Upcoming Events

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Women on Africa's constitutional and supreme courts: When, where, and why?

Colloquium | January 23 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Alice Kang, Associate Professor, Political Science and Ethnic Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 Center for African Studies

This is a meeting of the weekly colloquium for the Center for African Studies.

Alice Kang

Metropolitan Migrations and Interwar Vietnamese Culture

Lecture | January 23 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Charles Keith, Associate Professor of History, Michigan State University

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This talk will explore the close ties between Vietnamese migration to France and interwar Vietnamese culture and, as such, the importance of these migrations for postcolonial Vietnam.

Charles Keith

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Stitching Palestine: 70th Anniversary of Al-Nakba Film Series

Film - Documentary | January 25 | 6-8 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Arab Film Festival

Second of a three-part film series presented by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies in partnership with The Arab Film Festival on the 70th anniversary of Al-Nakba of 1948, one of the Middle East's most defining episodes.

Friday, January 26, 2018

History Graduate Association Research Symposium

Conference/Symposium: Sponsored by History Department: Featuring History Students | January 26 | 1-5 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Sara Friedman; John Handel; Pawel Koscielny; Christopher Lawson; Helen Miney; Derek K. O'Leary; Lois Rosson; Mustafa Yildiz

 Department of History, History Graduate Association (HGA)

At this inaugural symposium, history graduate students will deliver 15-20 minute presentations on aspects of their current research, spanning several geographical and chronological fields. A brief Q&A session will follow each presentation.

Monday, January 29, 2018

In a Field of Patriarchy: Gender Politics and Freedom Dreams During the United Farm Worker Movement: Book Talk with Assistant Professor Christian Paiz

Lecture | January 29 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), Director's Room

 Christian Paiz, Ethnic Studies Department

 UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education

Absent in farmworker historiographies are the voices of farmworker women who speak of patriarchal and racialized exploitation in post World War II California. For many, patriarchal power originated in domestic violence, strict gender roles and autonomy-denying social conditions. Using original oral interviews, this presentation foregrounds the patriarchal relations within the Mexican farmworker...   More >

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Richard Cándida Smith

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Illuminating the story of how cultural exchange programs brought many of the most important Latin American artists and writers to the United States, Richard Cándida Smith explores Pan-American cultural exchange in the twentieth century.

Innocence and Violence: The Theology of a Gun Culture

Lecture: Sponsored by History Department | January 31 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Dominic Erdozain, Freelance Writer

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Gun rights are typically identified with the Second Amendment – a legal, indeed constitutional, prerogative. This lecture argues that they are better understood as part of a culture and a belief system, centering on ideas of innocence and legitimate violence.

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Late Medieval Publishing Culture In Japan During The 14th And 16th Centuries

Colloquium | February 1 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 3401 Dwinelle Hall

 Sumiyoshi Tomohiko, Keiō Univeristy

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures

Books printed in Japanese Zen monasteries during the medieval period are known as Gozan-ban or “Five Mountains” editions. Originally, Gozan-ban were printed for the self-education of Gozan monks who were expected to imitate the latest Chinese scholarship and act out another culture in Japan. At this time, in the 13th to 14th centuries, Chinese Zen masters visited Japan very often, while Japanese...   More >

The Gendered Politics of Socialist Consumption in North Korea, 1953-1965

Colloquium | February 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Andre Schmid, University of Toronto

 Laura Nelson, UC Berkeley

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

How was ‘proper’ consumption conceived in the newly emergent socialist order of North Korea? Despite the desire of the Party-state to represent a population united around the Kim family and the (not unrelated) tendency of foreign observers to see North Korea as an extreme case of totalitarianism, there was in fact no straightforward answer to this question in the early postwar years.

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

The Fante Confederation never happened: silence, space, and the earnest historian in West Africa

Colloquium | February 6 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Trevor Getz, Professor and Chair, Department of History, San Francisco State University

 Center for African Studies

This is a meeting of the weekly colloquium for the Center for African Studies.

