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Monday, March 20, 2017

Visual Perception and Circuit-Level Insights into Autism

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | March 20 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Caroline Roberston, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Atypical visual perception is a defining characteristic of autism, noted since the earliest reports of the condition. We know very little about where visual differences arise in the autistic brain or how they relate to the wider litany of symptoms associated with the condition. In this talk, I will first present extensive fMRI and psychophysical evidence that autistic visual differences originate...   More >

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

The neuroscience of cognitive development and mathematics skill acquisition

Lecture | March 21 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Torkel Klingberg

Department of Psychology


Professor Torkel Klingberg from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden will be giving a lecture in the Cognitive Neuroscience colloquium series in Psychology.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

The Future of the Multi-core Platform Task-Superscalar Extensions to Von-Neumann Architecture and Optimization for Neural Networks

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | March 22 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Michael Frank, Magicore Systems

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


560 Evans
Technology scaling had been carrying computer science thru the second half of the 20th century until single CPU performance started leveling off, after which multi- and many-core processors, including GPUs, emerged as the substrate for high performance computing. Mobile market implementations followed this trend and today you might be carrying a phone with more than 16 different...   More >

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Neuroscience Student Seminar Series

Seminar | March 23 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center | Canceled


CANCELED - Kia Nobre, University of Oxford

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Friday, March 24, 2017

Formats for thinking

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | March 24 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Elisabeth Camp, Rutgers University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Many philosophers, logicians and psychologists assume an exhaustive and exclusive dichotomy between "imagistic", iconic, or pictorial representations and "discursive", logical, or propositional ones. Others dismiss the distinction as meaningless, on the ground that any content can be captured in propositional terms. Adherents of both positions often conclude that thought -- at least, cognition of...   More >

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Let's Have an Awesome Time Doing Science!

Conference/Symposium | March 29 | 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall


Steve Whitelam (LBL): a material scientist passionate about science writing; Eugene Cordero (San Jose State University): a climate scientist passionate about educational outreach; Michael Mayhew (LLNL): a computational biologist who tries to teach computers to diagnose people's diseases; Ryan Dalton (UC Berkeley): a Miller Fellow studying the molecular basis of sensory perception; Traci Grzymala (UC Berkeley): trained as an insect biologist and now brings science and scientists to elementary schoolers; Marla Feller (UC Berkeley): a physicist-turned-neuroscientist seeking to understand the circuitry of vision; Lior Pachter (CalTech): a computational biologist who is dedicated to promoting scientific integrity

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


Register online.



Reprogramming the Brain to Health Symposium: Brain Training to Promote Brain Health

Conference/Symposium | March 29 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building


Mark D'Espostio, UC Berkeley; Dan Krawcyzk, UT Dallas; Tony Chen, UCSF; Ian Robertson, UT Dallas; Michael Merzenich, UCSF; Adam Gazzaley, UCSF; Sandra Chapman, UT Dallas

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


This symposium will bring together the most distinguished brain scientists to share and learn up-to-date breakthroughs in brain research.


RSVP by March 28 by emailing ucbbraintrainingsymposium@gmail.com.

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Berkeley Grad Slam Championship

Special Event: Neuroscience Seminar | April 5 | 3-5:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall


Tim Day, Flannery / Schaffer Lab

Graduate Division


See eight graduate student semi-finalists compete to be the Berkeley Champion!
Everyone is invited to cheer on graduate students as they present their three-minute research talks! While a panel of distinguished judges ascertains the top two winners, audience members will have the opportunity to vote a “people’s choice” winner.

Wednesday, April 5, 2017
3 – 5:30 pm
309 Sproul Hall
FREE and...   More >

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Neuroscience Student Seminar Series

Seminar | April 6 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


CANCELED - Danielle Bassett, University of Pennsylvania

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology



Friday, April 7, 2017

Counterfactual thinking and comparative similarity

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | April 7 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Felipe de Brigard, Duke University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Counterfactual thinking involves imagining hypothetical alternatives to reality. Philosopher David Lewis argued that people estimate the subjective plausibility that a counterfactual event could have occurred by comparing an imagined possible world in which the counterfactual statement is true against the current, actual world in which the counterfactual statement is false. Accordingly,...   More >

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquia

Colloquium | April 11 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Vincent P. Clark, University of New Mexico

Department of Psychology

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Nonlinear ICA using temporal structure: a principled framework for unsupervised deep learning

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Aapo Hyvarinen, University College London

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Unsupervised learning, in particular learning general nonlinear representations, is one of the deepest problems in machine learning. Estimating latent quantities in a generative model provides a principled framework, and has been successfully used in the linear case, e.g. with independent component analysis (ICA) and sparse coding. However, extending ICA to the nonlinear case has proven to be...   More >

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Friday, April 14, 2017

Cognition Colloquium: Emily Liquin "The Effects of Explanation Generation on Explore-Exploit Decision Making and Learning"& Sophia Sanborn "TBA"

Colloquium | April 14 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Room 5101


Emily Liquin, UC Berkeley; Sophia Sanborn, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Grad student Emily Liquin will present her research, "The Effects of Explanation Generation on Explore-Exploit Decision Making and Learning," and grad student Sophia Sanborn will present some of her original research, topic TBA.

Monday, April 17, 2017

Fast Perception of Binocular Disparity

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | April 17 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Benjamin Backus, State University of New York

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


How quickly can binocular disparities be converted into perceived depth? Classic experiments by Barbara Gillam and colleagues showed cases in which stereopsis took many seconds, but in retrospect their task and stimulus design were problematic. Rapidly changing disparities are perceptually difficult to track, which also suggests that stereopsis is generally slow, but waiting for integration might...   More >



Hidden Hearing Loss: Synaptopathy in noise-induced and age related cochlear damage: Berkeley Ear Club

Colloquium | April 17 | 4 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room 3105


Charles Liberman, Mass Eye & Ear Eaton Peabody Lab Boston

Department of Psychology


The classic view of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is that the “primary” targets are hair cells, and that cochlear-nerve loss is “secondary” to hair cell degeneration. Our recent work in mouse and guinea pig has challenged that view. In noise-induced hearing loss, exposures causing only reversible threshold shifts (and no hair cell loss) nevertheless cause permanent loss of >50% of...   More >

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

The future of fMRI in cognitive neuroscience

Lecture | April 18 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Professor Russell Poldrack, Stanford University

Department of Psychology


Professor Russ Poldrack from the Department of Psychology at Stanford University will speak in the Cognitive Neuroscience colloquium series.

Friday, April 21, 2017

Objectivity and Trained Judgment: Toward an ethnography of experimental psychology

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | April 21 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Emily Martin, New York University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Historians of psychology have described how the "introspection" of early Wundtian psychology largely came to be ruled out of experimental psychology settings by the mid-20th century. In this talk I will take a fresh look at the years before this process was complete -- from the vantage point of early ethnographic and psychological field expeditions and from observing several current psychology...   More >

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Bridging the gap between the spatial and mnemonic views of the hippocampus

Seminar | April 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Elizabeth Buffalo, University of Washington

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, April 28, 2017

Cognition Colloquium: Tracking early vocabulary development with smartphones

Colloquium | April 28 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Stephan Meylan, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Our own Stephan Meylan will present his work on, "Tracking early vocabulary development with smartphones."

Monday, May 1, 2017

Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Rachel Albert, PhD Candidate (O’Brein Lab); Paul Cullen (Flanagan Lab)

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Rachel Albert's talk title is:

Latency Requirements for Foveated Rendering

&

Paul Cullen's talk title is:

Under Pressure: Understanding Glaucoma through the Lens of Astrocyte Reactivity

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

My Love Affair with the Brain: May Movie at Moffitt

Film - Documentary | May 3 | 7-9 p.m. | 405 Moffitt Undergraduate Library


Library


Spend Wednesday evening of RRR week learning more about your brain, and how it can thrive! This delightful documentary follows renowned brain scientist and UC Berkeley professor emerita of anatomy, Dr. Marian Diamond, introducing us to her groundbreaking accomplishments at a time when so few women entered her field, as well as her entertaining teaching style and charming personality.


Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate

Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate

Must have a UCB student ID for entrance.

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Friday, May 5, 2017

Cognition Colloquium: David Bourgin, "Putting the “me” back in recommendation: A comparative study of recommendation models from computer science and cognitive psychology"

Colloquium | May 5 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Room 5101


David Bourgin, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Grad student David Bourgin will present some of his original research, "Putting the “me” back in recommendation: A comparative study of recommendation models from computer science and cognitive psychology."

Monday, May 8, 2017

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Selective Attention in the Service of Reinforcement Learning: 2017 Ghiselli Lecture

Lecture | May 10 | 3 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Professor Yael Niv, Princeton University

Department of Psychology


On the face of it, most real-world world tasks are hopelessly complex from the point of view of reinforcement learning mechanisms. In particular, due to the "curse of dimensionality", even the simple task of crossing the street should, in principle, take thousands of trials to learn to master. But we are better than that.. How does our brain do it? In this talk I will argue that the limited...   More >

Monday, May 15, 2017

Behavioural Signatures of Ganglion Cell Dysfunction in Glaucoma

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  100 Minor Addition


​Andrew John Anderson, University of Melbourne

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


​It is well established that retinal ganglion cells die in glaucoma. What is less clear is whether glaucoma induces a protracted period of dysfunction prior to cell death. This talk will review the strengths and limitations of some of the behavioural evidence that has been used to argue for the presence of dysfunctional retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. Establishing that such dysfunction...   More >



Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Neuroscience Thesis Symposium

Conference/Symposium: Thesis Seminar | May 17 | 12-6 p.m. | 245 Li Ka Shing Center


Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


12pm: Joe Driscoll, Fields lab
“Circuit Specific Modulation by Corticotrophin Releasing Factor in Ventral Tegmental Neurons”

12:45pm: Chris Holdgraf, Knight lab
"Predictive models for studying auditory perception in human electrophysiology"

1:30pm: Shawn Marks, Jagust lab
“The influence of age and Alzheimer’s pathology on hippocampal function”

2:15pm: Anna Vlasits, Feller...   More >

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Neuroscience Thesis Symposium

Conference/Symposium: Thesis Seminar | May 18 | 3:30-5:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


3:30pm – Brian Isett, Feldman lab
"Simultaneous coding of texture and local shape in mouse somatosensory cortex"

4:15pm – Yvonne Fonken, Knight lab
“How what we know shapes future perception and action: investigating the mechanisms of prediction in the brain.”

Monday, May 22, 2017

Oxyopia Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 22 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Nevin Wadie El-Nimri OD, MS, FAAO PhD Candidate

Title: Effect of Topical Latanoprost on Myopia Progression in Guinea Pigs

Abstract: Myopia (near-sightedness) results from progressive, excessive eye enlargement and is associated with blinding complications. It has become a significant public health concern, reaching epidemic levels in some parts of the world. The eye is like a balloon, with...   More >

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

The Role of Astrocytes in Neurovascular Coupling at the Capillary and Arteriole Level in the Retina and Brain

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 23 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Anusha Mishra, University College London, UK

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Neuronal activity evokes a spatially and temporally localized increase in blood flow to power the information processing carried out by the neurons, a phenomenon that underlies BOLD fMRI signals. This neurovascular coupling occurs both in the brain and the retina.

In the retina, both light- and glial-stimulation evoke pronounced arteriole dilations (30.8±3.7% and 23.5±4.1%, respectively). This...   More >

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Time-Contrastive Networks: Self-Supervised Learning from Multi-View Observation

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | May 24 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Pierre Sermanet, Google Brain

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


We propose a self-supervised approach for learning representations entirely from unlabeled videos recorded from multiple viewpoints. This is particularly relevant to robotic imitation learning, which requires a viewpoint-invariant understanding of the relationships between humans and their environment, including object interactions, attributes and body pose. We train our representations using a...   More >

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Likelihood Based Evaluation for Scanpath Models in Scene Viewing

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | May 30 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Heiko Schütt, University of Tübingen

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


When observers view natural scenes their eye movements show elaborate statistical patterns beyond the fixation density over an image. An important approach to understand these patterns --- and thus ultimately to understand how humans choose where to look at --- is to build models which generate full scanpaths in natural scenes, i.e. a sequence of fixation locations. There are a multitude of...   More >



Neural circuits for goal-directed sensorimotor transformation

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | May 30 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Carl Petersen, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL)

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


A key function of the brain is to interpret incoming sensory information in the context of learned associations in order to guide adaptive behavior. However, the precise neuronal circuits and causal mechanisms underlying goal-directed sensorimotor transformations remain to be clearly defined for the mammalian brain. Technological advances in mouse genetics to define cell-types, in optogenetics to...   More >

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Monitoring Covert Visual Decisions via Neural Population Dynamics in Frontal Cortex

Seminar: Distinguished Lecture | June 1 | 4-5 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


William T. Newsome, Vincent C.V. Woo Director of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Cognitive Mapping and Planning for Visual Navigation

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | June 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Saurabh Gupta, UC Berkeley

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


560 Evans
We introduce a novel neural architecture for navigation in novel environments that learns a cognitive map from first person viewpoints and plans a sequence of actions towards goals in the environment. The Cognitive Mapper and Planner (CMP) is based on two key ideas: a) a unified joint architecture for mapping and planning, such that the mapping is driven by the needs of the planner,...   More >

Friday, June 9, 2017

Sculpted Light in the Brain

Conference/Symposium: Neuroscience Seminar | June 9 | 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. |  Stanley Hall


Bernardo Sabatini, Harvard Medical School; Hillel Adesnik, UC Berkeley; Josh Trachtenberg, UCLA; Laura Waller, UC Berkeley; Michael Hausser, University College London; Na Ji, UC Berkeley; Michael Lin, Stanford University; Rafael Yuste, Columbia University; Tommaso Fellin, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia; Ehud Isacoff, UC Berkeley

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


“Sculpted Light in the Brain” is a one-day conference and workshop aimed at fostering collaborations between neuroscientists, computer scientists, optics researchers, and other scientists who share the common interest of developing better technology to observe and control neural activity in the awake, behaving brain. “Sculpted Light” refers to a broad class of methods where light is shaped to...   More >

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Computational experiments with two neuro-inspired abstractions: Hebbian learning and spike timing information

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | June 14 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Upamanyu Madhow, UCSB

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In this talk, we discuss early work on two different neuro-inspired computational abstractions. In the first, we investigate flavors of competitive Hebbian learning for bottom-up training of deep convolutional neural networks. The resulting sparse neural codes are competitive with layered autoencoders on standard image datasets. Unlike standard training based on optimizing a cost function, our...   More >

Monday, June 19, 2017

A Deeper Understating of Deep Learning - Why Deep Neural Networks work so well?

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | June 19 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Naftali Tishby, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Through analytical and numerical studies of Deep Neural Networks (using standard TensorFlow) in the ""Information Plane"" - the Mutual Information the network layers preserve on the input and the output variables - we obtain the following new insights:

1. The training epochs, for each layer, are divided into two phases: (1) fitting the training data - increasing the mutual information on the...   More >

Monday, July 3, 2017

Fast multimodal neuroimaging for tracking whole-brain dynamics

Seminar: BIC Seminar | July 3 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Laura Lewis, Harvard MGH

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Many aspects of cognition take place on a timescale of hundreds of milliseconds, and measuring neural activity in this frequency range is essential for neuroscience. However, current non-invasive neuroimaging methods are not able to precisely localize oscillatory neural activity above 0.2 Hz. We show that fast fMRI acquisition enables the direct detection of neural oscillations with frequencies...   More >

Thursday, July 6, 2017

7T MRI: A Game-changer for Imaging Neuroscience

Seminar: BIC Seminar | July 6 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Robert Turner, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Psychiatry as a branch of medicine relies on good systems neuroscience of the human brain. When fMRI was first invented in 1990-91, with its non-invasive high spatial resolution mapping of evoked brain activity, many researchers hoped that rapid progress would ensue in understanding mental illness. However, the hope-for gains have been slow to materialize. I argue that inadequate efforts have so...   More >

Friday, July 7, 2017

Imaging cortical columns and cortical layers at 7 and 9.4 Tesla: From sensory mapping to cognitive applications

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | July 7 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Rainer Goebel, Maastricht University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Ultra-­high magnetic field (UHF) fMRI at 7 Tesla and higher enables measurement of human brain activity with sub-­millimeter spatial resolution allowing to differentiate brain activation at the mesoscopic level of cortical layers and columnar-­like feature clusters. Recent experiments show that it is possible to map known columnar organizations in specialised brain areas (e.g. V1-­V3, A1, hMT,...   More >

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Science at Cal Lecture - Mapping how language is represented in the human brain

Lecture | July 15 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building


Dr. Alex Huth

Science@Cal


In the past decade one trend in neuroscience has been to switch away from using simple, controlled experiments, and instead to study how the brain reacts to more complex, natural situations. Alex Huth will talk about one experiment in which subjects listened to hours of natural, narrative stories from The Moth Radio Hour while undergoing fMRI scanning. In order to take advantage of this complex,...   More >


All Audiences, Alumni, Faculty, Friends of the University, General Public, Staff, Students - Graduate, Students - Prospective, Students - Undergraduate, Cal Parents

All Audiences, Alumni, Faculty, Friends of the University, General Public, Staff, Students - Graduate, Students - Prospective, Students - Undergraduate, Cal Parents

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

State Dependent Modulation of Perception Based on a Computational Model of Conditioning

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | July 18 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Jordi Puigbò, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona - Spain)

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


The embodied mammalian brain evolved to adapt to an only partially known and knowable world. The adaptive labeling of the world is critically dependent on the neocortex which in turn is modulated by a range of subcortical systems such as the thalamus, ventral striatum, and the amygdala. A particular case in point is the learning paradigm of classical conditioning, where acquired representations...   More >

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The Stabilized Supralinear Network, or, The Importance of Being Loosely Balanced (Miller) / Spatiotemporal profiles of spiking variability in recurrent networks (Doiron)

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | August 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Ken Miller, Columbia University; Brent Doiron, University of Pittsburgh

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Miller: I will describe the Stabilized Supralinear Network mechanism and its application to understanding sensory cortical behavior. The mechanism is based on a network of excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) neurons with very simple assumptions: (1) Individual neurons have an expansive or supralinear input/output functions, e.g. a power law with power >1; (2) Feedback inhibition is sufficiently...   More >

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Discovering Relationships and their Structures Across Disparate Data Modalities

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | August 17 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Joshua Vogelstein, Johns Hopkins University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Determining whether certain properties are related to other properties is fundamental to scientific discovery. As data collection rates accelerate, it is becoming increasingly difficult yet ever more important to determine whether one property of data (e.g., cloud density) is related to another (e.g., grass wetness). Only if two properties are related are further investigations into the geometry...   More >

Monday, August 28, 2017

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

A Capacity Scaling Law for Artificial Neural Networks

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | September 6 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Gerald Friedland, UC Berkeley

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In this talk, we derive the calculation of two critical numbers that quantify the capabilities of artificial neural networks with gating functions, such as sign, sigmoid, or rectified linear units. First, we derive the calculation of the upper limit Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension of a network with binary output layer, which is the theoretical limit for perfect fitting of the training data. Second,...   More >



fMRI at high magnetic fields: Spatial resolution limits and applications

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | September 6 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Essa Yacoub, University of Minnesota

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


While higher magnetic fields present the opportunity to address higher resolution neuroscience questions, such applications are faced with confounds of fMRI spatial specificity, as well as technical challenges in acquiring higher resolution images. Significant efforts have been put forth over the past 20 years towards understanding these issues and in addressing them with technical developments....   More >

Thursday, September 7, 2017

IB Faculty on Parade

Seminar | September 7 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building


Daniela Kaufer, University of California, Berkeley; Brent Mishler, University of California, Berkeley

Department of Integrative Biology



Dynamics of prefrontal computations during decision-making

Seminar | September 7 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Joni Wallis, University of California, Berkeley

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, September 11, 2017

Oxyopia Postdoctoral Researcher Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | September 11 | 12 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Adrien Chopin; Brian Schmidt

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Adrien Chopin, PhD
Postdoctoral Researcher, Vision Science Program

Title: Bringing completely-stereoblind amblyopes to stereo-recovery
Abstract: Stereoscopic perception is an important component of a normal binocular life. Amblyopic patients often experience a disrupted binocular vision and may benefit from stereopsis recovery. Stereovision is usually tested with clinical stereotests. First,...   More >

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Thriving in Science September Seminar: "My Journey from Physics to Neurobiology as an Imposter" with Dr. Marla Feller

Seminar | September 13 | 6-7 p.m. | 105 Stanley Hall


Dr. Marla Feller, UC Berkeley

QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences


Talk will be followed by Artichoke Basille pizza and refreshments in Stanley Hall.

