Upcoming Events

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Share Your Scholarship: Humanities Commons

Workshop: Other Cal Archaeology | November 14 | 4:10-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, Academic Innovation Studio, Dwinelle Hall 117 (Level D)

 Stacy Reardon

 Library

Humanities Commons, a new platform developed by the MLA and other humanities organizations, offers a professional alternative to for-profit academic networking sites like Academia.edu. In this workshop, we'll learn how to make your research available online, develop an academic portfolio, and connect with colleagues at other universities using Humanities Commons.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Life and Labor in the Industrial Frontier: Archaeology of the Samuel Adams Limekilns, Santa Cruz, California

Lecture: ARF Brownbag: Other Cal Archaeology | November 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 David Hyde, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Beginning in the 1850s a lime extraction and processing industry took root in Santa Cruz County, California, supplying the American West Coast with a critical construction and manufacturing material. Over the subsequent 70 years, the industry shifted from being comprised of number of independently owned and operated operations to being monopolized by a single regional conglomerate. Throughout...   More >

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Native Claims Across Nations: Indigenous Land Ownership in Mexican and U.S. California, 1840-1860

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | November 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Julia Lewandoski, doctoral candidate, History, UC Berkeley

 Bancroft Library

The vast majority of indigenous Californians never received land promised to them after Mexico secularized California's missions in 1834. Drawing mainly from land case files in The Bancroft Library, Julia Lewandoski will trace the stories of those who did receive grants from Mexico in the 1840s. These communities used legal systems to gain and keep land after California became a U.S. state in 1850.

Phoebe's Cast Collection: Two Millennia of Copies and Replicas at the Hearst Museum

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | November 16 | 6-8 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

This talk will provide an introduction to UC Berkeley's collection of nearly 300 casts of Greek and Roman sculptures from the Classical period - examining both how these plaster copies were made from original sculptures in Europe, and how they travelled to California at the turn of the 20th century. This will be contextualized within a larger discussion of the copying tradition, starting in the...   More >

Friday, November 17, 2017

Archaeological Databases with FileMaker Pro

Workshop: ARF Special & Workshops | November 17 | 1-5 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Michael Ashley, Center for Digital Archaeology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Part I: Filemaker essentials. Using databases for fieldwork and research. Planning, practicalities,
Part II: Building custom applications with FileMaker - mobile, desktop, cloud, multiuser. Your projects.

 

 

 Workshops cost $50 for non-UC attendees. The workshops are free for students, faculty, and staff. Make reservations online

Monday, November 20, 2017

They Came From Everywhere: The People of the Amur

Colloquium | November 20 | 5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Victor Zatsepine, History, University of Connecticut

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

This talk, based on Victor Zatsepine’s recently published book, Beyond the Amur: Frontier Encounters between China and Russia, 1850-1930 (UBC Press, 2017), illuminates the varied social, economic and political contacts that enlivened the borders of the two empires (Qing China and Romanov Russia) and their successor states. The author argues that the Amur ‘frontier’ region functioned as a meeting...   More >

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Hail Paths and Springs: An Ontological Study of Indigenous Engagements in the Lake Titicaca Basin

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | November 29 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Christine Hastorf, Director, Archaeological Research Facility, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Jewell Soriano

 Archaeological Research Facility

This project is gathering ethnographic information of how contemporary dwellers talk about, engage with, and conceive of their landscape.

Friday, December 1, 2017

Ground Penetrating Radar for Archaeology

Workshop: ARF Special & Workshops | December 1 | 1-5 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Scott Byram, Research Associate, Archaeological Research Facility, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

At 1pm the workshop will begin at the UC Faculty Club lawn where subsurface features are being mapped.

 

 Workshops cost $50 for non-UC attendees. The workshops are free for students, faculty, and staff. Make reservations online

GSSI 350 Mhz Hyperstacking Antenna

Friday, December 8, 2017

Viewshed and Cost Distance Analysis in ArcGIS

Workshop: ARF Special & Workshops | December 8 | 1-4 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Nico Tripcevich, Lab Manager, UC Berkeley, Archaeological Research Facility

 Archaeological Research Facility

n this introductory GIS workshop we will conduct two common types of terrain-based analysis used by archaeologists: Viewshed and Cost-distance analysis.

