Upcoming Events

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Reawakening Ancient Salish Sea Basketry

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | January 24 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Ed Carriere, Master Basketmaker, Suquamish Elder

 Dale Croes, Washington State University

 Archaeological Research Facility

Ed Carriere and Dale Croes have been working with the U of Washington Burke Museum to replicate 2,000 year old waterlogged archaeological basketry found in the early 1960s from along the Snoqualmie River near Seattle.

Croes and Carriere

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

The Palatine East Pottery Project: The Study and On-Line Publication of 20 Tons of Pottery from Downtown Rome

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 J. Theodore Peña, Professor, University of California, Berkeley Classics

 Archaeological Research Facility

During the period 1989-1996 the American Academy in Rome undertook the excavation of large mid- to late-imperials structure located at the foot of the northeast slope of the Palatine Hill in downtown Rome. The speaker is in charge of the study and publication of the ca. 20 metric tons of Roman-period pottery recovered in the course of this project. The assemblage, what spans most of the first...   More >

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

From Saliva to Saints: (m)oral Hygiene in the Middle Ages and the Case of Late Medieval Villamagna

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | February 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Trent Trombley, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Human dentition and the accompanying oral cavity is a dense source of biocultural information and has enjoyed a long history of anthropological fascination. Analyses have ranged from establishing biological affinity in archaeological communities via dental metric and non-metric traits, to larger evolutionary questions of morphology. However, dental tissues have seldom been analyzed for their...   More >

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Connecting Cultures at the Phoebe Hearst Museum: Building a 21st-Century Anthropology Museum

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | February 14 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Benjamin Porter, Director, Phoebe A. Hearst Museum, Phoebe A. Hearst Museum, University of California Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

The Phoebe Hearst Museum Director Benjamin Porter will discuss the Museum’s recent efforts to create a dynamic venue where people from around the world can connect in new and meaningful ways. The Museum is positioning itself to be a place where visitors encounter pressing questions and challenges that can be explored through the lenses of contemporary anthropology. Recent accomplishments will be...   More >

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Evidences (both Archaeological and Textual) for Long-Distance Trade Networks and Weighted Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Near Eastern Bronze Age (1950-1750 BCE)

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Adam Anderson, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Berkeley Digital Humanities

 Archaeological Research Facility

Archaeology in the Middle East or Near East has a long and illustrious history, with more than 150 years of scholarship. From the 1840s onward western archaeologists like Sir Austen Henry Layard made early discoveries of textual artifacts in the heart of Mesopotamia, and awoke a deep curiosity in deciphering the beginnings of human history. Unfortunately, these discoveries inadvertently...   More >

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Shellfish and Seaweed at Sand Hill Bluff: A Deeper Look at Shell-Matrix Sites of California's Central Coast

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Mike Grone, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Along the Central Coast of California, changes in shoreline management practices and their subsequent effects on fisheries can be examined in the context of long-term human occupation, climatic and environmental variability, and the development of Indigenous, Spanish, Mexican, and American relationships with the environment. While extensive archaeological investigation regarding indigenous...   More >

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Pre-Industrial Iron-Working in Central India: a New Perspective

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Tathagata Neogi, Ph.D., Founder, Heritage Walk Calcutta

 Archaeological Research Facility, Institute for South Asia Studies

The research revealed a complex set of decisions involved in the organization and spread of metal production in the landscape that provided an explanation for the location of archaeological sites.

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Imagined Asia: Archaeology, Museums, and Questioning Asia in the 19th Century United States

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | March 14 | 12-1 p.m. |  2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Christopher Lowman, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

During the late nineteenth century, perceptions of Asia were changing rapidly among the predominantly Euro-American United States public. Immigration, trade, and rising American imperialism shaped how Asia was imagined, affecting policy and society on both sides of the Pacific, for immigrants and for Asian peoples alike. Using a combination of historical archaeology, oral history, and museum...   More >

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

The Fish and the Volcano: Human-Environment Interaction in Lake Cocibolca, Nicaragua

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | March 21 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Lucy Gill, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

My work explores human-environment interaction in the socially complex, ecologically variable landscape of pre-Hispanic Nicaragua. It employs a historical ecology conception of landscape to investigate networks of interaction centered around Lake Cocibolca, the largest source of freshwater in Central America, which continues to be an important locale for resource extraction and exchange....   More >

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

After the Looting

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | April 11 | 12-1 p.m. |  2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Carol Redmount, University of California, Near Eastern Studies

 Archaeological Research Facility

In 2011 and 2012 the archaeological site of El-Hibeh in Middle Egypt was badly looted in the aftermath of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. Every part of the ancient tell, once a first millennium BCE provincial city, was violated--from above, from below, and from the side. In our 2017 field season we began the process of assessing the damage and figuring out how to proceed in future.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

A Question of Design: Gender in Hawaiian Kauhale

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | April 18 | 12-1 p.m. |  2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Kirsten Vacca

 Archaeological Research Facility

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Urban Life and Foodways at Huari, Ayacucho, Peru (AD 600-1000): A Spatial Macrobotanical Analysis

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | April 25 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Geoffrey Taylor, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Huari is the proposed capital of the Wari cultural group whose architectural, ceramic, and iconographic traditions spread to distant parts of the Peruvian highlands during the Middle Horizon (AD 600-1000). With this presentation, I will introduce Wari studies and re-appraise the current state of archaeological evidence on the activities of Wari people. I will then investigate the botanical...   More >