Upcoming Events

Monday, September 10, 2018

Navigating Bureaucracy and Generating Vulnerability at an Agri-environmental Research Institute

Colloquium | September 10 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Tim McLellan, Center for Chinese Studies Postdoctoral Fellow, 2018-2019

 Rachel Stern, Professor, School of Law, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Conducting research in China throws up numerous headaches, from acquiring official invitation letters and securing permissions for field research to navigating the anti-corruption measures that govern the use of research funding. One well-documented strategy for overcoming such challenges is to leverage informal social relationships (guanxi) with government officials to circumvent formal rules...   More >

Roxane Gay: With One N: Presented by Berkeley Center for New Media

Lecture | September 10 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Roxane Gay

 Arts + Design, Berkeley Center for New Media

Roxane Gay is an author and cultural critic whose writing is unmatched and widely revered. Her work garners international acclaim for its reflective, no-holds-barred exploration of feminism and social criticism. With a deft eye on modern culture, she brilliantly critiques its ebb and flow with both wit and ferocity.

Words like “courage,” “humor,” and “smart” are frequently deployed when...   More >

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Investing in People: Jefferson Memorial Lecture featuring Michael Tubbs

Lecture | September 13 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium | Canceled

 Michael Tubbs, Mayor, City of Stockton

 Graduate Division

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED.
Mayor Michael Tubbs will present the Jefferson lecture on Thursday, September 13, 2018, in conjunction with the observance of Constitution Day. The lecture, entitled "Investing in People," will be held in the Chevron Auditorium of International House and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Friday, September 14, 2018

Patricia Williams in Conversation with Ramona Naddaff: When Not to Write Like a Lawyer: The Art of Genre Transgression

Lecture | September 14 | 4 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Patricia Williams is the James L. Dohr Professor of Law at Columbia University. A scholar of race, gender, and law, she is a prolific writer across a variety of genres. Her books include The Alchemy of Race and Rights and Open House: Of Family, Food, Piano Lessons, and The Search for a Room of My Own. She is a columnist for the Nation.

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Presidential Power and Individual Rights: a discussion with Prof. Daniel Farber in Honor of Constitution Day

Lecture | September 25 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Free Speech Movement Café (Moffitt Library)

 Prof. Daniel Farber, Berkeley Law

 Free Speech Movement Café Educational Programs

Presidential power is always a hot topic, but never more so than today. This lecture will explain the constitutional limits on the President and how individual rights are affected. The President is uniquely powerful -- but not above the law. Come to learn about the expansion and limits of presidential power and its impact on American people.

Dan Farber, Berkeley Law

Dan Farber is the Sho...   More >

Prof. Daniel Farber

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Francine Masiello: The Senses of Democracy: Perception, Politics, and Culture in Latin America

Lecture | September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Masiello explores the textual and visual representation of the senses during moments of crisis in Latin America from the early nineteenth century to the present.

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Revolutionary Blackness in the Soviet Imagination

Lecture | September 27 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Jonathan Flatley, Professor of English, Wayne State University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of English, Townsend Center for the Humanities

In the present moment, amidst a global rise of white supremacy and racism, this paper recalls a moment of state supported global anti-racism. It focuses on the work of Soviet artist Victor Koretsky, whose posters from the from the 1930s to the 1970s present black revolutionaries combating racist imperial capital around the world. My hope is that his work may stimulate our political imaginaries,...   More >

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Bringing the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America

Colloquium | October 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Kathleen Belew, Assistant Professor, Kathleen Belew, Assistant Professor of History and the College, University of Chicago

 Center for Right-Wing Studies, Department of Sociology, Department of History

The white power movement in America wants a revolution. It has declared all-out war against the federal government and its agents, and has carried out—with military precision—an escalating campaign of terror against the American public. Its soldiers are not lone wolves but are highly organized cadres motivated by a coherent and deeply troubling worldview of white supremacy, anticommunism, and...   More >

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Hertha Sweet Wong: Picturing Identity: Contemporary American Autobiography in Image and Text

Lecture | October 24 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Wong explores the intersection of writing and visual art in the autobiographical work of Art Spiegelman, Faith Ringgold, Leslie Marmon Silko, and other American writers-artists who experiment with hybrid forms of self-narration.

Monday, November 5, 2018

Avenali Lecture: Todd Gitlin: The Other 1968s: Counterrevolution, Communism and Desublimation

Lecture | November 5 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

In his exploration of a watershed political year, Professor of journalism and sociology at Columbia University Todd Gitlin unearths a "thrust toward retrogression" that stands in stark contrast to the popular image of 1968 as a politically progressive moment.

Todd Gitlin Photo by Edwin Tse