Trevor Getz with local scholar in Ghana

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Book Lecture | David Biale on Hasidism: A New History

Lecture | February 7 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Free and open to the public

Far from a throwback to the Middle Ages, Hasidism is a product of modernity that forged its identity as a radical alternative to the secular world. So argue the eight distinguished authors, led by David Biale, of Hasidism: A New History, the first comprehensive account of the movement’s place in modern Jewish history. The book represents an innovative collaboration...   More >

History Homecoming: A Panel and Reception for Friends of the Department

Special Event: Sponsored by History Department: Featuring History Faculty | February 7 | 6:30-9:30 p.m. |  Alumni House

 Susanna Elm; Jonathan Sheehan; Elena Schneider

 Mark Peterson

 Department of History

History Homecoming is a gathering of alumni and friends of the Department of History for fellowship, food, refreshments, and a special history panel. The topic of this year's faculty panel is "Quakes, Storms, and Wrecks: Disaster as a Window to the Past."

 Limited seating is available, so please plan to arrive early.

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Summer Opportunities Fair

Special Event | February 8 | 2-4 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Pauley Ballroom

 Summer Sessions

Wondering what to do next summer? Visit the Summer Opportunities Fair to learn about exciting summer options for UC Berkeley students, including summer courses, study abroad, student jobs and internships, research, volunteer and service, and more.

Representatives from Berkeley campus units will be tabling with information on their courses and programs.

The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire

Lecture: Sponsored by History Department | February 8 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Karl Jacoby, Professor, Department of History, Columbia University

 Department of History

To his contemporaries in Gilded Age Manhattan, Guillermo Eliseo was a fantastically wealthy Mexican, the proud owner of a luxury apartment overlooking Central Park, a busy Wall Street office, and scores of mines and haciendas in Mexico. But for all his obvious riches and his elegant appearance, Eliseo was also the possessor of a devastating secret: he was not, in fact, from Mexico at all. Rather,...   More >

Friday, February 9, 2018

Spreading the Word: Woodblock Publishing Sites and Book Distribution Networks in the Qing

Colloquium: Featuring History Faculty | February 9 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Cynthia Brokaw, History, Brown University

 Michael Nylan, History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

The commercial publishing boom of the late Ming was largely a regional phenomenon, as most businesses of any size were confined to the cities of Jiangnan and Jianyang (in northern Fujian). By the eighteenth century, however, the geography of commercial publishing had changed, as more and more entrepreneurs, responding to a rising demand for texts, founded important publishing operations in the...   More >

Monday, February 12, 2018

In Search of Modern Iran

Lecture | February 12 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Abbas Amanat, Yale University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Abbas Amanat will talk about the challenges and rewards of writing a longue dureé covering early modern and modern history of Iran. His new book: Iran: A Modern History (Yale University Press, 2017) looks at five centuries of national and transnational history and explores overarching themes that connect the history of the Safavids Empire and emergence of the religion-state symbiosis with modes...   More >

The Displacement of Borders among Russian Koreans in Northeast Asia

Colloquium | February 12 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Hyun-Gwi Park, University of Cambridge

 Steven Lee, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Mongolia Initiative

Since the late nineteenth century, ethnic Koreans have represented a small yet significant portion of the population of the Russian Far East, but until now, the phenomenon has been largely understudied. Based on extensive historical and ethnographic research, this is the first book in English to chart the contemporary social life of Koreans in the complex borderland region. Dispelling the...   More >

The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale And The American Tragedy In Vietnam

Lecture | February 12 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Max Boot, Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow for National Security Studies, Council on Foreign Relations

 Institute of International Studies

Max Boot is a historian, best-selling author, and foreign-policy analyst who has been called one of the “world’s leading authorities on armed conflict” by the International Institute for Strategic Studies. He is the Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow in National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.

Boot’s latest book—The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the...   More >

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Ancient Icons/Modern Russia

Lecture | February 13 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Judith Deutsch Kornblatt, Professor Emerita, Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Wisconsin - Madison

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

This lecture and slide show examines the history, theology, and presentation of Russian icons, from their beginnings through the twentieth century and into post-Soviet times. It will demonstrate how these sacred objects have permeated even secular Russian culture, including modernist art, poetry, advertising, and popular memes.

Africanisation and Government Intelligence: the Politics of Security in the Gold Coast, 1948 - 1957

Colloquium: Featuring History Students | February 13 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Chase Arnold, PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley Department of History

 Center for African Studies

In 1948, the Gold Coast witnessed a week of rioting sparked by political protest and violent confrontation with police. After the riots, the British and Gold Coast governments implemented numerous political reforms, transitioning the colony toward self-rule and, eventually, independence. The riots also spurred security reform in the Gold Coast. For many in Accra and London, the riots demonstrated...   More >

Translation as Research: Ahmad Diab and Anneka Lenssen in conversation with Saleh al-Jumaie

Lecture | February 13 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Annex, Room 126

 Arts Research Center

Anneka Lenssen (Assistant Professor, Global Modern Art, UC Berkeley) and Ahmad Diab (Assistant Professor of Arabic Literature, UC Berkeley) will speak with Iraqi artist Saleh al-Jumaie (b. al-Suwaira, 1939).

Saleh al-Jumaie Image

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

A Conversation About US Foreign Policy

Lecture | February 14 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Michèle Flournoy, Chief Executive Officer, WestExec

 Institute of International Studies

Michèle Flournoy is CEO of WestExec and is the former CEO of CNAS, an organization she co-founded. She serves on the CNAS Board of Directors.

She served as the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy from February 2009 to February 2012. She was the principal adviser to the Secretary of Defense in the formulation of national security and defense policy, oversight of military plans and operations,...   More >

Thursday, February 15, 2018

A Medieval Gospel Book from Genocide to Restitution: Toros Roslin’s Zeytun Gospels, 1915-2015

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Heghnar Zeitlian Watenpaugh, Associate Professor of Art History, UC Davis

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

The destruction of art, especially religious art, is one of the components of the genocidal phenomenon. Claims for the restitution of surviving religious and artistic objects form part post-conflict processes of survival or reconciliation. The widespread destruction of religious art is a well known dimension of the Armenian Genocide, yet its has rarely attracted critical attention. A rare example...   More >

The Promise of Patriarchy: Women and the Nation of Islam - Ula Taylor

Colloquium | February 15 | 4-7 p.m. | Hearst Field Annex, Fannie Lou Hamer Center

 Ula Taylor

 Fannie Lou Hamer Center

The CRG Thursday Forum presents...

The Promise of Patriarchy: Women and the Nation of Islam
Ula Taylor, African American Studies
Respondents TBA   More >

Barbarians at the Gate: Socialist University, Upward Mobility, and New Intelligentsia in Postwar Poland

Lecture | February 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Agata Zysiak, Visiting Scholar, Institute for Advanced Study

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

After the social revolution brought on by WWII and a new political order, Polish society started on a path of intense reconstruction. A freshly established university in the "Polish Manchester" - Łódź - serves as a case study to examine postwar visions of academia, reforms of higher education, and upward mobility. The socialist university project was designed for the people and was a...   More >

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Distributive politics for an urbanizing continent: A view from Ghana

Colloquium | February 20 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Jeffrey Paller, Assistant Professor, University of San Francisco Department of Politics

 Center for African Studies

Dominant social science approaches to distributive politics focus on elections and social characteristics. Yet these approaches often overlook the historical evolution of local contexts, as well as how certain residents and groups make meaning of specific goods and resources. This is particularly important in cities where land is scarce while property values rise, enabling politicians and leaders...   More >

From Turks to Mongols: David Ayalon’s Vision of the Eurasian Steppe in Islamic History

Lecture | February 20 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Reuven Amitai, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

This lecture seeks to survey and critically engage some of the ideas of David Ayalon (1914-98), and then to see where they might further be developed and applied. Although Ayalon is primarily known as a Mamlukist, and in fact can be called the father of Mamluk studies, he also turned his attention to other weighty matters in the study of Middle Eastern and Islamic history. Among these was the...   More >

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Decolonial and Deimperial Crossings: An Inter-Asian Feminist Genealogy

