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Thursday, March 15, 2018

Friday, March 16, 2018

The Impact of Mental State Inferences for Legal Outcomes

Colloquium | March 16 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Carly Giffin, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Ph.D. Exit Talk

Saturday, March 17, 2018

Science Lecture - Unlocking the secrets of brain aging

Lecture | March 17 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building


Daniela Kaufer, Neuroscience & Integrative Biology

Science@Cal


Aging can involve a decline in neural function that impairs cognition and contributes to neurological diseases. However, the biological mechanisms that cause the transition from a young-and-healthy to aged-and-dysfunctional brain are not well understood. In this talk, Dr. Kaufer will describe recent findings from her lab which identified a novel mechanism underlying this transition. She will also...   More >


All Audiences, Alumni, Faculty, Friends of the University, General Public, Staff, Students - Graduate, Students - Prospective, Students - Undergraduate, Cal Parents

All Audiences, Alumni, Faculty, Friends of the University, General Public, Staff, Students - Graduate, Students - Prospective, Students - Undergraduate, Cal Parents

Monday, March 19, 2018

Seeing where we’re going: a retinal code for self-motion

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | March 19 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Dr. David Berson, Professor of Medical Science, Chair of NeuroScience, Brown University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Self-motion triggers complementary visual and vestibular reflexes supporting image-stabilization and balance. Translation through space produces one global pattern of retinal image motion (optic flow), rotation another. We show that each subtype of direction-selective ganglion cell (DSGC) adjusts its direction preference topographically to align with specific translatory optic flow...   More >



Spike inference for genetically encoded calcium indicators with models of multistep binding kinetics

Seminar | March 19 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 177 Life Sciences Addition


Dr. David Greenberg, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research, Bonn, Germany

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract:
Multiphoton imaging of genetically encoded calcium indicators can detect action potential (AP) evoked fluorescence changes from populations of spatially resolved neurons, but the nonlinear dependence of fluorescence on AP counts and variable indicator expression across neurons make quantitative inference problematic. We developed a biophysical model of GCaMP6s in neurons based on the...   More >

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Friday, March 23, 2018

Grounds for Science-The deceptiveness of perception

Presentation | March 23 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Scarlet City Espresso Bar


3960 Adeline, Emeryville, CA 94608

Dylan Paiton, Vision Science Graduate Group

Science@Cal


Optical illusions and visual hallucinations are highly unusual. How is it that we are able to see something that is not really there? Dylan will outline standard methods that neuroscientists use to better understand how our brains process light, and introduce a theory for conscious vision that has guided decades of computational and experimental neuroscience.


All Audiences, Alumni, Faculty, Friends of the University, General Public, Staff, Students - Graduate, Students - Prospective, Students - Undergraduate, Cal Parents

All Audiences, Alumni, Faculty, Friends of the University, General Public, Staff, Students - Graduate, Students - Prospective, Students - Undergraduate, Cal Parents

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

“Stability and Flexibility in Motor Networks”

Seminar | March 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center | Note change in location


Michael Long, New York University School of Medicine

Bioengineering (BioE)


For us to interact with the outside world, our brains must plan and dictate our actions and behaviors. In many cases, we learn to reproducibly execute a well-defined series of muscle movements to perform impressive feats, such as hitting a golf ball or playing the violin. In other cases, however, we are required to adjust our behavior to account for uncertain sensory information from the world...   More >

Monday, April 2, 2018

Rhythms for Cognition: Communication through Coherence

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | April 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Pascal Fries, Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Free viewing of natural images induces gamma-band oscillations in early visual cortex. If the gamma rhythm in a lower visual area entrains a gamma rhythm in a higher visual area, this might establish an effective communication protocol: The lower area sends a representation of the visual stimulus rhythmically, and the higher area is most excitable precisely when this representation arrives. At...   More >



Neurodevelopmental Mechanisms linking Early Adversity with Adolescent Psychopathology

