Rome Behaving Badly: Appian’s Critique of Roman Imperialism: CTP Distinguished Lecturer's Seminar

Seminar: Featured | April 5 | 3 p.m. | 479 Bancroft Library

 Brian McGing, Regius Professor of Greek, Trinity College Dublin

 Center for the Tebtunis Papyri

The 2nd century AD Greek historian, Appian of Alexandria, is usually thought of as “above all, an ardent admirer of Rome” (Oxford Classical Dictionary). Although he says admiring things about the overall Roman imperial achievement, Appian is at times fiercely critical of Roman behavior in his coverage of Rome’s conquests during the Republican period. Some of this he may get from his sources, but similar narrative patterns indicate that he had his own views on Rome’s often treacherous treatment of her enemies. This paper will examine particularly Appian’s accounts of Roman diplomacy before the outbreak of the Third Punic War, the Third Macedonian War and the First Mithradatic War.

 soknebtunis@berkeley.edu