All events

Upcoming Events

Monday, October 22, 2018

In Remembrance of Diana Baumrind

Memorial | October 22 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Institute of Human Development

To honor the contributions of Diana Baumrind's life work on parenting, Larry Nucci, Phil and Carolyn Cowan, Nadia Sorkhabi, Liz Owens, and Bob Larzelere will briefly present their recent projects in collaboration with Diana.

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

You Want How Much?!: Perceptions of Extreme First Offers and The Men and Women Who Make Them

Colloquium | October 24 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Margaret Lee, Postdoctoral Scholar, Center for Equity, Gender, and Leadership

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Much research has robustly shown that individuals benefit from making a first offer in negotiations and has advocated high offers for sellers and low offers for buyers. However, little research has considered how extreme (unreasonably high for sellers and unreasonably low for buyers) offers, as well as the negotiators who make them, are perceived. Experiment 1 found that, compared to moderate...   More >

Department of Psychology Faculty Research Lecture: The role of self-distancing in enabling adaptive behavior under stress: Implications for emotion regulation and self-control

Colloquium | October 24 | 3 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Ozlem Ayduk, Professor, University of California, Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

This talk will describe a program of research on the emotion regulatory benefits of self-distancing -- the process of transcending one’s egocentric point of view in the here-and-now. I will present data from multiple levels of analyses (e.g., behavioral, neural) using a variety of research designs (i.e., correlational, experimental, longitudinal) that elucidate how and why self-distancing might...   More >

Monday, October 29, 2018

Children Learning to Collaborate: Cultural Paradigms

Colloquium | October 29 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Barbara Rogoff, University of California, Santa Cruz

 Department of Psychology

How do children learn to collaborate with others? In this talk, Barbara Rogoff discusses cultural differences in children's collaboration and in supports for learning to collaborate. She argues that collaboration is a key aspect of a cultural paradigm for learning that is especially prevalent in many Mexican and Indigenous-heritage communities of the Americas, where children have wide opportunity...   More >

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Opportunities and challenges of high-field fMRI for neuroscience applications

Colloquium | October 31 | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Kendrick Kay, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

In this talk, Dr. Kendrick Kay will describe two recent projects that exploit functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at ultra-high magnetic field strength (7 Tesla). The first project consisted of whole-brain fMRI retinotopic mapping in 181 healthy adults, as part of the Human Connectome Project (T2*-weighted gradient-echo EPI, 1.6-mm isotropic resolution, 1-s TR, 85 slices, multiband...   More >

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Their pain, our pleasure

Colloquium | November 7 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Mina Cikara, Assistant Professor, Harvard University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

If humans are innately good, cooperative, fair, and averse to harming one another, why does widespread intergroup conflict persist? Several factors contribute to fomenting hostility between groups; in my talk I will focus on the role of pleasure in response to out-group pain. People who identify strongly with their social groups frequently experience pleasure when they observe threatening...   More >

Friday, November 9, 2018

Attentional Episodes and Cognitive Control

Seminar | November 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 John Duncan, MRC Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Abstract: Human fMRI studies show a tightly-localised set of “multiple-demand” or MD regions, involved in solution of many different cognitive challenges, widely separated yet strongly functionally connected, and linked to standard measures of fluid intelligence. Multiple-demand regions are generally associated with “cognitive control”, but how should control be conceived? Using data from...   More >