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Thursday, October 11, 2018

Monday, October 15, 2018

​Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 15 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Jazzi Junge, Orel-Bixler Lab; Patrick Carney, Wildsoet Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Berkeley ACM A.M. Turing Laureate Lecture: Towards a Conscious AI: A Computer Architecture Inspired by Neuroscience with Manuel Blum

Colloquium | October 17 | 4-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium


Manuel Blum, UC Berkeley

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)


Thanks to major advances in neuroscience, we are on the brink of a scientific understanding of how the brain achieves consciousness. This talk will describe neuroscientist Bernard Baars' Global Workspace Model (GWM) of the brain, its implications for understanding consciousness, and a novel computer architecture that it inspires. The Model gives insight for the design of machines that truly...   More >



From Academia to Airbnb: a high dimensional anecdote: Jason Vytlacil

Colloquium | October 17 | 5:15-6:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


Jason Vytlacil

Department of Psychology


You can find Jason Vytlacil's LinkedIn page here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jason-vytlacil/

Thursday, October 18, 2018

A cortical reinforcement prediction error encoded by VIP interneurons

Seminar | October 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Adam Kepecs, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, October 22, 2018

​Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 22 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Sarah Kochik, Wildsoet Lab; Nevin El-Nimri, Wildsoet Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Nevin El-Nimri's Talk
Manipulating Intraocular Pressure as a Novel Avenue for Controlling Myopia Progression

Myopia (near-sightedness) results from progressive, excessive eye enlargement and is associated with blinding complications. It has become a significant public health concern, reaching epidemic levels in some parts of the world. The eye is like a balloon, with pressure inside the eye...   More >

Monday, October 29, 2018

Set Summary Perception, Outlier Pop Out, and Categorization: A Common Underlying Computation?

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 29 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Shaul Hochstein, Professor, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Recent research has focused on perception of set statistics. Presented briefly with a group of elements, simultaneously or successively, observers report precisely the mean of a variety of set features, but are unaware of individual element values. This has been shown for both low and high level features, from circle size to facial expression. A remaining puzzle is how can the perceptual system...   More >



Vision to Action: Towards a Cellular-Resolution Atlas of the Zebrafish Visual and Visuomotor System

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | October 29 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Herwig Baier, Department Genes – Circuits – Behavior, Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, 82152 Martinsried, Germany

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Understanding brain-wide neuronal dynamics and behavior requires a detailed map of the underlying circuit architecture. We built an interactive cellular-resolution atlas of the zebrafish brain, with a focus on the visual and visuomotor system, and generated from our dataset an inter-areal wiring diagram, which serves as ground truth for synapse-scale, electron microscopic reconstructions. We have...   More >

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Opportunities and challenges of high-field fMRI for neuroscience applications

Colloquium | October 31 | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


Kendrick Kay, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In this talk, Dr. Kendrick Kay will describe two recent projects that exploit functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at ultra-high magnetic field strength (7 Tesla). The first project consisted of whole-brain fMRI retinotopic mapping in 181 healthy adults, as part of the Human Connectome Project (T2*-weighted gradient-echo EPI, 1.6-mm isotropic resolution, 1-s TR, 85 slices, multiband...   More >

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Information Storage in Memory Engrams

Seminar | November 1 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Tomas Ryan, Trinity College Dublin, School of Biochemistry and Immunology,

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, November 5, 2018

The science of missing what is right in front of your eyes

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | November 5 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Jeremy Wolfe, Professor of Ophthalmology & Radiology, Harvard Medical School

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


OMG, I did not see that!
The science of missing what is right in front of your eyes.

Visual Attention Lab
Department of Surgery
Brigham & Women's Hospital

We cannot simultaneously recognize every object in our field of view. As a result, we deploy attention from object to object or place to place, searching for what we need. This is true whether we are looking for the cat in the bedroom...   More >

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Adversarial Examples that Fool both Computer Vision and Time-Limited Humans

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Gamaleldin Elsayed, Google Brain

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Machine learning models are vulnerable to adversarial examples: small changes to images can cause computer vision models to make mistakes such as identifying a school bus as an ostrich. However, it is still an open question whether humans are prone to similar mistakes. Here, we address this question by leveraging recent techniques that transfer adversarial examples from computer vision models...   More >



Professor Michael Silver Psychology Colloquium Lecture: Effects of acetylcholine on visual cortex, attention, and learning

Colloquium | November 7 | 5:15-6:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


Department of Psychology


The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) has been extensively studied at the level of synapses and neural circuits, but comparatively little is known about its effects on perception and cognition in humans. We augmented the effects of ACh in the brains of healthy human participants by administering the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil (trade name: Aricept). I will describe the effects of...   More >

Friday, November 9, 2018

Attentional Episodes and Cognitive Control

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | November 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


John Duncan, MRC Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Human fMRI studies show a tightly-localised set of “multiple-demand” or MD regions, involved in solution of many different cognitive challenges, widely separated yet strongly functionally connected, and linked to standard measures of fluid intelligence. Multiple-demand regions are generally associated with “cognitive control”, but how should control be conceived? Using data from...   More >

Thursday, November 15, 2018

How do Astrocytes Sculpt Synaptic Circuits?

Seminar: HWNI/MCB Seminar | November 15 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Li Ka Shing Center


Cagla Eroglu, Duke University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


How are synaptic networks formed during development and remodeled during learning and disease? This is the main question that drives our research. In particular, we investigate the roles of glial cells called astrocytes in the development, remodeling and function of synaptic circuits. In my talk, I will share findings from my lab on two distinct molecular mechanisms through which astrocytes...   More >

Monday, November 19, 2018

​Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | November 19 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Dylan Paiton, Olshausen Lab; Liz Lawler, Silver Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Monday, November 26, 2018

Oxyopia Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | November 26 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Kurtis Auguste, Chief of Surgery, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Maternal gut bacteria, inflammation and neurodevelopmental disorder

Seminar | November 27 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Jun R. Huh, Harvard University

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Neurocomputational mechanisms underlying social norms and controllability

Colloquium | November 28 | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


Xiaosi Gu, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


To maintain the normal functioning of a society, individuals must be able to learn to adapt to norms. Neuroimaging studies have suggested that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and the insular cortex might be important for norm learning. However, norms are not static processes but rather, can be changed and updated if individuals of a society learn to act on them. In other words, the...   More >


All Audiences



Thursday, November 29, 2018

Convergent circuitry for thermoregulation

Seminar | November 29 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Lily Jan, University of California, San Francisco

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, December 3, 2018

Oxyopia Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | December 3 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Kevin Duffy, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills



Gesture: its relationship to thinking and speaking

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | December 3 | 4-5 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall


Sotaro Kita, University of Warwick

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


This presentation concerns a theory on how gestures (accompanying speaking and silent thinking) are generated and how gestures facilitate the gesturer's own cognitive processes. I will present evidence that gestures are generated from a general-purpose Action Generator, which also generates “practical” actions such as grasping a cup to drink, and that the Action Generator generates gestural...   More >

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Ion Channels as Organizers of Neuronal Signaling Domains

Seminar | December 6 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


James Trimmer, University of California, Davis, Department of Physiology and Membrane Biology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Writing Scientific Research Proposals

Workshop | December 11 | 12-1 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall


Erica Whitney, Berkeley Research Development Office

Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research


In this workshop, we will explore techniques and best practices for writing a research proposal in the sciences and engineering, from the beginning (the specific aims/objectives) to the middle (the research design and methods) to the very end (supplementary documents). We will look at examples of successful proposals and discuss the different techniques that can be used to effectively present...   More >


Faculty

Faculty

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Individual differences in brain development and plasticity - effects on learning

Colloquium | December 12 | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


Allyson Mackey, University of Pennsylvania

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Dr. Allyson Mackey will discuss her research on understanding individual differences in brain development and plasticity, and the impact of these differences on learning and academic performance. She will present research linking socioeconomic status, which encompasses a broad set of childhood experiences, to the structure and function of cortex. She then will examine the impact of specific...   More >