 

 Workshops cost $50 for non-UC attendees. The workshops are free for students, faculty, and staff. Make reservations online

Viewshed Analysis in ArcGIS

Friday, January 5, 2018

Andean Studies Conference, Day 1: Institute for Andean Studies

Conference/Symposium: Other Cal Archaeology | January 5 | 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. | 160 Kroeber Hall

 John Rick, President, Institute for Andean Studies

 Institute of Andean Studies

The Institute of Andean Studies was the vision of John H. Rowe (1918–2004), who founded it in 1960.

 $40 Early registration, $10 Student early registration, $60 Registration after Jan 1 and at the door, $20 Student registration after Jan 1 and at the door

  Register online or by calling 5106847930, or by emailing instituteofandeanstudies@gmail.com

Saturday, January 6, 2018

Andean Studies Conference, Day 2: Institute for Andean Studies

Conference/Symposium: Other Cal Archaeology | January 6 | 8:30 a.m.-10 p.m. | 160 Kroeber Hall

 John Rick, President, Institute for Andean Studies

 Institute of Andean Studies

The Institute of Andean Studies was the vision of John H. Rowe (1918–2004), who founded it in 1960.

 $40 Early registration, $10 Student early registration, $60 Registration after Jan 1 and at the door, $20 Student registration after Jan 1 and at the door

  Register online or or by emailing instituteofandeanstudies@gmail.com

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Plant Domestication in the Near East and Notes on the Modern Human Condition

Lecture: ARF Special & Workshops | January 16 | 5-6 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Avi Gopher, Professor, Tel Aviv University; Shahal Abbo, The Levi Eshkol School of Agriculture, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 Archaeological Research Facility

The major issue pertaining to Near Eastern plant domestication by archaeologists is: which model best reconstructs plant domestication? On the one hand, the protracted-autonomous (non-centered) model, thriving in Near Eastern Neolithic studies in the past decade, emphasizes three major aspects of domestication: (a) a long, protracted process that was (b) geographically autonomous (non-centered)...   More >

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Talking to Gods: Ainu Artifacts in the Hearst Museum

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | January 18 | 6-8 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Christopher Lowman, UC Berkeley, Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

The Ainu, the Indigenous people of northern Japan, traditionally use uniquely carved prayer sticks and highly-prized lacquer bowls to send prayers and offerings to their many gods. These sacred objects have made their way into museum collections, but their stories are seldom straightforward: they are entwined with ongoing Ainu cultural change, the desires of collectors, and the ways in which...   More >

Friday, January 19, 2018

Porfirio Gutiérrez y Familia: Textile Sale Event

Sale | January 19 – 21, 2018 every day | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Porfirio Gutierrez

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Browse and purchase unique works by master dyer and weaver Porfirio Gutiérrez and his family at this three day textile pop-up sale. This sale will occur alongside a lecture on Friday, January 19th and a natural dye workshop on Saturday, January 20th.

The Art of Handmade: A Zapotec Weaver in the 21st century

Lecture | January 19 | 5-7 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Porfirio Gutierrez

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Join us for the closing lecture of the inaugural exhibit People Made These Things: Connecting with the Makers of Our World. Weaver Porfirio Gutiérrez will speak about his work as an artist and the work of his community to preserve the use of plant and insect dyes, techniques that stretch back more than 1,000 years in the indigenous Zapotec tradition. This talk will open a three day series of...   More >

 

  RSVP online

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Zapotec Natural Dye Workshop: with Porfirio Gutiérrez

Workshop | January 20 | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Porfirio Gutierrez

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Natural materials have been used to produce dyes and colorants throughout much of human history. in Oaxaca, the way of learning has been passed down from generation. Join master dyer and weaver Porfirio Gutiérrez to learn about the rich history of the craft in its cultural context, to make a range of richly colored dyes using natural colorants derived from the indigo, cochineal, and wild marigold...   More >

 Must be 15 years of age and older to participate.

 $50 Workshop Registration

  Tickets go on sale December 21. Buy tickets online or or by emailing pahma-programs@berkeley.edu

Porfirio Gutiérrez y Familia: Textile Sale Event

Sale | January 19 – 21, 2018 every day | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Porfirio Gutierrez

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Browse and purchase unique works by master dyer and weaver Porfirio Gutiérrez and his family at this three day textile pop-up sale. This sale will occur alongside a lecture on Friday, January 19th and a natural dye workshop on Saturday, January 20th.

