Upcoming Events

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Milk and Cookies: Department of History Welcome and Orientation for New and Continuing Students

Orientation: History Department Events | August 21 | 3-5 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Leah Flanagan, Undergraduate Advisor, Department of History

 Department of History

Are you a Berkeley undergrad who's interested in studying history? If so, join us on August 21 for "Milk & Cookies," our welcome and orientation for all students!

After hearing from History faculty about what we do here (and why), we'll introduce staff, new peer advisors, our library liaison, and our student group leaders. There will be plenty of time for snacks, questions, and...   More >

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | August 28 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for...   More >

Thursday, August 30, 2018

Scenes from the Vault: Never Before Screened Films from the Northwest Coast

Lecture | August 30 | 6-8 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

This presentation will feature the first results from the Museum’s ongoing project to digitize its film collection, containing the largest research collection of footage on Native American cultures. The original American Indian Film Project was directed between 1960 and 1965 by Samuel A. Barrett, Cal’s first doctorate in anthropology (1908).

This program will present footage shot in Victoria...   More >

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Style as Essence: The Baroque.

Lecture | September 5 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, Townsend Center

 Anthony Cascardi, UC Berkeley

 Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, D.E.

Lecture to celebrate the beginning of the semester.

Thursday, September 6, 2018

2018 AJLS Conference: Past, Present, and Future - Evidence, Transmission, and Inheritance in Japanese Literature and Media

Conference/Symposium | September 6 | 5-8 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Library (101 Doe)

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), C. V. Starr East Asian Library, Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures, Townsend Center for the Humanities, National Institute of Japanese Literature

The 2018 AJLS Conference seeks to address the history and theory of Japanese literature and media with special attention given to the ways in which writers have grappled with the problems of evidence, transmission, and inheritance and how these problems continue to renew and complicate the relation between the past, present, and future.

 Free

  Register online

Ancient Mediterranean Revolutions: AHMA 50th Anniversary

Conference/Symposium: Featuring History Faculty | September 6 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  David Brower Center

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

A conference on the theme of Ancient Mediterranean Revolutions to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the founding of the Graduate Group in Ancient History and Archaeology.

Friday, September 7, 2018

2018 AJLS Conference: Past, Present, and Future - Evidence, Transmission, and Inheritance in Japanese Literature and Media

Conference/Symposium | September 7 | 9:45 a.m.-7 p.m. | Doe Library, 180 and 190

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), C. V. Starr East Asian Library, Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures, Townsend Center for the Humanities, National Institute of Japanese Literature

The 2018 AJLS Conference seeks to address the history and theory of Japanese literature and media with special attention given to the ways in which writers have grappled with the problems of evidence, transmission, and inheritance and how these problems continue to renew and complicate the relation between the past, present, and future.

 Free

  Register online

Saturday, September 8, 2018

2018 AJLS Conference: Past, Present, and Future - Evidence, Transmission, and Inheritance in Japanese Literature and Media

Conference/Symposium | September 8 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | Doe Library, 180 and 190

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), C. V. Starr East Asian Library, Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures, Townsend Center for the Humanities, National Institute of Japanese Literature

The 2018 AJLS Conference seeks to address the history and theory of Japanese literature and media with special attention given to the ways in which writers have grappled with the problems of evidence, transmission, and inheritance and how these problems continue to renew and complicate the relation between the past, present, and future.

 Free

  Register online

Monday, September 10, 2018

Borders, Borderlands, and Migration

Conference/Symposium: Featuring History Faculty | September 10 | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Central European Univeristy

The Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the Central European University present a two-day conference - "Borders, Borderlands, and Migration."

Day 1, Panel 1, 10:15am-12:00pm
- “Rethinking the Impact of Migration, Mobility, and Exile in the Modern Middle East,” Nadia Al-Bagdadi, Professor of History, Central European University
- “The Global Migration...   More >

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Borders, Borderlands, and Migration

Conference/Symposium: Featuring History Faculty | September 11 | 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Central European Univeristy

The Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the Central European University present a two-day conference - "Borders, Borderlands, and Migration."

Day 1, Panel 1, 10:15am-12:00pm
- “Rethinking the Impact of Migration, Mobility, and Exile in the Modern Middle East,” Nadia Al-Bagdadi, Professor of History, Central European University
- “The Global Migration...   More >

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Investing in People: Jefferson Memorial Lecture featuring Michael Tubbs

Lecture | September 13 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Michael Tubbs, Mayor, City of Stockton

 Graduate Division

Mayor Michael Tubbs will present the Jefferson lecture on Thursday, September 13, 2018, in conjunction with the observance of Constitution Day. The lecture, entitled "Investing in People," will be held in the Chevron Auditorium of International House and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Pogrom: Kishinev and the Tilt of History: Steven Zipperstein (Stanford) in conversation with John Efron (UC Berkeley)

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | September 13 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

In April, 1903, 49 Jews were killed, 600 were raped or wounded, and more than 1,000 Jewish-owned houses and stores were ransacked and destroyed during three days of violence in the town of Kishinev. So shattering were the aftereffects of this rampage, that one historian remarked that it was “nothing less than a prototype for the Holocaust itself.”