Colloquium | April 2 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall


Kate McLaughlin, Department of Psychology, University of Washington

Institute of Human Development


Children who have experienced environmental adversity—such as abuse, neglect, or poverty—are at markedly elevated risk for developing psychopathology. What is less clear is how and why adverse early experiences exert such a profound influence on mental health. Identifying developmental processes that are disrupted by adverse early environments is the key to developing better intervention...   More >

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Informed Approaches to Deep Learning via Neural Networks with Random Parameters

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | April 3 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Yasaman Bahri, Google Brain

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Obtaining a better understanding of neural networks with random parameters is relevant for deep learning practice — for instance, by informing good initializations — and is a natural first step in building a more complete base of knowledge within deep learning. I will survey some of our recent work at Google Brain which originated from the study of random neural networks. [1]. I’ll begin by...   More >

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Biology of Bedtime: Understanding Circadian Rhythms and Sleep

Seminar | April 5 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Amita Sehgal, University of Pennsylvania

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, April 6, 2018

“Resource-Rational Attention Allocation”

Colloquium | April 6 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Fred Callaway, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


One of two 30 min research talks by graduate students.

Monday, April 9, 2018

​Graduate Students Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | April 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Stephanie Wan, UC Berkeley, Fleiszig Lab; Kathryn Bonnen, University of Texas at Austin, Huk Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Stephanie Wan’s Talk Title: Impact of contact lens wear and dry eye on the amicrobiomic status of the murine cornea

Abstract: Contrasting with the conjunctiva and other exposed body surfaces, the cornea does not host a stable bacterial population (amicrobiomic). Yet, the cornea and conjunctiva are not usually distinguished in ocular surface microbiome research. Additionally, commonly used...   More >

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Computational dysfunctions in anxiety: Failure to differentiate signal from noise

Colloquium | April 10 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Martin Paulus, Scientific Director and President, Laureate Institute for Brain Research

Department of Psychology

Monday, April 16, 2018

A Tale of Two Strains: Ocular Studies in B6 and BALB/c Mice

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | April 16 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Elizabeth Berger, PhD, Professor, Wayne State University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Corneal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa perforates the cornea in C57BL/6 (B6), but not BALB/c mice. Comparative analysis of these two responses has revealed that B6 mice, type 1-dominant responders, exhibit increased inflammation, leading to an exacerbated disease response when compared to BALB/c mice, which demonstrate a less severe/resistant response and are classified as type...   More >

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Neural oscillations: What we're doing wrong

Colloquium | April 17 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Brad Voytek, Professor, Department of Cognitive Science, UCSD

Department of Psychology

Friday, April 20, 2018

Optogenetic and Chemogenetic Tools for Mapping Molecular and Cellular Circuits: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | April 20 | 2-3 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall


Prof. Alice Ting, Stanford University, Genetics/Biology/Chemistry

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


The first part of the talk will describe optogenetic tools we have developed for labeling and manipulating functional circuits in the brain (e.g., FLARE and related tools).

The second part of the talk will describe chemogenetic tools we have developed for mapping molecular interactions in living cells (e.g., APEX and TurboID).

********
Alice Ting did her PhD in Chem here at UC Berkeley...   More >

Monday, April 23, 2018

Mobilizing Synaptic Plasticity to Promote Recovery from Amblyopia

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | April 23 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Dr. Mark Bear, PhD, PiCower Professor of Neuroscience, MIT

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Amblyopia is a prevalent form of visual disability that arises during infancy and early childhood when inputs to the visual cortex from the two eyes are poorly balanced (e.g., by misalignment of the eyes, asymmetric refraction, or opacities and obstructions of one eye). Characteristics of amblyopia are very poor acuity in one eye, and an attendant loss of stereopsis. The current standard of care...   More >

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Deciphering the Dynamics of the Unconscious Brain Under General Anesthesia

Seminar | April 26 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Emery Brown , Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, April 27, 2018

Education, plasticity and learning: the virtuous cycle between education and neuroscience

Lecture | April 27 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall


Jason D. Yeatman, PhD, Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences, University of Washington

Department of Psychology


Reading instruction prompts the emergence of neural circuits that are specialized for rapidly translating printed symbols into sound and meaning. Understanding how these circuits differ in children with dyslexia, and change with learning, is an important scientific challenge that holds practical implications for education. In this talk I will present new data linking changes in the white matter...   More >

Thursday, May 3, 2018

Perturbation and Control of Human Brain Network Dynamics

Seminar | May 3 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Dani Bassett, University of Pennsylvania

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: The human brain is a complex organ characterized by heterogeneous patterns of interconnections. New non-invasive imaging techniques now allow for these patterns to be carefully and comprehensively mapped in individual humans, paving the way for a better understanding of how wiring supports our thought processes. While a large body of work now focuses on descriptive statistics to...   More >

Monday, May 7, 2018

Oxyopia - Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Paul Cullen, John Flanagan Lab; Brian Cheung, Bruno Olshausen Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Paul Cullen
John Flanagan Lab
Title: The Secret Lives of Retinal Astrocytes
Abstract: The study of glia – the support cells of the central nervous system – has come a long way since Rudolf Virchow described a connective tissue of the brain that he termed ‘nervenkitt’ in 1856. Rather than a passive scaffolding for neurons (the word ‘glia’ means glue in Greek), these cells are responsible for a...   More >

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Expander graph architectures for high-capacity neural memory

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | May 22 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Rishidev Chaudhuri, UT Austin/Simons Institute UC Berkeley

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Memory networks in the brain must balance two competing demands. On the one hand, they should have high capacity to store the large numbers of stimuli an organism must remember over a lifetime. On the other hand, noise is ubiquitous in the brain and memory is typically retrieved from incomplete input. Thus, memories must be encoded with some redundancy, which reduces capacity. Current neural...   More >

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Characterizing neurons in the visual area V4 through interpretable machine learning

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | May 23 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Reza Abbasi-Asl, UC Berekely

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In the past decade, research in machine learning has been exceedingly focused on the development of algorithms and models with remarkably high predictive capabilities. Models such as convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have achieved state-of-the-art predictive performance for many tasks in computer vision, autonomous driving, and transfer learning in areas such as computational neuroscience....   More >

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Inference and Efficient Coding in Natural Auditory Scenes

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | May 30 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Wiktor Mlynarski, MIT

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Processing of natural stimuli in sensory systems has been traditionally studied within two theoretical frameworks: probabilistic inference and efficient coding. Probabilistic inference specifies optimal strategies for learning about relevant properties of the environment from local and ambiguous sensory signals. Efficient coding provides a normative approach to study encoding of natural stimuli...   More >

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Eavesdropping on Cortical Plasticity

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | June 14 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Adi Mizrahi, The Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


One of the overarching goal in our lab is to understand cortical plasticity in adult circuits. This goal remains challenging because cortical neurons are functionally heterogeneous and access to specific active neurons for further experimentation is limited. In the primary auditory cortex (A1), for example, spiking responses to natural stimuli like vocalization cannot be easily predicted from...   More >

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Optimal sensors in random environments

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | June 20 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Sarah Marzen, MIT

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


The efficient coding hypothesis has revolutionized theoretical neuroscience. I would argue that it is best understood using rate-distortion theory. I use rate-distortion theory to inspire a simple model of sensory adaptation. In randomly drawn, fluctuating environments, this model suggests that neurogenesis in sensory regions is unnecessary and predicts that biological sensors are poised to just...   More >

Monday, June 25, 2018

Expression of ethanol sensitive glycine receptors in several brain regions

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | June 25 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Luis Aguayo, University of Concepcion, Chile

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Synaptic glycine receptors (GlyR) are expressed primarily in spinal cord and brain stem neurons. GlyRs are sensitive to general anesthetics, neurosteroids, Zn2+ and ethanol. Recently, GlyRs were also found in other supratentorial regions, but their properties are largely unknown. Mesolimbic regions, such as ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (nAc), were also found to express GlyRs...   More >

