Upcoming Events

Friday, October 19, 2018

Why Read Montaigne’s Essays?: “Why Read…? Series”

Lecture | October 19 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Antónia Szabari, University of Southern California; Carla Freccero, UC Santa Cruz; Diego Pirillo, UC Berkeley; Jane O. Newman, U.C. Irvine

 Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, D.E.

Round-table and discussion

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Indivisible Tohono: Resisting the US-Mexico Border and Militarization on Tohono O’odham Land Through Education and Civic Engagement

Panel Discussion | October 23 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall

 April Ignacio, Indivisible Tohono O'odham; Gabriella Cazares-Kelly, Indivisible Tohono O'odham; Annamarie Stevens, Indivisible Tohono O'odham

 Fantasia Painter, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley

 Center for Native American Issues Research on, Native/Immigrant/Refugee Crossings Research Initiative

Indivisible Tohono is a grassroots organization working on issues that affect the Tohono O'odham Nation and those that affect the Natives within the state of Arizona and federally. Tohono O’odham is a federally recognized tribe split by the US-Mexico border in what is today southern Arizona, and it has become well known for its recent refusal to allow Trump’s Wall on Tohono O’odham land. This...   More >

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Hertha Sweet Wong: Picturing Identity: Contemporary American Autobiography in Image and Text

Lecture | October 24 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Wong explores the intersection of writing and visual art in the autobiographical work of Art Spiegelman, Faith Ringgold, Leslie Marmon Silko, and other American writers-artists who experiment with hybrid forms of self-narration.

From Dissertation to Book: Navigating the Publication Process

Workshop | October 24 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall

 Library

Hear from a panel of experts - an acquisitions editor, a first-time author, and an author rights expert - about the process of turning your dissertation into a book. You’ll come away from this panel discussion with practical advice about revising your dissertation, writing a book proposal, approaching editors, signing your first contract, and navigating the peer review and...   More >

 

  RSVP online

The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption

Colloquium | October 24 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 117, Academic Innovation Studio

 Nikki Jones, Associate Professor of African American Studies, UC Berkeley

 Clarence Ford, Masters Candidate, Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, Center for the Study of Law and Society, American Cultures, Berkeley Underground Scholars

The discussion will be based on Dr. Jones's new book, The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption, as centers around the topic of the struggles faced by formerly incarcerated black men trying to fit back into their communities and the obstacles they face when attempting to integrate into greater society.

Thursday, October 25, 2018

Getting the Facts on Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment: What are the limits of personal narratives shared online—and what do we miss in survey data?

Panel Discussion | October 25 | 4-6 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall

 Edward Wasserman, Professor of Journalism and Dean of the Graduate School of Journalism, UC Berkeley School of Journalism; Lisa García Bedolla, Professor of Education, Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies, UC Berkeley Graduate School of Education; Aya de Leon, Author, Poet, June Jordan’s Poetry for the People; Billy Curtis, Director, Gender Equity Resource Center

 Laura Nelson, Associate Professor and Chair of Gender & Women's Studies, UC Berkeley Department of Gender & Women's Studies

 Social Science Matrix, Special Faculty Advisor to the Chancellor on SVSH

Please join us for a panel discussion and Q&A focused on the limits of what can be learned about sexual violence and harassment from personal narratives that are shared online, as well as the question of is missed in survey data related to sexual violence and harassment.

Anatomy of a Genocide: The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz

Lecture | October 25 | 5:15-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Omer Bartov, John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History, Brown University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Center for Jewish Studies

Omer Bartov is the John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History at Brown University. He is the author of Anatomy of a Genocide: The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz, along with several other well-respected scholarly works on the Holocaust and genocide, including Hitler’s Army, Germany’s War and the Holocaust: Disputed Histories and Erased: Vanishing Traces of...   More >

 

  RSVP online

Friday, October 26, 2018

2018 Human Rights Fellowship Conference

Conference/Symposium | October 26 | 12-5 p.m. | 215 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Heba Alnajada; Safa Ansari-Bayegan; Pieter Baker; Karin Bashir; Tania Docarmo; Derrika Hunt; Seigi Karasaki; Jennifer Jones; Bernadette Lim; Sammy Mehtar; Sophie Perl; Raed Rafei; Olivia Rempel; Aleksandra Simonova; Mavis Siu; Yasemin Taskin-Alp; Levi Vonk

 Human Rights Center

Our 2018 Fellows have returned from their summer fieldwork and will discuss pressing human rights topics at our annual Human Rights Fellowship Conference. Enjoy brief TED-style talks and panel
discussions related to racial injustice and the death penalty, child
labor, the mental health effects of separating families at the
U.S./Mexico border as well as inspirational lessons from human rights...   More >

 

  RSVP online

Islamic Texts Circle: Same-Sex Relations in the Qur'an

Workshop | October 26 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Asad Q. Ahmed, Near Eastern Studies

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The Islamic Texts Circle introduces the broader CMES community to important themes in the Islamic tradition via its holy scripture, the Qur’an, and via its long history of exegesis. Participants will gain exposure to the rich and variegated interpretive angles developed in the fourteen-hundred years of Islamic history, so that they may discuss relevant themes in the form of a productive dialogue....   More >

Managing and Maximizing Your Scholarly Impact

Workshop | October 26 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall

 Library

This workshop will provide you with practical strategies and tips for promoting your scholarship, increasing your citations, and monitoring your success. You’ll also learn how to understand metrics, use scholarly networking tools, evaluate journals and publishing options, and take advantage of funding opportunities for Open Access scholarship.

 

  RSVP online

"Special Talent in the Chest, Special Eyes under the Brows": Jīn Shèngtàn’s (1608-1661) Discursion on Travel in his Commentary to The Story of the Western Wing: “胸中別才、眉下別眼”:金聖嘆《西廂記》漫筆遊記與評點

Colloquium | October 26 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Stephen H. West, Foundation Professor of Chinese; Head of East and Southeast Asian Section, Arizona State University

 Sophie Volpp, Associate Professor, Comparative Literature; EALC, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

An eccentric commentary to the famous drama The Story of the Western Wing (西廂記) may seem like strange place to begin a discussion about travel. But Jīn Shèngtàn's (金聖嘆) commentarial exegeses are in fact noted for their discursive nature.

Sunday, October 28, 2018

AIA - Ellen and Charles S. La Follette Lecture - Murder in the Agora: Violent Death and Illicit Burial in Ancient Athens

Lecture | October 28 | 2 p.m. | 142 Dwinelle Hall

 Maria Liston, Department of Anthropology, University of Waterloo

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Violent crime and homicides are not a problem limited to the modern world alone, and the ancient city of Athens experienced similar events throughout antiquity. A recent study of all the human skeletons found in wells excavated by the American Excavations in the Athenian Agora has found that many of these individuals died violently. Some of the dead, including women and children, appear to be...   More >

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Metropolis in Ruins. Berlin's Interval of Time, 1943-1947: Global Urban Humanities Fall 2018 Colloquium

Colloquium: Featuring History Faculty | October 30 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 170 Wurster Hall

 Global Urban Humanities

"Metropolis in Ruins. Berlin's Interval of Time, 1943-1947"
Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann
Associate Professor of History
Tuesday, October 30, 12-1:30pm
Wurster 170

Part of the Global Urban Humanities Colloquium The City and Its People, Rhetoric 198-3 / ARCH 198-2, Rhetoric 244A / ARCH 298-2

With the modern metropolis emerges also the anticipation of urban ruination. However, what if the...   More >

Bernard Moses Memorial Lectures featuring Wendy Brown: Neoliberalism’s Scorpion Tail: Markets and Morals Where Democracy Once Was

Lecture | October 30 | 4:10 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Wendy Brown, Class of 1936 First Chair Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley

 Graduate Division

Wendy Brown will present the Bernard Moses Memorial Lecture on Tuesday, October 30, 2018 titled "Neoliberalism’s Scorpion Tail: Markets and Morals Where Democracy Once Was." The lecture is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | October 31 | 4-5 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for...   More >

Thursday, November 1, 2018

On Routes of Slavery: The African Cultural Diaspora with Ahmad Sikainga

Lecture | November 1 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Arts + Design

In collaboration with Cal Performances and the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, this lecture, presented by Ahmad Sikainga, will discuss the African Diaspora in relation to the performance The Routes of Slavery (1444–1888). Currently at the Department of History at the Ohio State University, Sikainga’s academic interests embrace the study of Africa, the African Diaspora, and the...   More >

The Nicaraguan Crisis and the Battle over History

Lecture | November 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. |  2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies)

 Myrna Santiago, UC Berkeley

 Center for Latin American Studies

Professor Myrna Santiago argues that the crisis in Nicaragua is not only a conflict over the fate of the Ortega-Murillo presidency, but also over the memory of the Sandinista Revolution and the country's political history. Nicaraguans’ perspectives on the presidential couple depends, at heart, on how they interpret the history and legacy of the Sandinista Revolution. In the process, various...   More >

Men outside the Museo de la Revolución in Léon, Nicaragua. (Photo by Alexander Schimmick.)

Saturday, November 3, 2018

Medieval Africa? Re-thinking Early African History in Comparative Perspectives

Conference/Symposium: History Department Events | November 3 | 10:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. |  Alumni House

 Michael Gomez, New York University; Ann B. Stahl, University of Victoria

 Middle Ages in the Wider World

“Medieval Africa? Re-thinking early African history in comparative perspectives,” the fourth conference in The Middle Ages in the Wider World project, will take place on Saturday, November 3, 2018 in the Alumni House on the UC Berkeley campus. Keynote speakers will be Michael Gomez (New York University) and Ann B. Stahl (University of Victoria). A complete program is attached below.

 

  RSVP online

Monday, November 5, 2018

Petroleum Powered: Resources and the Transnational Foundations of China’s Far West

Colloquium | November 5 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Judd Kinzley, Associate Professor of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 You-tien Hsing, Professor and Pamela P. Fong Family Distinguished Chair in China Studies, University of California, Berkeley

 Li Ka-Shing Foundation Program in Modern Chinese History at Berkeley, Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This talk will focus on the central role that natural resources played in shaping Chinese state power and authority in China's far western province of Xinjiang. Based on my recently published book, Natural Resources and the New Frontier: Constructing Modern China’s Borderlands, my talk will highlight the often overlooked role played by an assortment of Chinese and Soviet state agents, as well as...   More >

The Western and Questions of Indigeneity, Race and Violence in the American and Japanese Frontiers or, Two Unforgivens

Colloquium | November 5 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Andrew Barshay, Professor, UC Berkeley

 Takashi Fujitani, Professor, University of Toronto

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

This presentation juxtaposes Clint Eastwood’s critically acclaimed Unforgiven (1992) against Lee Sang-il’s “remake” (Yurusarezaru mono, 2013) of the original as a method for recasting the histories of modern Japan and the U.S. as comparable and coeval settler colonial empires. The speaker will work through the insights and absences in these films to piece together a historical...   More >

Eric Calderwood: Colonial al-Andalus: Spain and the Making of Modern Moroccan Culture in Conversation with Professors Emily Gottreich (History) and Nasser Meerkhan (Near Eastern Studies)

Panel Discussion: Featuring History Faculty | November 5 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Eric Calderwood, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Drawing on a rich archive of Spanish, Arabic, French, and Catalan sources—including literature, historiography, journalism, political speeches, schoolbooks, tourist brochures, and visual arts—Calderwood reconstructs the varied political career of convivencia and al-Andalus, showing how shared pasts become raw material for divergent contemporary ideologies, including Spanish fascism and Moroccan...   More >

Avenali Lecture: Todd Gitlin: The Other 1968s: Counterrevolution, Communism and Desublimation

Lecture | November 5 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

In his exploration of a watershed political year, Professor of journalism and sociology at Columbia University Todd Gitlin unearths a "thrust toward retrogression" that stands in stark contrast to the popular image of 1968 as a politically progressive moment.

Todd Gitlin Photo by Edwin Tse

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Cold War Ruins: Transpacific Critique of American Jusice and Japanese War Crimes

Colloquium | November 6 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Lisa Yoneyama, University of Toronto

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

The U.S.-led post-conflict transitional justice in the Asia-Pacific War’s aftermath has not only rendered certain violences illegible and unredressable. It also left many colonial legacies intact. In Cold War Ruins: Transpacific Critique of American Justice and Japanese War Crimes I argued that, much more than products of the East Asian state policies capitalizing on the anti-Japanese...   More >

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Anne Nesbet: The Orphan Band of Springdale

Lecture | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Nesbet’s historical novel for younger readers takes place during World War II in Springdale, Maine. It tells the story of eleven-year-old Gusta, who is sent to live in an orphanage run by her grandmother after her labor-organizer father is forced to flee the country.

Remembering Queen Mary: Heritage Conservation of Free Blacks on St. Croix, U.S.V.I.

Lecture | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 William White, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

This talk explores the ways positionality plays a central role in the way heritage conservation is practiced by black Crucians and white Danish scholars.

