Upcoming Events

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Thursday, January 25, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Free Speech and Its Limits: An Unfinished Conversation

Film - Documentary | January 25 | 7:10 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

The First Amendment’s protection of freedom of expression has allowed progressive voices to argue powerfully for tolerance, equality, and social change. But what happens when that freedom is used to express intolerance and hate? Charlene Stern’s documentary Near Normal Man, about her father, Holocaust survivor Ben Stern, illustrates the challenges of maintaining First Amendment rights while...   More >

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: Richard Cándida Smith: Improvised Continent: Pan-Americanism and Cultural Exchange

Lecture | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Illuminating the story of how cultural exchange programs brought many of the most important Latin American artists and writers to the United States, Richard Cándida Smith explores Pan-American cultural exchange in the twentieth century.

Thursday, February 1, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Monday, February 5, 2018

Anthropology 290 Speaker Series:: Critical Perspectives on Free Speech

Panel Discussion | February 5 | 2-4 p.m. | 221 Kroeber Hall

 Nicholas Dirks, Anthropology and Histroy; Rosemary Joyce, Anthropology; Christopher Kutz,, Law School

 Charles L. Briggs, Anthropology

 Department of Anthropology

The Department of Anthropology is pleased to invite you to an
Anthropology 290 panel discussion. The goal is to bring a range of
perspectives to bear on the task of rethinking the analytic and political

underpinnings of debates centering on “free speech.”

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Cine Latino: Dolores

Film - Feature | February 7 | 7-9 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Center for Latin American Studies

Dolores Huerta is among the most important, yet least known, activists in American history. With intimate and unprecedented access to this intensely private mother to eleven, the film reveals the raw, personal stakes involved in committing one’s life to social change. 95 minutes. English and Spanish with English subtitles.

(Dolores Huerta organizing marchers on the 2nd day of March Coachella in California, 1969. © 1976 George Ballis/Take Stock/The Image Works/Courtesy of Ro*co.)

Thursday, February 8, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Working Together: How the Supreme Court Divided the Labor and Civil Rights Movements

Lecture | February 8 | 4 p.m. |  2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment)

 Catherine Fisk, Professor, Berkeley Law

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Center for the Study of Law and Society, Berkeley Journal of Employment and Labor Law

Once, activists dreamed of an all-inclusive movement for poor people. But then came the 1950s – labor began to decline as a social movement, and civil rights leaders turned away from their early focus on labor rights. What role did the courts play in pushing these movements apart?

Professor Fisk finds that the era’s labor laws, which were hostile to picketing by labor organizers, encouraged...   More >

 

  RSVP online

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Thursday, February 15, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Thursday, February 22, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Defending Liberty in the Age of Trump: Lessons from the Front: Jefferson Memorial Lecture featuring David Cole

Lecture | February 22 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 David Cole, National Legal Director, American Civil Liberties Union

 Graduate Division

David Cole will present the Jefferson lecture on Thursday, February 22, 2018, entitled "Defending Liberty in the Age of Trump: Lessons from the Front." The lecture will be held in the Chevron Auditorium of International House and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

David Cole

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

The 'Global 1968' at Fifty: What it Meant and What it Means

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Institute of European Studies

Timothy Scott Brown will discuss the global revolt of 1968 on both sides of the Cold War divide, identifying basic principles that underpinned the revolt in its diverse national and regional locations. Exploring the transnational exchanges and communities of the imagination that make it possible to speak of a global 1968, he will place the events of fifty years ago in historical perspective with...   More >

Thursday, March 1, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Friday, March 2, 2018

Berta Didn't Die, She Multiplied: Film Screening and Discussion

Film - Documentary | March 2 | 5 p.m. | 160 Kroeber Hall

 Silvio Carrillo, a filmmaker, producer, and the nephew of Berta Cáceres; Roxanna Altholz, an international human rights lawyer, and author of the recent Dam Violence: The Plan That Killed Berta Cáceres

 Center for Latin American Studies

Join CLAS for a screening of the documentary on the legacy of Berta Cáceres, the indigenous Honduran environmental activist. After the screening, there will be a discussion featuring Silvio Carrillo, a filmmaker, producer, and the nephew of Berta Cáceres, and Roxanna Altholz, an international human rights lawyer, and co-author of the recent Dam Violence: The Plan That Killed Berta Cáceres.

(Image courtesy of Mutual Aid Media.)

Film Screening: Act and Punishment

Film - Documentary | March 2 | 6-8 p.m. | 188 Dwinelle Hall

 Evgeny Mitta, Visual Artist, Documentary Filmmaker, Scenographer, and Actor

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Film & Media Studies

Act and Punishment is a documentary that historically and culturally grounds the protest actions of Pussy Riot. The film, which the Russian government has banned, juxtaposes interviews with members of Pussy Riot who tell their own stories alongside commentary by Russian art historians, curators, and artists who contextualize their work. The film makes extensive use of raw footage depicting Pussy...   More >

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Thursday, March 8, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

“Thank You For Your Service”: Gratitude, Silence, and the Production of Militarized Common Sense on College Campuses

Colloquium | March 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. |  2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues)

 Ellen Moore, Visiting Scholar, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues

 Center for Ethnographic Research, Graduate School of Education, Center for Studies in Higher Education

In this contemporary period of prolonged undeclared wars, where lethal-force conflicts are waged not against designated nation-states but against rhetorical abstractions (Terror) in the name of other rhetorical abstractions (Freedom), speech and language are important loci of power. On contemporary college campuses, the needs of student veterans, veteran support programs and veteran identities...   More >

Saturday, March 10, 2018

Free Speech, Civility and Democratic Engagement: “Can’t We All Just Get Along?”

Special Event | March 10 | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. |  Free Speech Movement Café (Moffitt Library)

 Center on Civility and Democratic Engagement at the Goldman School of Public Policy

 Free Speech Movement Café Educational Programs, Class of '68 and the Center on Civility and Democratic Engagement

Presented by the Class of ’68 and the Center on Civility and Democratic Engagement at the Goldman School of Public Policy:

“CAN’T WE ALL JUST GET ALONG?”
Breaching ideological echo chambers and the role of civility. A unique opportunity for students and the Cal community to engage in small group discussions with members of the Class of ’68.

This event is free, open to the public.

Monday, March 12, 2018

Are Atheists Tolerable? American Nonbelievers and Irreligious Freedom

Lecture | March 12 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Leigh Eric Schmidt, Edward C. Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in the Humanities, Washington University in St. Louis

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Leigh Eric Schmidt is the Edward C. Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis. He joined Washington’s John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics in 2011.

LeighSchmidt

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Covering Congress and a White House in Perpetual Crisis Lessons from Five of the Media's Best: Please join us for a special evening event featuring top DC reporters from the Chicago Sun-Times, New York Times, Politico, Vanity Fair and the Washington Post.

Lecture | March 14 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Maureen Orth, Vanity Fair; Carl Hulse, New York Times

 Jake Sherman, Politico

 Graduate School of Journalism

Covering Congress and a White House in Perpetual Crisis
Lessons from Five of the Media's Best March 14 -- RSVP

 

  RSVP online by March 13.

Free Speech Movement

Meeting | March 14 | 7 p.m. | 3050 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Joel Geier

 International Socialist Organization

In 1964, amidst major fights over civil rights in the Bay Area, the UC Berkeley administration banned all student political organizations from campus. The Free Speech Movement demanded and won the right to free speech on campus. At its peak, the FSM organized hundreds of students to occupy Sproul Hall and an army of police was sent onto campus to violently arrest them.

Our guest speaker, Joel...   More >

Thursday, March 15, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Human Rights in the Neoliberal Maelstrom: Samuel Moyn, Professor of Law and History at Yale University

Lecture | March 15 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall

 Samuel Moyn

 Marianne Constable, Professor, UC Berkeley Department of Rhetoric

 Social Science Matrix, Human Rights Program, Department of Rhetoric

Please join us on March 15 for a presentation by Samuel Moyn, Professor of Law and History at Yale University, entitled "Human Rights in the Neoliberal Maelstrom." Marianne Constable, Professor of Rhetoric at UC Berkeley, will serve as discussant.

A reception for Samuel Moyn’s forthcoming book, Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World, will precede the talk from...   More >

Samuel Moyn

Art in a State of Siege: Bosch in Retrospect: Joseph Leo Koerner, Art Historian

Lecture | March 15 | 5 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Reading Room, 101 Doe

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Koerner examines Hieronymus Bosch’s Garden of Delights—approaching the painting as a representation of a world without history and without law. The discussion emerges from a larger project in which Koerner explores the relationship between art and freedom under a range of emergency “states of siege,” including apartheid South Africa and Nazi Germany.

Friday, March 16, 2018

Symposium on Art in a State of Siege

Conference/Symposium | March 16 | 1-4 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

This year’s Avenali Chair in the Humanities, Harvard art historian Joseph Leo Koerner, joins a panel of scholars to discuss the role of art in a society in which freedom is radically curtailed, such as Nazi Germany and apartheid South Africa. Panelists engage with audience members in lively discussion about creative expression under an emergency “state of siege."

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

A Conversation Across the Political Divide: The Role of Government in Trade, Taxes, and Inequality

Panel Discussion | March 20 | 5-6:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Office of Chancellor, Goldman School of Public Policy’s Center on Civility & Democratic Engagement

In the first iteration of a new event series that brings together prominent individuals from both sides of the political spectrum, Professor Robert Reich will be joined on the stage by the Heritage Foundation's Stephen Moore to discuss inequality in the US.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

The Metaphysics of Free Speech

Lecture | March 21 | 5-7 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 Banatao Auditorium

 Harvey Mansfield, Harvard University

 Law, Boalt School of

March 21, 2018
5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
310 Banatao Auditorium, Sutardja Dai Hall, Berkeley

Harvey Mansfield: The Metaphysics of Free Speech
The purpose of free speech is making things intelligible to fellow human beings, as opposed to self-expression. Thus, the fundamental subject of free speech is justice, and our relationship with our fellows.

The Berkeley Forum Presents a Forum on Police and Community

Panel Discussion | March 21 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Chou Hall N500

 Kriss Worthington; Brandon Anderson; Rashidah Grinage

 The Berkeley Forum

The discussion over police and use of force, a constant refrain in Berkeley’s community discourse, was revitalized over UC Berkeley’s Free Speech Week last September. Nationally, protests against brutality have drawn to attention the relationship between police and the community. Large scale social movements have been critical of the nation’s police presence, concerning issues of accountability...   More >

 Free

  Buy tickets online

Thursday, March 22, 2018

The Future of Free Speech and Campus Debate

Panel Discussion | March 22 | 1-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 Banatao Auditorium

 George Thomas, Claremont McKenna College

 Shep Melnick, Boston College; Lindsay Shepherd, Laurier University; Larry Alexander, University of San Diego School of Law; Joshua Dunn, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs; April Kelly-Woessner, Elizabethtown College; Steve Teles, Johns Hopkins University

 UC Berkeley School of Law

March 22, 2018
310 Banatao Auditorium, Sutardja Dai Hall

Panel 1 (1 – 2:50 pm): The Blurred Lines Over Free Speech, Hate Speech, and Academic Freedom

Panel 2 (3:10 – 5:00 pm): Is Intellectual Diversity Essential to Academic Excellence?

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Thursday, March 29, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Monday, April 2, 2018

Critical Discussions in Food Systems Presents: Dolores

Film - Documentary | April 2 | 6-8 p.m. | Morgan Hall, Morgan Lounge

 Berkeley Food Institute

Join Critical Discussions in Food Systems in a screening of "Dolores", a documentary uncovering the journey of the lesser known but just as important labor and and racial justice activist Dolores Huerta.

*DINNER PROVIDED* ~ More details TBA!!

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Thursday, April 5, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Monday, April 9, 2018

Proud to be "Tribeless": Cato Institute President Peter Goettler at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | April 9 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Peter Goettler, Cato Institute

 The Berkeley Forum

In our lifetimes, we’ve never seen a more divisive period in American politics. According to the Pew Research Center, the partisan gap on political values is now the widest it has been in decades. But is this divide based on actual principles, or merely on differentiating ourselves from the other political “tribe”? Peter Goettler, president of the Cato Institute, will make the case that tribalism...   More >

 Free

  Buy tickets online

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Thursday, April 12, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Politics at Work: How Employers Use Their Workers to Change US Politics and Policy

Lecture | April 12 | 4-6 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), IRLE Director's Room

 Alexander Hertel-Fernandez, Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University

 Kim Voss, Professor of Sociology, UC Berkeley; Ann Ravel, Lecturer, Berkeley Law

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley Labor Center

In 2010, the landmark Citizens United Supreme Court decision upheld corporations’ right to participate in politics, declaring that limits to their political spending would infringe on freedom of speech. But money is not the only political resource that corporations can use. Private companies have access to – and control over – powerful human capital in the form of their employees. Professor...   More >