Sunday, January 21, 2018

Porfirio Gutiérrez y Familia: Textile Sale Event

Sale | January 19 – 21, 2018 every day | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Porfirio Gutierrez

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Browse and purchase unique works by master dyer and weaver Porfirio Gutiérrez and his family at this three day textile pop-up sale. This sale will occur alongside a lecture on Friday, January 19th and a natural dye workshop on Saturday, January 20th.

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Reawakening Ancient Salish Sea Basketry

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | January 24 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Ed Carriere, Master Basketmaker, Suquamish Elder

 Dale Croes, Washington State University

 Archaeological Research Facility

Ed Carriere and Dale Croes have been working with the U of Washington Burke Museum to replicate 2,000 year old waterlogged archaeological basketry found in the early 1960s from along the Snoqualmie River near Seattle.

Croes and Carriere

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

The Palatine East Pottery Project: The Study and On-Line Publication of 20 Tons of Pottery from Downtown Rome

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 J. Theodore Peña, Professor, University of California, Berkeley Classics

 Archaeological Research Facility

During the period 1989-1996 the American Academy in Rome undertook the excavation of large mid- to late-imperials structure located at the foot of the northeast slope of the Palatine Hill in downtown Rome. The speaker is in charge of the study and publication of the ca. 20 metric tons of Roman-period pottery recovered in the course of this project. The assemblage, what spans most of the first...   More >

Monday, February 5, 2018

Anthropology 290 Speaker Series:: Critical Perspectives on Free Speech

Panel Discussion | February 5 | 2-4 p.m. | 221 Kroeber Hall

 Nicholas Dirks, Anthropology and Histroy; Rosemary Joyce, Anthropology; Christopher Kutz,, Law School

 Charles L. Briggs, Anthropology

 Department of Anthropology

The Department of Anthropology is pleased to invite you to an
Anthropology 290 panel discussion. The goal is to bring a range of
perspectives to bear on the task of rethinking the analytic and political

underpinnings of debates centering on “free speech.”

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

From Saliva to Saints: (m)oral Hygiene in the Middle Ages and the Case of Late Medieval Villamagna

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | February 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Trent Trombley, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Human dentition and the accompanying oral cavity is a dense source of biocultural information and has enjoyed a long history of anthropological fascination. Analyses have ranged from establishing biological affinity in archaeological communities via dental metric and non-metric traits, to larger evolutionary questions of morphology. However, dental tissues have seldom been analyzed for their...   More >

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Memory and the Ear: Sather Lecture #1

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | February 8 | 8 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maud Fife Room | Note change in time and location

 Maurizio Bettini, Università degli Studi di Siena

 Department of Classics

Sunday, February 11, 2018

AIA Joukowsky Lecture - The Late Bronze Age Eruption of Thera (Santorini)

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | February 11 | 2 p.m. | 142 Dwinelle Hall

 Floyd McCoy, University of Hawaii

 AIA, San Francisco Society

The largest volcanic eruption of the past 10,000 years occurred in the southern Aegean Sea on an island known in antiquity as Thera (Santorini). A landscape was forever altered – as was a culture that thrived on that island, the Cycladic culture. Here was the core of a thriving maritime trade network, in close communication with the Minoan culture on Crete, vaporized in a four/five-day volcanic...   More >

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Connecting Cultures at the Phoebe Hearst Museum: Building a 21st-Century Anthropology Museum

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | February 14 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Benjamin Porter, Director, Phoebe A. Hearst Museum, Phoebe A. Hearst Museum, University of California Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

The Phoebe Hearst Museum Director Benjamin Porter will discuss the Museum’s recent efforts to create a dynamic venue where people from around the world can connect in new and meaningful ways. The Museum is positioning itself to be a place where visitors encounter pressing questions and challenges that can be explored through the lenses of contemporary anthropology. Recent accomplishments will be...   More >

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

From Turks to Mongols: David Ayalon’s Vision of the Eurasian Steppe in Islamic History

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | February 20 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Reuven Amitai, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

This lecture seeks to survey and critically engage some of the ideas of David Ayalon (1914-98), and then to see where they might further be developed and applied. Although Ayalon is primarily known as a Mamlukist, and in fact can be called the father of Mamluk studies, he also turned his attention to other weighty matters in the study of Middle Eastern and Islamic history. Among these was the...   More >