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Rock and Rule: Popular Music in Cold War Poland and East Germany

Lecture | November 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Kyrill Kunakhovich, Assistant Professor, Corcoran Department of History, University of Virginia

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

We often hear that rock and roll helped bring down communist regimes, but they themselves believed that it could help their cause. For much of the Cold War, communist states taught rock in schools, organized popular music festivals, and held singing competitions on TV. However, things did not always go as planned. This talk considers what rock looked like on the other side of the Iron Curtain,...   More >

AHMA Colloquium - Tools for Georeferencing and Preserving the Ancient Mediterranean

Lecture | November 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Sarah Bond, University of Iowa

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

This paper is part of a larger lecture series entitled "Digital Humanities and the Ancient World." The events are co-sponsored by the AHMA Colloquium and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Imperial Powers: The Roles of Deputies, Substitutes, the Sun God, and the King in the Assyrian Empire

Lecture | November 8 | 7:30-8:30 p.m. | 155 Kroeber Hall

 Mikko Luukko, University of Helsinki

 Near Eastern Studies, The Assyrian Heritage Fund

Dr. Luukko will consider the importance of deputies and substitutes, and the relationship between the sun god, who is the divine judge, and the Assyrian king, the supreme judge on earth. This lecture will offer a new interpretation of the nature of and interconnections between the powers of the Assyrian empire. Mikko Luukko (PhD, University of Helsinki 2004) studied Assyriology, Semitics, and...   More >

Friday, November 9, 2018

TARTUFFE: a modern take on Molière’s classic comedy, Nov. 9-18: Translated into English verse by Richard Wilbur

Performing Arts - Theater | November 9 – 10, 2018 every day | 8-9:30 p.m. |  Zellerbach Playhouse

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies

Initially censored following its premiere in 1664, TARTUFFE is a bold work that is decidedly relevant today. Set in present-day Los Angeles, TARTUFFE is the story of a con man disguised as a pious spiritual leader who wheedles his way into the home of a gullible, affluent patriarch in the midst of a mid-life crisis — promptly setting the household topsy turvy!

 $13 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: online in advance, $15 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: at the door (ID required), $18 General Admission: $18 online in advance, $20 General Admission: at the door

  Buy tickets online

Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies Department presents TARTUFFE: Molière’s classic comedy, Nov. 9-18

Saturday, November 10, 2018

TARTUFFE: a modern take on Molière’s classic comedy, Nov. 9-18: Translated into English verse by Richard Wilbur

Performing Arts - Theater | November 9 – 10, 2018 every day | 8-9:30 p.m. |  Zellerbach Playhouse

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies

Initially censored following its premiere in 1664, TARTUFFE is a bold work that is decidedly relevant today. Set in present-day Los Angeles, TARTUFFE is the story of a con man disguised as a pious spiritual leader who wheedles his way into the home of a gullible, affluent patriarch in the midst of a mid-life crisis — promptly setting the household topsy turvy!

 $13 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: online in advance, $15 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: at the door (ID required), $18 General Admission: $18 online in advance, $20 General Admission: at the door

  Buy tickets online

Sunday, November 11, 2018

TARTUFFE: a modern take on Molière’s classic comedy, Nov. 9-18: Translated into English verse by Richard Wilbur

Performing Arts - Theater | November 11 – 18, 2018 every Sunday | 2-3:30 p.m. |  Zellerbach Playhouse

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies

Initially censored following its premiere in 1664, TARTUFFE is a bold work that is decidedly relevant today. Set in present-day Los Angeles, TARTUFFE is the story of a con man disguised as a pious spiritual leader who wheedles his way into the home of a gullible, affluent patriarch in the midst of a mid-life crisis — promptly setting the household topsy turvy!

 $13 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: online in advance, $15 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: at the door (ID required), $18 General Admission: $18 online in advance, $20 General Admission: at the door

  Buy tickets online

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Earth Writing: ISAS Faculty Workshop led by Prof. Sharad Chari

Workshop | November 13 | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Lenore Manderson, Public Health and Medical Anthropology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Sumathi Ramaswamy, James B. Duke Professor of History and International Comparative Studies, Duke University; Amita Baviskar, Sociology, Institute of Economic Growth, New Delhi; Kath Weston, Anthropology, University of Virginia; Geeta Patel, Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Virginia

 Sharad Chari, Geography, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Department of Geography, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Alan Dundes Distinguished Chair in Folklore

In our time of unprecedented instrumentalization and transformation of earthly and worldly processes, from the scale of the body to the planet, the Earth-Writing Symposium returns to the question of ‘geography’ as the praxis of ‘Earth-writing.’ Attention to the ‘graphia’ in ‘geography’ points us to a variety of forms of writing or inscription with, through or alongside material, earthly or...   More >

Rewriting History in the Age of #MeToo

Lecture: History Department Events | November 13 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Amy Stanley, Associate Professor of History, Northwestern University

 Department of History, Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Department of History Committee on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (CEDI), History Graduate Association (HGA)

