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<< September 2018 >>

Monday, September 10, 2018

An objective functional biomarker of retinal ganglion cell function: Applications for probing disease mechanisms

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | September 10 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Suresh Viswanathan, Associate Professor & Chair of Biological and Vision Sciences, SUNY College of Optometry

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Work over the last decade and a half have identified and characterized a retinal ganglion cell nerve component in the flash electroretinogram. This talk will review the evidence for retinal ganglion cell origin of this potential, its mechanism of generation and applications towards understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of glaucoma and mild traumatic brain injury.

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Correlated neural activity across the brains of socially interacting bats

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | September 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Wujie Zhang, Yartsev Lab, UC Berkeley

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Social interaction is fundamental to our everyday life and that of diverse animals. When two animals interact, they behave in different ways. Thus, to get a full picture of the neural activity underlying each interaction, we need to record from the brains of both animals at the same time. We do so in a highly social mammal, the Egyptian fruit bat, using wireless electrophysiology, which allows...   More >

Monday, September 17, 2018

​Graduate Students Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | September 17 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Vivek Labhishetty, PhD; Baladitya Yellapragada, PhD

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Vivek Labhishetty's Abstract
Retinal-Conjugate Surfaces: The Blur Horopter
When we fixate at an object, the image of that object is brought to sharp focus on the fovea due to the eye’s accommodation. Other objects in the periphery may be farther or nearer than best focus on those parts of the retina. We measured the shape of surface of best focus in the world as the eye accommodates to...   More >



Information decomposition

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | September 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Juergen Jost, MPI for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In many situations, two or more sources have some information about a target. For instance, sensory input and context information can jointly determine the firing pattern of a neuron. Since the information from the two sources is typically not identical, one wishes to decompose it in those parts that are unique to each source, what is shared between them and what is complementary, that is,...   More >

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Learning Representations for Planning

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | September 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Aviv Tamar, Postdoc, UC Berkeley's Artificial Intelligence Research Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract:
How can we build autonomous robots that operate in unstructured and dynamic environments such as homes or hospitals?
This problem has been investigated under several disciplines, including planning (motion planning, task planning, etc.), and reinforcement learning. While both of these fields have witnessed tremendous progress, each have fundamental drawbacks when it comes to...   More >

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Monday, September 24, 2018

​Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | September 24 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Ethan Bensinger, Roorda Lab; Baladitya Yellapragada, Yu Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Ethan Bensinger's Talk Title
Dysflective Cones: Differences in Cone Reflectivity and Function in Healthy Subjects
Confocal Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images acquired in healthy subjects reveal small areas with diminished cone reflectivity. In a survey of AOSLO images these transient hyporeflective areas of cones were found in 19 of the 80 eyes. 3 healthy subjects with...   More >



The neural circuits underlying motor planning and short-term memory

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | September 24 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Karel Svoboda, Janelia Research Campus, HHMI

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Our goal is to uncover the principles by which mammalian neural circuits perform fundamental computations, from perception to action. Cortex is parcellated into areas with distinct functions, each of which contains complex local circuits. Cortical areas in turn associate into mesoscale circuits with other cortical and subcortical areas via long-range connections. Information is represented by...   More >



The neural circuits underlying motor planning and short-term memory

Seminar | September 24 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center | Note change in time


Karel Svoboda, Janelia Research Campus, HHMI

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Our goal is to uncover the principles by which mammalian neural circuits perform fundamental computations, from perception to action. Cortex is parcellated into areas with distinct functions, each of which contains complex local circuits. Cortical areas in turn associate into mesoscale circuits with other cortical and subcortical areas via long-range connections. Information is represented by...   More >

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

A New Benchmark and Progress Toward Improved Weakly Supervised Learning

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Russ Webb, Apple

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


A primary goal of this work is to give a clear example of the limits of current, deep-learning techniques and suggest how progress can be made. The presentation will include a discussion of open questions, unpublished experiments, suggestions on how to make progress. This work is founded on the paper Knowledge Matters: Importance of Prior Information for Optimization by Gulcehre et. al., which...   More >



Repairing the brain after stroke: a biomaterials strategy

Seminar | September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall


Tatiana Segura, Duke University

Bioengineering (BioE)


Stroke is the leading cause of disability due to the brain’s limited capacity to regenerate damaged tissue. After stroke, an increased inflammatory and immune response coupled with severely limited angiogenesis and neuronal growth results in a stroke cavity devoid of normal brain tissue. However, stroke also induces the formation of a pro-repair/plastic region in the area adjacent to the stroke...   More >

Friday, September 28, 2018