 

  RSVP online

Monday, April 16, 2018

Heated Debates: Conversations about Climate Change

Panel Discussion | April 16 | 3-9 p.m. | ASUC Stores (King Student Union), Pauley Ballroom

 Jameson McBride, Energy and Climate Analyst, Breakthrough Institute; Steven Greenhut, Western Region Director, R-Street Institute; Wynn Tucker, Senior Program Associate, Climate Leadership Council; Spencer Smith, Founder, Jefferson Center for Holistic Management; Dr. Lynn Huntsinger, Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Management, UC Berkeley; Kevin Bayuk, Senior Fellow, Drawdown; Paige Stanley, PhD Student, UC Berkeley; Dan Kreeger, Executive Director, Association of Climate Change Officers; Dr. Kristina Hill, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning and Urban Design, UC Berkeley; Dr. Michael Mascarenhas, Associate Professor in Environmental, Science, Policy and Management Department, UC Berkeley; Mel Krnjaic, Graduate Student, UC Berkeley; Mitch Hescox, President/C.E.O., The Evangelical Network; Debbie Dooley, Founder, Conservatives for Energy Freedom; Benji Backer, Founder and President, American Conservation Coalition; Nina Jhunjnuwala, ASUC Senator, UC Berkeley

 BridgeUSA

Bridge USA at Berkeley is incredibly excited to bring you Heated Debates: Conversations about Climate Change. This event will serve to highlight solutions to climate change consistent with a diversity of political leanings and empower Cal students to be able to engage in constructive discourse on this divisive issue with their political opposites.

Heated Debates will feature panels of speakers...   More >

 Free admission for students with ID.

 FREE UC Berkeley Students/Faculty/Staff, $15 General Admission

  Buy tickets online

Conversations about Climate Change

Elephant's Dream

Film - Documentary | April 16 | 6-8 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Kristof Bilsen, Filmaker, Director, Co-Producer

 Dr. Ann A. Laudati, Ciriacy-Wanthrup Research Fellow, Department of Geography, UCB; Adam Clemons, Librarian for African and African American Studies, UC Berkeley Library

 Center for African Studies, Free Speech Movement Café Educational Programs, Department of Geography

The Republic of Congo is a country mainly represented by stories of violence, rape, rebels and crime. In Elephant’s Dream, director Kristof Bilsen takes us beyond these usual reports and provides poetic and compassionate insight into a country in transition.

Kristof Bilsen (Director, Co-Producer) completed a filmmaking BA in Brussels (2002) and then worked as a cinematographer, editor and...   More >

Kristof Bilsen

Elephant's Dream: A Film by Kristof Bilsen

Film - Documentary | April 16 | 6-8 p.m. | Doe Library, Room 180

 Kristof Bilsen, Director/Producer

 Free Speech Movement Café Educational Programs, Department of Geography, Center for African Studies

Set in war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Elephant's Dream is a breath-taking documentary that captures the daily lives of Congolese street-level civil servants in Kinshasa and Bas-Congo. Discussion with the director/producer to follow. Free to the public. For more information please contact us: fsmprograms@lists.berkeley.edu, 510-768-7618.

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Why the Status of Women Matters for National Progress: Rachel Vogelstein at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | April 17 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Rachel Vogelstein, Council on Foreign Relations

 The Berkeley Forum

With the resurgence of women's rights movement, thanks to the #MeToo campaign and the Women's March on Washington, the status of women has risen to the top of the national and global dialogue. Rachel Vogelstein has spent her career working to elevate the status of women both at home and abroad, as an official at the State Department, the White House Council for Women and Girls, and as a senior...   More >

 Free

  Buy tickets online

Thursday, April 19, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Friday, April 20, 2018

Parties and Partisanship in the Era of Twitter and Trump: 21st Annual Travers Conference on Ethics and Accountability in Government

Conference/Symposium | April 20 | 10:15 a.m.-4:30 p.m. |  The Bancroft Hotel

 2680 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA

 Institute of Governmental Studies and the Commonwealth Club of California

An exploration of how social media and societal trends have challenged the power of American political parties and re-shaped the nature of the American’s partisan attachments.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Erwin Chemerinsky and Nadine Strossen: Resisting Hate with Free Speech

Panel Discussion | April 28 | 10-11:15 a.m. |  Freight & Salvage

 Arts + Design

The question of limits on free speech has recently occupied our nation’s consciousness—as well as the physical streets of Berkeley. The American Civil Liberties Union has worked for nearly 100 years to arbitrate this question in times of intense political division, and now Nadine Strossen, former president of the ACLU, joins us to to present “HATE: Why We Should Resist it With Free Speech, Not...   More >

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Thursday, May 3, 2018

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Zuguleaiñ - We Will Speak: Film Screening and Discussion

Film - Documentary | June 14 | 6-8 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Kelly Baur; Carolina Kürrüf

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, Wallmapu Support Committee

In 2015, a group of Mapuche university students organized the first ever Mapuche language revitalization camp. Over 50 students from across Chile came together for one month to be a part of the struggle to learn and preserve the indigenous Mapuche language. This documentary follows the stories of four participants over the course of three years in their process of decolonization by way of...   More >

Monday, September 10, 2018

Navigating Bureaucracy and Generating Vulnerability at an Agri-environmental Research Institute

Colloquium | September 10 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Tim McLellan, Center for Chinese Studies Postdoctoral Fellow, 2018-2019

 Rachel Stern, Professor, School of Law, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Conducting research in China throws up numerous headaches, from acquiring official invitation letters and securing permissions for field research to navigating the anti-corruption measures that govern the use of research funding. One well-documented strategy for overcoming such challenges is to leverage informal social relationships (guanxi) with government officials to circumvent formal rules...   More >

Roxane Gay: With One N: Presented by Berkeley Center for New Media

Lecture | September 10 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Roxane Gay

 Arts + Design, Berkeley Center for New Media

Roxane Gay is an author and cultural critic whose writing is unmatched and widely revered. Her work garners international acclaim for its reflective, no-holds-barred exploration of feminism and social criticism. With a deft eye on modern culture, she brilliantly critiques its ebb and flow with both wit and ferocity.

Words like “courage,” “humor,” and “smart” are frequently deployed when...   More >

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Investing in People: Jefferson Memorial Lecture featuring Michael Tubbs

Lecture | September 13 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium | Canceled

 Michael Tubbs, Mayor, City of Stockton

 Graduate Division

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED.
Mayor Michael Tubbs will present the Jefferson lecture on Thursday, September 13, 2018, in conjunction with the observance of Constitution Day. The lecture, entitled "Investing in People," will be held in the Chevron Auditorium of International House and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Friday, September 14, 2018

Patricia Williams in Conversation with Ramona Naddaff: When Not to Write Like a Lawyer: The Art of Genre Transgression

Lecture | September 14 | 4 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Patricia Williams is the James L. Dohr Professor of Law at Columbia University. A scholar of race, gender, and law, she is a prolific writer across a variety of genres. Her books include The Alchemy of Race and Rights and Open House: Of Family, Food, Piano Lessons, and The Search for a Room of My Own. She is a columnist for the Nation.

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Presidential Power and Individual Rights: a discussion with Prof. Daniel Farber in Honor of Constitution Day

Lecture | September 25 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Free Speech Movement Café (Moffitt Library)

 Prof. Daniel Farber, Berkeley Law

 Free Speech Movement Café Educational Programs

Presidential power is always a hot topic, but never more so than today. This lecture will explain the constitutional limits on the President and how individual rights are affected. The President is uniquely powerful -- but not above the law. Come to learn about the expansion and limits of presidential power and its impact on American people.

Dan Farber, Berkeley Law

Dan Farber is the Sho...   More >

Prof. Daniel Farber

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Francine Masiello: The Senses of Democracy: Perception, Politics, and Culture in Latin America

Lecture | September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Masiello explores the textual and visual representation of the senses during moments of crisis in Latin America from the early nineteenth century to the present.

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Revolutionary Blackness in the Soviet Imagination

Lecture | September 27 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Jonathan Flatley, Professor of English, Wayne State University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of English, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Department of Comparative Literature

In the present moment, amidst a global rise of white supremacy and racism, this paper recalls a moment of state supported global anti-racism. It focuses on the work of Soviet artist Victor Koretsky, whose posters from the from the 1930s to the 1970s present black revolutionaries combating racist imperial capital around the world. My hope is that his work may stimulate our political imaginaries,...   More >

Monday, October 1, 2018

Why Free Speech Matters Now: Lauren Cooley at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | October 1 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Lauren Cooley, Red Alert Politics Editor at the Washington Examiner

 The Berkeley Forum

While freedom of speech is upheld legally by the Constitution and the Supreme Court, the First Amendment is on trial in American culture - especially on campus. Join Lauren Cooley, editor at the Washington Examiner, at the Berkeley Forum as she speaks about the need for civil discourse and deep conversations, especially in higher education. In this talk, Lauren Cooley will separate emotion from...   More >

  Free

  Buy tickets online

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America

Colloquium | October 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Kathleen Belew, Assistant Professor, Kathleen Belew, Assistant Professor of History and the College, University of Chicago

 Center for Right-Wing Studies, Department of Sociology, Department of History

The white power movement in America wants a revolution. It has declared all-out war against the federal government and its agents, and has carried out—with military precision—an escalating campaign of terror against the American public. Its soldiers are not lone wolves but are highly organized cadres motivated by a coherent and deeply troubling worldview of white supremacy, anticommunism, and...   More >

Friday, October 12, 2018

Why the Common Good Disappeared and How We Get It Back

Lecture | October 12 | 1-2 p.m. |  Hertz Concert Hall

 Goldman School of Public Policy

The Class of '68 50th Reunion Lecture
HOMECOMING WEEKEND, OCTOBER 12-14, 2018

PROFESSOR ROBERT B. REICH ignites a discussion of the good we have had in common, what happened to it, and what we might do to restore it. His goal is not that we all agree on the common good. It is that we get into the habit of thinking and talking about it, listening to each other’s views and providing a means for...   More >

“I don't want to be a publisher!” Regulating liability for the sticky parts: An exploration of CDA Section 230, sex work, and user content

Seminar | October 12 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Peter Brantley

 Information, School of

Threats to information sharing, users, and free speech

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

2018 CAL Ballot Breakdown: Boots on the Ground: Your Vote Counts

Special Event | October 23 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 150 University Hall

 Dan Morain, Senior Editor, CALmatters

 Public Health, School of

Do you want to make a real impact on important issues of health and social justice in California? Do you care about affordable housing, mental health, access to safe and clean drinking water, treatment of farm animals?

Come to University Hall 150 on Tuesday, October 23 from 4:00-5:30 PM to learn about the 2018 California ballot initiatives at this session led by Dan Morain from CALMatters, an...   More >

We the People: Raising Our Voices: with Erwin Chemerinsky and Jeffrey Edleson

Panel Discussion | October 23 | 7 p.m. |  JCC East Bay, Berkeley Branch

 1414 Walnut Street, Berkeley, CA, CA 94709

 Jeffrey Edleson, Dean, School of Social Welfare; Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean, Boalt Law School

 Social Welfare, School of

An intimate discussion with Erwin Chemerinsky (dean of the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law) and Jeffrey Edleson (dean and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Social Welfare)
The foremost authority of the first amendment and free speech (Chemerinsky) and a leading expert on domestic abuse (Edleson) discuss the rights and privileges of our voices—how...   More >

 $12.00 Members $15.00 Public

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Hertha Sweet Wong: Picturing Identity: Contemporary American Autobiography in Image and Text

Lecture | October 24 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Wong explores the intersection of writing and visual art in the autobiographical work of Art Spiegelman, Faith Ringgold, Leslie Marmon Silko, and other American writers-artists who experiment with hybrid forms of self-narration.

Thursday, October 25, 2018

Free Speech Movement Cafe Educational Programs Presents… 50 Years of 1968: A Conversation with Bobby Seale, Max Elbaum, and Watson Ladd

Panel Discussion | October 25 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Free Speech Movement Café (Moffitt Library)

 Bobby Seale; Max Elbaum; Watson Ladd

 Free Speech Movement Café Educational Programs

For half a century, 1968 has represented a high-water mark of social and political transformation, a year of social upheaval that spanned the entire globe. Ushered in by a New Left that sought to distinguish itself from the Old Left that emerged in the 1920s and ’30s, the monumental events of 1968 set the tone for everything from protest politics to academic leftism.