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Evidences (both Archaeological and Textual) for Long-Distance Trade Networks and Weighted Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Near Eastern Bronze Age (1950-1750 BCE)

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Adam Anderson, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Berkeley Digital Humanities

 Archaeological Research Facility

Archaeology in the Middle East or Near East has a long and illustrious history, with more than 150 years of scholarship. From the 1840s onward western archaeologists like Sir Austen Henry Layard made early discoveries of textual artifacts in the heart of Mesopotamia, and awoke a deep curiosity in deciphering the beginnings of human history. Unfortunately, these discoveries inadvertently...   More >

Scalar for Multimedia Digital Projects

Workshop: Other Cal Archaeology | February 21 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, D-Lab, 350 Barrows Hall

 Stacy Reardon, Library

 Library

Scalar is a web platform designed especially for multimedia digital projects and for multimedia academic texts. Choose it to develop born digital projects and books, or as a companion site for traditional scholarship. In this hands-on workshop, we’ll learn how to create a Scalar project, create pages and media, add metadata and annotations, and define paths.

Reconfiguration of Ceramic Production and Trade in China at the Threshold of Global Trade: An Archaeological Perspective

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | February 21 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Li Min, UCLA

 Tang Center for Silk Road Studies

Taking archaeological ceramics from production, transportation, and consumption sites during the 13th to 17th century, this paper examines the changing configuration of ceramic production and trade on Chinese coast during the critical transition from the Asiatic Trade Network to the beginning of early global trade. I will explore how potter communities in China linked to emerging maritime...   More >

The Gallery and the Archive: Contemporary Artists Work with The Magnes Collection

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | February 21 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Join David Wilson, Greg Niemeyer and Nicki Green, three contemporary artists who, in recent years, have interacted with The Magnes Collection and contributed to exhibitions that intersect new works with art and artifacts from the collection itself, in a conversation about art, creativity, archives, and memory, moderated by Francesco Spagnolo.

David Wilson, an artist based in Oakland, worked...   More >

Thursday, February 22, 2018

The Column Monument in Bīsāpūr - a Roman Design for Sāpūr I?

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | February 22 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall

 Anahita Mittertrainer, Ph.D Candidate, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich

 Near Eastern Studies

One of the most curious findings of the early Sasanian cities in Fars (modern southwest Iran) is the Roman style column monument of Bīsāpūr, which was discovered by Roman Ghirshman, the excavator of Bīsāpūr, in winter 1935/36. The monument was set up in the center of the city at the crossroads of the two main axes and consisted originally probably of two columns...   More >

Monday, February 26, 2018

The Natural History Museum and the Future of Nature

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | February 26 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Beka Economopoulos, Co-founder and Director, The Natural History Museum; Dan Kammen, Professor, Energy & Chair Energy and Resources Group

 Arts + Design

In a post-truth era, the role of trusted institutions of science is more important than ever. Drawing on recent initiatives organized by The Natural History Museum, a mobile and pop-up museum founded by the activist art collective Not An Alternative, this talk will explore how The Natural History Museum leverages the symbolic and infrastructural power of science museums to transform them into...   More >

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Shellfish and Seaweed at Sand Hill Bluff: A Deeper Look at Shell-Matrix Sites of California's Central Coast

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Mike Grone, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Along the Central Coast of California, changes in shoreline management practices and their subsequent effects on fisheries can be examined in the context of long-term human occupation, climatic and environmental variability, and the development of Indigenous, Spanish, Mexican, and American relationships with the environment. While extensive archaeological investigation regarding indigenous...   More >

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR - Kevin Rowe: Conserve the Collector: Natural history collections and historical change

Seminar: Other Cal Archaeology | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Kevin Rowe (MVZ/IB Faculty Candidate)

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

Thursday, March 1, 2018

California Through Native Eyes: Reclaiming History

Colloquium: Other Cal Archaeology | March 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, 220 Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union

 William J. Bauer, Jr., Professor, Department of History,, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 Center for Native American Issues Research on, American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, Department of Ethnic Studies

In 1935, Concow Austin McLaine, of northern California’s Round Valley Reservation, told an oral tradition about Lizard, who saw smoke wafting up from West Mountain, now known as Lassen Peak. The people in Lizard’s town planned to steal fire from Eagle, who selfishly kept the fire under his wings. The people teamed up, stole the fire, and raced with it back to town. Before they reached their...   More >

Friday, March 2, 2018

Archaeology Agencies Panel Workshop: Archaeological careers with government agencies and utilities

Workshop: ARF Special & Workshops | March 2 | 1:30-4 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Archaeological Research Facility

A public round table discussion of how governmental and agency
businesses engage with archaeology and archaeologists.

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Ethno-Matallurgy (ethnoarcaeology project) of Traditional Iron Working in the Indian Sub-Continent

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Tathagata Neogi, Founder, Heritage Walk Calcutta

 Archaeological Research Facility

Since its inception in 2010, the Pioneering Metallurgy Project has surveyed pre-industrial iron and steel production sites across the four districts of northern Telangana, India. The initial reconnaissance in this region, which is rich in easily accessible banded magnetite and lateritic iron-ore deposits and famous for producing wootz (Damascus) steel, yielded 245 locations associated with...   More >

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Characteristically Etruscan: Etruscan and Italic Bronze Production in Context: The Annual Del Chiaro Lecture

Lecture | March 15 | 5:30-8:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Greg Warden, President, Franklin University, Switzerland

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

AHMA Colloquium - The Theatrical Guild and Rome

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | March 20 | 4 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Kent Rigsby, Duke University

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

The AHMA Colloquium is a series of informal papers presented in the afternoon in 7205 Dwinelle Hall. It is hosted and organized by graduate students from the Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology Graduate Group.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

The Past is Present:: Virtuality, Archaeology, and the Future of History

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | April 4 – 6, 2018 every day | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 Banatao Auditorium

 Center for New Media

Presented in partnership with swissnex San Francisco.
The Past is Present is an interdisciplinary event bringing together scholars, students, technology innovators, and cultural heritage workers in conversation about new methods and tools which are shaping their work.
From April 4-6, the BCNM will provide a venue for an international group to explore critical issues of new technologies.

Thursday, April 5, 2018

The Past is Present:: Virtuality, Archaeology, and the Future of History

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | April 4 – 6, 2018 every day | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 Banatao Auditorium

 Center for New Media

Presented in partnership with swissnex San Francisco.
The Past is Present is an interdisciplinary event bringing together scholars, students, technology innovators, and cultural heritage workers in conversation about new methods and tools which are shaping their work.
From April 4-6, the BCNM will provide a venue for an international group to explore critical issues of new technologies.

The Imperial Landscape of Assyria, from the Ground and Above

Lecture: ARF Special & Workshops | April 5 | 5-7 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Jason Ur, Professor, Harvard University

 Archaeological Research Facility, Near Eastern Studies, Badè Museum

This presentation describes project’s methods and preliminary results, with a particular focus on its use of historical remote sensing sources: declassified intelligence aerial photographs (U2) and satellite imagery (CORONA and HEXAGON) and drone-based aerial imagery.

Bastora Dam

Friday, April 6, 2018

The Past is Present:: Virtuality, Archaeology, and the Future of History

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | April 4 – 6, 2018 every day | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 Banatao Auditorium

 Center for New Media

Presented in partnership with swissnex San Francisco.
The Past is Present is an interdisciplinary event bringing together scholars, students, technology innovators, and cultural heritage workers in conversation about new methods and tools which are shaping their work.
From April 4-6, the BCNM will provide a venue for an international group to explore critical issues of new technologies.

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Reimagining Morocco's Cultural Heritage for the 21st Century

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | April 10 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ashley Miller, Visiting Scholar, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

In July of 2011, King Mohammed VI of Morocco (r.1999-present) endorsed a constitutional referendum that acknowledged his country’s plural identities and histories in an unprecedented way, describing a Moroccan national identity “forged through the convergence of its Arab-Islamic, Amazigh, and Saharan-Hassanic components, nourished and enriched by its African, Andalusian, Hebraic, and...   More >

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

After the Looting

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | April 11 | 12-1 p.m. |  2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Carol Redmount, University of California, Near Eastern Studies

 Archaeological Research Facility

In 2011 and 2012 the archaeological site of El-Hibeh in Middle Egypt was badly looted in the aftermath of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. Every part of the ancient tell, once a first millennium BCE provincial city, was violated--from above, from below, and from the side. In our 2017 field season we began the process of assessing the damage and figuring out how to proceed in future.

