Skip to main content.
Advanced search >
Print

<< April 2018 >>

Monday, April 2, 2018

Rhythms for Cognition: Communication through Coherence

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | April 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Pascal Fries, Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Free viewing of natural images induces gamma-band oscillations in early visual cortex. If the gamma rhythm in a lower visual area entrains a gamma rhythm in a higher visual area, this might establish an effective communication protocol: The lower area sends a representation of the visual stimulus rhythmically, and the higher area is most excitable precisely when this representation arrives. At...   More >



Neurodevelopmental Mechanisms linking Early Adversity with Adolescent Psychopathology

Colloquium | April 2 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall


Kate McLaughlin, Department of Psychology, University of Washington

Institute of Human Development


Children who have experienced environmental adversity—such as abuse, neglect, or poverty—are at markedly elevated risk for developing psychopathology. What is less clear is how and why adverse early experiences exert such a profound influence on mental health. Identifying developmental processes that are disrupted by adverse early environments is the key to developing better intervention...   More >

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Informed Approaches to Deep Learning via Neural Networks with Random Parameters

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | April 3 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Yasaman Bahri, Google Brain

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Obtaining a better understanding of neural networks with random parameters is relevant for deep learning practice — for instance, by informing good initializations — and is a natural first step in building a more complete base of knowledge within deep learning. I will survey some of our recent work at Google Brain which originated from the study of random neural networks. [1]. I’ll begin by...   More >

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Biology of Bedtime: Understanding Circadian Rhythms and Sleep

Seminar | April 5 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Amita Sehgal, University of Pennsylvania

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, April 6, 2018

“Resource-Rational Attention Allocation”

Colloquium | April 6 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Fred Callaway, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


One of two 30 min research talks by graduate students.

Monday, April 9, 2018

​Graduate Students Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | April 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Stephanie Wan, UC Berkeley, Fleiszig Lab; Kathryn Bonnen, University of Texas at Austin, Huk Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Stephanie Wan’s Talk Title: Impact of contact lens wear and dry eye on the amicrobiomic status of the murine cornea

Abstract: Contrasting with the conjunctiva and other exposed body surfaces, the cornea does not host a stable bacterial population (amicrobiomic). Yet, the cornea and conjunctiva are not usually distinguished in ocular surface microbiome research. Additionally, commonly used...   More >

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Computational dysfunctions in anxiety: Failure to differentiate signal from noise

Colloquium | April 10 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Martin Paulus, Scientific Director and President, Laureate Institute for Brain Research

Department of Psychology

Monday, April 16, 2018

A Tale of Two Strains: Ocular Studies in B6 and BALB/c Mice

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | April 16 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Elizabeth Berger, PhD, Professor, Wayne State University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Corneal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa perforates the cornea in C57BL/6 (B6), but not BALB/c mice. Comparative analysis of these two responses has revealed that B6 mice, type 1-dominant responders, exhibit increased inflammation, leading to an exacerbated disease response when compared to BALB/c mice, which demonstrate a less severe/resistant response and are classified as type...   More >

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Neural oscillations: What we're doing wrong

Colloquium | April 17 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Brad Voytek, Professor, Department of Cognitive Science, UCSD

Department of Psychology

Friday, April 20, 2018

Optogenetic and Chemogenetic Tools for Mapping Molecular and Cellular Circuits: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | April 20 | 2-3 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall


Prof. Alice Ting, Stanford University, Genetics/Biology/Chemistry

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


The first part of the talk will describe optogenetic tools we have developed for labeling and manipulating functional circuits in the brain (e.g., FLARE and related tools).

The second part of the talk will describe chemogenetic tools we have developed for mapping molecular interactions in living cells (e.g., APEX and TurboID).

********
Alice Ting did her PhD in Chem here at UC Berkeley...   More >

Monday, April 23, 2018

Mobilizing Synaptic Plasticity to Promote Recovery from Amblyopia

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | April 23 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Dr. Mark Bear, PhD, PiCower Professor of Neuroscience, MIT

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Amblyopia is a prevalent form of visual disability that arises during infancy and early childhood when inputs to the visual cortex from the two eyes are poorly balanced (e.g., by misalignment of the eyes, asymmetric refraction, or opacities and obstructions of one eye). Characteristics of amblyopia are very poor acuity in one eye, and an attendant loss of stereopsis. The current standard of care...   More >

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | April 26 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Emery Brown , Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH