<< Week of November 04 >>

Sunday, November 4, 2018

SOLD OUT - Pine Needle Basketry with Judith Thomas

Workshop | November 4 | 10 a.m.-3 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Judith Thomas, weaver and Waldorf handwork teacher will instruct students how to source materials and craft a pine needle basket. Learn how to work with pine needles to create a small coiled basket, using a needle and waxed linen to bind the bundles of needles together. A perfect activity for the fall. Pack a lunch to enjoy in the beautiful Garden setting during the break! All levels welcome.

$85 / $75 Garden Members

 SOLD OUT.

Trees and Tones - Wooden Instrument Traditions: Guitars

Presentation | November 4 | 4-6:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Come learn about the global history of guitars and the many woods used to make them. We’ll be joined by local luthier John F. Mello, a classical guitar maker, with a performance by classical guitarist Peter Zisa. This will be followed by a lecture-demonstration of the Mexican folk tradition of San Jarocho featuring the jarana, guitarra de son, and a rustic violin from Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz.

$40 / $35 UCBG Member / $20 student

  Register online or by calling 510-664-7606, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Monday, November 5, 2018

The science of missing what is right in front of your eyes

Seminar | November 5 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Jeremy Wolfe, Professor of Ophthalmology & Radiology, Harvard Medical School

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

OMG, I did not see that!
The science of missing what is right in front of your eyes.

Visual Attention Lab
Department of Surgery
Brigham & Women's Hospital

We cannot simultaneously recognize every object in our field of view. As a result, we deploy attention from object to object or place to place, searching for what we need. This is true whether we are looking for the cat in the bedroom...   More >

Investigating "Security Roads": Southeast Asia and South Korea's Nascent Construction Industry

Colloquium | November 5 | 12-2 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 John P. DiMoia, Seoul National University

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

This talk considers South Korea’s relationship to Southeast Asia through the pair of Thailand and South Vietnam, looking at the “new” relationships formed in the aftermath of the Korean War. With diplomatic ties restored in the mid to late 1950s, the ROK began to make inquiries while pursuing infrastructure projects, often connecting with the same pool of international...   More >

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | November 5 | 12-1 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for...   More >

Mindfulness at Moffitt: Moffitt Wellness Program

Workshop | October 1 – December 10, 2018 every Monday with exceptions | 12-1 p.m. | Moffitt Undergraduate Library, 501 (Wellness Room)

 Library

Help focus your mind and foster your creativity. Increase your resiliency and well being. Join Jeffrey Oxendine of the School of Public Health for mindfulness practice.

All experience levels welcome; weekly practice or drop in attendance also welcome. Mondays from noon to 1pm.

 Must have campus I.D. (Cal 1 card) for entrance

Moffitt Wellness Program

Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials Seminar: The Role of Large-Scale Experimental Simulation in Earthquake Engineering

Seminar | November 5 | 12:10-1 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 Masayoshi Nakashima, Kobori Research Complex, Tokyo, Japan

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

This seminar will explore the role of large-scale laboratory experiments in the development and verification of earthquake-resistant design technologies.

Combinatorics Seminar: Inequalities for families of symmetric functions

Seminar | November 5 | 12:10-1 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Curtis Greene, Haverford College and MSRI

 Department of Mathematics

We are interested in families of inequalities of the form $f(X) \geq g(X)$, where $f(X)$ and $g(X)$ are symmetric polynomials in $X = (x_1,...,x_n)$ and the inequality must hold for all nonnegative substitutions of the variables. We will focus initially on inequalities involving well known combinatorial families (elementary, monomial, Schur, etc.). Far too much is known to permit a comprehensive...   More >

[Dean's Speaker Series] Margo Alexander

Panel Discussion | November 5 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Spieker Forum (6th Fl), Chou Hall

 Institute for Business & Social Impact

Join Margo Alexander, BS 68, Chair Emeritus, Acumen and Berkeley Haas Interim Dean Laura Tyson in a fireside chat discussing Ms. Alexander’s personal story, career, and leadership philosophy, specifically as it relates to the unique challenges she faced as a woman in finance. There will be time at the end for questions from the audience.

Political Economy Seminar: "Lobbying as Cooperative Policy Development"

Seminar | November 5 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Ian Turner, UC Berkeley

 Department of Economics

The Political Economy Seminar focuses on formal and quantitative work in the political economy field, including formal political theory.

Adobe Acrobat Fundamentals (BETEC038): Betec038

Workshop | November 5 | 1-4 p.m. | 28 University Hall

 Kathleen Valerio

 Human Resources

This course details the process of designing PDF (Portable Document Format) files using Adobe Acrobat. Emphasis is placed on design tools, content management, form design basics, and integration with Microsoft Office applications.

Learning Objectives
* Identify the elements of the Acrobat user interface and workspace.
* Use multiple views to navigate documents and access specific functions...   More >

Seminar 211, Economic History: Taxes and Growth: New Narrative Evidence from Interwar Britain

Seminar | November 5 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 597 Evans Hall

 James Cloyne, University of California, Davis

 Department of Economics

Anthro 290 Plant Panel: Anthropology 290 Speaker Series, Fall 2018

Panel Discussion | November 5 | 2-4 p.m. | Kroeber Hall, Gifford Room, 221

 Prof. Marisol de la Cadena, Department of Anthropology and the Department of Science and Technology Studies at UC Davis; Prof. Charles Briggs; Prof. Christine Hastorf; Prof. Kent Lightfoot

 Department of Anthropology

In this panel discussion, archaeological, social/cultural, medical, and linguistic anthropological perspectives intersect in exploring how humans perceive, sense, build, nourish, and heal with plants in fashioning distinct—and sometimes conflictual or fatal— ways of being in the world.

Arithmetic Geometry and Number Theory RTG Seminar: Slopes in eigenvarieties for definite unitary groups

Seminar | November 5 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Lynnelle Ye, Harvard

 Department of Mathematics

Pre-talk: the study of eigenvarieties began with Coleman and Mazur, who constructed the first eigencurve, a rigid analytic space whose points are in bijection with $p$-adic modular Hecke eigenforms. Since then various authors have constructed eigenvarieties for many other kinds of automorphic forms. We will define automorphic forms on definite unitary groups and explain Chenevier's construction...   More >

Differential Geometry Seminar: Singularities of Hermitian-Yang-Mills connections

Seminar | November 5 | 3:10-4 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Xuemiao Chen, Stony Brook (visiting Berkeley)

 Department of Mathematics

Abstract: The celebrated Donaldson-Uhlenbeck-Yau theorem builds the correspondence between irreducible Hermitian-Yang-Mills (HYM) connections and slope stability for holomorphic vector bundles over a Kahler manifold. Singular HYM connections naturally occur when one tries to compactify the moduli space of HYM connections. For singular HYM connections, the tangent cones at any singular point are...   More >

Structural and Quantitative Biology Seminar

Seminar | November 5 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Karin Reinisch, Yale School of Medicine

 College of Chemistry

Petroleum Powered: Resources and the Transnational Foundations of China’s Far West

Colloquium | November 5 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Judd Kinzley, Associate Professor of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 You-tien Hsing, Professor and Pamela P. Fong Family Distinguished Chair in China Studies, University of California, Berkeley

 Li Ka-Shing Foundation Program in Modern Chinese History at Berkeley, Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This talk will focus on the central role that natural resources played in shaping Chinese state power and authority in China's far western province of Xinjiang. Based on my recently published book, Natural Resources and the New Frontier: Constructing Modern China’s Borderlands, my talk will highlight the often overlooked role played by an assortment of Chinese and Soviet state agents, as well as...   More >

The Western and Questions of Indigeneity, Race and Violence in the American and Japanese Frontiers or, Two Unforgivens

Colloquium | November 5 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Andrew Barshay, Professor, UC Berkeley

 Takashi Fujitani, Professor, University of Toronto

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

This presentation juxtaposes Clint Eastwood’s critically acclaimed Unforgiven (1992) against Lee Sang-il’s “remake” (Yurusarezaru mono, 2013) of the original as a method for recasting the histories of modern Japan and the U.S. as comparable and coeval settler colonial empires. The speaker will work through the insights and absences in these films to piece together a historical...   More >

Quantitative Ethnography

Colloquium | November 5 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Berkeley Way West, Room 1215 (2121 Berkeley Way, Berkeley, CA)

 David Williamson Shaffer, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Educational Psychology

 Graduate School of Education

In the age of Big Data, we have more information than ever about what students are doing and how they are thinking. However, the sheer volume of data available can overwhelm traditional qualitative and quantitative research methods, leading to research that finds significance without meaning. The science of quantitative ethnography connects the study of culture with statistical tools to...   More >

Analysis and PDE Seminar: The Marked Length Spectrum of Anosov manifolds

Seminar | November 5 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Colin Guillarmou, Orsay

 Department of Mathematics

We discuss new results on the geometric problem of determining a Riemannian metric with negative curvature on a closed manifold from the lengths of its periodic geodesics. We obtain local rigidity results in all dimensions using combination of dynamical system results with microlocal analysis. Joint work with Thibault Lefeuvre.

Eric Calderwood: Colonial al-Andalus: Spain and the Making of Modern Moroccan Culture in Conversation with Professors Emily Gottreich (History) and Nasser Meerkhan (Near Eastern Studies, Spanish and Portuguese)

Panel Discussion | November 5 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Eric Calderwood, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Drawing on a rich archive of Spanish, Arabic, French, and Catalan sources—including literature, historiography, journalism, political speeches, schoolbooks, tourist brochures, and visual arts—Calderwood reconstructs the varied political career of convivencia and al-Andalus, showing how shared pasts become raw material for divergent contemporary ideologies, including Spanish fascism and Moroccan...   More >

Berkeley Journal of Criminal Law - Bluebook Party

Workshop | November 5 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | 100 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Berkeley Journal of Criminal Law

We will be completing Bluebooking assignments together so you can work with fellow journal members and get your questions answered by the Supervising Editors

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

What the data tell us about persistence in lower-division pre-requisites for STEM majors

Presentation | November 6 | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Science@Cal

Andrew Eppig, Institutional Research Analyst, UC Berkeley Div. of Equity and Inclusion, and Roshni Wadhwani, Research Associate, Public Profit will discuss their recent analysis of patterns of student enrollment, retention and success in lower-division STEM prerequisite courses.

A Growing Concern

Seminar | November 6 | 9-9:30 a.m. | Barrows Hall, Radio broadcast, ON-AIR ONLY, 90.7 FM

 Rosalie Lawrence, PhD candidate, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology; Andrew Saintsing, PhD student, Department of Integrative Biology

 KALX 90.7 FM

Tune in to The Graduates this Tuesday for an interview with Rosalie Lawrence from the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at UC Berkeley. Rosalie is a PhD candidate whose research is focused on cellular decision-making.

Rosalie Lawrence

Two-Year Home Country Physical Presence Requirement Workshop

Workshop | November 6 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. | International House, Sproul Rooms

 Berkeley International Office(BIO))

J-1 and J-2 visitors subject to this requirement must return to their country of legal permanent residence for two years or obtain a waiver before being eligible for certain employment visas such as H (temporary employment), L (intra-company transfer), or Permanent Resident status ("green card"). Not all J visitors are subject as it depends on specific factors.

At this workshop, you will...   More >

Merck Seminar in the Chemical Sciences: A few of my favorite rings: Catalysis inspired by macrocycles

Seminar | November 6 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Vy Maria Dong, Department of Chemistry, UC Irvine

 College of Chemistry

Lactones and lactams make up a range of structurally complex and functional compounds, from antibiotics to nanomaterials. Inspired by Nature's cyclic architectures, we are developing catalytic methods that feature stereoselective hydroacylation. Hydroacylation, the formal addition of an aldehyde C–H bond across an unsaturated functional group, is an ideal approach to carbonyl functionalities...   More >

Encounters on Contested Lands: Indigenous Performances of Sovereignty and Nationhood in Quebec

Colloquium | November 6 | 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Julie Burelle, UC San Diego

 Canadian Studies Program (CAN))

Julie Burelle holds a PhD from the joint program in Drama and Theatre at UC San Diego and UC Irvine. Originally from Quebec, Canada, Julie has studied and taught theatre on both coasts of Canada and of the United States. She earned a B.A. in Theatre from the University of Toronto. Julie's research is invested in a decolonizing project and is in conversation with the fields of Performance Studies,...   More >

GUH Lecture: What does Infrastructure do? Water in Mexico City

Colloquium | November 6 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 170 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

This talk will explore the paradoxical history of water in Mexico City--the constant flooding, the lack of water for daily consumption--and the conditions of possibility that allowed for 22 million inhabitants to reside in a place not suitable for such...   More >

What does Infrastructure do? Water in Mexico City

Colloquium | November 6 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 170 Wurster Hall

 Global Urban Humanities

"What does Infrastructure do? Water in Mexico City"
Ivonne del Valle, Associate Professor of Spanish & Portuguese
Tuesday, November 6, 2018
12-1:30pm
170 Wurster

Part of the Global Urban Humanities Colloquium The City and Its People, Rhetoric 198-3 / ARCH 198-2, Rhetoric 244A / ARCH 298-2

This talk will explore the paradoxical history of water in Mexico City--the constant flooding, the...   More >

What the data tell us about persistence in lower-division pre-requisites for STEM majors

Presentation | November 6 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Coalition for Education and Outreach

Presenters: Andrew Eppig, Institutional Research Analyst, UC Berkeley Div. of Equity and Inclusion and Roshni Wadhwani, Research Associate, Public Profit. Berkeley’s STEM departments have long struggled to improve persistence, particularly among non-traditional students, including women, underrepresented minorities, students with disabilities, and students from low socioeconomic backgrounds....   More >

Student Faculty Macro Lunch - "Slack and Efficiency in Sequential Goods and labor Markets"

Presentation | November 6 | 12-1 p.m. | 639 Evans Hall

 Nicolas Petroskey-Nadeau, Senior Research Advisor, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

 Clausen Center

This workshop consists of one-hour informal presentations on topics related to macroeconomics and international finance, broadly defined. The presenters are UC Berkeley PhD students, faculty, and visitors.
** MUST RSVP**

  RSVP by emailing jgmendoza@berkeley.edu by November 1.

Essential Legal Planning (BEUHS179)

Workshop | November 6 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Class of '42

 Kathleen Day-Seiter

 Elder Care Program

Thoughtful planning for your and your loved one’s future care, includes legal considerations. This workshop will review necessary information and documents you will need in your legal toolbox. These include:

• Durable Power of Attorney for health care and finances
• Living Trust
• Advanced Health Care Directive
• Physician Ordered Life Sustaining Treatment (POLST)

Symplectic Working Group: Let's try to understand what the classical mirror symmetry conjecture says!

Seminar | November 6 | 2-3 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Daniel Chupin, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Seminar 218, Psychology and Economics: Using Models to Persuade

Seminar | November 6 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Josh Schwartzstein, Harvard Business School

 Department of Economics

Seminar 237, Fiscal Origins of Monetary Paradoxes

Seminar | November 6 | 2:10-3:30 p.m. | 597 Evans Hall

 Nicolas Caramp, UC Davis

 Department of Economics

joint with Dejanir Silva

Shuddhabrata Sengupta and the Raqs Media Collective: ISAS Faculty Workshop led by Prof. Poulomi Saha

Workshop | November 6 | 3-5 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Study Center

 Shuddhabrata Sengupta, Artist and writer, and member of Raqs Media Collective

 Poulomi Saha, Assistant Professor of English, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Arts Research Center, Department of English, Department of Art Practice, Department of History of Art, University of California Humanities Research Institute

A Faculty and Graduate Seminar with Shuddhabrata Sengupta, artist and writer, and member of Raqs Media Collective.

The Molecules of Medicine and How to Make Them

Seminar | November 6 | 3-4 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Eric Ashley, Discovery Process Chemistry Site Lead, Merck Research Laboratories San Francisco

 College of Chemistry

Throughout history medicinal molecules have changed the path of human societies. The foundational art and science of synthetic chemistry powers modern strategies for the discovery and development of new medicinal compounds. This seminar will explore the interplay between target molecules, molecular design, synthetic strategy, and reaction discovery in the context of a novel mechanism for the...   More >

Student Harmonic Analysis and PDE Seminar (HADES): Fried's conjecture in small dimensions

Seminar | November 6 | 3:40-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Colin Guillarmou, Univ. Paris Sud (Orsay)

 Department of Mathematics

We explain how to use microlocal methods in order to show Fried's conjecture relating torsion and Ruelle zeta function in dimension 3 and some cases in dimension 5. In higher dimensions we show that the value of the Ruelle zeta function at 0 is a local invariant of the connection (thus independent of the Anosov flow) under certain spectral assumptions, providing new insights toward Fried’s...   More >

Probabilistic Operator Algebra Seminar: Invariance of absolutely continuous spectra under hybrid normed ideal perturbations.

Seminar | November 6 | 3:45-5:45 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Dan-Virgil Voiculescu, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

In hybrid normed ideal perturbations of n-tuples of operators the normed ideal is allowed to vary with the component operator. The talk will deal with the machinery we developed for normed ideal perturbations based on a numerical invariant, the modulus of quasicentral approximation, and its extension to the hybrid setting. We used this approach to show that if two n-tuples of commuting hermitian...   More >

Cold War Ruins: Transpacific Critique of American Justice and Japanese War Crimes

Colloquium | November 6 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Lisa Yoneyama, University of Toronto

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

The U.S.-led post-conflict transitional justice in the Asia-Pacific War’s aftermath has not only rendered certain violences illegible and unredressable. It also left many colonial legacies intact. In Cold War Ruins: Transpacific Critique of American Justice and Japanese War Crimes I argued that, much more than products of the East Asian state policies capitalizing on the anti-Japanese...   More >

Getting Something for Nothing: Classical and Machine-Learning Methods for Quantum Simulation

Seminar | November 6 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Thomas Miller, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Caltech

 College of Chemistry

A focus of my research is to the develop simulation methods that reveal the mechanistic details of quantum mechanical reactions that are central to biological, molecular, and heterogenous catalysis. The nature of this effort is three-fold: we work from the foundation of quantum statistical mechanics and semiclassical dynamics to develop methods that significantly expand the scope and reliability...   More >

Seminar 221, Industrial Organization: ​"Overspending in the Videogames Market"

Seminar | November 6 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Zhenia Yarmosh, UC Berkeley

 Department of Economics

Calm at Cal: Managing Stress for School/Life Balance: L&S Workshop Series Shoot for the Stars

Workshop | November 6 | 4:15-6:15 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

Graduate Mentors, College of L&S

 College of Letters & Science, L&S Graduate Mentors

A workshop focused on stress management and maintaining a healthy school-life balance

DICE Climate Survey Town Hall

Presentation | November 6 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Berkeley Way West, Colloquia Room 1104

 Public Health, School of

DICE presents the results and analysis of the SPH Climate Survey taken by students, staff, and faculty in May 2018.

Please join us after the presentation for a discussion on what we have learned from the Climate Survey and how we can make the School of Public Health a more welcoming and inclusive community.

No RSVP necessary
*please make sure to VOTE before coming to this event*
Food...   More >

Demystifying the Chalk Talk

Workshop | November 6 | 6-7:15 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Scientists seeking faculty positions will be asked to deliver a “job talk” and a “chalk talk.” Learn the difference between these two components of the hiring process - what each demonstrates to the search committee, and ways you can prepare to discuss your science that will make a strongly positive impression. This event will focus on the chalk talk; panelists are UC Berkeley professors and...   More >

Hugues Leclère

Colloquium | November 6 | 6 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

TIME TBA

Born in France in 1968, Hugues Leclère perfected his playing with Catherine Collard before entering first nominated the Conservatoire National Superieur de musique de Paris, from which he graduated with high honors in piano, music theory, and chamber music.

He performs all other the world, in the USA (Cleveland, Bloomington, Boston, San Antonio…) and Canada (Montreal), in far east...   More >

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

CASA Professional Growth Conference

Conference/Symposium | November 7 |  Alumni House

 Cal Alumni Association

Cal Alumni Student Association is hosting a conference of different workshops, including LinkedIn, resume review, mock interview, and recruiting.

Computer Workstation Evaluator Training (BEUHS403)

Workshop | November 7 | 8 a.m.-12 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Class of '42

 Greg Ryan, Ergonomic Campus Ergonomist, Be well at Work - Ergonimics; Mallory Lynch, MA, Campus Ergonomist, Ergonomics@Work

 Be Well at Work - Ergonimics

Specifically for Departmental Computer Workstation Evaluators, learn the basics of how to evaluate and modify computer workstations according to campus ergonomic guidelines in this practical, hands-on workshop. Enroll online through the UC Learning Center

  Register online

Computational protein circuits in mammalian cells — natural and synthetic

Seminar | November 7 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 245 Li Ka Shing Center

 Michael Elowitz, California Institute of Technology

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Demographic Dividend or Disaster? Population, Food Security and Stability in the Sahel

Panel Discussion | November 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 5101 Berkeley Way West

 Prof. Malcolm Potts, The OASIS Initiative; Bob Walker, Population Institute; Alisha Graves, The OASIS Initiative

 Public Health, School of

The Sahel region of Africa is home to the fastest growing population in all of human history. Join Professor Malcolm Potts and Alisha Graves of UC Berkeley, along with special guest, Bob Walker, President of the Population Institute, for a presentation and discussion on the demographic implications for food security, stability in the region and unprecedented levels of migration.

TSUJIMOTO LECTURE: "Searching for simplicity amidst the complexity of the soil microbiome"

Seminar | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Noah Fierer, University of Colorado, Boulder

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

The Fierer Lab explores the distribution and roles of microscopic organisms in diverse environments and the relevance of microbes to the health and function of ecosystems, plants, and animals (including humans).

Ethnic Neighborhood Segregation and Residential Mobility Dynamics in Norway, 1993–2013

Colloquium | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 2232 Piedmont, Seminar Room

 Torkild Lyngstad, Professor, Department of Sociology and Human Geography at the University of Oslo

 Population Science, Department of Demography

A lunch time talk and discussion session, featuring visiting and local scholars presenting their research on a wide range of topics of interest to demography.

Extracellular matrix viscoelasticity and its impact on cells

Seminar | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Ovi Chaudhuri, Stanford University

 Bioengineering (BioE)

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex assembly of structural proteins that provides physical support and biochemical signaling to cells in tissues. Over the last two decades, studies have revealed the important role that ECM elasticity plays in regulating a variety of biological processes in cells, including stem cell differentiation and cancer progression. However, tissues and ECM are...   More >

Adversarial Examples that Fool both Computer Vision and Time-Limited Humans

Seminar | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Gamaleldin Elsayed, Google Brain

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Machine learning models are vulnerable to adversarial examples: small changes to images can cause computer vision models to make mistakes such as identifying a school bus as an ostrich. However, it is still an open question whether humans are prone to similar mistakes. Here, we address this question by leveraging recent techniques that transfer adversarial examples from computer vision models...   More >

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR - Alejandro Rico-Guevara: Natural vs. sexual selection tug-of-war: Nectarivory energetics and intrasexually selected weapons

Seminar | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Alejandro Rico-Guevara

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

Their pain, our pleasure

Colloquium | November 7 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Mina Cikara, Assistant Professor, Harvard University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

If humans are innately good, cooperative, fair, and averse to harming one another, why does widespread intergroup conflict persist? Several factors contribute to fomenting hostility between groups; in my talk I will focus on the role of pleasure in response to out-group pain. People who identify strongly with their social groups frequently experience pleasure when they observe threatening...   More >

Cook Well Berkeley Healthy Cooking Series: Fall/Winter Seasonal Veggies (BEUHS641)

Workshop | November 7 | 12:10-1 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Section Club

 Kim Guess, RD, Be well at Work - Wellness

 Be Well at Work - Wellness

Temptations are everywhere during the holiday season. In this class, you will learn to cook vegetable dishes so flavorful that they may outshine your favorite holiday dessert! These clever and creative recipes will have your whole family asking for seconds. Presentation, demonstration, sample and recipes provided.

  Register online

Urban Informal Settlements in East Africa: Community-led Upgrading for Health Equity

Colloquium | November 7 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Jason Corburn, Professor, City and Regional Planning, UC Berkeley; Jack Makau, Director, Shack/Slum Dwellers International (SDI)

 Center for African Studies

Professor Jason Corburn will describe a ten-year partnership between his UC Berkeley team and the NGO Shack/Slum Dwellers International (SDI) focused on improving the lives and living conditions in the urban slums of East African Cities.

Urban Informal Settlement in East Africa

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Quilts, operads, and the Fukaya category

Seminar | November 7 | 2-3 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Nate Bottman, Princeton University

 Department of Mathematics

In my first talk, I will introduce the Fukaya category of a compact symplectic manifold. This is an invariant that keeps track of the Lagrangian submanifolds, as well as an intersection theory of these submanifolds that is enhanced by counts of pseudoholomorphic polygons. The algebraic structure of the Fukaya category is controlled by a collection (in fact, an operad) of polytopes called...   More >

Averaging principle and shape theorem for growth with memory.

Seminar | November 7 | 3-4 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Amir Dembo, Stanford University

 Department of Statistics

We consider a family of random growth models in n-dimensional space. These models capture certain features expected to manifest at the mesoscopic level for certain self-interacting microscopic dynamics (such as once-reinforced random walk with strong reinforcement and origin-excited random walk). In a joint work with Pablo Groisman, Ruojun Huang and Vladas Sidoravicius, we establish for such...   More >

Number Theory Seminar: The Nygaard filtration

Seminar | November 7 | 3:40-5 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 TBD, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

We will discuss the Nygaard filtration.

Why Deep Learning Works: Traditional and Heavy-Tailed Implicit Self-Regularization in Deep Neural Networks

Seminar | November 7 | 4-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Michael W. Mahoney, UC Berkeley

 Department of Statistics

Random Matrix Theory (RMT) is applied to analyze the weight matrices of Deep Neural Networks (DNNs), including both production quality, pre-trained models and smaller models trained from scratch. Empirical and theoretical results clearly indicate that the DNN training process itself implicitly implements a form of self-regularization, implicitly sculpting a more regularized energy or penalty...   More >

Transposable elements and epigenome evolution

Seminar | November 7 | 4-5 p.m. | 114 Morgan Hall

 Ting Wang, Washington University in St. Louis

 Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): The symplectic \((A_\infty ,2)\)-category

Seminar | November 7 | 4-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Nate Bottman, Princeton University

 Department of Mathematics

In my second talk, I will describe a framework for building maps between Fukaya categories of different symplectic manifolds. This is a 2-category-like structure called Symp, where the objects are symplectic manifolds, the 1-morphisms are Lagrangians in products, and the 2-morphisms are intersections of these Lagrangians. Just as the structure of the Fukaya category comes from an operad of...   More >

ERG Colloquium: Itay Fischhendler: The Political Economy of Shifting Renewable Energy Targets: A Global Perspective

Colloquium | November 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 126 Barrows Hall

 Itay Fischhendler, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Hebrew University

 Energy and Resources Group

This talk will focus on discussing policy-set renewable energy targets around the globe and using quantitative analysis to determine how and why they may change with time.

Berkeley ACM A.M. Turing Laureate Lecture: A Numerical Analyst Thinks about Deep Learning with William Kahan

Colloquium | November 7 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, 306 (HP Auditorium) | Note change in location

 William Kahan, U. C. Berkeley

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

William "Velvel" Kahan, professor emeritus of EECS and Mathematics, received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Toronto. Kahan is widely known as "The Father of Floating Point."

Representation Theory and Mathematical Physics Seminar: Premodular categories and 4-dimensional topological field theories

Seminar | November 7 | 4-5 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Alexander Kirillov Jr., Stony Brook University

 Department of Mathematics

The notion of topological field theory was formalized by Michael Atiyah; it is a purely mathematical notion inspired by physics. In particular, such a theory gives invariants of closed \(d\)-manifolds.

Examples of 3-dimensional topological field theories have been well studied, most notably Reshetikhin–Turaev and Turaev–Viro theories. However, in dimension 4, situation is much less...   More >

Professor Michael Silver Psychology Colloquium Lecture: Effects of acetylcholine on visual cortex, attention, and learning

Colloquium | November 7 | 5:15-6:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Department of Psychology

The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) has been extensively studied at the level of synapses and neural circuits, but comparatively little is known about its effects on perception and cognition in humans. We augmented the effects of ACh in the brains of healthy human participants by administering the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil (trade name: Aricept). I will describe the effects of...   More >

LAGSES/GWE Career Panel

Panel Discussion | November 7 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 293 Cory Hall

 Graduate Assembly

Interested in learning more about life after grad school? Latinx Association of Graduate Students in Engineering and Sciences and Graduate Women of Engineering will be hosting a panel on successful career paths after grad school. The panelists represent a variety of career options including industry, start-ups, national labs, and academia. We're looking forward to seeing you there!

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Applied Math Seminar: Convex optimization for multimarginal optimal transport problem with Coulomb cost

Seminar | November 8 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 732 Evans Hall

 Yuehaw Khoo, Stanford University

 Department of Mathematics

We introduce methods from convex optimization to solve the multimarginal transport problem arise in the context of strictly correlated electron density functional theory. Convex relaxations are used to provide outer approximation to the set of $N$-representable 2-marginals and 3-marginals, which in turn provide lower bounds to the energy. We further propose rounding schemes based on tensor...   More >

Open Seminar: Characterization and Gender, 1800-2008 with Ted Underwood

Seminar | November 8 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 220 Geballe Room

 Ted Underwood, Professor in the School of Information Sciences and the English Department, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

 Digital Humanities at Berkeley, D-Lab, Department of Comparative Literature, Information, School of, Library, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Professor of English and Information Science Ted Underwood will lead a discussion on the findings of his distant reading study on gender and fiction.

Econ 235, Financial Economics Seminar: "TBA"

Seminar | November 8 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | C210 Haas School of Business

 Dean Karlan, Northwestern University

 Department of Economics

Joint with the Haas Finance Seminar

Oliver E. Williamson Seminar

Seminar | November 8 | 12-1:30 p.m. | C330 Haas School of Business

 Nancy Qian, Kellogg

 Department of Economics

The Oliver E. Williamson Seminar on Institutional Analysis, named after our esteemed colleague who founded the seminar, features current research by faculty, from UCB and elsewhere, and by advanced doctoral students. The research investigates governance, and its links with economic and political forces. Markets, hierarchies, hybrids, and the supporting institutions of law and politics all come...   More >

Excited electronic states: Dielectric screening and hot-electron mediated ion diffusion

Seminar | November 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 André Schleife, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 Computational Materials at Berkeley

High-performance computing enables quantum-mechanical studies of material properties with unprecedented accuracy: In particular, many-body perturbation theory is capable of predicting electronic and optical properties in excellent agreement with experiment. Dynamics of excited electrons that interact with fast-moving ions can be investigated accurately and efficiently using real-time...   More >

IB Seminar: The ecology and cell biology of life history evolution

Seminar | November 8 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Didem Sarikaya, University of California, Davis

 Department of Integrative Biology

EHS 201 Biosafety in Laboratories

Course | November 8 | 1:30-3:30 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This training is required for anyone who is listed on a Biological Use Authorization (BUA) application form that is reviewed by the Committee for Laboratory and Environmental Biosafety (CLEB). A BUA is required for anyone working with recombinant DNA molecules, human clinical specimens or agents that may infect humans, plants or animals. This safety training will discuss the biosafety risk...   More >

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research and Finding a Mentor Workshop

Workshop | November 8 | 2-3 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research

If you are thinking about getting involved in undergraduate research, this workshop is a great place to start! You will get a broad overview of the research opportunities available to undergraduates on campus, and suggestions on how to find them.

We will also let you know about upcoming deadlines and eligibility requirements for some of...   More >

Learning Movement and Social Behaviors in Multi-Agent Settings

Seminar | November 8 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 540AB Cory Hall

 Igor Mordatch, Senior Research Scientist, Open AI

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In this talk, I will discuss how principles of optimal control, learning, and model-based reasoning can be used to generate and explain a broad range of human movement behaviors, from locomotion to dexterous manipulation, applicable both in simulation and on physical robot platforms.

Public Opinion on Policy Solutions:: The Role of Equivalence Frames, Policy Scope, and Party Cues

Colloquium | November 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Laura Stoker Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues

Our research brings together insights from three disparate literatures—on equivalence framing, scope sensitivity, and party cue-taking—to study public opinion on policies designed to ameliorate problems facing the nation, including the opioid crisis, gun violence, identity theft, failing infrastructure, domestic violence, pollution, teenage bullying, and access to health care.

TDPS Speaker Series: The Making of Antíkoni

Panel Discussion | November 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Jenni(f)er Tamayo, Director and TDPS Graduate Student, UC Berkeley's Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies; Beth Piatote, Playwright and Associate Professor, Native American Studies, UC Berkeley's Department of Ethnic Studies; Mark Griffith, Professor of Classics and Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies, UC Berkeley's Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies; Catherine Cole, Divisional Dean of Arts, University of Washington, School of Drama, University of Washington

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, Department of Classics, Native American Studies, Arts + Design, Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

This panel offers diverse perspectives on the intellectual, practical, and political aspects of making the play, 'Antíkoni', presented in staged readings at the Hearst Museum of Anthropology on November 6-7, 2018. The panelists will discuss the play’s engagement with the Sophocles tragedy 'Antigone', the contemporary conflicts over human remains, and the play’s inaugural reading in the Hearst Museum.

Mathematics Department Colloquium: Some applications of analytic techniques to geometric and dynamical system problems

Colloquium | November 8 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Colin Guillarmou, Orsay

 Department of Mathematics

We review new results based on harmonic and microlocal analysis in order to obtain positive answers to certain geometric inverse problems and questions about dynamical systems going back to Smale and Fried.

Modeling Perspective and Parallax to Tell the Story of Genre Fiction with Ted Underwood

Seminar | November 8 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 220 Geballe Room

 Ted Underwood, Professor in the School of Information Sciences and the English Department, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

 Digital Humanities at Berkeley, D-Lab, Department of Comparative Literature, Information, School of, Library, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Ted Underwood will discuss his work with predictive models of genre literature to explore how implicit assumptions about genre consolidate or change across time.

UROC (Underrepresented Researchers of Color): Research opportunities for who? FOR YOU!!

Workshop | November 8 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Learn about the different research opportunities on campus and how to best prepare for applying to them.

Eileen Myles in conversation with Stephen Best

Panel Discussion | November 8 | 7:30-9 p.m. |  Nourse Theater

 275 Hayes St, San Francisco, CA 94117

 Eileen Myles

 Stephen Best, Associate Professor, Berkeley English

 City Arts and Lectures, KQED

Stephen Best will be interviewing Eileen Myles for the City Arts & Lectures program at the Nourse Theater in San Francisco on Thursday, November 8th, 2018 at 7:30pm.

Please consider attending the interview. You can purchase tickets by calling 415-393-4400 or by visiting the City Arts and Lectures website. KQED will also rebroadcast the interview on November 16, 2018.

Eileen Myles is the...   More >

$29.00 Single admission

  Buy tickets online or by calling 415-392-4400

Friday, November 9, 2018

Essig Brunch: Dr. Curtis Ewing, CalFire Entomologist

Seminar | November 9 | 10-11 a.m. | 1101 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Entomology, Essig Museum of

Essig Brunch is a weekly seminar series focused on arthropod science (insects, spiders, scorpions, etc.) hosted by the Entomology Students Organization.

Attentional Episodes and Cognitive Control

Seminar | November 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 John Duncan, MRC Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Abstract: Human fMRI studies show a tightly-localised set of “multiple-demand” or MD regions, involved in solution of many different cognitive challenges, widely separated yet strongly functionally connected, and linked to standard measures of fluid intelligence. Multiple-demand regions are generally associated with “cognitive control”, but how should control be conceived? Using data from...   More >

Dissertation Talk: Statistical Learning Towards Gamification in Human-Centric Cyber-Physical Systems

Seminar | November 9 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | Cory Hall, 400 Hughes

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In this talk, we explore Human-Centric Cyber-Physical Systems by simultaneously considering users’ behavior/preference and their interaction as strategic agents. People’s interaction in a cyber-physical system is a core mechanism of the implementation of smart building technology. However, human preference in regard to living conditions is usually unknown and heterogeneous in its manifestation as...   More >

i4Y Speaker Series - Alexandra Carter

Presentation | November 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 5400 Berkeley Way West

 Alexandra Carter

 Innovations for Youth

This presentation will discuss the ongoing legal battle over abortion restrictions for unaccompanied immigrant minors in U.S. federal custody and the implications for public health policy, practice, and research.

ESPM Seminar: Resilience of Metapopulations

Seminar | November 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 103 Mulford Hall

 Nathan van Schmidt

 Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM)

Nathan van Schmidt, PhD candidate here at UC Berkeley will speak on resilience of metapopulations in coupled natural-human systems: uncovering connections between wetlands, people, climate change, and disease

Yoga for Tension and Stress Relief (BEUHS664)

Workshop | November 9 | 12:10-1 p.m. | 251 Hearst Gymnasium

 Laurie Ferris, Yoga Instructor, Be Well at Work - Wellness Program

 Be Well at Work - Wellness

Practicing yoga can release tension in your joints, give you greater range of movement, soothe your back, and grant you increased comfort in all aspects of your life. Learn how pranayama breathing can enhance your practice, and help liberate your mind in surprising ways. Yoga mats are provided, or you can bring your own. Comfortable clothing and bare feet recommended.

  Register online

The Aggregate and Distributional Effects of Urban Transit Infrastructure: Evidence from Bogotá’s TransMilenio

Seminar | November 9 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | 248 Giannini Hall

 Nick Tsivanidis, Haas School of Business

 Agricultural & Resource Economics

2018 UC Berkeley Geotechnical Engineering Research Symposium

Conference/Symposium | November 9 | 1-5 p.m. |  Sutardja Dai Hall

 Julian Cohen-Waeber, PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley; Jinho Park, Researcher, UC Berkeley

 Makbule Ilgac, PhD Student, UC Berkeley; Greg Lavrentiadis, PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley; Ezra Setiasabda (Tjung), PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley; Jes Parker, PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley

 Graduate Assembly

On behalf of the graduate students of the UC Berkeley GeoSystems program, we are pleased to announce our second annual Geotechnical Engineering Research Symposium. This event is an opportunity for current PhD students and Research Associates to share their research with the geotechnical engineering industry. There will be short oral presentations as well as time for one-on-one interactions via a...   More >

2018 UC Berkeley Geotechnical Engineering Research Symposium

Conference/Symposium | November 9 | 1-5 p.m. |  Sutardja Dai Hall

 Julian Cohen-Waeber, PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley; Jinho Park, Researcher, UC Berkeley

 Daniel Hutabarat, PhD Student, UC Berkeley; Greg Lavrentiadis, PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley; Ezra Setiasabda (Tjung), PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley; Jes Parker, PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley

 Graduate Assembly

On behalf of the graduate students of the UC Berkeley GeoSystems program, we are pleased to announce our second annual Geotechnical Engineering Research Symposium. This event is an opportunity for current PhD students and Research Associates to share their research with the geotechnical engineering industry. There will be short oral presentations as well as time for one-on-one interactions via a...   More >

Workshop: Living Landscapes: Time, Knowledge, and Ecology

Workshop | November 9 | 1-5 p.m. | 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility), Room 101

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Archaeological Research Facility, Department of Anthropology, Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Art and Cultures (SISJAC), Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN)

November 9 (Fri.): 1-5PM: Rm 101, 2251 College Building (Archaeological Research Facility), UC Berkeley

November 10 (Sat.): 9AM-12 noon: Rm 221, Kroeber Hall, UC Berkeley (closed session; please RSVP: habu@berkeley.edu)


How can knowledge of the past be developed and transformed so that it informs understandings of the present and future? The Center for Japanese Studies at UC...   More >

 The Saturday, November 10 portion of the workshop is a closed session. To request attendance, please email Professor Junko Habu at habu@berkeley.edu.

Seminar 208, Microeconomic Theory: "Multinomial Logit Processes and Preference Discovery: Inside and Outside the Black Box"

Seminar | November 9 | 1:30-3 p.m. | 639 Evans Hall

 Fabio Maccheroni, Bocconi

 Department of Economics

* Please note the change in date/time
Co-Authored by Simone Cerreia-Vioglio, Massimo Marinacci and Aldo Rustichini

Data in the Higher Education Curriculum

Seminar | November 9 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Cathryn Carson

 Information, School of

Undergraduate institutions nationally and internationally are increasingly grappling with how to provide data analytic competencies to their students. This talk offers three lines of sight into this development, reflecting on drivers internationally (looking at the case of a recent German national initiative), nationally (taking a synoptic look at recent U.S. efforts), and at UC Berkeley.

China's "Law and Development" Moment?: Reflecting on Reflections of Law in China’s Globalism

Colloquium | November 9 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Matthew S. Erie, Oriental Studies, University of Oxford

 Stanley Lubman, Boalt School of Law, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Law, Boalt School of

What is the role of law in China’s new globalism? By the year 2020, China will be one of the largest capital exporters in the world, marking the first time in modern history a nondemocratic state will have such a widespread impact on the developing world. While much of Chinese investment flows to post-industrial Europe and North America, a significant amount reaches Sub-Saharan Africa, West Asia,...   More >

Logic Colloquium: If 13 were not prime: Mathematics and counterpossibles

Colloquium | November 9 | 4-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Mark Colyvan, Professor of Philosophy and Philosophy of Mathematics, University of Sydney; Visiting Professor and Humboldt Fellow, Ludwig-Maximilians University

 Department of Mathematics

Standard approaches to counterfactuals in the philosophy of explanation are geared toward causal explanation. I suggest how to extend the counterfactual theory of explanation to non-causal, mathematical explanation. The core idea here is to model impossible perturbations to the relevant mathematics while tracking the resulting differences to the explanandum (either physical or mathematical,...   More >

BASF Seminar in Inorganic Chemistry: Designer DNA Architectures for Programmable Self-assembly

Seminar | November 9 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Hao Yan, School of Molecular Sciences, Arizona State University

 College of Chemistry

Hao Yan studied chemistry and earned his Bachelor’s degree at Shandong University, China. He obtained his PhD in Chemistry under Professor N. C. Seeman, New York University in 2001, working on design and construction of sequence dependent DNA nanomechanical devices. He then moved to the Computer Science Department at Duke University, where he continued to explore his interests in DNA based...   More >

After Effects: Professor Rajagopalan Mrinalini

Conference/Symposium | November 9 | 6-8 p.m. |  Wurster Hall

 Professor Rajagopalan Mrinalin, Assoc Prof, Department of Art/Architecture History, University of Pittsburgh

 Department of Architecture

Professor Rajagopalan Mrinalini will deliver the opening lecture for a graduate student conference entitled: After Effects: Architectural Histories of the Present, November 9th-11th 2018.