Monday, April 16, 2018

Aleshire Lecture

Lecture | April 16 | 4-6:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Paula Perlman, University of Texas

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Foerster Lectures on the Immortality of the Soul featuring Marilyn Strathern: Souls in Other Selves, and the Immortality of the Body

Lecture: Other Cal Archaeology | April 17 | 4:10 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Marilyn Strathern, Former William Wyse Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge

 Graduate Division

Marilyn Strathern will present the Foerster lecture on Tuesday, April 17, 2018 titled "Souls in Other Selves, and the Immortality of the Body." The lecture is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Marilyn Strathern

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

A Question of Design: Gender in Hawaiian Kauhale

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | April 18 | 12-1 p.m. |  2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Kirsten Vacca

 Archaeological Research Facility

Friday, April 20, 2018

The Origins of the Chinese Nation: Song China and the Forging of an East Asian World Order

Colloquium: Other Cal Archaeology | April 20 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Nicolas Tackett, History, UC Berkeley

 Pheng Cheah, Rhetoric, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In his new book, Tackett proposes that the Northern Song Dynasty (960–1127) witnessed both the maturation of an East Asian inter-state system and the emergence of a new worldview and sense of Chinese identity among educated elites. These developments together had sweeping repercussions for the course of Chinese history, while also demonstrating that there has existed in world history a viable...   More >

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Urban Life and Foodways at Huari, Ayacucho, Peru (AD 600-1000): A Spatial Macrobotanical Analysis

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | April 25 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Geoffrey Taylor, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Huari is the proposed capital of the Wari cultural group whose architectural, ceramic, and iconographic traditions spread to distant parts of the Peruvian highlands during the Middle Horizon (AD 600-1000). With this presentation, I will introduce Wari studies and re-appraise the current state of archaeological evidence on the activities of Wari people. I will then investigate the botanical...   More >

Exhibits at UCB

The Invisible Museum: History and Memory of Morocco

Exhibit - Multimedia: Exhibits at UCB | August 29 – December 15, 2017 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Since its inception in 1962, the former Judah L. Magnes Museum distinguished itself by directing its collecting efforts outside the focus on European Jewish culture and history that was prevalent among American Jewish museums at the time. During the 1970s and 1980s, its founders, Seymour and Rebecca Fromer, actively corralled an informal team of activist collectors and supporters. Together, they...   More >

People Made These Things: Connecting with the Makers of Our World

Exhibit - Multimedia: Other Cal Archaeology | April 12 – December 17, 2017 every Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday with exceptions | Hearst Museum of Anthropology, 102 Kroeber Hall

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Why do we sometimes know a lot about who made things, and why do we sometimes not? Why does it sometimes matter to us, and why might it sometimes not? These are the questions that will be raised in the exhibit that will inaugurate the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology’s renovated Kroeber Hall Gallery. The Museum will display objects from the collection that urge visitors to think...   More >

 Free UC Berkeley Students, Faculty, Staff, Hearst Museum Members, and Youth under 18, $6 General Admisison, $3 Non-UC Berkeley Students and seniors over 65

The Invisible Museum: History and Memory of Morocco

Exhibit - Artifacts: Other Cal Archaeology | January 23 – June 29, 2018 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Since its inception in 1962, the former Judah L. Magnes Museum distinguished itself by directing its collecting efforts outside the focus on European Jewish culture and history that was prevalent among American Jewish museums at the time. During the 1970s and 1980s, its founders, Seymour and Rebecca Fromer, actively corralled an informal team of activist collectors and supporters. Together, they...   More >

The Karaite Canon: Manuscripts and Ritual Objects from Cairo

Exhibit - Artifacts: Other Cal Archaeology | January 23 – June 29, 2018 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

A selection from the over fifty manuscripts collected by The Magnes in Cairo, Egypt, during an expedition led by the museum’s founder, Seymour Fromer, in 1971. At the time, the aim of The Magnes was to salvage unique documents during a period of great turmoil in the Middle East.

The manuscripts are accompanied by a variety of ritual objects, original ketubbot (marriage contracts), and by...   More >