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Monday, April 16, 2018

A Tale of Two Strains: Ocular Studies in B6 and BALB/c Mice

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | April 16 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Elizabeth Berger, PhD, Professor, Wayne State University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Corneal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa perforates the cornea in C57BL/6 (B6), but not BALB/c mice. Comparative analysis of these two responses has revealed that B6 mice, type 1-dominant responders, exhibit increased inflammation, leading to an exacerbated disease response when compared to BALB/c mice, which demonstrate a less severe/resistant response and are classified as type...   More >

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Neural oscillations: What we're doing wrong

Colloquium | April 17 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Brad Voytek, Professor, Department of Cognitive Science, UCSD

Department of Psychology

Friday, April 20, 2018

Optogenetic and Chemogenetic Tools for Mapping Molecular and Cellular Circuits: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | April 20 | 2-3 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall


Prof. Alice Ting, Stanford University, Genetics/Biology/Chemistry

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


The first part of the talk will describe optogenetic tools we have developed for labeling and manipulating functional circuits in the brain (e.g., FLARE and related tools).

The second part of the talk will describe chemogenetic tools we have developed for mapping molecular interactions in living cells (e.g., APEX and TurboID).

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Alice Ting did her PhD in Chem here at UC Berkeley...   More >

Monday, April 23, 2018

Mobilizing Synaptic Plasticity to Promote Recovery from Amblyopia

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | April 23 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Dr. Mark Bear, PhD, PiCower Professor of Neuroscience, MIT

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Amblyopia is a prevalent form of visual disability that arises during infancy and early childhood when inputs to the visual cortex from the two eyes are poorly balanced (e.g., by misalignment of the eyes, asymmetric refraction, or opacities and obstructions of one eye). Characteristics of amblyopia are very poor acuity in one eye, and an attendant loss of stereopsis. The current standard of care...   More >

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Deciphering the Dynamics of the Unconscious Brain Under General Anesthesia

Seminar | April 26 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Emery Brown , Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, April 27, 2018

Education, plasticity and learning: the virtuous cycle between education and neuroscience

Lecture | April 27 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall


Jason D. Yeatman, PhD, Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences, University of Washington

Department of Psychology


Reading instruction prompts the emergence of neural circuits that are specialized for rapidly translating printed symbols into sound and meaning. Understanding how these circuits differ in children with dyslexia, and change with learning, is an important scientific challenge that holds practical implications for education. In this talk I will present new data linking changes in the white matter...   More >

Thursday, May 3, 2018

Perturbation and Control of Human Brain Network Dynamics

Seminar | May 3 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Dani Bassett, University of Pennsylvania

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: The human brain is a complex organ characterized by heterogeneous patterns of interconnections. New non-invasive imaging techniques now allow for these patterns to be carefully and comprehensively mapped in individual humans, paving the way for a better understanding of how wiring supports our thought processes. While a large body of work now focuses on descriptive statistics to...   More >

Monday, May 7, 2018

Oxyopia - Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Paul Cullen, John Flanagan Lab; Brian Cheung, Bruno Olshausen Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Paul Cullen
John Flanagan Lab
Title: The Secret Lives of Retinal Astrocytes
Abstract: The study of glia – the support cells of the central nervous system – has come a long way since Rudolf Virchow described a connective tissue of the brain that he termed ‘nervenkitt’ in 1856. Rather than a passive scaffolding for neurons (the word ‘glia’ means glue in Greek), these cells are responsible for a...   More >

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Expander graph architectures for high-capacity neural memory

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | May 22 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Rishidev Chaudhuri, UT Austin/Simons Institute UC Berkeley

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Memory networks in the brain must balance two competing demands. On the one hand, they should have high capacity to store the large numbers of stimuli an organism must remember over a lifetime. On the other hand, noise is ubiquitous in the brain and memory is typically retrieved from incomplete input. Thus, memories must be encoded with some redundancy, which reduces capacity. Current neural...   More >

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Characterizing neurons in the visual area V4 through interpretable machine learning

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | May 23 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Reza Abbasi-Asl, UC Berekely

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In the past decade, research in machine learning has been exceedingly focused on the development of algorithms and models with remarkably high predictive capabilities. Models such as convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have achieved state-of-the-art predictive performance for many tasks in computer vision, autonomous driving, and transfer learning in areas such as computational neuroscience....   More >

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Inference and Efficient Coding in Natural Auditory Scenes

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | May 30 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Wiktor Mlynarski, MIT

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Processing of natural stimuli in sensory systems has been traditionally studied within two theoretical frameworks: probabilistic inference and efficient coding. Probabilistic inference specifies optimal strategies for learning about relevant properties of the environment from local and ambiguous sensory signals. Efficient coding provides a normative approach to study encoding of natural stimuli...   More >

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Eavesdropping on Cortical Plasticity

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | June 14 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Adi Mizrahi, The Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


One of the overarching goal in our lab is to understand cortical plasticity in adult circuits. This goal remains challenging because cortical neurons are functionally heterogeneous and access to specific active neurons for further experimentation is limited. In the primary auditory cortex (A1), for example, spiking responses to natural stimuli like vocalization cannot be easily predicted from...   More >

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Optimal sensors in random environments

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | June 20 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Sarah Marzen, MIT

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


The efficient coding hypothesis has revolutionized theoretical neuroscience. I would argue that it is best understood using rate-distortion theory. I use rate-distortion theory to inspire a simple model of sensory adaptation. In randomly drawn, fluctuating environments, this model suggests that neurogenesis in sensory regions is unnecessary and predicts that biological sensors are poised to just...   More >

Monday, June 25, 2018

Expression of ethanol sensitive glycine receptors in several brain regions

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | June 25 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Luis Aguayo, University of Concepcion, Chile

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Synaptic glycine receptors (GlyR) are expressed primarily in spinal cord and brain stem neurons. GlyRs are sensitive to general anesthetics, neurosteroids, Zn2+ and ethanol. Recently, GlyRs were also found in other supratentorial regions, but their properties are largely unknown. Mesolimbic regions, such as ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (nAc), were also found to express GlyRs...   More >