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<< June 2018 >>

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Eavesdropping on Cortical Plasticity

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | June 14 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Adi Mizrahi, The Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


One of the overarching goal in our lab is to understand cortical plasticity in adult circuits. This goal remains challenging because cortical neurons are functionally heterogeneous and access to specific active neurons for further experimentation is limited. In the primary auditory cortex (A1), for example, spiking responses to natural stimuli like vocalization cannot be easily predicted from...   More >

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Optimal sensors in random environments

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | June 20 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Sarah Marzen, MIT

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


The efficient coding hypothesis has revolutionized theoretical neuroscience. I would argue that it is best understood using rate-distortion theory. I use rate-distortion theory to inspire a simple model of sensory adaptation. In randomly drawn, fluctuating environments, this model suggests that neurogenesis in sensory regions is unnecessary and predicts that biological sensors are poised to just...   More >

Monday, June 25, 2018

Expression of ethanol sensitive glycine receptors in several brain regions

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | June 25 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Luis Aguayo, University of Concepcion, Chile

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Synaptic glycine receptors (GlyR) are expressed primarily in spinal cord and brain stem neurons. GlyRs are sensitive to general anesthetics, neurosteroids, Zn2+ and ethanol. Recently, GlyRs were also found in other supratentorial regions, but their properties are largely unknown. Mesolimbic regions, such as ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (nAc), were also found to express GlyRs...   More >