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<< January 2018 >>

Monday, January 22, 2018

Integration of guided experiential skill application into attention regulation training yields generalized improvements in cognitive functioning

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | January 22 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Sahar Yousef, Silver Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Improvement of cognitive function is of great value to many aspects of society. However, identifying robust procedures for training cognitive processes in a generalizable way remains elusive. Here we present a novel attention regulation training paradigm that incorporates skill application in multiple learning environments. We hypothesized that our training procedure would enhance...   More >

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Towards artificial general intelligence: Brain-inspired CAPTCHA breaking and Atari playing

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | January 24 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Miguel Lázaro-Gredilla, Vicarious, Inc.

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Compositionality, generalization, and learning from a few examples are among the hallmarks of human intelligence. In this talk I will describe how Vicarious combines these ideas to create approaches to CAPTCHA breaking and Atari game playing that improve on the state of the art. Both of these tasks have indeed been tackled before, using respectively Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs)...   More >



Optically probing the neural basis of perception

Seminar | January 24 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building


Hillel Adesnik, University of California, Berkeley, Molecular and Cell Biology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Friday, January 26, 2018

Monday, January 29, 2018

Long Term Adaptation in Vision

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | January 29 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Stephen Engel, University of Minnesota, Dept. of Psychology

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Experience with the environment dramatically influences how we act, think, and perceive; understanding the neural plasticity that supports such change is a long-standing goal in cognitive neuroscience. In the visual system, neural function alters dramatically as people adapt to changes in their visual world. Most past work, however, has altered visual input only over the short-term,...   More >



I see you: Social gaze as a window of opportunity in early brain development

Colloquium | January 29 | 12:15-1:15 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall


Ronny Geva, The Gonda Brain Research Center, Bar Ilan University, Israel

Department of Psychology


Social bonding—including the social learning that underpins the creation of early emotional ties between infants and their caretakers—are among the most fundamental developmental processes for human survival and well-being. Social attention is thought to play a crucial role in these processes, but little is known about the neurodevelopmental mechanisms—particularly regarding the involvement of...   More >



Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Where

Colloquium | January 30 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Patrick Cavanagh, Department of Psychology, Glendon College and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College

Department of Psychology


How do we know where things are? Recent results indicate that an object’s visual location is constructed at a high level where, critically, an object’s motion is discounted to recover its current location, much like we discount the illumination when we perceive color. As a result we sometimes see a target far from its actual location. These predictions operate differently for eye movements,...   More >

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Sensory Integration, Density Estimation, and Information Retention

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Joe Makin, UCSF

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


A common task facing computational scientists and, arguably, the brains of primates more generally is to construct models for data, particularly ones that invoke latent variables. Although it is often natural to identify the latent variables of such a model with the true unobserved variables in the world, the correspondence between the two can be more complicated, as when the former are...   More >



Computational psychiatry: When good decisions go bad

Seminar | January 31 | 3 p.m. |  5101 Tolman Hall


**Peter Dayan**

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Substantial efforts across the fields of computer science, artificial intelligence, statistics, operations research, economics, and control theory have provided us with a psychologically- and neurobiologically-grounded account of how humans and other animals learn to predict rewards and punishments, and choose actions to maximize the former and minimize the latter. It becomes an obvious...   More >