Lecture | February 21 | 12-2 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Laura Kang, Professor of Gender & Sexuality Studies, English and Comparative Literature, UC Irvine

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Race and Gender, Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

Part of the Feminist Studies and Decolonial Epistemologies Lecture Series

This talk recalls and retraces the inter-Asian network of feminist mobilizations against Japanese sex tourism and U.S. military prostitution in the early 1970s. The work of attending to the discrepant yet linked histories of imperialist sexual violence, military dictatorship, and neocolonial exploitation of Asian women’s...   More >

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Defending Liberty in the Age of Trump: Lessons from the Front: Jefferson Memorial Lecture featuring David Cole

Lecture | February 22 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 David Cole, National Legal Director, American Civil Liberties Union

 Graduate Division

David Cole will present the Jefferson lecture on Thursday, February 22, 2018, entitled "Defending Liberty in the Age of Trump: Lessons from the Front." The lecture will be held in the Chevron Auditorium of International House and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

David Cole

Friday, February 23, 2018

An African American and Latinx History of the United States: An intersectional history of the shared struggle for African American and Latinx civil rights

Lecture | February 23 | 2-4 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Multicultural Community Center

 Paul Ortiz, Associate Professor of History and the Director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, University of Florida

 Office of Undergraduate Research, American Cultures, Center for Race and Gender, Center for Research on Social Change, Department of Ethnic Studies, Department of African American Studies, Multicultural Community Center

Professor Paul Ortiz will speak about his newly published book, An African American and Latinx History of the United States (Beacon Press, 2018). Spanning more than two hundred years, this much anticipated book is a revolutionary, politically charged narrative history, arguing that the “Global South” was crucial to the development of America as we know it. Scholar and activist Paul Ortiz...   More >

Paul Ortiz's newly published book from Beacon Press

Monday, February 26, 2018

Social Change in Post-Khomeini Iran: What to Expect in the Coming Years?

Lecture | February 26 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Mahmood Monshipouri, San Francisco State University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The post-Khomeini era has profoundly changed the socio-political landscape of Iran. Since 1989, the internal dynamics of change in Iran, rooted in a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic, and behavioral factors, have led to a noticeable transition in both societal and governmental structures of power, as well as the way in which many Iranians have come to deal with the...   More >

Transcending Institutions: A Medieval Way to Individual Freedom

Lecture: Sponsored by History Department | February 26 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Gert Melville, Senior Professor of Medieval History and Director of the Research Centre for the Comparative History of Religious Orders, Technische Universität Dresden

 Department of History, Medieval Studies Program, San Francisco Theological Seminary / Graduate Theological Union

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Historicizing the Realist Imagination: Hans Morgenthau in the Early Cold War

Lecture | February 27 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Matthew Specter, Institute of European Studies

 Institute of European Studies

International relations has recently enjoyed a “historical turn,” in which the intellectual biographies of major figures like E.H. Carr and Hans Morgenthau, as well as the origins of central concepts like “internationalism” and “realism” have been reconstructed. Figures from Henry Kissinger to Barack Obama have claimed the mantle of “realist,” but the figure who gave its most distinctive modern...   More >

Fanon in the Algerian War: A Painful Gender Issue

Lecture | February 27 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Seloua Luste-Boulbina

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Department of French

The colony operates with a double standard. Women are both largely excluded from schooling and supposed to be protected by their male fellow citizens. Everything then happens as if, according to the old despotic saying, colonial politics were benevolent toward them: they must be protected from their own. But how? And in what sense? To answer this, Seloua Luste-Boulbina examines the conditions...   More >

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Addressing Gendered and Sexualized Violence in Conflict

Colloquium | March 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

Political Conflict, Gendered Violence and People’s Struggles for Justice in South Asia
Angana Chatterji, Political Conflict, Gender, and People’s Rights Project, Center for Race & Gender

Challenges in Prosecuting Sexual Violence from Nuremberg and Tokyo to the ICC
David Cohen, WSD Handa Center for Human Rights and International Justice, Stanford University

Mosse-Lecture: Can Architecture Be Democratic?: 2nd Annual Mosse-Lecture

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | March 1 | 4:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jan-Werner Mueller, Professor, Political Science, Princeton University

 Martin Jay, Professor, History, UC Berkeley

 Department of German, The Mosse Foundation

Many people have an intuitive sense that the built environment is bound up with politics. The lecture poses the question how we might think more systematically (and normatively) about the relationship between democracy and architecture as well as public spaces as a particular form of the built environment.

Friday, March 2, 2018

The Killing Season

Lecture | March 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Geoffrey Robinson, Professor of History, UCLA

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Prof. Robinson will discuss his new book The Killing Season:
A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66
(Princeton University Press, 2018)

Geoff Robinson

Thursday, March 8, 2018

Teena Purohit | The “Protestant” Impulse in Modern Islamic Thought

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | March 8 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Teena Purohit, Associate Professor of Religion at Boston University

 Abhishek Kaicker, Assistant Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies

A talk by Teena Purohit, Associate Professor of Religion at Boston University

Friday, March 9, 2018

An Intellectual History of Literati Localism, 1100-1500

Colloquium: Featuring History Faculty | March 9 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Peter Bol, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

 Nicolas Tackett, History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Literati communities took form at the local level in the twelfth century and developed various forms of voluntary activism in areas that had once been the province of the state and religious institutions. Some Neo-Confucians encouraged this voluntarism, but generally literati continued to see themselves as members of a national elite even if they lived their lives locally. This case study of...   More >

Monday, March 12, 2018

Annette Yoshiko Reed: Forgetting: the Jewish Past between Rupture and Renewal

Lecture | March 12 | 7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Annette Yoshiko Reed, Professor, New York University

 Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Chair in Jewish Studies, GTU Center for Jewish Studies, Lehrhaus Judaica, Jewish Studies Program at UC Davis, Taube Center for Jewish Studies at Stanford University

2018 Taubman Lecture Series

Lecture 1: Monday, March 12, 7 pm: What Was Lost with the Dead Sea Scrolls

 

  RSVP online

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Transboundary Natures: The Consequences of the Iron Curtain for Landscape

Lecture | March 13 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Astrid M. Eckert, Emory University

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West. The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

This talk investigates the ecological footprint of the Iron Curtain and the consequences of the border regime for landscape and wildlife. It moves beyond the quotidian claim that the Iron Curtain divided ecosystems and landscapes by arguing that the fortifications and all activities that kept them functional became causal – in direct or in mitigated fashion – to changes in the natural environment...   More >

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Annette Yoshiko Reed: Forgetting: the Jewish Past between Rupture and Renewal

Lecture | March 14 | 7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Annette Yoshiko Reed, Professor, New York University

 Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Chair in Jewish Studies, GTU Center for Jewish Studies, Lehrhaus Judaica, Jewish Studies Program at UC Davis, Taube Center for Jewish Studies at Stanford University

2018 Taubman Lecture Series

Lecture 2: Wednesday, March 14, 7 pm: How the Jewishness of Christianity was Forgotten

 

  RSVP online

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Other Materialisms: Black and Indigenous Scholars on Science, Technology, and the Environment

Colloquium | March 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

Toward Indigenous Materialisms: Alaska, Glacier, and Invitation
Jen Smith, Ethnic Studies

Letting the Land Speak: Race and Genetic Reconciliation through Land Gifts in Cameroon
Victoria M. Massie, Anthropology

The Principles of Living in Harmony: Mexica-Anahuaca Approaches to Embodied Knowledge, Pedagogy and Healing
Marcelo Garzo Montalvo, Ethnic Studies

Annette Yoshiko Reed: Forgetting: the Jewish Past between Rupture and Renewal

Lecture | March 15 | 5:30 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Annette Yoshiko Reed, Professor, New York University

 Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Chair in Jewish Studies, GTU Center for Jewish Studies, Lehrhaus Judaica, Jewish Studies Program at UC Davis, Taube Center for Jewish Studies at Stanford University

2018 Taubman Lecture Series

Lecture 1: Monday, March 12, 7 pm: What Was Lost with the Dead Sea Scrolls

Lecture 2: Wednesday, March 14, 7 pm: How the Jewishness of Christianity was Forgotten

Lecture 3: Thursday, March 15, 5:30 pm: Forgetting and Remembering Second Temple Judaism
Lecture followed by reception with unforgettable delectables.

  RSVP online

Characteristically Etruscan: Etruscan and Italic Bronze Production in Context: The Annual Del Chiaro Lecture

Lecture | March 15 | 5:30-8:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Greg Warden, President, Franklin University, Switzerland

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

Friday, March 16, 2018

Sunflowers and Umbrellas: Social Movements, Expressive Practices, and Political Culture in Taiwan and Hong Kong

Conference/Symposium | March 16 | 9 a.m.-7:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Focusing on two important student-led protest movements that took place in 2014 in in Taiwan and Hong Kong, nicknamed “Sunflowers and Umbrellas" respectively, this two-day symposium, with a screening of the film "Yellowing" on Day 2, will attempt to bring new angles to the comparison between Taiwan and Hong Kong...   More >

Misery and Pleasure in the Origins of the Study of Happiness

Colloquium | March 16 | 1:10-2:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Daniel Horowitz, Professor Emeritus, Smith College

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

In December 2017, Oxford University Press published 'Happier? The History of a Cultural Movement That Aspired to Transform America' by Daniel Horowitz, an emeritus professor from Smith College. Focusing on the period from 1940 to 1970, this talk will cover some of the origins of the study of happiness and then go on to suggest some of the key aspects that shaped the field in the last half century.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

When Attachments Fail: Psychiatry, Space, and History in South Africa

Colloquium | March 20 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Stephen McIsaac, PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Center for African Studies

A constitutive part of both colonialism and apartheid in South Africa was the forced spatial extension of black families. A crucial concern was how to ensure black, exploitative labor for resource extraction and infrastructural labor. Today, this spatial legacy of apartheid remains a solidified part of kinship structure, with families largely spit between the space of the urban township and the...   More >

Freedom in the Colombian Rainforests: Bay Area Latin America Forum

Lecture | March 20 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies), Conference Room

 Center for Latin American Studies

The transition from slavery to freedom in the largest region in Spanish America inhabited mostly by black people has been aided by the geography of Colombia’s western rainforests. Access to a diverse environment – the jungle, soils and subsoils, rivers and the ocean – contributed to free people’s subsistence and allowed them to make commodities from nature.

Fishermen cast their nets in Chocó, western Colombia. (Photo by Quimbaya.)

AHMA Colloquium - The Theatrical Guild and Rome

Lecture | March 20 | 4 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Kent Rigsby, Duke University

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

The AHMA Colloquium is a series of informal papers presented in the afternoon in 7205 Dwinelle Hall. It is hosted and organized by graduate students from the Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology Graduate Group.

Friday, March 23, 2018

Berkeley 150 Charter Day Celebration

Special Event | March 23 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. |  Sproul Plaza

 TBA

 UC Berkeley

Don’t miss this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to celebrate 150 years of Berkeley’s extraordinary life. Join us on Charter Day to mark the founding of our university and all it has brought to bear on our own lives, California, and the world. Witness a moving procession of alumni carrying class banners that date back to our beginning. Meet Cal celebrities, from athletes to Nobel laureates. Rev up...   More >

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Islamic Text Circle: Muhammad in the Qur'an

Workshop | April 4 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Asad Ahmed, Department of Near Eastern Studies

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

he Islamic Texts Circle introduces the broader CMES community to important themes in the Islamic tradition via its holy scripture, the Qur’an, and via its long history of exegesis. Participants will gain exposure to the rich and variegated interpretive angles developed in the fourteen-hundred years of Islamic history, so that they may discuss relevant themes in the form of a productive dialogue....   More >

 

  RSVP by calling 5106428208, or by emailing cmes@berkeley.edu

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Bodies of Knowledge: Race, Power, and Pedagogy

Colloquium | April 5 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

(En)Gendering Whiteness: A Historical Analysis of White Womanhood, Colonial Anxieties, and "Tender Violence" in US Schools
Natalee Kēhaulani Bauer, Graduate School of Education

The Latino Male Teacher: Discursive Formations, the Pressure to Perform, and the Possibility of Disidentification
Michael Singh, School of Education

Arthur Dudney | Testing the Limits of Comparatism: The Quarrel of the Ancients and Moderns in Persian and Urdu Literary Culture

Lecture | April 5 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Arthur Dudney, Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Cambridge University

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies; Associate Professor in the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Dr Arthur Dudney, scholar of the history of early modern Persian literary education and lexicography in India.

The Imperial Landscape of Assyria, from the Ground and Above

Lecture | April 5 | 5-7 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Jason Ur, Professor, Harvard University

 Archaeological Research Facility, Near Eastern Studies, Badè Museum

This presentation describes project’s methods and preliminary results, with a particular focus on its use of historical remote sensing sources: declassified intelligence aerial photographs (U2) and satellite imagery (CORONA and HEXAGON) and drone-based aerial imagery.

Bastora Dam

Monday, April 9, 2018

Towards a Subaltern History of the Crusades?

Lecture: Sponsored by History Department | April 9 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Christopher J. Tyerman, Oxford University Professor of the History of the Crusades

 Department of History, Medieval Studies Program

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Reimagining Morocco's Cultural Heritage for the 21st Century

Lecture | April 10 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ashley Miller, Visiting Scholar, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

In July of 2011, King Mohammed VI of Morocco (r.1999-present) endorsed a constitutional referendum that acknowledged his country’s plural identities and histories in an unprecedented way, describing a Moroccan national identity “forged through the convergence of its Arab-Islamic, Amazigh, and Saharan-Hassanic components, nourished and enriched by its African, Andalusian, Hebraic, and...   More >

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Ev'ry Body, This Time: A Sexuality Studies Conference: Hosted by the Center for the Study of Sexual Culture

Conference/Symposium | April 12 – 14, 2018 every day | Sutardja Dai Hall, 250,310

 Center for the Study of Sexual Culture

The conference will feature both panels assembled in response to an open call for abstracts, as well as invited speakers who currently include: Qian Wang, Gemma Romain, Qwo-li Driskill, Amy Sueyoshi, Gloria Wekker, Nayan Shah, Omi'seke Natasha Tinsley, Amber Musser, alongside panels, workshops, and events.

Friday, April 13, 2018

Ev'ry Body, This Time: A Sexuality Studies Conference: Hosted by the Center for the Study of Sexual Culture

Conference/Symposium | April 12 – 14, 2018 every day | Sutardja Dai Hall, 250,310

 Center for the Study of Sexual Culture

The conference will feature both panels assembled in response to an open call for abstracts, as well as invited speakers who currently include: Qian Wang, Gemma Romain, Qwo-li Driskill, Amy Sueyoshi, Gloria Wekker, Nayan Shah, Omi'seke Natasha Tinsley, Amber Musser, alongside panels, workshops, and events.

Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities

Conference/Symposium | April 13 | 1-6 p.m. |  1995 University Avenue, fifth floor

 Map

 Ching Kwan Lee, Sociology, UCLA

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Center for East Asian Studies, Stanford University

Conference continues on Saturday at 10 am.

Initiated in 2010, the annual Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities brings together current graduate students from across the U.S. and around the world to present innovative research on any aspect of modern Chinese cultural production in the humanistic disciplines.

Saturday, April 14, 2018

Ev'ry Body, This Time: A Sexuality Studies Conference: Hosted by the Center for the Study of Sexual Culture

Conference/Symposium | April 12 – 14, 2018 every day | Sutardja Dai Hall, 250,310

 Center for the Study of Sexual Culture

The conference will feature both panels assembled in response to an open call for abstracts, as well as invited speakers who currently include: Qian Wang, Gemma Romain, Qwo-li Driskill, Amy Sueyoshi, Gloria Wekker, Nayan Shah, Omi'seke Natasha Tinsley, Amber Musser, alongside panels, workshops, and events.

Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities

Conference/Symposium | April 14 | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. |  1995 University Avenue, fifth floor

 Map

 Xiao Liu, East Asian Studies, McGill University

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Center for East Asian Studies, Stanford University

Conference begins on Friday at 1 pm.

Initiated in 2010, the annual Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities brings together current graduate students from across the U.S. and around the world to present innovative research on any aspect of modern Chinese cultural production in the humanistic disciplines.

Monday, April 16, 2018

Aleshire Lecture

Lecture | April 16 | 4-6:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Paula Perlman, University of Texas

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

A White Stone for Belfast: One Take on Religious Politics

Lecture | April 17 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Robert Orsi, Professor of Religious Studies and History and Grace Craddock Nagle Chair in Catholic Studies, Northwestern University

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

This lecture asks what “religious” politics might be given the deconstruction of the concept of “religion” that has taken place over the past several decades, which has uncovered its implicit social, legal, and political agendas from early modernity forward. It takes as its starting point an experience Anglican sisters had in Belfast at the height of the troubles, when they attempted to carve out...   More >

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Muslim Spaces, Jewish Pasts: Genealogies of the Split Arab / Jew Figure

Lecture | April 18 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Ella Shohat, Professor, Art & Public Policy and Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies, New York University

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Race and Gender

This lecture will offer a genealogical reading of the gradual splitting of the formerly unified Orientalist Semitic figure into a separate “Arab” and “Jew” and the ramifications of this split for contemporary discourses about Jews and Muslims.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

The Question of Judeo-Arabic: Nation, Partition, and the Linguistic Imaginary: CMES Distinguished Visitor Lecture

Lecture | April 19 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ella Shohat, New York University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Professor Ella Shohat, 2018 CMES Distinguished Visitor, teaches at the departments of Art & Public Policy and Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies at New York University. She has lectured and written extensively on issues having to do with post/colonial and transnational approaches to Cultural studies. Her writing has been translated into diverse languages, including: French, Hebrew, Arabic,...   More >

Friday, April 20, 2018

The Origins of the Chinese Nation: Song China and the Forging of an East Asian World Order

Colloquium: Featuring History Faculty | April 20 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Nicolas Tackett, History, UC Berkeley

 Pheng Cheah, Rhetoric, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In his new book, Tackett proposes that the Northern Song Dynasty (960–1127) witnessed both the maturation of an East Asian inter-state system and the emergence of a new worldview and sense of Chinese identity among educated elites. These developments together had sweeping repercussions for the course of Chinese history, while also demonstrating that there has existed in world history a viable...   More >

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Pax Americana: Sketches For An Undiplomatic History

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | April 26 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Daniel Sargent, Associate Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Institute of International Studies

Daniel J. Sargent is Associate Professor of History, University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of A Superpower Transformed: The Remaking of American Foreign Relations in the 1970s (Oxford University Press, 2015) and co-editor of The Shock of the Global: The International History of the 1970s (Harvard University Press, 2010).

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

History 101 Circus: Undergraduate Research Showcase

Colloquium: Sponsored by History Department: Featuring History Students | May 2 | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Department of History

The 101 Circus is the great annual gathering at which undergraduate history majors present their thesis research. Students will give 10-minute presentations on their research before opening the floor for 5-minute Q&A sessions.

The History 101 seminar is designed to guide students through the capstone experience of undergraduate education as a history major: the researching and writing of a...   More >

Thursday, May 3, 2018

Anne Monius | Rāma and Sītā in a Śaiva Literary Key?: Rethinking the Literary and Religious Orientation of Kampaṉ’s Irāmāvatāram

Lecture | May 3 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Anne E. Monius, Professor of South Asian Religions at Harvard Divinity School

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Anne E. Monius, Professor of South Asian Religions at Harvard Divinity School.

Friday, May 4, 2018

Maritime Asia

Conference/Symposium | May 4 | 2-5 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

The Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Centre for Rising Powers at the University of Cambridge is convening a workshop on “Maritime Asia” with a focus on “the Securitization of the China Seas in the 19th and 20th Centuries.” As China emerges to become a major Asian maritime power in the 21st century, scholars examine...   More >