Recounted in lurid detail by newspapers...   More >

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Berkley Seminar on Global History: Borderlands and Border Crossings in the 19th-Century World

Seminar: History Department Events | September 19 | 4-6 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Samuel Truett, Associate Professor of History, University of New Mexico

 Department of History, Institute of International Studies

As a historian who approaches the U.S. West and Mexican North primarily from the perspective of their shared borderlands, Professor Truett is interested in the crossings—social, cultural, and environmental—that have connected these two regions to the rest of the Americas and the world at large. Known best for his work in borderlands history, he also works actively in western U.S. history,...   More >

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Constructing Post-Imperium Identity: Taiwan and Eastern Europe

Conference/Symposium | September 20 – 21, 2018 every day | 10 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Efforts in Taiwan to create a new identity and nation-state as part of the process of democratization have much in common with the making of new identities and nation-states in democratizing Eastern and Central Europe, especially with the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia. This workshop ...   More >

Friday, September 21, 2018

Constructing Post-Imperium Identity: Taiwan and Eastern Europe

Conference/Symposium | September 20 – 21, 2018 every day | 10 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Efforts in Taiwan to create a new identity and nation-state as part of the process of democratization have much in common with the making of new identities and nation-states in democratizing Eastern and Central Europe, especially with the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia. This workshop ...   More >

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

AIA Lecture - Reports from the Field

Lecture | September 25 | 6 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Francine Masiello: The Senses of Democracy: Perception, Politics, and Culture in Latin America

Lecture | September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Masiello explores the textual and visual representation of the senses during moments of crisis in Latin America from the early nineteenth century to the present.

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Why Read Machiavelli's The Prince?: “Why Read…? Series”

Lecture | September 27 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Albert Ascoli, UC Berkeley; Julia Lupton, UC Irvine; David Marno, UC Berkeley; Nadia Urbinati, Columbia University

 Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, D.E.

Round-table and discussion

Revolutionary Blackness in the Soviet Imagination

Lecture | September 27 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Jonathan Flatley, Professor of English, Wayne State University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of English

In the present moment, amidst a global rise of white supremacy and racism, this paper recalls a moment of state supported global anti-racism. It focuses on the work of Soviet artist Victor Koretsky, whose posters from the from the 1930s to the 1970s present black revolutionaries combating racist imperial capital around the world. My hope is that his work may stimulate our political imaginaries,...   More >

Friday, September 28, 2018

Socialist China’s New Exhibitions: Rethinking Class, Material Culture, and Propaganda

Colloquium: Featuring History Faculty | September 28 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Denise Y. Ho, Assistant Professor of twentieth-century Chinese History, Yale University

 Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This talk examines the origins and Mao-era elaborations on “new exhibitions” in socialist China, the practice of displaying personal possessions as a way to articulate meanings of class in both “old China” and “new China.” During the Socialist Education Movement, “class education exhibitions” linked material objects to class status, arguing for the persistence of class and the need for...   More >

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Catherine Gallagher: Telling It Like It Wasn’t: The Counterfactual Imagination in History and Fiction

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | October 3 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Inventing counterfactual histories—such as a Europe that never threw off Hitler, or a second term for JFK—is a common pastime of modern day historians. Gallagher probes how counterfactual history works and to what ends.

Thursday, October 4, 2018

The Influence of the Republican Period on the Painting of Ming China

Colloquium | October 4 | 4-6 p.m. | Heyns Faculty Club

 Craig Clunas, FBA, Professor of the History of Art, University of Oxford

 Patricia Berger, Professor Emerita, Chinese Art, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

The creation of a modern Chinese art in the first half of the twentieth century necessarily required the creation of its opposite - ‘traditional Chinese art’, that which by definition was not modern. The materials out of which traditional Chinese art, and in particular ‘traditional Chinese painting’ were constructed were many and various, including the actual art of the past, and the copious...   More >

© Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Bryan Wagner: The Tar Baby: A Global History

Lecture | October 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Wagner offers a fresh analysis of this deceptively simple story of a fox, a rabbit, and a doll made of tar and turpentine, tracing its history and connections to slavery, colonialism, and global trade.

Friday, October 19, 2018

Why Read Montaigne’s Essays?: “Why Read…? Series”

Lecture | October 19 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Antónia Szabari, University of Southern California; Carla Freccero, UC Santa Cruz; Diego Pirillo, UC Berkeley; Jane O. Newman, U.C. Irvine

 Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, D.E.

Round-table and discussion

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Hertha Sweet Wong: Picturing Identity: Contemporary American Autobiography in Image and Text

Lecture | October 24 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Wong explores the intersection of writing and visual art in the autobiographical work of Art Spiegelman, Faith Ringgold, Leslie Marmon Silko, and other American writers-artists who experiment with hybrid forms of self-narration.

Friday, October 26, 2018

Islamic Texts Circle: Same-Sex Relations in the Qur'an

Workshop | October 26 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Asad Q. Ahmed, Near Eastern Studies

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The Islamic Texts Circle introduces the broader CMES community to important themes in the Islamic tradition via its holy scripture, the Qur’an, and via its long history of exegesis. Participants will gain exposure to the rich and variegated interpretive angles developed in the fourteen-hundred years of Islamic history, so that they may discuss relevant themes in the form of a productive dialogue....   More >

"Special Talent in the Chest, Special Eyes under the Brows": Jīn Shèngtàn’s (1608-1661) Discursion on Travel in his Commentary to The Story of the Western Wing: “胸中別才、眉下別眼”:金聖嘆《西廂記》漫筆遊記與評點

Colloquium | October 26 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Stephen H. West, Foundation Professor of Chinese; Head of East and Southeast Asian Section, Arizona State University

 Sophie Volpp, Associate Professor, Comparative Literature; EALC, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

An eccentric commentary to the famous drama The Story of the Western Wing (西廂記) may seem like strange place to begin a discussion about travel. But Jīn Shèngtàn's (金聖嘆) commentarial exegeses are in fact noted for their discursive nature.

Sunday, October 28, 2018

AIA Lecture - Murder in the Agora: Violent Death and Illicit Burial in Ancient Athens

Lecture | October 28 |  TBD

 Maria Liston, Department of Anthropology, University of Waterloo

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Violent crime and homicides are not a problem limited to the modern world alone, and the ancient city of Athens experienced similar events throughout antiquity. A recent study of all the human skeletons found in wells excavated by the American Excavations in the Athenian Agora has found that many of these individuals died violently. Some of the dead, including women and children, appear to be...   More >

Monday, November 5, 2018

Avenali Lecture: Todd Gitlin: The Other 1968s: Counterrevolution, Communism and Desublimation

Lecture | November 5 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

In his exploration of a watershed political year, Professor of journalism and sociology at Columbia University Todd Gitlin unearths a "thrust toward retrogression" that stands in stark contrast to the popular image of 1968 as a politically progressive moment.

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Anne Nesbet: The Orphan Band of Springdale

Lecture | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Nesbet’s historical novel for younger readers takes place during World War II in Springdale, Maine. It tells the story of eleven-year-old Gusta, who is sent to live in an orphanage run by her grandmother after her labor-organizer father is forced to flee the country.

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Daniel Boyarin: Judaism: The Genealogy of a Modern Notion

Lecture | November 14 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Boyarin argues that the very concept of a religion of “Judaism” is an invention of the Christian church that was adopted by Jews only with the coming of modernity and the spread of Christian languages.

Thursday, November 15, 2018

AIA Lecture

Lecture | November 15 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Barbara Spackman: Accidental Orientalists: Modern Italian Travelers in Ottoman Lands

Lecture | December 5 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Spackman’s account, which won the 2017 American Association for Italian Studies Best Book Prize, examines narratives by Italians who, through historical accident, found themselves in Ottoman Egypt and Anatolia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

AIA Lecture - Joukowsky Lecture - Remembering Boudica: Monuments of a Barbarian Queen

Lecture | January 29 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Alison Futrell, Department of History, University of Arizona

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Empire! Taxes! Violation! Massacre! In the early years of his reign, the emperor Nero briefly considered withdrawing the legions from the new province of Britannia. Before he could do so, the stability of empire was shaken by revolt, as Boudica, a tribal queen pushed beyond her limits by the excesses of the Roman colonizers, exacted a horrifying retribution, with deaths in the tens of thousands....   More >

Ongoing Events

Pièces de Résistance: Echoes of Judaea Capta From Ancient Coins to Modern Art

Exhibit - Multimedia | August 28 – December 14, 2018 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

This exhibition will be continuing in Spring 2019.

Notions of resistance, alongside fears and realities of oppression, resound throughout Jewish history. As a minority, Jews express their political aspirations, ideals of heroism, and yearnings of retaliation and redemption in their rituals, art, and everyday life.

Centering on coins in The Magnes Collection, this exhibition explores how...   More >

Project “Holy Land”: Yaakov Benor-Kalter’s Photographs of British Mandate Palestine, 1923-1940

Exhibit - Photography | August 28 – December 14, 2018 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4:05 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

For nearly two decades, Yaakov (Jacob) Benor-Kalter (1897-1969) traversed the Old City of Jerusalem, documenting renowned historical monuments, ambiguous subjects in familiar alleyways, and scores of “new Jews” building a new homeland. Benor-Kalter’s photographs smoothly oscillate between two worlds, and two Holy Lands, with one lens.

After immigrating from Poland to the British Mandate of...   More >