The #MeToo movement is now over a year old, but over the past few weeks its stakes have become increasingly clear, not only in American culture and politics but also in many of our intellectual lives as historians. This talk considers how the rallying call “believe women” challenges our epistemology and might lead us to a different approach to our evidence. The sources are drawn from an early...   More >

Twentieth-Century Anti-Utopianism and its West German Antidote

Lecture | November 13 | 5 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Jennifer Allen, Yale University

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West, the Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

This talk picks up a melancholic thread in assessments of the end of the Cold War, when the triumph of liberal democracy and capitalism over “really existing socialism” led academics and public intellectuals to pronounce the end of utopian ambitions. Margaret Thatcher captured this idea in her claim that “there is no alternative.” Some West Germans, however, resisted this logic. Facing the...   More >

Celebrating Poland: 100 Years of Independence

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | November 13 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Graduate Theological Union, Dinner Board Room

 John Connelly, Professor, History, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), SF-Krakow Sister City Association, Taube Philanthropies, Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies, Graduate Theological Union

This talk will consider the meanings and consequences of the reemergence of a Polish state in 1918 in new boundaries, after 125 years of rule by foreign powers. The event is celebrated as liberation, but what did it mean for ethnic minorities like Jews and Ukrainians? What did it mean for women? That Poland lasted barely twenty years before being overwhelmed by its totalitarian neighbors. Could...   More >

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Daniel Boyarin: Judaism: The Genealogy of a Modern Notion

Lecture | November 14 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Boyarin argues that the very concept of a religion of “Judaism” is an invention of the Christian church that was adopted by Jews only with the coming of modernity and the spread of Christian languages.

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Situated Knowledges Thirty Years Later

Conference/Symposium | November 15 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall | Canceled

 Center for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM), Filipino & Philippine Studies Working Group

This day-long conference will celebrate and challenge the intellectual legacy of Donna Haraway's "Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective." Presenters from various disciplines will reflect on the impact of "situated knowledges" while offering new perspectives on and revisions to the concept since its introduction.

Situated Knowledges Thirty Years Later

Conference/Symposium | November 15 | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall

 Alastair Iles, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley; Mitali Thakor, Assistant Professor, Science in Society Program, Wesleyan University; Sarah E. Vaughn, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, U.C. Berkeley; Jennifer L. Derr, Assistant Professor, Department of History, U.C. Santa Cruz; Lisa A. Brooks, Doctoral Candidate, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, U.C. Berkeley; Paul Michael L. Atienza, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Michael Mascarenhas, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley; Victoria Massie, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, U.C. Berkeley

 Sibyl Diver, Research Scientist, Department of Earth Systems Science, Stanford University; Laura Lee Dev, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management

 Ashton Wesner, Doctoral Candidate, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley

 Julie Pyatt, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley

 Kathleen Cruz Gutierrez, Doctoral Candidate, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, U.C. Berkeley

 Center for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM), Filipino & Philippine Studies Working Group, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Science and Technology Studies Working Group, Graduate Assembly

This day-long conference will celebrate and challenge the intellectual legacy of Donna Haraway's "Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective." Presenters from various disciplines will reflect on the impact of "situated knowledges" while offering new perspectives on and revisions to the concept since its introduction.

On Indian Ground: California. A Return to Indigenous Knowledge: Generating Hope, Leadership, and Sovereignty through Education

Colloquium | November 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Nicole Lim, J.D., Executive Director, California Indian Museum and Cultural Center

 Joely Proudfit, Ph.D., Director California Indian Culture & Sovereignty Center Professor, American Indian Studies Department Chair and Professor, American Indian Studies, California State University San Marcos

 Center for Native American Issues Research on, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, Native American Studies, American Indian Graduate Student Association, Indigenous Language Revitalization DE, Graduate School of Education

Authors and Editors of On Indian Ground: California, Proudfit and Lim will discuss issues related to Native American education reform in California. They will address the impacts of genocide, colonization, racism and historical bias upon curriculum and student achievement. Additionally, they will present holistic indigenous perspectives that can be integrated into systems of education to foster...   More >

Raza Rumi | Democracy and its Discontents - Project Naya Pakistan: The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture for 2018

Lecture | November 15 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Raza Ahmad Rumi, Pakistani writer and a public policy specialist

 Munis Faruqui, Chair, Institute for South Asia Studies, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture

Pakistani writer and a public policy specialist, Reza Ahmad Rumi delivers our sixth Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture.

Race and the Apparatus of Disposability

Lecture | November 15 | 5:30-8 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Multicultural Community Center

 Center for Race and Gender

SHERENE H. RAZACK
DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR AND THE PENNY KANNER ENDOWED CHAIR IN GENDER STUDIES, UCLA
Thursday, Nov 15, 2018
5:30pm – Reception
6pm – Lecture

Disposability, a condition written on the body, is a racial project. Populations that stand in the way of the progress of capital accumulation, are targeted for disposability, and relegated to the realm of “sub-humanity.” Processes of...   More >

AIA Lecture - Pottery, Paintings, and Pinakides: the latest dirt from the excavation of Petsas House, Mycenae

Lecture | November 15 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Kim Shelton, Associate Professor of Classics and Director, the Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

This elaborately illustrated lecture will present the results of ten seasons of excavation by the Archaeological Society of Athens at ‘Petsas House’ in the settlement of the famous Bronze Age palatial center at Mycenae. A look into a complex structure of the 14th century BCE reveals domestic and workshop use together with an expanding role in the socio-political life of the palace. Pottery, as...   More >

Friday, November 16, 2018

TARTUFFE: a modern take on Molière’s classic comedy, Nov. 9-18: Translated into English verse by Richard Wilbur

Performing Arts - Theater | November 16 – 17, 2018 every day | 8-8:30 p.m. |  Zellerbach Playhouse

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies

Initially censored following its premiere in 1664, TARTUFFE is a bold work that is decidedly relevant today. Set in present-day Los Angeles, TARTUFFE is the story of a con man disguised as a pious spiritual leader who wheedles his way into the home of a gullible, affluent patriarch in the midst of a mid-life crisis — promptly setting the household topsy turvy!

 $13 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: online in advance, $15 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: at the door (ID required), $18 General Admission: $18 online in advance, $20 General Admission: at the door

  Buy tickets online

Saturday, November 17, 2018

TARTUFFE: a modern take on Molière’s classic comedy, Nov. 9-18: Translated into English verse by Richard Wilbur

Performing Arts - Theater | November 16 – 17, 2018 every day | 8-8:30 p.m. |  Zellerbach Playhouse

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies

Initially censored following its premiere in 1664, TARTUFFE is a bold work that is decidedly relevant today. Set in present-day Los Angeles, TARTUFFE is the story of a con man disguised as a pious spiritual leader who wheedles his way into the home of a gullible, affluent patriarch in the midst of a mid-life crisis — promptly setting the household topsy turvy!

 $13 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: online in advance, $15 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: at the door (ID required), $18 General Admission: $18 online in advance, $20 General Admission: at the door

  Buy tickets online

Sunday, November 18, 2018

TARTUFFE: a modern take on Molière’s classic comedy, Nov. 9-18: Translated into English verse by Richard Wilbur

Performing Arts - Theater | November 11 – 18, 2018 every Sunday | 2-3:30 p.m. |  Zellerbach Playhouse

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies

Initially censored following its premiere in 1664, TARTUFFE is a bold work that is decidedly relevant today. Set in present-day Los Angeles, TARTUFFE is the story of a con man disguised as a pious spiritual leader who wheedles his way into the home of a gullible, affluent patriarch in the midst of a mid-life crisis — promptly setting the household topsy turvy!

 $13 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: online in advance, $15 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: at the door (ID required), $18 General Admission: $18 online in advance, $20 General Admission: at the door

  Buy tickets online

Monday, November 19, 2018

Critical Yugoslav Cultural Studies: Challenges Ahead

Panel Discussion | November 19 | 6-7:30 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Jasmina Husanovic, University of Tuzla; Branislav Jakovljevic, Stanford University; Jovana Knezevic, Stanford University; Pavle Levi, Stanford University; Antje Postema, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Erich Mendelsohn vs. the Skyscraper Primitives: A Berliner in Jazz-Age Manhattan: Global Urban Humanities Fall 2018 Colloquium

Colloquium | November 20 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 170 Wurster Hall

 Global Urban Humanities

"Erich Mendelsohn vs. the Skyscraper Primitives: A Berliner in Jazz-Age Manhattan"
Greg Castillo
Associate Professor of Architecture
Tuesday, November 20, 1-2:30pm
Wurster 170

Part of the Global Urban Humanities Colloquium The City and Its People, Rhetoric 198-3 / ARCH 198-2, Rhetoric 244A / ARCH 298-2

Upon first sight of the Manhattan skyline in 1924, Erich Mendelsohn proclaimed it an...   More >

My Bolivia: Remembering What I Never Knew

Film - Documentary | November 20 | 7-9 p.m. | 160 Kroeber Hall

 Rick Tejeda, UC Berkeley

 Center for Latin American Studies

Filmmaker Rick Tejada Flores unravels secrets of his family’s past in Bolivia, discovering his grandfather’s hidden role as President during one of the bloodiest wars in Latin America. From downtown La Paz to the remote mountain town of Llojeta, Tejada Flores explores how his family, as part of the white ruling class, perpetuated disparities in rural indigenous communities. He finds both a family...   More >

La Paz, Bolivia, in 1941. (Image courtesy of Rick Tejada Flores.)

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

V.D Savarkar - The Politics, Poetics and History of Hindu Nationalism: ISAS Faculty Workshop led by Prof. Janaki Bakhle

Workshop: Featuring History Faculty | November 27 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Thomas Blom Hansen, Professor in South Asian Studies and Professor in Anthropology, Stanford University; Vidyut Aklujkar, Research Associate, Centre for India and South Asia Research, University of British Columbia; Christian Novetzke, Professor in the South Asia Program, the Comparative Religion Program, and the International Studies Program at the University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies; Vasudha Paramasivan, Assistant Professor of South & Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley; Sudipta Sen, Professor of History at the University of California, Davis; Christine Philliou, Associate Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Janaki Bakhle, Associate Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

Presenter Bios
Thomas Blom Hansen is the Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor in South Asian Studies and Professor in Anthropology. He is the author of The Saffron Wave: Democracy and Hindu Nationalism in Modern India (Princeton 1999); Wages of Violence: Naming and Identity in Postcolonial Bombay...   More >

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

What is the future of archaeology in Greece? How the nation-building project devalues archaeology and the quest for relevance

Lecture | November 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Anastasia Sakellariadi, Honorary Research Associate, UCL Institute of Archaeology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Dr. Sakellariadi demonstrates through research focusing on three local communities how an exclusive emphasis on the glory of the past and its physical manifestations has rendered this past irrelevant to contemporary Greeks. She argues that another archaeology is possible in Greece.

Thursday, November 29, 2018

The Gerald D. and Norma Feldman Annual Lecture: The Life and Death of the Russian Revolution

Lecture: History Department Events: Featuring History Faculty | November 29 | 4-6 p.m. |  Bancroft Hotel

 2680 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Professor Yuri Slezkine, Jane K. Sather Professor of History, Dept. of History

 Institute of European Studies, Department of History, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

This talk will follow the lives of the original Bolsheviks from the time they joined the apocalyptic sect known as “the party of a new type” to the time most of them were arrested for terrorism and treason. It will focus on the connection between private lives and millenarian expectations and attempt to clarify the reasons for socialism’s premature demise.

Friday, November 30, 2018

Colloquium:Annette Richards Cornell University: title TBA

Colloquium | November 30 | 4:30 p.m. | 128 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

Annette Richards is Professor of Music and University Organist at Cornell, and the Executive Director of the Westfield Center for Historical Keyboard Studies. She is a performer and scholar with a specialty in 18th-century music and aesthetics, and interdisciplinary research into music, literature and visual culture. She is founding editor of Keyboard Perspectives, a yearbook dedicated to...   More >

Monday, December 3, 2018

The History and Science of Paper in Manuscripts of Central Asia

Lecture | December 3 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Agnieszka Helman-Ważny, University of Hamburg & University of Warsaw

 Tang Center for Silk Road Studies

Manuscripts from the Silk Road have been used as a key source in the study of religions, literature, and the cultural history of Central Asia. However, they have hardly ever been viewed as artifacts in their own right. As one of the most important physical features of a manuscript, paper serves as a means to distinguish one type of manuscript from another, and can help to determine the origin of...   More >

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Barbara Spackman: Accidental Orientalists: Modern Italian Travelers in Ottoman Lands

Lecture | December 5 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Spackman’s account, which won the 2017 American Association for Italian Studies Best Book Prize, examines narratives by Italians who, through historical accident, found themselves in Ottoman Egypt and Anatolia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Friday, January 25, 2019

No Laughing Matter: Learning to Speak the "Common Language" in 1950s China

Colloquium: Featuring History Faculty | January 25 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Janet Chen, Associate Professor of History and East Asian Studies, Princeton University

 Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In the winter and early spring of 1956, a series of articles appeared in nationally circulating publications, featuring an earnest entreaty: please do not laugh at those who are trying to learn putonghua, the “common language” of the socialist state. Beyond the headlines, permutations of the same refrain echoed in different forums. At the opening stages of a campaign to “popularize the common...   More >

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

AIA Lecture - Joukowsky Lecture - Remembering Boudica: Monuments of a Barbarian Queen

Lecture | January 29 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Alison Futrell, Department of History, University of Arizona

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Empire! Taxes! Violation! Massacre! In the early years of his reign, the emperor Nero briefly considered withdrawing the legions from the new province of Britannia. Before he could do so, the stability of empire was shaken by revolt, as Boudica, a tribal queen pushed beyond her limits by the excesses of the Roman colonizers, exacted a horrifying retribution, with deaths in the tens of thousands....   More >

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Deep Impunity

Lecture | February 7 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Kamala Visweswaran,, Professor in Ethnic Studies, UCSD

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by cultural anthropologist Kamala Visweswaran, Professor in Ethnic Studies, UCSD.

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 21 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

Friday, February 22, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 21 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

Saturday, February 23, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 21 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

A UCBHSSP Un-Conference

Workshop | February 23 | 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

UCBHSSP invites Bay Area educators to participate in an "un-conference." This participate-driven event will allow teachers to share and learn from one another with regard to how they are approaching history instruction at this historical moment - What does this moment demand of us as history teachers?

 This event is directed at educators.

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

AIA Lecture

Lecture | March 6 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

What’s Theology Got to Do with It? An Eighteenth-Century Chinese Emperor Debating Religions and Christianity

Lecture | March 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Eugenio Menegon, Associate Professor of Chinese History, Boston University; Collaborative Scholar, Institute for Advanced Jesuit Studies, Boston College

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

In his Lettres chinoises, indiennes et tartares, Voltaire republished “a note by the good Kangxi Emperor to the Peking Jesuits” as follows: “The emperor is surprised to see you so stubborn in your ideas. Why would you worry so much about a world where you have not been yet? Enjoy the present. Your God must be pained by your preoccupations...   More >

Monday, March 18, 2019

Governance and Transitions of Power in Taiwan

Conference/Symposium | March 18 – 19, 2019 every day | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

This conference investigates the nexus between changes in governance and transitions of power in Taiwan. The conference would address two broad themes:

1) How have deficiencies in participatory institutions or limited access by various social groups to the political process affected transitions of power? How have social groups demanded access to political decision-making? Papers could address...   More >

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Governance and Transitions of Power in Taiwan

Conference/Symposium | March 18 – 19, 2019 every day | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

This conference investigates the nexus between changes in governance and transitions of power in Taiwan. The conference would address two broad themes:

1) How have deficiencies in participatory institutions or limited access by various social groups to the political process affected transitions of power? How have social groups demanded access to political decision-making? Papers could address...   More >

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Jorge Flores | Unwanted Neighbors: The Mughals, the Portuguese, and Their Frontier Zones

Lecture | April 4 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Jorge Flores, Professor of Early Modern Global History, Department of History and Civilization, European University Institute, Florence

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

In December 1572 the Mughal emperor Akbar arrived in the port city of Khambayat. Having been raised in distant Kabul, Akbar had never in his thirty years been to the Ocean. Presumably anxious with the news about the Mughal military campaign in Gujarat, several Portuguese merchants in Khambayat rushed to Akbar’s presence. This encounter marked the beginning of a long, complex, and unequal...   More >

Ongoing Events

Pièces de Résistance: Echoes of Judaea Capta From Ancient Coins to Modern Art

Exhibit - Multimedia | August 28 – December 14, 2018 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

This exhibition will be continuing in Spring 2019.

Notions of resistance, alongside fears and realities of oppression, resound throughout Jewish history. As a minority, Jews express their political aspirations, ideals of heroism, and yearnings of retaliation and redemption in their rituals, art, and everyday life.

Centering on coins in The Magnes Collection, this exhibition explores how...   More >

Project “Holy Land”: Yaakov Benor-Kalter’s Photographs of British Mandate Palestine, 1923-1940

Exhibit - Photography | August 28 – December 14, 2018 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4:05 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

For nearly two decades, Yaakov (Jacob) Benor-Kalter (1897-1969) traversed the Old City of Jerusalem, documenting renowned historical monuments, ambiguous subjects in familiar alleyways, and scores of “new Jews” building a new homeland. Benor-Kalter’s photographs smoothly oscillate between two worlds, and two Holy Lands, with one lens.

After immigrating from Poland to the British Mandate of...   More >

Facing West 1: Camera Portraits from the Bancroft Collection

Exhibit - Photography | November 9, 2018 – March 15, 2019 every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Bancroft Library

 Bancroft Library

The first part of a double exhibition celebrating the tenth anniversary of the renewed Bancroft Library and its gallery, Facing West 1 presents a cavalcade of individuals who made, and continue to make, California and the American West. These camera portraits highlight the communities and peoples of Hubert Howe Bancroft’s original collecting region, which extended from the Rockies to the Pacific...   More >