Upcoming food events on campus

Upcoming Events

Monday, September 23, 2019

BFI Open House

Tour/Open House | September 23 | 4:30-6 p.m. | Morgan Hall, Morgan Lounge

 Berkeley Food Institute

Interested in getting involved with food on campus? Join the Berkeley Food Institute for our annual open house on Monday, September 23, from 4:30-6pm in Morgan Lounge. BFI staff will provide background on BFI and how students can get involved. Undergraduate and graduate student groups focused on various aspects of food systems will also share opportunities within their organizations.

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

The TDPS Speaker Series presents Vince Medina and Louis Trevino of mak-'amham | Ohlone Foods Teach-In and Lunch

Presentation | September 25 | 1-3 p.m. |  Café Ohlone, University Press Books

 2430 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Vince Medina; Louis Trevino, co-founders, mak-'amham

 Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies

Vince Medina and Louis Trevino, co-founders of mak-'amham, will lead the preparation of traditional Ohlone foods from fruits, spices, nuts, herbs, teas, and other selected items gathered in their indigenous homelands of the East Bay and the Carmel Valley.

 

 The event and meal are free, but advanced registration is required as seating is limited. Register online

Thursday, September 26, 2019

Freedom Farmers: Agricultural Resistance and the Black Freedom Movement

Lecture | September 26 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 132 Mulford Hall

 Monica White, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 College of Natural Resources

Freedom Farmers: Agricultural Resistance and the Black Freedom Movement revises the historical narrative of African American resistance and breaks new ground by including the work, roles, and contributions of southern Black farmers and the organizations they formed. The book traces the origins of Black farmers’ organizations to the late 1800s, emphasizing their activities during the...   More >

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Agricultural strategies and environmental change in the ancient eastern Mediterranean

Lecture | October 2 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 John M. Marston, Associate Professor, Anthropology, Boston University

 Archaeological Research Facility

Marston presents recent work from an ancient urban center in central Anatolia (modern Turkey), where complex agricultural strategies were employed to adapt to coincident environmental and social change on both local and regional scales.

Monday, October 14, 2019

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Townsend Book Chat with Mark Schapiro: Seeds of Resistance: The Fight to Save Our Food Supply

Lecture | October 23 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens, Townsend Center

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Three-quarters of the seed varieties on earth in 1900 are now extinct, and more than half of the remaining commercial seeds are owned by three large companies. Schapiro examines the fate of our food supply under the pressures of corporate consolidation.

In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa’s Food Legacy in the Atlantic World - The 23rd Carl O. Sauer Memorial Lecture

Lecture | October 23 | 4 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Judith Carney, Department of Geography, UCLA

 Department of Geography, Department of African American Studies, Center for African Studies, Center for Research on Social Change, Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM), Berkeley Food Institute, 400 Years of Resistance to Slavery and Injustice

A striking feature of plantation era history is the number of first-person accounts that credit the enslaved with the introduction of specific foods, all previously grown in Africa. This lecture
lends support to these observations by identifying the crops that European witnesses attributed to slave agency and by engaging the ways that African subsistence staples arrived, and...   More >

 

  RSVP online

Friday, October 25, 2019

PLANTS + PEOPLE Lunchtime Talks: Biocultural Diversity in the Central Valley

Lecture | October 25 | 12-1 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

While many people may think of California’s Central Valley as mostly monocultures of almonds and tomatoes, the landscape is also dotted with small-scale diversified farms. On these farms, you can find 50-100 different types of crops –– from jujube to jicama, from papaya to moringa, from water spinach to taro, and many more.

 Free with Garden Admission; Free for UC Berkeley Students, Staff and Faculty

  Register online

Friday, November 8, 2019

Food, Wine Culture: A Conversation on EU and California Foodways

Panel Discussion | November 8 | 5-7 p.m. |  David Brower Center

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA

 Elaine Chukan Brown, Award-winning wine journalist; Fabrizia Lanza, Director, Anna Tasca Lanza School, Sicily

 Institute of European Studies, European Union Center, Department of Italian Studies

As a rare nexus where public policy, politics and pleasure all meet, food has become a focus of today’s professional and scholarly world. This event will focus on the economic viability of food systems through a comparative lens in a conversation that joins voices from the EU and California. In particular it will explore how culture and identity dialogue with food systems and the positioning of...   More >

 

  RSVP online by November 5.

Thursday, November 14, 2019

ESPM Seminar Series, Fall 2019: Jahi Chappell

Seminar | November 14 | 3:30 p.m. | 132 Mulford Hall

 Jahi Chappell

 Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM)

Jahi Chappell, Executive Director of Food First, will present: "Beginning to End Hunger: Lessons on food security, transformation, and solidarity from Belo Horizonte, Brazil." Coffee will be available before the talk at 2:30PM in 139 Mulford; meet the speaker after the talk in 139 Mulford Hall. Co-sponsored by the the Center for Diversified Farming Systems.

Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Plant-Based and Planet-Friendly (BEUHS641)

Workshop | November 19 | 12:10-1 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Section Club

 Kim Guess, RD, Be well at Work - Wellness

 Be Well at Work - Wellness

Eating lower on the food chain uses less natural resources and provides your body with loads of valuable nutrients. Whether it’s a meatless meal once a day or week, or eating mostly plants at every meal, there are benefits for your health and your planet. Demonstration, recipes, and samples provided.