Upcoming Events

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

The Struggle for Cuba: Race and Empire in the 18th-century Atlantic World

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | February 19 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Elena Schneider

 Center for Latin American Studies

In this talk, Elena Schneider will discuss her recent book The Occupation of Havana: War, Trade, and Slavery in the Atlantic World, as well as the broader theme of the relationship between Anglo-American imperialism and racial struggle in Cuba.

Elena Schneider is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at UC Berkeley.

(Image courtesy of UNC Press.)

Faiz Ahmed | Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires

Lecture | February 19 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Faiz Ahmed, Associate Professor of History, Brown University

 Wali Ahmadi, Associate Professor of Persian Literature, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Urdu Initiative, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Center for British Studies

A talk by Assistant Professor of History at Brown University, Dr. Faiz Ahmed on his new book, Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires.

“my petites madeleines are water canisters” : The Genres, Images, and Intertexts of Bosnia’s Remembered War

Lecture | February 19 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Antje Postema, Lecturer, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Language, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

In Bosnia and Hercegovina, wartime artistic patterns of genre, image, and intertextual reference have set the terms for postwar memory-making. These versatile, enduring patterns also illuminate the reciprocal influence of memory and art in Bosnia from the 1990s to the present.

While wartime authors like Semezdin Mehmedinovic and Ozren Kebo infused the practical, didactic genres of the map and...   More >

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Diego Pirillo: The Refugee-Diplomat: Venice, England, and the Reformation

Lecture | February 20 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Pirillo offers a new history of early modern diplomacy, centered on Italian religious refugees who left Italy in order to forge ties with English and northern European Protestants in the hope of inspiring an Italian Reformation.

The Mechanisms of Direct and Indirect Rule: Colonialism and Economic Development in Africa

Lecture | February 20 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Natalie Letsa, University of Oklahoma

 Center for African Studies

A number of studies have found that British colonialism—specifically its policy of indirect rule—improved economic development relative to the French policy of direct rule. There is less consensus, however, as to why indirect rule would produce better economic outcomes. We argue that indirect rule produced better economic outcomes because it was more likely to decentralize decision-making, which...   More >

Artist and Curator: Silvia Gruner in conversation with Tarek Elhaik

Lecture | February 20 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Annex, Room 126

 Silvia Gruner

 Arts Research Center

Artist & Curator: Silvia Gruner in conversation with Tarek Elhaik
Wednesday, February 20, 2019
5:30-7:30pm
Dwinelle Annex, Room 126

Co-sponsors: Arts Research Center and UCHRI.

2019 Phi Alpha Theta Faculty Dinner

Special Event: History Department Events | February 20 | 6-9 p.m. |  Alumni House

 Department of History

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Migrants in the Making: Invisible Agricultural Child Labor and the Limits of Citizenship, 1938-1965

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez, PhD candidate in History at Columbia University and Visiting Dissertation Research Scholar at the UC Berkeley Latinx Research Center

 Bancroft Library

Farm work is the most hazardous industry for young workers. Yet, despite the implementation of a national child labor ban in 1938, Latinx children continue to toil in fields nationwide with an estimated 200,000-500,000 agricultural child laborers employed each year. Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez has identified the child labor ban's agricultural exemption as the reason for this disjuncture.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

It’s not a NATURAL disaster: looking from past to future through archaeology

Lecture | February 21 | 4:30-6:30 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Margaret Nelson, Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change and Distinguished Sustainability Scholar in the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, Arizona State University

 Archaeological Research Facility

In this talk, Nelson looks at rare climate challenges and human-created vulnerabilities in the long-term history/prehistory of seven areas and evaluates the magnitude of changes to food security and social conditions following extreme climate events. Results of these analyses support the role of human-created vulnerabilities in the occurrence of “disasters” associated with climate extremes.

The Longue Durée of 1989. Regime Change and Everyday Life in East Germany

Lecture | February 21 | 5-6 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Kerstin Brückweh, Centre for Contemporary History, Potsdam (Germany)

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Center for German and European Studies

1989 is often considered a key caesura of the 20th century. By looking at the long-term developments surrounding this historic event Brückweh analyzes the social changes that paved the way for and shaped all three stages: the late phase of the German Democratic Republic, the peaceful revolution, and the transformation that followed. Property, especially real estate, serves as an example to examine...   More >

Kerstin Brückweh

A Truly Prehistoric Archaeology: Sather Lecture Series: A Bronze Age Greek State in Formation

Lecture | February 21 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jack L. Davis, Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology, University of Cincinnati

 Department of Classics

Internationally recognized scholar of Bronze Age Greece offers a series of lectures showing how the archaeological record sheds light on culture and communal life of early Greece.

