singapore Nanyang Technological University and China Foreign Affairs University. Sun joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of China in 2005. He served in Chinese Embassy in Qatar from 2005 to 2010. During 2010-2015, Sun served in the Information Department of Chinese Foreign Ministry.


Yves TIBERGHIEN, Institute of Asian Research at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada

Yves Tiberghien (Ph.D. Stanford University, 2002) is the Director of the Institute of Asian Research at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Executive Director of the UBC China Council, and Associate Professor of Political Science. In 2014-2016, Dr. Tiberghien also served as Co-Director of the Master of Public Policy and Global Affairs (MPPGA), which he founded as Chair of the UBC Public Policy Curriculum Committee in 2014. In 2014-2015 he chaired the President’s ‘Ad-Hoc Committee on International Strategy.’

He specializes in East Asian comparative political economy, international political economy, and global economic and environmental governance, with an empirical focus on China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. In 2007, he published Entrepreneurial States: Reforming Corporate Governance in France, Japan, and Korea (Cornell University Press in the Political Economy Series directed by Peter Katzenstein). His most recent publications include three books (亚洲与世界未来 (Asia and the Future of the World). Beijing: 社会科学文献出版社 (Social Sciences Academic Press, China) ; L’Asie et le futur du monde, Paris: Science Po Press, 2012; and Leadership in Global Institution-Building: Minerva’s Rule, edited volume, Palgrave McMillan, 2013).

Dr. Tiberghien focuses on the ongoing transition in the global economic and environmental order, in the face of new systemic risks, a changing balance of power, and the rise of populist political forces. He is also currently working on articles and a book on China’s role in global governance (including G20, AIIB, climate change, Belt and Road Initiative). For a more expensive bio statement, see listing for his talk April 18 at 12:30.

Consul WANG Dong, Consulate General of the PRC-SF
Consul Wang Dong has worked in the Chinese Consulate General in San Francisco since July 2014 as Consul for Press and Public Diplomacy. Prior, he worked in the Chinese Consulate General in Houston, from August 2006 to October 2013, as Consul for Cultural and Press Affairs. Consul Dong also previously worked as Consul for Cultural and Press Affairs in the Chinese Consulate General in San Francisco from October 2000 to January 2004. He graduated from Renmin University, Beijing, in March 1995, with a Masters degree in International Politics.

 ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809