Thursday, August 30, 2018

The Ins and Outs of Visual cortex

Seminar | August 30 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Massimo Scanziani, University of California San Francisco, Center for Integrative Neuroscience Sandler Neurosciences Center

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, September 10, 2018

An objective functional biomarker of retinal ganglion cell function: Applications for probing disease mechanisms

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | September 10 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Suresh Viswanathan, Associate Professor & Chair of Biological and Vision Sciences, SUNY College of Optometry

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Work over the last decade and a half have identified and characterized a retinal ganglion cell nerve component in the flash electroretinogram. This talk will review the evidence for retinal ganglion cell origin of this potential, its mechanism of generation and applications towards understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of glaucoma and mild traumatic brain injury.

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Correlated neural activity across the brains of socially interacting bats

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | September 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Wujie Zhang, Yartsev Lab, UC Berkeley

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Social interaction is fundamental to our everyday life and that of diverse animals. When two animals interact, they behave in different ways. Thus, to get a full picture of the neural activity underlying each interaction, we need to record from the brains of both animals at the same time. We do so in a highly social mammal, the Egyptian fruit bat, using wireless electrophysiology, which allows...   More >

Monday, September 17, 2018

​Graduate Students Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | September 17 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Vivek Labhishetty, PhD; Baladitya Yellapragada, PhD

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Vivek Labhishetty's Abstract
Retinal-Conjugate Surfaces: The Blur Horopter
When we fixate at an object, the image of that object is brought to sharp focus on the fovea due to the eye’s accommodation. Other objects in the periphery may be farther or nearer than best focus on those parts of the retina. We measured the shape of surface of best focus in the world as the eye accommodates to...   More >



Information decomposition

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | September 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Juergen Jost, MPI for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In many situations, two or more sources have some information about a target. For instance, sensory input and context information can jointly determine the firing pattern of a neuron. Since the information from the two sources is typically not identical, one wishes to decompose it in those parts that are unique to each source, what is shared between them and what is complementary, that is,...   More >

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Learning Representations for Planning

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | September 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Aviv Tamar, Postdoc, UC Berkeley's Artificial Intelligence Research Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract:
How can we build autonomous robots that operate in unstructured and dynamic environments such as homes or hospitals?
This problem has been investigated under several disciplines, including planning (motion planning, task planning, etc.), and reinforcement learning. While both of these fields have witnessed tremendous progress, each have fundamental drawbacks when it comes to...   More >

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Monday, September 24, 2018

​Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | September 24 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Ethan Bensinger, Roorda Lab; Baladitya Yellapragada, Yu Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Ethan Bensinger's Talk Title
Dysflective Cones: Differences in Cone Reflectivity and Function in Healthy Subjects
Confocal Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images acquired in healthy subjects reveal small areas with diminished cone reflectivity. In a survey of AOSLO images these transient hyporeflective areas of cones were found in 19 of the 80 eyes. 3 healthy subjects with...   More >



The neural circuits underlying motor planning and short-term memory

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | September 24 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Karel Svoboda, Janelia Research Campus, HHMI

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Our goal is to uncover the principles by which mammalian neural circuits perform fundamental computations, from perception to action. Cortex is parcellated into areas with distinct functions, each of which contains complex local circuits. Cortical areas in turn associate into mesoscale circuits with other cortical and subcortical areas via long-range connections. Information is represented by...   More >



The neural circuits underlying motor planning and short-term memory

Seminar | September 24 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center | Note change in time


Karel Svoboda, Janelia Research Campus, HHMI

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Our goal is to uncover the principles by which mammalian neural circuits perform fundamental computations, from perception to action. Cortex is parcellated into areas with distinct functions, each of which contains complex local circuits. Cortical areas in turn associate into mesoscale circuits with other cortical and subcortical areas via long-range connections. Information is represented by...   More >

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

A New Benchmark and Progress Toward Improved Weakly Supervised Learning

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Russ Webb, Apple

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


A primary goal of this work is to give a clear example of the limits of current, deep-learning techniques and suggest how progress can be made. The presentation will include a discussion of open questions, unpublished experiments, suggestions on how to make progress. This work is founded on the paper Knowledge Matters: Importance of Prior Information for Optimization by Gulcehre et. al., which...   More >



Repairing the brain after stroke: a biomaterials strategy

Seminar | September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall


Tatiana Segura, Duke University

Bioengineering (BioE)


Stroke is the leading cause of disability due to the brain’s limited capacity to regenerate damaged tissue. After stroke, an increased inflammatory and immune response coupled with severely limited angiogenesis and neuronal growth results in a stroke cavity devoid of normal brain tissue. However, stroke also induces the formation of a pro-repair/plastic region in the area adjacent to the stroke...   More >

Friday, September 28, 2018

Monday, October 1, 2018

(Computer) Vision without Sight: Finding, Reading, and Magnifying Text

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 1 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Roberto Manduchi, Professor of Computer Engineering, UC Santa Cruz

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Reading is a pervasive activity in our daily life. We read text printed on books and documents, shown on directional signs and advertisement, and displayed on computer and smartphone screens. People who are blind can read text using OCR on their smartphone; those with low vision may magnify onscreen content. But these tasks are not always easy. Reading a document with OCR requires taking a...   More >

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Berkeley ACM A.M. Turing Laureate Lecture: Towards a Conscious AI: A Computer Architecture Inspired by Neuroscience

Colloquium | October 17 | 4-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium


Manuel Blum, UC Berkeley

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)


Thanks to major advances in neuroscience, we are on the brink of a scientific understanding of how the brain achieves consciousness. This talk will describe neuroscientist Bernard Baars' Global Workspace Model (GWM) of the brain, its implications for understanding consciousness, and a novel computer architecture that it inspires. The Model gives insight for the design of machines that truly...   More >

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | October 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Adam Kepecs

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, October 29, 2018

Vision to Action: Towards a Cellular-Resolution Atlas of the Zebrafish Visual and Visuomotor System

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | October 29 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Herwig Baier, Department Genes – Circuits – Behavior, Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, 82152 Martinsried, Germany

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Understanding brain-wide neuronal dynamics and behavior requires a detailed map of the underlying circuit architecture. We built an interactive cellular-resolution atlas of the zebrafish brain, with a focus on the visual and visuomotor system, and generated from our dataset an inter-areal wiring diagram, which serves as ground truth for synapse-scale, electron microscopic reconstructions. We have...   More >

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Information Storage in Memory Engrams

Seminar | November 1 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Tomas Ryan, Trinity College Dublin, School of Biochemistry and Immunology,

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, November 9, 2018

Attentional Episodes and Cognitive Control

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | November 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


John Duncan, MRC Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Human fMRI studies show a tightly-localised set of “multiple-demand” or MD regions, involved in solution of many different cognitive challenges, widely separated yet strongly functionally connected, and linked to standard measures of fluid intelligence. Multiple-demand regions are generally associated with “cognitive control”, but how should control be conceived? Using data from...   More >

Thursday, November 15, 2018

How do Astrocytes Sculpt Synaptic Circuits?

Seminar: HWNI/MCB Seminar | November 15 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 177 Li Ka Shing Center


Cagla Eroglu, Duke University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


How are synaptic networks formed during development and remodeled during learning and disease? This is the main question that drives our research. In particular, we investigate the roles of glial cells called astrocytes in the development, remodeling and function of synaptic circuits. In my talk, I will share findings from my lab on two distinct molecular mechanisms through which astrocytes...   More >

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Division of Immunology and Pathogenesis

Seminar | November 27 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Jun R. Huh, Harvard University

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Convergent circuitry for thermoregulation

Seminar | November 29 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Lily Jan, University of California, San Francisco

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Division of Neurobiology and H.Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | December 6 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


James Trimmer, University of California, Davis, Department of Pharmacology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH