<< Week of October 28 >>

Sunday, October 28, 2018

AIA - Ellen and Charles S. La Follette Lecture - Murder in the Agora: Violent Death and Illicit Burial in Ancient Athens

Lecture | October 28 | 2 p.m. | 142 Dwinelle Hall

 Maria Liston, Department of Anthropology, University of Waterloo

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Violent crime and homicides are not a problem limited to the modern world alone, and the ancient city of Athens experienced similar events throughout antiquity. A recent study of all the human skeletons found in wells excavated by the American Excavations in the Athenian Agora has found that many of these individuals died violently. Some of the dead, including women and children, appear to be...   More >

Monday, October 29, 2018

Environmental Justice & the Borderlands

Lecture | October 29 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  The Latinx Research Center

 2547 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Dr.Carolina Prado, https://ourenvironment.berkeley.edu/people/carolina-prado

 The Latinx Research Center

Dr.Carolina Prado analyzes the participation of a Tijuana-San Diego social movement network with border environmental governance structures in the U.S.-México border region. Based on 2015 interviews with governance actors in the governmental, social movement & private realms, this lecture delineates an intervention in the field of community participation in environmental governance & a set of...   More >

Oct 29 Environmental Justice & the Borderlands

Visiting Scholar Talk: Mona Kasra

Lecture | October 29 | 1-2 p.m. | Moffitt Undergraduate Library, 340 BCNM Commons

 Mona Kasra, Digital Media Design at the University of Virginia

 Center for New Media

Mona Kasra is an Assistant Professor of Digital Media Design at the University of Virginia (UVa). A cross-disciplinary scholar, Mona examines political and theoretical questions about the power of online images in our digital culture and cross-culturally in her research. She has presented her work at national and international conferences, including The Society for Photographic Education (SPE),...   More >

Principles, Passion and Purpose:: Standing Up for the Rule of Law in a Turbulent Age

Lecture | October 29 | 4-6 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Room 105

 Mike Feuer, Los Angeles City Attorney, https://www.lacityattorney.org/

 Law, Boalt School of

Mike Feuer, Los Angeles City Attorney, will present the first annual Judge Harry Pregerson Lecture. At one of the most tumultuous times in the life of our legal system, Feuer will draw on examples from Judge Pregerson's life and career as he explores issues including the fragility of democracy and justice reform.

Design Field Notes: Chris Hill and Prat Ganapathy

Lecture | October 29 | 4-5 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

About Design Field Notes:
Each informal talk in this pop-up series brings a design practitioner to a Jacobs Hall teaching studio to share ideas, projects, and practices.

About this talk:
Stephanie Chen is a design researcher based in San Francisco. The scope of her work has occasionally driven her mother to ask, "How do I explain what you do?!" The best answer is simply that she studies...   More >

Expendables For Whom?: Terry Crews, Phallicism, and the Erasure of Black Male Victims of Sexual Assault and Rape

Lecture | October 29 | 5-7 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife

 Tommy J. Curry, Professor, Texas A&M Philosophy

 Department of English, Department of Ethnic Studies, Center for Race and Gender, Department of African American Studies

The sexual assault of Terry Crews by Adam Venit raises all sorts of questions about the nature of sexual violence and our reluctance to see Black men as victims of sexual assault in the United States. Despite a history of Black men and boys being raped by white men and women, there is no effort to connect the centuries long record of sexual violence against Black males to the sexual victimization...   More >

The Good Anthropocene: Terraforming Earth

Lecture | October 29 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Osher Theater, BAMPFA

 Kim Stanley Robinson

 Berkeley Center for New Media, CED Studio One

The Anthropocene is a name in a periodizing scheme, or in more than one periodizing scheme, so to understand it more fully we need first to discuss periodization itself. After that it may be possible to move on to considerations of what it would take to create a “good Anthropocene.”

The Good Anthropocene: Terraforming Earth

Lecture | October 29 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Kim Stanley Robinson

 Arts + Design, Berkeley Center for New Media

Robinson reminds us that the Anthropocene is a name in a periodizing scheme, or in more than one periodizing scheme. He suggests that, to understand it more fully, we need first to discuss periodization itself. After that, Robinson considers whether it is possible to consider the conditions for creating a “good Anthropocene.

Kim Stanley Robinson is an American science fiction writer. He is...   More >

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Fall 2018 Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | October 30 – December 4, 2018 every Tuesday | 190 Doe Library

 Deb Agarwal, Department Head, Data Science and Technology, Computational Research Division, LBNL; Rosemary Gillespie, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy & Management; Rachel Slaybaugh, Assistant Professor, Nuclear Engineering

 Kristina Hill, Associate Professor, Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning and Urban Design

 Data Sciences

The Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science, co-hosted by the The Berkeley Division of Data Sciences and the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), return for the Fall 2018 series. Lectures feature Berkeley faculty doing visionary research that illustrates the character of the ongoing data revolution.

Printing Soft Matter in Three Dimensions

Lecture | October 30 | 4-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Professor Jennifer Lewis, Harvard University

 Materials Science and Engineering (MSE)

3D printing enables one to rapidly design and fabricate materials in arbitrary shapes on demand. I will introduce the fundamental principles that underpin 3D printing methods pioneered by our group. I will then describe the design, composition, and rheological properties of functional, structural and biological inks that we have developed, which are vastly expanding the capabilities of 3D...   More >

Bernard Moses Memorial Lectures featuring Wendy Brown: Neoliberalism’s Scorpion Tail: Markets and Morals Where Democracy Once Was

Lecture | October 30 | 4:10 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Wendy Brown, Class of 1936 First Chair Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley

 Graduate Division

Wendy Brown will present the Bernard Moses Memorial Lecture on Tuesday, October 30, 2018 titled "Neoliberalism’s Scorpion Tail: Markets and Morals Where Democracy Once Was." The lecture is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Changing Careers: Myths and Best Practices

Lecture | October 30 | 6:30-8 p.m. | UC Berkeley Extension (Golden Bear Center), room 202

 Marty Nemko

 UC Berkeley Extension

You’ve decided it’s time for a career change. How big a change can you realistically make? What techniques work and which don't? Career Coach Marty Nemko will offer fresh, but proven, ideas to illuminate the career change process and help you focus your efforts. Which rewarding careers tend to be more open to career changers? How can you prepare for your new career when you don’t have the time...   More >

  Register online

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Return of the Basket: On Art and Environment

Lecture | October 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Daniel Niles, Associate Professor, Geography, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (Kyoto)

 Archaeological Research Facility

Baskets are the original bags. They are among humankind’s earliest technologies, speaking especially to distant human interaction with plants. For as long as it is possible to measure, people everywhere made and used baskets in order to make life easier. In the modern imaginary, however, basketry is common, perhaps too common, and so tightly linked to pre-industrial life that it appears not just...   More >

Smadar Ben-Natan, "Citizen-Enemies: Military Courts in Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories"

Lecture | October 31 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The 1967 Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories produced a boomerang effect on Palestinian citizens within the 1948 borders, re-framing them as citizen-enemies. While the Israeli legal regime of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip is extensively researched, this study extends its focus to the interrelations between the different parts comprising the Israeli “imperial formation.” Looking into...   More >

Using Machine Learning to Understand Health Care Systems

Lecture | October 31 | 1:10-2:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Sendhil Mullainathan

 Information, School of

Sendhil Mullainathan discusses how machine learning can improve our understanding of the health system itself.

Crisis in the Making: The Implications of US Interventions in Venezuela

Lecture | October 31 | 3-5 p.m. |  The Latinx Research Center

 2547 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Steven Ellner, Professor, Universidad de Oriente in Puerto La Cruz, Venezuela

 The Latinx Research Center

Join us for this historic speaking tour by Dr. Steve Ellner, the preeminent scholar in the English language on political, economic histories of Venezuela to understand the complexities of the current situation in Venezuela and its effects both inside and outside the country.

GDPR: Big Data, Big Responsibility

Lecture | October 31 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Jeff Jonas

 Information, School of

The EUâs new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes big responsibilities for organizations.

Thursday, November 1, 2018

On Routes of Slavery: The African Cultural Diaspora with Ahmad Sikainga

Lecture | November 1 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Arts + Design

In collaboration with Cal Performances and the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, this lecture, presented by Ahmad Sikainga, will discuss the African Diaspora in relation to the performance The Routes of Slavery (1444–1888). Currently at the Department of History at the Ohio State University, Sikainga’s academic interests embrace the study of Africa, the African Diaspora, and the...   More >

Talking with the Trees: John Muir’s Nature Spirituality

Lecture | November 1 | 10-11:30 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden, and the Center for the Arts & Religion, Graduate Theological Union

The iconic hero of the wilderness, John Muir, held an ecstatic relationship to trees. While Muir’s writings about trees helped lay the foundations for federal laws that aimed to protect wilderness forests as national treasures, they also index Muir’s deeply religious response to trees as living, sentient beings. This talk explores Muir’s nature spirituality that endowed trees with a kind of...   More >

Free with Garden admission ($12); Free for UCBG members, GTU and UC Berkeley students, staff, and faculty

  Register online

Jorde Symposium: James Forman, Jr.: Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America

Lecture | November 1 | 4 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Booth Auditorium

 Devon Carbado, UCLA School of Law

 James Forman, Jr., Yale Law School; L. Song Richardson, UCI Law School; David Sklansky, Stanford Law School

 Ms.

The 2018 Jorde Symposium will feature Pulitzer Prize winner James Forman, Jr., Professor of Law at Yale Law School speaking about his book "Locking Up Our Own: Crime & Punishment in Black America." The lecture features comments by Devon Carbado of UCLA Law, L. Song Richardson of UC Irvine Law and David Sklansky of Stanford Law School. Book sales will follow the lecture

Counter-memory and Justice in Armed Conflicts

Lecture | November 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

Angana P. Chatterji, Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Project and Visiting Research Anthropologist, Center for Race & Gender

Mariane C. Ferme, Professor of Anthropology and African Studies, Curator of African Ethnology at the Hearst Museum of Anthropology

The Nicaraguan Crisis and the Battle over History

Lecture | November 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. |  2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies)

 Myrna Santiago, UC Berkeley

 Center for Latin American Studies

Professor Myrna Santiago argues that the crisis in Nicaragua is not only a conflict over the fate of the Ortega-Murillo presidency, but also over the memory of the Sandinista Revolution and the country's political history. Nicaraguans’ perspectives on the presidential couple depends, at heart, on how they interpret the history and legacy of the Sandinista Revolution. In the process, various...   More >

Men outside the Museo de la Revolución in Léon, Nicaragua. (Photo by Alexander Schimmick.)

AHMA Colloquium - The Preservation of Disability

Lecture | November 1 | 4-5:15 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 David Gissen, California College of the Arts

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

This paper is part of a larger lecture series entitled "Digital Humanities and the Ancient World." The events are co-sponsored by the AHMA Colloquium and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Daniel M. Kammen | The Clean Energy Transition in Bangladesh - Local and Global Impacts and Opportunities: The Chowdhury Center Distinguished Lecture for 2018

Lecture | November 1 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) | Note change in location

 Daniel M. Kammen, Director of Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL); Professor in the Energy and Resources Group (ERG); and Professor of Public Policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy

 Isha Ray, Associate Professor at the Energy and Resources Group and Co-Director of the Berkeley Water Center at University of California, Berkeley

 The Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies, Energy and Resources Group

A lecture by Distinguished Professor of Energy and Chair of the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California, Berkeley and a former Science Envoy for the State Department, Prof. Daniel M. Kammen.

The Wonder of the World: Merleau-Ponty, Cezanne, and the meaning of painting

Lecture | November 1 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, Library of French Thought, 4229 Dwinelle

 William D. Adams, Senior Fellow, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundationhttps://mellon.org/

 Department of French

William D. Adams is a Senior Fellow at the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and a former Chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Victoria Bergstrom, of the French Department, will be his respondent.

Astronomy Night at UC Berkeley

Lecture | November 1 | 6:30-9:30 p.m. | 131 Campbell Hall

 Dan Werthimer, UC Berkeley

 Department of Astronomy

The final UC Berkeley Astronomy Night of the 2018 season features a talk by Dan Werthimer, the Marilyn and Watson Alberts SETI Chair and chief scientist of the Berkeley SETI Research Center, on the search for extraterrestrial life with SETI@home.

As always, come join us at Campbell Hall on the UC Berkeley campus on the first Thursday of every month for a FREE night of astronomy and stargazing...   More >

Searching for Dark Matter

Lecture | November 1 | 6:30-7:30 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Matt Pyle, Department of Physics

 Science@Cal

What is dark matter? For decades, firm astronomical evidence from observations of stars and galaxies has indicated that most of the matter in the universe cannot be seen directly in telescopes. Instead, this matter must be observed indirectly through its gravitational pull on the objects that we can see. This is how the term “dark matter” was coined…But how do we search for something we can’t...   More >

Evidence for dark matter in the Bullet Cluster

Friday, November 2, 2018

Talk featuring composer/performer/improviser Tyshawn Sorey

Lecture | November 2 | 12:30-2 p.m. |  CNMAT (1750 Arch St.)

 Center for New Music and Audio Technologies (CNMAT)

Tyshawn Sorey is a composer and musician whose music assimilates and transforms ideas from a broad spectrum of musical idioms and defies distinctions between genres, composition, and improvisation in a singular expression of contemporary music.

Ultrafast Manipulation of Topological Phases in WTe2 Nanolayers: Nano Seminar Series

Lecture | November 2 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Prof. Aaron Lindenberg, Stanford Univ., Materials Science & Engineering

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

Manipulation of topological invariants in quantum materials plays a key role in topological switching applications and can stabilize emergent topological phases in otherwise trivial materials. Lattice strain has been proposed as one means of tuning these topological invariants. However, conventional means of applying strain are not extendable to controllable time-varying protocols. In particular,...   More >

Are New Vehicle Emissions Standards Effective and Efficient?

Lecture | November 2 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 James Sallee, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Transportation Studies

UC Berkeley's James Sallee will present Are New Vehicle Emissions Standards Effective and Efficient? on November 2, 2018 at 4 p.m. in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building. Join us for cookies and beverages at 3:30 p.m.

Are New Vehicle Emissions Standards Effective and Efficient?

Lecture | November 2 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 James Sallee, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Transportation Studies

UC Berkeley's James Sallee will present Are New Vehicle Emissions Standards Effective and Efficient? on November 2, 2018 at 4 p.m. in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building. Join us for cookies and beverages at 3:30 p.m.

Work between National Socialism and the Economic Miracle: A Forgotten Crisis in the Early Federal Republic

Lecture | November 2 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Joerg Neuheiser, University of California, San Diego

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West

Joerg Neuheiser’s current research focuses on post-war Germany and the history of work in 20th century Europe. He is working on a book on the West German work ethic after 1945 in which he analyzes the legacy of Weimar and Nazi work experiences after 1945, the migration of so-called “guest workers” from the 1960s onwards and the German experience of economic, technological and cultural change in...   More >