Upcoming Events

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Why is that there? Feature tuning across the visual cortex

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | January 16 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | Berkeley Way West, 2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1203

 Talia Konkle, Harvard University

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

What drives the functional organization of the visual system? All proposals balance the causal roles of two pressures: innately specified cortical patterning mechanisms, establishing large-scale network architecture, and self-organizing mechanisms driven by the statistics of natural experience, effecting local organization. In part 1, I will characterize the functional organization of...   More >

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Early vision in artificial neural networks

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | January 22 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Chris Olah, Open AI

 Berkeley Neuroscience, UC Berkeley

Artificial neural networks are capable of sophisticated vision tasks, including recognizing complex object families and captioning images. But very little is known about how they accomplish this. What happens if we take such a neural network seriously as a kind of "model organism?" In this talk, we give a neuron by neuron account of low-level visual features in InceptionV1, and demonstrate that...   More >

Cell types, and the specificity of synaptic connectivity and signaling between them, in primary visual cortex

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | January 22 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 177 Life Sciences Addition

 Dr. Gabe Murphy, Allen Institute

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Neurons are frequently classified into distinct groups, or ‘cell types’, on the basis of structural, physiological, or genetic attributes. Constraining the definition and diversity of neuronal cell types likely requires a different, more integrated approach - e..g, assaying the cellular and network attributes of individual neurons and determining the degree to which those attributes co-vary...   More >

Uncovering the molecular and cellular basis of neurodevelopmental disorders

Seminar | January 22 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Helen Bateup, University of California, Berkeley

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Syntactic generalization in natural language inference

Seminar | January 23 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Tal Linzen, Johns Hopkins University

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Neural network models for natural language processing often perform very well on examples that are drawn from the same distribution as the training set. Do they accomplish such success by learning to solve the task as a human might solve it, or do they adopt heuristics that happen to work well on the data set in question, but do not reflect the normative definition of the task (how one "should"...   More >

IB Seminar: The Social Brain: Physiological mechanisms underlying peer relationships

Seminar | January 23 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Annaliese Beery, Smith College/UMass Amherst

 Department of Integrative Biology

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | January 23 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition | Canceled

 Ona Bloom, Feinstein Institute

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, January 27, 2020

Disparity and motion-in-depth processing in human visual cortex

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | January 27 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Anthony Norcia, Stanford University

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

The lateral separation of the two eyes creates slight retinal image differences that provide binocular disparity and binocular motion cues that can be used to extract information about depth in the world. To gain insight about the neural mechanisms involved in processing these cues, we use cue-isolating stimulation techniques to study the dynamics of brain responses to changing disparity cues,...   More >

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Visual Cortical Processing: Image to Object Representation

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | January 29 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Rudiger von der Heydt, Johns Hopkins University

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Image understanding is often conceived as a hierarchical process with many levels where complexity and invariance of object selectivity gradually increase with level in the hierarchy. In contrast, neurophysiological studies have shown that figure-ground organization and border ownership coding, which imply understanding of the object structure of an image, occur at levels as low as V1 and V2 of...   More >

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Learning in Neocortex-Cerebellum Circuits

Seminar | January 30 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 **Mark Wagner**, Stanford University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Sparse Deep Predictive Coding: A Model of Visual Perception

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | February 5 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Victor Boutin, Institute of Neuroscience of la Timone (INT), Aix-Marseille University

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Building models to efficiently represent images is a central problem in the machine learning community. The brain and especially the visual cortex, has long find economical and robust solutions to solve such a problem. At the local scale, Sparse Coding is one of the most successful framework to model neural computation in the visual cortex. It directly derives from the efficient coding...   More >

Thursday, February 6, 2020

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology Seminar

Seminar | February 6 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 **Prerana Shrestha**

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Monday, February 10, 2020

A novel blood volume and perfusion contrast for laminar fMRI in humans at 7T

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | February 10 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Yuhui Chai, NIMH

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

With increased availability of ultra-high field (7T) human MRI scanners, fMRI spatial resolution has been pushed to the sub-millimeter domain, making it possible to resolve functional activity and connectivity across cortical depths/layers. Despite the great potential of laminar fMRI research in humans, its widespread application is tempered by technical constraints: (1) The gradient-echo...   More >

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Seminar Title TBD

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | February 12 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Ruben Coen-Cagli, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Seminar description is forthcoming.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology Seminar

Seminar | February 20 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 **Christina Kim**, Stanford University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Thursday, February 27, 2020

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology Seminar

Seminar | February 27 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 **Arpiar Saunders**

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology Seminar

Seminar | March 5 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 **Cindy Poo**, Champalimaud Foundation

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Innate immune mechanisms of synapse remodeling

Seminar | March 31 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Anna Molofsky, University of California, San Francisco, UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, April 2, 2020

The temporal dynamics of neuronal responses in human visual cortex

Seminar | April 2 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Jonathan Winawer, New York University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, April 9, 2020

Sensory Integration at the Retinogeniculate Synapse

Seminar | April 9 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Chinfei Chen, Harvard University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, April 23, 2020

Neuroscience Student Seminar Series

Seminar | April 23 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Liqun Luo, Stanford University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Thursday, April 30, 2020

Neuroscience Student Seminar Series Seminar

Seminar | April 30 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Matt Wilson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology