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maya

One Maya Frontier to the Other: Archaeology at Chinikiha, Chiapas, Mexico

Lecture: ARF Brownbag | October 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)


Rosemary Joyce, Professor, Anthropology, UC Berkeley; Flavio Silva de la Mora, Anthropology, UC Berkeley; Kim Salyers, Anthropology, UC Berkeley; Abbey White, Anthropology, UC Berkeley

Archaeological Research Facility


In collaboration with faculty from UNAM, Mexico's top research university, Berkeley faculty, students, and postdocs have begun new research at the Classic Maya site Chinikiha, a neighbor of the better known Palenque in the eighth century. UNAM archaeologist Rodrigo Liendo has conducted the best regional-scale survey in the entire Maya area, providing a unique basis to take an integrated look at how a network of settlements at all scales. Berkeley participants are drawing on models and approaches honed at the other edge of the Maya world, in Honduras Ulua Valley, to embed practice centered approaches in the study of a more stratified social network. We will report on the work in summer 2012, and outline the proposal for continuing research by the Berkeley team in the future.

Rosemary Joyce is a professor of anthropology at Berkeley. Beginning in 1977, she started conducting field research in Honduras, and continues work on analyzing materials from her most recent work there, which ranges from the earliest villages to the 18th century colonial period. Flavio Silva de la Mora is a PhD candidate at Berkeley who is continuing research collaboration in Mexico that he initiated as an undergraduate. His proposed dissertation will examine integration at the regional scale extending out from Chinikiha through examination of exchange in both exotic and more locally available stone resources. For the last two years he has been excavating chert workshops at Chinikiha. Kim Salyers and Abbey White are anthropology majors who spent summer 2012 at Chinikiha, Kim as a Haas Scholar and Abbey with a SURF fellowship, learning field and laboratory techniques, and gaining expertise for their proposed senior honors theses which will use Chinikiha as a case study.


twyrick@berkeley.edu