Friday, February 22, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 22 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus | Note change in date

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

Points of Transition: Ovoo and the Ritual Remaking of Religious, Ecological, and Historical Politics in Inner Asia

Conference/Symposium | February 22 | 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Ovoo, the structures of stones, trees, scarves, skulls, steering wheel covers, and a staggering array of other objects that are ubiquitous across the landscape of contemporary Mongolia, Buryatia, Inner Mongolia, and Qinghai, have long marked sites where ritual, though often highly spontaneous, practices invoke the presence of immanent relations. Built and maintained by various publics, gatherings...   More >

Fighting for a Laugh: East African Entertainers, WWII, and the Global Politics of Comedy

Lecture | February 22 | 3-5 p.m. | 3205 Dwinelle Hall

 Elizabeth Dyer, Visiting Scholar -UC Berkeley, University of Pennsylvania

 Department of History, African History Working Group

Saturday, February 23, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 22 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus | Note change in date

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

A UCBHSSP Un-Conference

Workshop | February 23 | 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

UCBHSSP invites Bay Area educators to participate in an "un-conference." This participate-driven event will allow teachers to share and learn from one another with regard to how they are approaching history instruction at this historical moment - What does this moment demand of us as history teachers?

 This event is directed at educators.

Sunday, February 24, 2019

Colloquium: When Science Entered Modern Art

Panel Discussion | February 24 | 2 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Four leading UC Berkeley faculty members (historian of science Cathryn Carson, mathematician David Eisenbud, astrophysicist Alex Filippenko, and biophysicist James Hurley) are joined by the curator of Dimensionism (Vanja Malloy) for a colloquium offering a fascinating look at how scientific advances of the early to mid-twentieth century were visualized in the media of the day and made their way...   More >

Monday, February 25, 2019

Nationhood in Antiquity. Was There Any Such Thing?: A History Department Colloquium

Colloquium: History Department Events: Featuring History Faculty | February 25 | 12-2 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Erich Gruen, Wood Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley Department of History

 Department of History

Did the idea of nationhood have any significance in the ancient world? Or is it simply the importation and imposition of a concept framed in the modern world? Wherein lay the focal point of allegiance or the sense of collective identity in ancient societies? Is the notion of nation an anachronism, even a deception, when applied to antiquity? The talk does not profess to resolve this large and...   More >

American Sutra: Buddhism and the Incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII

Colloquium | February 25 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Duncan Ryūken Williams, Professor of Religion and East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Southern California

 Mark Blum, Professor, Shinjo Ito Distinguished Chair in Japanese Studies, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley; Carolyn Chen, Associate Professor, Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies, UC Berkeley

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Asian American Studies, Department of Ethnic Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Duncan Ryūken Williams (USC) will discuss his new book “American Sutra” about Buddhism and the WWII Japanese American internment. The fact that the vast majority of Japanese Americans were Buddhist was responsible for why nearly 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry, two-third of whom were American citizens, were targeted for forcible removal from the Pacific coast states and incarcerated in...   More >

 

  Register online

From Exile to Utopia: A Yugoslav Writer’s Return

Lecture | February 25 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Djordje Popovic, PhD candidate in Comparative Literature, University of Minnesota

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

The act of writing assures that exile is never permanent in the mind of the writer even if it is an abiding feature of their reality. Dubravka Ugresic explores this paradox in her essay “The Writer in Exile,” suggesting that what separates the exiled writer from the migrant is the former’s ability to leave her footprints on the cultural map of the world, thus retaining the imprint of her...   More >

Ned Sublette: Kalunga, Kongo Thought in Africa and the Americas

Lecture | February 25 | 4-6 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

 Ned Sublette

 Department of English, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Global Urban Humanities, Institute of European Studies

Ned Sublette is a historian, musicologist, musician, and record producer. His books include *Cuba and its Music: from the First Drums to the Mamba* (2004), *The World that made New Orleans: from Spanish Silver to Congo Square* (2008), *The Year before the Flood: a Story of New Orleans* (2009), and, with Constance Sublette, *The American Slave Coast: a History of the Slave-breeding Industry*...   More >

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Michael Lewis in Conversation on the Art of Writing

Lecture | February 26 | 5 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Reading Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Michael Lewis is the author of The Big Short, Moneyball, The Fifth Risk, and other New York Times bestselling books. He is also an investigative journalist whose articles have appeared in Vanity Fair, the New Yorker, and Slate. Lewis talks with Ramona Naddaff (Rhetoric), director of Art of Writing, about his career and practice as a writer.

Around Arthur Szyk: Berkeley Scholars on Art and History: Poland Reborn: A State Between Democracy and Fascism

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | February 26 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

This talk focuses on the divided Poland that emerged after World War I. On the one hand Poland had to accommodate the demands of generations of freedom fighters, while on the other...   More >

 

  RSVP online or by calling 5106432526

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Maggie Nelson: Songs of Care and Constraint: Townsend Center Una's Lecture 2019

Lecture | February 27 | 5 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Maggie Nelson, a 2016 MacArthur Fellow, is the author of numerous works of nonfiction and poetry, including The Argonauts, an autobiographical account that received the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism. Her Una's Lecture is titled "Songs of Care and Constraint."

Photo of Maggie Nelson

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Sadia Saeed | Politics of Desecularization: Law and the Minority Question in Pakistan

Lecture | February 28 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Sadia Saeed, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, University of San Francisco

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative

Talk by Sociologist Sadia Saeed on her new book that examines how the contentious relationship between Islam, nationalism, and rights of religious minorities has been debated and institutionalized in colonial India and Pakistan.

Speaker Bio
Sadia Saeed is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the...   More >

Project Europe: A New History of the European Union

Lecture | February 28 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 240 Mulford Hall

 Kiran Klaus Patel, Maastricht University

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West, Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Insitute Washington DC, Department of History, Center for German and European Studies

Today, the EU seems to be in an existential crisis. Against this backdrop, the early history of European integration since the 1950s shines all the brighter. But is this an appropriate assessment? Kiran Patel analyzes the concrete effects and results of European integration and what we can learn from the past for our present day, summarizing some of the key findings of his monograph on the topic...   More >

Public University, Public Values

Lecture | February 28 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220

 Maggie Nelson, Professor of English, University of Southern California

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Public University, Public Values is a new series of talks and conversations co-organized by BCSR and the Townsend Center for the Humanities. The series is prompted by the recognition that the current moment of crisis in the liberal democracies of Europe and North America is, among other things, a crisis of value. The “political” focus that has shaped the humanities and much of the social...   More >

Preserving and Conserving Nestor: Sather Lecture Series: A Bronze Age Greek State in Formation

Lecture | February 28 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jack L. Davis, Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology, University of Cincinnati

 Department of Classics

Internationally recognized scholar of Bronze Age Greece offers a series of lectures showing how the archaeological record sheds light on culture and communal life of early Greece.

Friday, March 1, 2019

Art as Critique Conference

Conference/Symposium | March 1 | 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, Townsend Center

 Arts Research Center

Art as Critique Conference
Friday, March 1, 2019
9:00am-6:30pm
Geballe Room, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Featuring Victor Albarracin, Neda Atanasoski, Natalia Brizuela, Tarek Elhaik, Adriana Johnson, Koyo Kouoh, Anneka Lenssen, Leigh Raiford, Kriss Ravetto, Poulomi Saha, and Kalindi Vora.

Dealing With Infinity: Art and the Transformation of the Symbolic Order

Conference/Symposium | March 1 – 2, 2019 every day | 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, Department of German

This is a multi-day, interdisciplinary workshop. Presentations on Friday, March 1st will run from 10:00am-4:30pm, and from 10:00am-2:00pm on Saturday, March 2nd.

A genealogy of the historical forms of imagination or of attentiveness in literature and the other arts traces these forms back to epistemological realms that predate aesthetic experience: to the medieval formation of the soul, to...   More >

Saturday, March 2, 2019

Dealing With Infinity: Art and the Transformation of the Symbolic Order

Conference/Symposium | March 1 – 2, 2019 every day | 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, Department of German

This is a multi-day, interdisciplinary workshop. Presentations on Friday, March 1st will run from 10:00am-4:30pm, and from 10:00am-2:00pm on Saturday, March 2nd.