Today, with the U.S....   More >

 The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, including sign-language interpretation, please contact the event sponsor, fsmprograms@lists.berkeley.edu, ideally

Friday, October 26, 2018

2018 Human Rights Fellowship Conference

Conference/Symposium | October 26 | 12-5 p.m. | 215 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Heba Alnajada; Safa Ansari-Bayegan; Pieter Baker; Karin Bashir; Tania Docarmo; Derrika Hunt; Seigi Karasaki; Jennifer Jones; Bernadette Lim; Sammy Mehtar; Sophie Perl; Raed Rafei; Olivia Rempel; Aleksandra Simonova; Mavis Siu; Yasemin Taskin-Alp; Levi Vonk

 Human Rights Center

Our 2018 Fellows have returned from their summer fieldwork and will discuss pressing human rights topics at our annual Human Rights Fellowship Conference. Enjoy brief TED-style talks and panel
discussions related to racial injustice and the death penalty, child
labor, the mental health effects of separating families at the
U.S./Mexico border as well as inspirational lessons from human rights...   More >

 

  RSVP online

Book Talk: Power Shift: How Latinos in California Transformed Politics in America

Lecture | October 26 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 109 Moses Hall

 David R. Ayón, Author; George L. Pla, Author

 Lisa García Bedolla, IGS Director

 Institute of Governmental Studies

Come join us for a dialogue among authors David R. Ayón and George L. Pla and IGS Director Lisa García Bedolla.

Register at: bit.ly/PowerShiftBook

Organized by the Institute of Governmental Studies and the Matsui Center.

Monday, October 29, 2018

Free Speech and Voting Rally

Special Event | October 29 | 12-1 p.m. | Sproul Plaza, Savio Steps

 Lynne Savio, widow of Free Speech activist Mario Savio; Leon Wofsy, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry; Leon Litwack, Professor Emeritus of History; Charles Sellers, Professor Emeritus of History; Malcolm Burnstein, Free Speech Movement Attorney

 Carol Christ, Chancellor

 Department of History, Division of Student Affairs

“Free speech doesn’t come from a simple declaration. It is a process of engagement.” - Chancellor Carol Christ

Revisit the 1964 Free Speech Movement with remarks by UC Berkeley emeriti who lived through it. Prepare to exercise your right to vote on November 6 with remarks by current faculty and students.

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Bernard Moses Memorial Lectures featuring Wendy Brown: Neoliberalism’s Scorpion Tail: Markets and Morals Where Democracy Once Was

Lecture | October 30 | 4:10 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Wendy Brown, Class of 1936 First Chair Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley

 Graduate Division

Wendy Brown will present the Bernard Moses Memorial Lecture on Tuesday, October 30, 2018 titled "Neoliberalism’s Scorpion Tail: Markets and Morals Where Democracy Once Was." The lecture is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Immigration, Imprisonment and Deportation: Movie Night at the IGS Library

Film - Series | November 1 | 6 p.m. | 109 Moses Hall

 Institute of Governmental Studies, Institute of Governmental Studies

 Institute of Governmental Studies

Join us for popcorn and movies to help us celebrate our new library exhibit: "Immigration, Deportation & Citizenship, 1908-2018"! Featuring four videos from Brave New Films’ Immigrant Prisons Series: Immigrant Prisons, Immigrants for Sale, No More Detention: Free Pastor Noe, and Trauma at the Border.

The IGS Library exhibit "Immigration, Deportation & Citizenship, 1908-2018" contains items...   More >

Friday, November 2, 2018

MENA Salon: The Jamal Khashoggi Case and Regional Rivalries

Workshop | November 2 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The Jamal Khashoggi case has had an enormous impact on international relations in the Middle East. Turkey has been at the center of the investigation, providing key evidence to the global audience, pinning Saudi Arabia and MBS to the crime. This has given them a moral high ground despite their abysmal track record with protecting journalists and securing free speech. Given the irony of the...   More >

Monday, November 5, 2018

Avenali Lecture: Todd Gitlin: The Other 1968s: Counterrevolution, Communism and Desublimation

Lecture | November 5 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

In his exploration of the political culture of the 1960s, Todd Gitlin (Columbia University) questions the popular image of that era as a politically progressive one. He traces the resurgence of white supremacy, rule by a wealthy elite, and other signs of a repressive “counterrevolution” which, in his view, led to the current political moment.

Todd Gitlin Photo by Edwin Tse

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

2018 Election Night Watch Party

Social Event | November 6 | 4:30-8:30 p.m. | 109 Moses Hall

 Institute of Governmental Studies

The Matsui Center, the Institute of Governmental Studies and Cal Undergraduate Political Science Association are hosting an Election Night Watch Party.

Come watch the election results! Join us for a fun night of games and prizes. Food and Drinks will be provided.

RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/1893761134053392/

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Summary Execution: The Seattle Assassinations of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes: Book Talk with Michael Withey

Reading - Nonfiction | November 13 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), Large Conference Room

 Human rights lawyer Michael Withey

 UC Berkeley Labor Center

Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes were Filipino American labor activists and officers of ILWU Local 37 who were murdered in their Seattle union office in 1981. Mike Withey, lead attorney on the case, demonstrates in his book the legal twists and turns of citing the Philippine government as the culprit.

“Some lawyers shamelessly seek attention. And some lawyers deserve attention because they...   More >

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

A Conversation Across the Divide: David French and Erwin Chemerinsky Discuss the National Climate

Panel Discussion | November 14 | 2-3:30 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 David French, Senior Fellow, National Review Institute; Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean, Berkeley Law

 Office of Chancellor

We are thrilled to welcome students, staff, faculty, alumni, and friends of the campus to the second event in the Conversations Across the Divide speaker series we are continuing to host this year. You can view the first in this series between Robert Reich, Chancellor's Professor and Carmel P. Friesen Chair in Public Policy and former Secretary of Labor and Stephen Moore, Distinguished Visiting...   More >

Monday, November 19, 2018

The Tumultuous Sixties: 1968 Around The Globe

Lecture | November 19 | 12-1 p.m. | 202 UC Berkeley Extension (Golden Bear Center)

 Christina Gerhardt, Visiting Scholar at the University of California at Berkeley and Associate Professor of Film and German Studies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa

 UC Berkeley Extension

In 1964, the Free Speech Movement at UC Berkeley achieved national visibility with a series of student protests responding to the administration’s decision to ban information tables regarding the Civil Rights Movement. They mark the first time that the civil disobedience tactics of the Civil Rights Movement were brought to a college campus and served as a foundation for future protests such as...   More >

 $0

  Register online

CANCELED: Mario Savio Memorial Lecture and Young Activist Award: Free Speech in Angry Times

Lecture | November 19 | 8-10 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Pauley Ballroom | Canceled

 Robert Reich, Chancellor's Professor of Public Policy, UC Berkeley

 College of Letters & Science, Goldman School of Public Policy, Library

This event has been postponed until the spring semester due to poor air quality.

The Mario Savio Memorial Lecture and Young Activist Award are presented annually to honor the memory of Mario Savio (1942-
1996), a spokesperson for Berkeley's Free Speech Movement of 1964, and the spirit of moral courage and vision which he and
countless other activists of his generation exemplified...   More >

 Free admission. Open to the public; first come, first served.

Professor Robert Reich

Friday, February 1, 2019

Book Talk: The Feminist Awakening in China

Colloquium | February 1 | 3 p.m. | UC Berkeley Extension (Golden Bear Center), IEAS Conference Room (510A)

 Leta Hong Fincher

 Lü Pin

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

On the eve of International Women’s Day in 2015, the Chinese government arrested five feminist activists and jailed them for 37 days. The Feminist Five became a global cause célèbre, with Hillary Clinton speaking out on their behalf, and activists inundating social media with #FreetheFive messages. But the Feminist Five are only symbols of a much larger feminist movement of university students,...   More >

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Reimagining Labor Law

Lecture | February 13 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison St, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Catherine Fisk, Berkeley Law

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Transformation of work through the gig economy and through the decline of unions presents unprecedented challenges for regulating work for the common good. But it also presents opportunities for a fresh start. This lecture will examine some of the recent radical changes in the law of the workplace in California and nationwide.

Monday, April 15, 2019

Hate Speech, Algorithms, and Digital Connectivity

Lecture | April 15 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Zeynap Tufekci, Independent Writer and Public Scholar

 D- Lab and Digital Humanities at Berkeley, Berkeley Center for New Media, The Center for Technology and Society at the Anti-Defamation League, Digital Humanities Working Group, The Library, Office of the vice Chancellor for Research, The Visual Resources Center

Since the launch of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, reports of hate speech targeting various minority groups have risen dramatically. Although this surge is well-reported, it remains difficult to quantify the magnitude of the problem or even properly classify hate speech, let alone identify and measure its effects. Keyword searches and dictionary methods are often imprecise and overly blunt...   More >