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<< March 2018 >>

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Mosse-Lecture: Can Architecture Be Democratic?: 2nd Annual Mosse-Lecture

Lecture: Upcoming | March 1 | 4:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall


Jan-Werner Mueller, Professor, Political Science, Princeton University

Martin Jay, Professor, History, UC Berkeley

Department of German, The Mosse Foundation


Many people have an intuitive sense that the built environment is bound up with politics. The lecture poses the question how we might think more systematically (and normatively) about the relationship between democracy and architecture as well as public spaces as a particular form of the built environment.

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

The End of Gold? Monetary Metals Studied at the Planetary and Human Scale During the Classical Gold Standard Era

Lecture | March 6 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Andrea Westermann, GHI West. The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institude Washington DC

Institute of European Studies, GHI West. The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institude Washington DC


Andrea Westermann analyzes an early case of global mineral resource appraisal: In 1877, Eduard Suess, a professor of geology from Vienna published The Future of Gold (Die Zukunft des Goldes). In 1892, the year the Austrian Government convened an expert commission to discuss its Empire's transition from a 40-year period of inconvertible paper money to a gold coinage standard, he published his...   More >

Friday, March 9, 2018

Elemental Media: 26th Annual Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference

Conference/Symposium: Upcoming | March 9 – 10, 2018 every day | 10 a.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall


Townsend Center for the Humanities


The Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference brings media theory in conversation with ecological thought. Contributions from the fields of German, Comparative Literature, Rhetoric, Visual and Environmental Studies, Film and Media, and History.

Saturday, March 10, 2018

Elemental Media: 26th Annual Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference

Conference/Symposium: Upcoming | March 9 – 10, 2018 every day | 10 a.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall


Townsend Center for the Humanities


The Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference brings media theory in conversation with ecological thought. Contributions from the fields of German, Comparative Literature, Rhetoric, Visual and Environmental Studies, Film and Media, and History.

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Transboundary Natures: The Consequences of the Iron Curtain for Landscape

Lecture | March 13 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Astrid M. Eckert, Emory University

Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West. The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC


This talk investigates the ecological footprint of the Iron Curtain and the consequences of the border regime for landscape and wildlife. It moves beyond the quotidian claim that the Iron Curtain divided ecosystems and landscapes by arguing that the fortifications and all activities that kept them functional became causal – in direct or in mitigated fashion – to changes in the natural environment...   More >

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Space Resources Luxembourg: Exploring New Frontiers

Lecture | March 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Pierre Franck, Consul General of Luxembourg in San Francisco

Institute of European Studies, BENELUX Studies Program


The identification and utilization of space resources is fast becoming a reality, driven by a revolution in space technology and accelerating exploration of outer space. In February 2016, the Luxembourg government announced a series of measures to position the country as a European hub in the exploration and use of space resources within the SpaceResources.lu initiative, including but not limited...   More >



Art in a State of Siege: Bosch in Retrospect: Joseph Leo Koerner, Art Historian

Lecture | March 15 | 5 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Reading Room, 101 Doe


Townsend Center for the Humanities


Koerner examines Hieronymus Bosch’s Garden of Delights—approaching the painting as a representation of a world without history and without law. The discussion emerges from a larger project in which Koerner explores the relationship between art and freedom under a range of emergency “states of siege,” including apartheid South Africa and Nazi Germany.


All Audiences

Alumni

Friday, March 16, 2018

Habsburg Peacemaking During the Dutch Revolt

Lecture | March 16 | 4-5 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Violet Soen, Leuven University, Belgium

Institute of European Studies, Department of History, BENELUX Studies Program, Dutch Studies


The Habsburg strategy for the pacification of the Dutch Revolt went beyond the mere military strategy uncovered by Geoffrey Parker, as it equally entailed the alternative of diplomacy. Unlike the Black Legend of the Spanish struggle for undisputed world dominion, Habsburg strategy did not renounce the possibility of finding a mediated middle ground. From the outset of the civil and religious...   More >

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Healthy or Sick? Co-Evolution of Health Care and Public Health in a Comparative Perspective

Lecture | March 20 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Philipp Trein, University of Lausanne

Institute of European Studies


Health policymakers around the world face complex policy challenges such as chronic diseases, which require integrated policy responses. In this talk, Philipp Trein presents his book (forthcoming with Cambridge University Press), in which he analyses how policies to prevent diseases are related to policies aiming to cure illnesses. The book argues that two factors lead to a close relationship of...   More >

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

The Rise of the Neural Subject

Lecture | March 21 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 282 Dwinelle Hall


Matthew Smith, Stanford University

Department of German, Townsend Center for the Humanities


How did we come to think of the self not as soul but as nervous system? This talk charts the rise of a neural conception of the self in Western culture and argues that the recent turn to neuroscience is a return as well: a return to a way of thinking about the human being that arose in the late 17th century and developed to maturity in the Victorian age. After sketching a brief history of the...   More >

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Trust as Violence: The Politics of Film and the Militarization of Male Sexuality in National Socialism

Lecture | March 22 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Anja Laukötter, Center for the History of Emotions at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin

Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West, the Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC


This talk discusses the political significance of film and emotions in National Socialism. It explains how Nazi ideology and culture politics led to the conception and production of films as a forum for regulating emotions. It then explores the regime's ambivalent sexual politics, and in particular its attempts to fight the spread of venereal disease, which took on new relevance for the military...   More >