A genealogy of the historical forms of imagination or of attentiveness in literature and the other arts traces these forms back to epistemological realms that predate aesthetic experience: to the medieval formation of the soul, to...   More >

Monday, March 4, 2019

Captivated by the Mediterranean: Early Modern Spain and the Political Economy of Ransom

Lecture | March 4 | 4-6 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220

 Daniel Hershenzon, Associate Professor of Literature, Cultures, and Languages, University of Connecticut

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, Department of History

This talk explores the entangled experience of Muslim and Christian captives and by extension the connected histories of the Spanish Empire, Morocco, and Ottoman Algiers in the 17th-century. It argues that piracy, captivity, and redemption shaped the Mediterranean as an integrated region—at the social, political, and economic levels. The history that emerges of the captivities of Christians and...   More >

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Displaying International Communism: The Exhibition of Socialist Countries (Moscow, 1958)

Lecture | March 5 | 5:15-6:45 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Matteo Bertelé, Marie Skłodowska-Curie Global Fellow at the University of California Santa Barbara, Universität Hamburg and Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Ca’ Foscari University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

The Exhibition of Socialist Countries, held in the Moscow Manege in 1958, was the first large exhibition ever organized in the socialist hemisphere, with more than two thousand artworks from twelve East-European and Asian countries. Conceived as a socialist response to the Venice Biennale - branded as the main international showcase for “decadent and bourgeois art from capitalist nations” - the...   More >

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Joyce Carol Oates: Hazards of Time Travel

Lecture | March 6 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Oates’s latest novel is the dystopian story of a young woman living in a bleak future dictatorship, who is punished for her transgressions by being sent back in time.

AIA Lecture

Lecture | March 6 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Why Read Descartes's Meditations: Why Read...Series

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | March 7 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jonathan Sheehan, U.C. Berkeley; Kristin Primus, U.C. Berkeley; John Carriero, UCLA; Janet Broughton, U.C. Berkeley

 Renaissance and Early Modern Studies

European Economic Integration and Populism: Foes or Allies?

Lecture | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Dariusz Adamski, University of Wrocław

 Institute of European Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Could it be that one of the most extraordinary experiments in international reconciliation and community-building in the history of mankind – European integration after World War II – has contributed to what European Commission President Juncker once dubbed “galloping populism”? Seeking an answer to this question, Dariusz Adamski will dissect the nature of the major economic policies of the...   More >

Dariusz Adamski

Hegemonies of Language and Their Discontents: The Southwest North American Region Since 1540

Colloquium | March 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Carlos G. Vélez-Ibáñez, ASU Regents' Professor; Presidential Motorola Professor of Neighborhood Revitalization; Founding Director Emeritus, School of Transborder Studies; Professor, School of Human Evolution and Social Change; Emeritus Professor of Anthropology of the University, University of Arizona

 Center for Native American Issues Research on

Spanish and English have fought a centuries-long battle for dominance in the Southwest North American Region, commonly known as the U.S.-Mexico transborder region. Covering the time period of 1540 to the present, the book provides a deep and broad understanding of the contradictory methods of establishing language supremacy and details the linguistic and cultural processes used by penetrating...   More >

Critical Public Theology: How to Use and Not to Use the Bible in Contemporary Public Issues

Lecture | March 7 | 5-7 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall | Note change in location

 Konrad Schmid, Professor of Old Testament Science and Early Jewish Religious History, University of Zürich

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

The Bible sometimes plays a major role in current, political discourses, especially in the United States. As a project, public theology supports efforts to let the Bible speak to contemporary, public concerns. But using the Bible in this way involves many potential traps. How can a 2000 year old book provide guidance for social and political challenges? Should it do so at all? This lecture argues...   More >

Friday, March 8, 2019

The Specter of Communism: Imperial Security and Anti-Colonial Activism in the Gold Coast, 1948 - 1951

Lecture | March 8 | 3-5 p.m. | 3205 Dwinelle Hall

 Chase Arnold, PhD Candidate, University of California, Berkeley

 Department of History, African History Working Group

Monday, March 11, 2019

Eric Karpeles in Conversation with Robert Hass: Józef Czapski: A Good Man in Bad Times

Special Event | March 11 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Eric Karpeles, author of Almost Nothing: The 20th-Century Art and Life of Józef Czapski, is a Fellow of the Czesław Miłosz Institute at Claremont-McKenna College. Karpeles has received wide acclaim for bringing public attention to Józef Czapski, a figure who was deeply engaged in the fight against totalitarianism while cultivating a nearly monastic practice as a painter. Karpeles is the...   More >

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Dockworker Power: Race and Activism in Durban and the San Francisco Bay Area

Presentation: History Department Events | March 12 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Dr. Peter Cole

 American Cultures

Dr. Peter Cole discusses his highly anticipated book - Dockworker Power. Often missed in commentary on today's globalizing economy, workers in the world’s ports can harness their role, at a strategic choke point, to promote their labor rights and social justice causes. Cole brings such overlooked experiences to light in an eye-opening comparative study of Durban, South Africa, and the San...   More >

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Anthony Long: How to Be Free: An Ancient Guide to the Stoic Life

Lecture | March 13 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Born a slave, the ancient Roman Stoic philosopher Epictetus taught that mental freedom is supreme, since it can liberate one anywhere, even in a prison. Long presents a new edition of Epictetus’s famed handbook on Stoicism.

What’s Theology Got to Do with It? An Eighteenth-Century Chinese Emperor Debating Religions and Christianity

Lecture | March 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Eugenio Menegon, Associate Professor of Chinese History, Boston University; Collaborative Scholar, Institute for Advanced Jesuit Studies, Boston College

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

In his Lettres chinoises, indiennes et tartares, Voltaire republished “a note by the good Kangxi Emperor to the Peking Jesuits” as follows: “The emperor is surprised to see you so stubborn in your ideas. Why would you worry so much about a world where you have not been yet? Enjoy the present. Your God must be pained by your preoccupations...   More >

To the Academy: A Lecture-Demonstration by Third Space Performance Lab

Performing Arts - Theater | March 13 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Bancroft Studio (2401 Bancroft)

 Shanti Pillai; Marc Gomes, Third Space Performance Lab

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, Asian American Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies, Institute of International Studies Faculty Working Group on Gender and the Transpacific, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Race and Gender, Department of History of Art

Two performers of unusual talents rehearse how they will delight and confound a group of earnest scholars. Intent on conjuring the colonial object of inquiry who refuses to cooperate and the privileged angst of the postcolonial, diasporic intellectual, the performers grapple—literally—with the gendered, raced, and sexual assumptions that construct knowledge. Multiple performance codes intersect...   More >

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Priya Moorjani | Reconstructing South Asian Population History using Genetic Data

Lecture | March 14 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Priya Moorjani, Assistant Professor, Department of Molecular & Cell Biology, UC Berkeley

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Center for Computational Biology, Population Center, Population Science, Department of Demography

Talk by molecular biologist and geneticist, Professor Priya Moorjani.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Defining Roles. Representations of Lumumba and his Independence Speech in Congolese and Belgian Literature

Lecture | March 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Lieselot De Taeye, Institute of European Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, Center for African Studies

On June 30th 1960, Congo declared its independence from Belgium. In his speech at the ceremony, the Belgian King Baudouin applauded the work of his countrymen during the colonial period, calling his great-granduncle Leopold II, who was responsible for the death of approximately ten million Congolese people, a ‘genius’. Patrice Lumumba, the first Congolese Prime Minister, gave a now-famous speech...   More >

Lieselot De Taeye

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Around Arthur Szyk: Berkeley Scholars on Art and History: Visual Judaica: Jewish Icons and Collecting Patterns in the early 20th century

Lecture | March 19 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

The highly decorative works of Arthur Szyk contain key Jewish visual elements such as the Lion of Judah, the dove, and the seven spices mentioned in the bible as typical of the Land of Israel. These themes are repeated in Szyk’s oeuvre throughout his life and can be found in his early pieces ("Book of Esther," 1925) as well as in later ones ("Pathways Through the Bible," 1946). In this talk, we...   More >

 

  RSVP online or by calling 5106432526

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Mary Ann Smart: Waiting for Verdi: Opera and Political Opinion in Nineteenth-Century Italy, 1815-1848

Lecture | March 20 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Smart explores how nineteenth-century Italian opera sparked political change by making the newly engaged spectator in the opera house into an actor on the political stage.

The Etruscans Outside the Box: Ancient and Modern Tomb Biographies

Lecture | March 20 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Lisa Pieraccini, History of Art, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

This presentation explores three different examples of Etruscan tomb biographies literally “outside the box” with new evidence of prestige items, new discoveries of Etruscan tomb groups, as well how the Etruscans were appropriated at the turn of the 20th century.

Monday, April 1, 2019

Lecture by Shirley Thompson: Race, Property, and Belonging in Creole New Orleans

Lecture | April 1 | 3-5:15 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

 Shirley Thompson, Associate Professor, Department of American Studies, UT Austin

 Department of English

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Jorge Flores | Unwanted Neighbors: The Mughals, the Portuguese, and their Frontier Zones

Lecture | April 2 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Jorge Flores, Professor of Early Modern Global History, Department of History and Civilization, European University Institute, Florence

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

In December 1572 the Mughal emperor Akbar arrived in the port city of Khambayat. Having been raised in distant Kabul, Akbar had never in his thirty years been to the Ocean. Presumably anxious with the news about the Mughal military campaign in Gujarat, several Portuguese merchants in Khambayat rushed to Akbar’s presence. This encounter marked the beginning of a long, complex, and unequal...   More >

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Diverging destinies? Changing family structures and inequality of opportunity in the United States: A Brown Bag Talk

Colloquium | April 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 2232 Piedmont, Seminar Room

 Diederik Boertien, Researcher, Centre for Demographic Studies, University of Barcelona

 Population Science, Department of Demography

A lunch time talk and discussion session, featuring visiting and local scholars presenting their research on a wide range of topics of interest to demography.

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Berkeley Lecture on Religious Tolerance

Lecture | April 10 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220

 Jan Assman, Professor Emeritus, Egyptology Institute, University of Heidelberg and the Department of History and Sociology, University of Konstanz

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Lecture details are forthcoming.

Jan Assman is Professor Emeritus, Egyptology Institute, University of Heidelberg and the Department of History and Sociology, University of Konstanz. His English-language books include Moses the Egyptian (1997), The Search for God in Ancient Egypt (2002), Death and Salvation in Ancient Egypt (2006), and The Price of Monotheism...   More >

Friday, April 12, 2019

A Primer for Teaching African History

Lecture: History Department Events | April 12 | 3-5 p.m. | 3205 Dwinelle Hall

 Trevor Getz, Professor, San Francisco State University

 Department of History, African History Working Group

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Timothy Hampton: Bob Dylan's Poetics: How the Songs Work

Lecture | April 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Hampton’s close examination of Bob Dylan's songs locates the artist’s transgressive style within a long history of modern (and modernist) art.

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Cherokees and Choctaws Among the Miwok and Yokuts: Legacies of Cultural Blending and Intertribal Relations in Nineteenth Century California

Lecture | April 18 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Andrew Shaler, PhD candidate in History, UC Riverside

 Bancroft Library

The California Gold Rush is remembered for the thousands of immigrants who traversed continents and oceans for a chance to gain quick wealth. Lost in these narratives are the rich histories of Native American emigrants who made the same journey to California’s Gold Country beginning in 1849. Andrew Shaler considers the legacies of these Native emigrants.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

Diversity and Power in Global Christian Communities

Lecture | April 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

Candace Lukasik, PhD Candidate in Anthropology

Hannah Waits, PhD Candidate in American History

“ ‘Global Mission’: Nazi Foreign Cultural Policy and the Goethe Society in Weimar”

Lecture | April 18 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Department of German

Bio:
W. Daniel Wilson was professor of German at Berkeley from 1983 to 2005 and departmental chair for four years; he is now professor of German at Royal Holloway, University of London. He has published widely in eighteenth-century literature, culture, and politics, particularly on political, gender and sexuality in Goethe. His most recent books are Goethe Männer Knaben: Ansichten zur...   More >

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Race, Place, and Other Things for the Taking: The Buffalo Soldiers and Allensworth, California

Lecture | April 24 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Jarre Hamilton, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

In 1908, Lieutenant Colonel Allen Allensworth (and chaplain to the 24th infantry regiment of the Buffalo Soldiers) founded the town of Allensworth, California. This talk will discuss the daily, lived experiences of both the civilian population and the enlisted military men who existed in these varying racialized landscapes and the archaeological material culture they have left behind.

Les Blank Lecture: Susana de Sousa Dias

Lecture | April 24 | 7-8:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Susana de Sousa Dias

 Arts Research Center

Les Blank Lecture: Susana de Sousa Dias
Wednesday, April 24, 2019
7:00pm
Berkeley Art Museum Pacific Film Archive

Susana de Sousa Dias is an award-winning Portuguese independent filmmaker.

Susana de Sousa Dias

Thursday, April 25, 2019

"Doing" Political Theology Today: Promises and Pitfalls

Lecture | April 25 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Ruth Marshall, Associate Professor of Religion & Political Science, University of Toronto

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Lecture details forthcoming.

Ruth Marshall received her DPhil in Politics from Oxford University, and joined both the Department for the Study of Religion and Political Science in 2008, after having spent 8 years living and researching in West Africa. She is the author of Political Spiritualities: The Pentecostal Revolution in Nigeria (U. Chicago Press, 2009) and numerous scholarly...   More >

Monday, April 29, 2019

New Archaeology Discoveries in Asia: Book Launch for "Handbook of East and Southeast Asian Archaeology"

Panel Discussion | April 29 | 3-5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Peter V. Lape, Professor of Anthropology, University of Washington; John W. Olsen, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Arizona

 Junko Habu, Professor of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This event celebrates the publication of the "Handbook of East and Southeast Asian Archaeology" with two editors of this volume, both of whom are prominent scholars in the field of Asian archaeology: Prof. John W. Olsen (University of Arizona) and Prof. Peter V. Lape (University of Washington).

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Khursheed Mahmood Kasuri | Pakistan-India Relations: The Way Forward

Lecture | May 2 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Khurshid Mahmud Kasuri, Pakistani politician, Writer, & (former) Minister of Foreign Affairs of Pakistan

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, Pakistan America Institute

Talk by Khursheed Mahmood Kasuri, former foreign minister for Pakistan and author of "Neither a Hawk Nor a Dove: An insider's account of Pakistan's Foreign Policy."

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Bancroft Library Roundtable: "Loans for the Little Fellow": Credit, Crisis, and Recovery in the Great Depression

Lecture | May 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Sarah Quincy, PhD candidate in Economics at UC Davis

 Bancroft Library

Both lauded as “the great bank of the West” and reviled as a “huge financial octopus,” the Bank of America introduced several modern banking practices during the Great Depression, which played an integral role in California’s development. Sarah Quincy will discuss her research on the impacts of this unusual bank on the state’s economy during the 1920s and 1930s.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

Ongoing Events

Facing West 1: Camera Portraits from the Bancroft Collection

Exhibit - Photography | November 9, 2018 – March 15, 2019 every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Bancroft Library

 Bancroft Library

The first part of a double exhibition celebrating the tenth anniversary of the renewed Bancroft Library and its gallery, Facing West 1 presents a cavalcade of individuals who made, and continue to make, California and the American West. These camera portraits highlight the communities and peoples of Hubert Howe Bancroft’s original collecting region, which extended from the Rockies to the Pacific...   More >

Pièces de Résistance: Echoes of Judaea Capta From Ancient Coins to Modern Art

Exhibit - Multimedia | January 29 – June 28, 2019 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

This exhibition will be continuing in Spring 2019.

Notions of resistance, alongside fears and realities of oppression, resound throughout Jewish history. As a minority, Jews express their political aspirations, ideals of heroism, and yearnings of retaliation and redemption in their rituals, art, and everyday life.

Centering on coins in The Magnes Collection, this exhibition explores how...   More >

Project “Holy Land”: Yaakov Benor-Kalter’s Photographs of British Mandate Palestine, 1923-1940

Exhibit - Photography | January 29 – June 28, 2019 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4:05 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

For nearly two decades, Yaakov (Jacob) Benor-Kalter (1897-1969) traversed the Old City of Jerusalem, documenting renowned historical monuments, ambiguous subjects in familiar alleyways, and scores of “new Jews” building a new homeland. Benor-Kalter’s photographs smoothly oscillate between two worlds, and two Holy Lands, with one lens.

After immigrating from Poland to the British Mandate of...   More >