Marla Feller is a Professor at UC Berkeley in Molecular and Cell Biology Department where she is the Head of the Neurobiology Division and a member of the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute. Dr. Feller received an AB in Physics in 1985 and a Ph. D. in Physics in 1992, both from UC Berkeley. Dr. Feller...   More >

Friday, September 15, 2017

Bay Area Vision Research Day

Conference/Symposium | September 15 | 8 a.m.-7 p.m. |  Anna Head Alumnae Hall (2537 Haste St.)


UC Berkeley Vision Science Department


The Bay Area Vision Research Day (BAVRD) is a one-day research conference devoted to bringing the vision research community of the Bay Area together in order to present and to discuss new and exciting findings in the fields of visual psychophysics, ophthalmology, optometry, biology, neuroscience, and computer vision. What distinguishes BAVRD from other conferences is that it is primarily...   More >

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Clinical Science Psychology Students 3rd Yr Talk

Colloquium | September 19 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 Beach Room


Department of Psychology


Caitlin Gasperetti
Talk: Characterizing Sleep in Evening-Type Adolescents

Niki Gumport
Talk: Patient Learning of Treatment Contents in Cognitive Therapy

Enitan Marcelle
Talk: Prenatal Predictors of Working Memory Functioning in ADHD

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Thursday, September 21, 2017

The neural mechanism of aggression

Seminar | September 21 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Dayu Lin, New York University, School of Medicine

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, September 25, 2017

​Two forms of perceptual learning generalization: Immediate transfer and learning to learn

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | September 25 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


C. Shawn Green, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


​While it is clear that, with appropriate practice, people will improve on most perceptual tasks, the improvements seen from such practice commonly fail generalize to new tasks. However, while this type of learning specificity is undoubtedly the most frequently described outcome of perceptual training, over the past few decades, numerous examples have been described in the literature...   More >



Remembering in the Toddler Years

Colloquium | September 25 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall


Simona Ghetti, UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain

Department of Psychology


The ability to subjectively re-experience our past requires processes that develop substantially during the course of childhood. Children ought to be able form, retain and retrieve detailed memory representations. In addition, they ought to be able to reflect on the quality of these memory representations (e.g., whether they are certain versus uncertain; whether the memories include vivid detail)...   More >

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Computational Approaches to Human Affective Neuroscience

Lecture | September 27 | 3 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Sonia Bishop, Professor, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Abstract: Computational modelling allows us to move beyond simple approaches to experimental design. Here, I will present two very different examples of integrating computational modelling into human affective neuroscience. In the first example, we sought to better characterize the mechanisms underlying intolerance of uncertainty in anxiety. Participants performed bandit style decision-making...   More >

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Nature and nurture in neurocognitive development: insights from studies of plasticity in blindness

Seminar | September 28 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Marina Bedny, John Hopkins, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH



Nature and nurture in neurocognitive development: insights from studies of plasticity in blindness

Colloquium | September 28 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Marina Bedny, Johns Hopkins University

Department of Psychology


The human cortex consists of distinct networks that support cognitive functions such as language processing, face perception, and motor control. How do intrinsic physiology and experience determine this specialization? Studies of sensory loss provide unique insights into this question. In individuals who are blind from birth so called “visual” cortices acquire responses to sound and touch....   More >



Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium

Colloquium | September 28 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Marina Bedny, Johns Hopkins University

Department of Psychology


Nature and nurture in neurocognitive development: Insights from studies of plasticity in blindness.

Monday, October 2, 2017

​Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Cecile Fortune, Flannery Lab; Kelly Byrne, Silver Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Kelly Byrne (Michael Silver Lab)

Title: The relationship between cholinergic enhancement and visuospatial perception

Abstract: Acetylcholine (ACh) is synthesized in the basal forebrain and diffused widely throughout the brain, exerting diverse neuromodulatory effects. Animal physiology studies indicate that in visual cortex, ACh modulates spatial integration by changing neuronal receptive...   More >

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Data Slam 1

Colloquium | October 5 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Ye Xia, Whitney lab; Carson McNeil, Gallant lab; Darius Parvin, Ivry lab; Maria Eckstein, Collins lab; Kata Slama, Knight lab; Dan Lurie, D'Esposito lab

Department of Psychology


Data slam from grads in Cognitive Neuroscience/Neuroscience. Grad lounge afterwards for pingpong/foosball plus drinks and pizza.

Monday, October 9, 2017

​Biophysical Cues and Ocular Cell Behaviors: The Big Impact of Little and Squishy Things

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Chris Murphy, D.V.M., PhD, Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, UC Davis; Sara Thomasy, D.V.M., PhD, Associate Professor and Associate Researcher, Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, UC Davis

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Biophysical cues, such as substratum topography and compliance, are ubiquitous attributes of the miroenvironment of cells. They have been proven to be as potent as soluble cytoactive factors in the modulation of cell behaviors. The main focus of our labs has been the investigation of how biophysical cues modulate cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and response to growth...   More >

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Curiosity-driven Exploration by Self-supervised Prediction

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | October 11 | 12:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Deepak Pathak, UC Berkeley/BAIR

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In many real-world scenarios, rewards extrinsic to the agent are extremely sparse, or absent altogether. In such cases, curiosity can serve as an intrinsic reward signal to enable the agent to explore its environment and learn skills that might be useful later in its life. We formulate curiosity as the error in an agent’s ability to predict the consequence of its own actions in a visual feature...   More >

Monday, October 16, 2017

​Crowding from three sides: Foveal interference, spatial attention, and appearance

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 16 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Dan Coates, PhD, University of Houston Optometry

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Crowding, the deleterious influence of clutter on identification of a target, is typically studied in the visual periphery, where it is a fundamental limit to visual perception. Most experiments entail keen spatial focus on a flanked target, which must be categorized using forced-choice response methods. I present several recent studies that extend conventional practice. First, I...   More >

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Genetic Approaches to Brain Circuit Mapping and Cell Type Characterization

Seminar | October 19 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Hongkui Zeng, Allen Institute for Brain Science

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, October 23, 2017

​Imaging Retinal Ganglion Cells

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 23 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Don Miller, PhD, Indiana University School of Optometry

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: The retinal ganglion cell is the primary cell damaged by glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible visual loss worldwide. While we have a detailed understanding of the atrophy this disease inflicts on retinal ganglion cells, our ability to assess this damage in the living human eye is limited. A major obstacle is the difficulty to image—and thus count—these cells owing to their high...   More >

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Monday, October 30, 2017

Monday, November 6, 2017

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Maximum Entropy and the Inference of Patterns in Nature

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | November 8 | 12 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


John Harte, UC Berkeley

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Constrained maximization of information entropy yields least biased probability distributions. In statistical physics, this powerful inference method yields classical thermodynamics under the constraints implied by conservation laws. Here we apply this method to ecology, starting with logically necessary constraints formed from ratios of ecological state variables, and derive realistic abundance...   More >

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Cell adhesion and signaling pathways governing CNS development and cancer

Seminar | November 16 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Joseph McCarty, MD Anderson Cancer Center

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, November 27, 2017

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Information seeking and randomization in human exploration and exploitation

Seminar | November 30 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Robert Wilson, University of Arizona, Department of Psychology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, December 4, 2017

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Neural oscillations: what, where, when, and why?

Seminar | December 7 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Bradley Voytek, University of California, San Diego

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, December 15, 2017

Neural circuits of dexterity

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | December 15 | 12 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Dr. Adam Hantman, Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Dexterous movements serve the major functions of the brain, perception and manipulation of the world. Considering the range of possible actions and the complexity of musculoskeletal arrangements, control of the hand is an amazing achievement of the nervous system. Dexterous behavior involves understanding objects in the world, developing appropriate plans, converting those plans into appropriate...   More >

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Seminar | January 24 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building


Hillel Adesnik, University of California, Berkeley, Molecular and Cell Biology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology