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Tuesday, July 18, 2017

State Dependent Modulation of Perception Based on a Computational Model of Conditioning

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | July 18 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Jordi Puigbò, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona - Spain)

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


The embodied mammalian brain evolved to adapt to an only partially known and knowable world. The adaptive labeling of the world is critically dependent on the neocortex which in turn is modulated by a range of subcortical systems such as the thalamus, ventral striatum, and the amygdala. A particular case in point is the learning paradigm of classical conditioning, where acquired representations...   More >

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The Stabilized Supralinear Network, or, The Importance of Being Loosely Balanced (Miller) / Spatiotemporal profiles of spiking variability in recurrent networks (Doiron)

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | August 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Ken Miller, Columbia University; Brent Doiron, University of Pittsburgh

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Miller: I will describe the Stabilized Supralinear Network mechanism and its application to understanding sensory cortical behavior. The mechanism is based on a network of excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) neurons with very simple assumptions: (1) Individual neurons have an expansive or supralinear input/output functions, e.g. a power law with power >1; (2) Feedback inhibition is sufficiently...   More >

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Discovering Relationships and their Structures Across Disparate Data Modalities

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | August 17 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Joshua Vogelstein, Johns Hopkins University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Determining whether certain properties are related to other properties is fundamental to scientific discovery. As data collection rates accelerate, it is becoming increasingly difficult yet ever more important to determine whether one property of data (e.g., cloud density) is related to another (e.g., grass wetness). Only if two properties are related are further investigations into the geometry...   More >

Monday, August 28, 2017

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

A Capacity Scaling Law for Artificial Neural Networks

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | September 6 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Gerald Friedland, UC Berkeley

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In this talk, we derive the calculation of two critical numbers that quantify the capabilities of artificial neural networks with gating functions, such as sign, sigmoid, or rectified linear units. First, we derive the calculation of the upper limit Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension of a network with binary output layer, which is the theoretical limit for perfect fitting of the training data. Second,...   More >



fMRI at high magnetic fields: Spatial resolution limits and applications

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | September 6 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Essa Yacoub, University of Minnesota

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


While higher magnetic fields present the opportunity to address higher resolution neuroscience questions, such applications are faced with confounds of fMRI spatial specificity, as well as technical challenges in acquiring higher resolution images. Significant efforts have been put forth over the past 20 years towards understanding these issues and in addressing them with technical developments....   More >

Thursday, September 7, 2017

IB Faculty on Parade

Seminar | September 7 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building


Daniela Kaufer, University of California, Berkeley; Brent Mishler, University of California, Berkeley

Department of Integrative Biology



Dynamics of prefrontal computations during decision-making

Seminar | September 7 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Joni Wallis, University of California, Berkeley

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, September 11, 2017

Oxyopia Postdoctoral Researcher Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | September 11 | 12 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Adrien Chopin; Brian Schmidt

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Adrien Chopin, PhD
Postdoctoral Researcher, Vision Science Program

Title: Bringing completely-stereoblind amblyopes to stereo-recovery
Abstract: Stereoscopic perception is an important component of a normal binocular life. Amblyopic patients often experience a disrupted binocular vision and may benefit from stereopsis recovery. Stereovision is usually tested with clinical stereotests. First,...   More >

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Thriving in Science September Seminar: "My Journey from Physics to Neurobiology as an Imposter" with Dr. Marla Feller

Seminar | September 13 | 6-7 p.m. | 105 Stanley Hall


Dr. Marla Feller, UC Berkeley

QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences


Talk will be followed by Artichoke Basille pizza and refreshments in Stanley Hall.

Marla Feller is a Professor at UC Berkeley in Molecular and Cell Biology Department where she is the Head of the Neurobiology Division and a member of the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute. Dr. Feller received an AB in Physics in 1985 and a Ph. D. in Physics in 1992, both from UC Berkeley. Dr. Feller...   More >

Friday, September 15, 2017

Bay Area Vision Research Day

Conference/Symposium | September 15 | 8 a.m.-7 p.m. |  Anna Head Alumnae Hall (2537 Haste St.)


UC Berkeley Vision Science Department


The Bay Area Vision Research Day (BAVRD) is a one-day research conference devoted to bringing the vision research community of the Bay Area together in order to present and to discuss new and exciting findings in the fields of visual psychophysics, ophthalmology, optometry, biology, neuroscience, and computer vision. What distinguishes BAVRD from other conferences is that it is primarily...   More >

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Clinical Science Psychology Students 3rd Yr Talk

Colloquium | September 19 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 Beach Room


Department of Psychology


Caitlin Gasperetti
Talk: Characterizing Sleep in Evening-Type Adolescents

Niki Gumport
Talk: Patient Learning of Treatment Contents in Cognitive Therapy

Enitan Marcelle
Talk: Prenatal Predictors of Working Memory Functioning in ADHD

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Thursday, September 21, 2017

The neural mechanism of aggression

Seminar | September 21 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Dayu Lin, New York University, School of Medicine

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, September 25, 2017

​Two forms of perceptual learning generalization: Immediate transfer and learning to learn

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | September 25 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


C. Shawn Green, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


​While it is clear that, with appropriate practice, people will improve on most perceptual tasks, the improvements seen from such practice commonly fail generalize to new tasks. However, while this type of learning specificity is undoubtedly the most frequently described outcome of perceptual training, over the past few decades, numerous examples have been described in the literature...   More >

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Computational Approaches to Human Affective Neuroscience

Lecture | September 27 | 3 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Sonia Bishop, Professor, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Abstract: Computational modelling allows us to move beyond simple approaches to experimental design. Here, I will present two very different examples of integrating computational modelling into human affective neuroscience. In the first example, we sought to better characterize the mechanisms underlying intolerance of uncertainty in anxiety. Participants performed bandit style decision-making...   More >

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Nature and nurture in neurocognitive development: insights from studies of plasticity in blindness

Seminar | September 28 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Marina Bedny, John Hopkins, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH



Nature and nurture in neurocognitive development: insights from studies of plasticity in blindness

Colloquium | September 28 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Marina Bedny, Johns Hopkins University

Department of Psychology


The human cortex consists of distinct networks that support cognitive functions such as language processing, face perception, and motor control. How do intrinsic physiology and experience determine this specialization? Studies of sensory loss provide unique insights into this question. In individuals who are blind from birth so called “visual” cortices acquire responses to sound and touch....   More >

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Monday, October 9, 2017

​Biophysical Cues and Ocular Cell Behaviors: The Big Impact of Little and Squishy Things

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Chris Murphy, D.V.M., PhD, Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, UC Davis; Sara Thomasy, D.V.M., PhD, Associate Professor and Associate Researcher, Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, UC Davis

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Biophysical cues, such as substratum topography and compliance, are ubiquitous attributes of the miroenvironment of cells. They have been proven to be as potent as soluble cytoactive factors in the modulation of cell behaviors. The main focus of our labs has been the investigation of how biophysical cues modulate cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and response to growth...   More >

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Genetic Approaches to Brain Circuit Mapping and Cell Type Characterization

Seminar | October 19 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Hongkui Zeng, Allen Institute for Brain Science

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, October 20, 2017

Becoming More Productive: Workflow Strategies for Grad Students

Workshop | October 20 | 1-2:30 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 2101, Bioscience Library Training Room


Graduate students in the Life and Health Sciences disciplines; Becky Miller, Natural Resources & Environmental Sciences Librarian; Jeffery Loo, Optometry & Health Sciences Librarian

Library


In this workshop, graduate students from the Life and Health Sciences will present a range of strategies for gathering, storing, organizing, and synthesizing all your information and data for your research and teaching. Come learn to be more productive!


Students - Graduate

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | October 26 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition | Note change in date


Indira Raman, Northwestern University

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Information seeking and randomization in human exploration and exploitation

Seminar | November 30 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Robert Wilson, University of Arizona, Department of Psychology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Neural oscillations: what, where, when, and why?

Seminar | December 7 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Bradley Voytek, University of California, San Diego

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, December 15, 2017

Neural circuits of dexterity

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | December 15 | 12 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Dr. Adam Hantman, Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Dexterous movements serve the major functions of the brain, perception and manipulation of the world. Considering the range of possible actions and the complexity of musculoskeletal arrangements, control of the hand is an amazing achievement of the nervous system. Dexterous behavior involves understanding objects in the world, developing appropriate plans, converting those plans into appropriate...   More >

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Seminar | January 24 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building


Hillel Adesnik, University of California, Berkeley, Molecular and Cell Biology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology