<< Week of February 25 >>

Monday, February 26, 2018

Social Change in Post-Khomeini Iran: What to Expect in the Coming Years?

Lecture | February 26 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Mahmood Monshipouri, San Francisco State University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The post-Khomeini era has profoundly changed the socio-political landscape of Iran. Since 1989, the internal dynamics of change in Iran, rooted in a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic, and behavioral factors, have led to a noticeable transition in both societal and governmental structures of power, as well as the way in which many Iranians have come to deal with the...   More >

Autocratic Legalism: Kim Lane Scheppele, Princeton University

Lecture | February 26 | 2-4 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall

 Kim Lane Scheppele, Professor, Princeton University

 Social Science Matrix, Department of Sociology

Please join us on February 26 for "Autocratic Legalism," a presentation by Kim Lane Scheppele of Princeton University, with discussions by Dylan Riley and Jason Wittenberg. This event is presented as part of the UC Berkeley Department of Sociology's Departmental Colloquium Series.

Kim Lane Scheppele

Transcending Institutions: A Medieval Way to Individual Freedom.: A talk by Gert Melville, Feb. 26th 2018

Lecture | February 26 | 5 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Gert Melville, Technische Universität Dresden

 Medieval Studies Program

"Transcending Institutions: A Medieval Way to Individual Freedom."

Gert Melville, Senior Professor of Medieval History and Director of the Research Centre for the Comparative History of Religious Orders at the Technische Universität Dresden.

26 February 2018
5:00 pm in 3335 Dwinelle

A talk by Micha Lazarus: Shakespeare’s Aristotle: the Poetics in Renaissance England

Lecture | February 26 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Micha Lazarus

 Department of English, Katharine Bixby Hotchkis Chair

Transcending Institutions: A Medieval Way to Individual Freedom

Lecture | February 26 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Gert Melville, Senior Professor of Medieval History and Director of the Research Centre for the Comparative History of Religious Orders, Technische Universität Dresden

 Department of History, Medieval Studies Program, San Francisco Theological Seminary / Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

What happened before the big bang and other big questions about the universe: 2018 Oppenheimer Lecture

Lecture | February 26 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Michael S. Turner, Professor, Director, University of Chicago, Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics

 Department of Physics

Big ideas like the deep connections between quarks and the cosmos and powerful instruments like the Hubble Space Telescope and Large Hadron Collider have advanced our understanding of the universe.  We can now trace its history from the big-bang beginning 13.8 billion years ago through an early state of quantum fluctuations to a soup of quarks and other particles, from the formation of nuclei and...   More >

Neha Choksi | Artist Talk: On Exploring Absence, Loss, and Transformation

Lecture | February 26 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 120 Kroeber Hall

 Neha Choksi, Performance Artist/Sculptor

 Asma Kazmi, Assistant Professor, Department of Practice of Art, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of Art Practice

A public lecture by Performance Artist/Sculptor Neha Choksi.

The Natural History Museum and the Future of Nature

Lecture | February 26 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Beka Economopoulos, Co-founder and Director, The Natural History Museum; Dan Kammen, Professor, Energy & Chair Energy and Resources Group

 Arts + Design

In a post-truth era, the role of trusted institutions of science is more important than ever. Drawing on recent initiatives organized by The Natural History Museum, a mobile and pop-up museum founded by the activist art collective Not An Alternative, this talk will explore how The Natural History Museum leverages the symbolic and infrastructural power of science museums to transform them into...   More >

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Historicizing the Realist Imagination: Hans Morgenthau in the Early Cold War

Lecture | February 27 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Matthew Specter, Institute of European Studies

 Institute of European Studies

International relations has recently enjoyed a “historical turn,” in which the intellectual biographies of major figures like E.H. Carr and Hans Morgenthau, as well as the origins of central concepts like “internationalism” and “realism” have been reconstructed. Figures from Henry Kissinger to Barack Obama have claimed the mantle of “realist,” but the figure who gave its most distinctive modern...   More >

Measure for the Anthropocene: Planetary Imagination and Design

Lecture | February 27 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Neyran Turan, College of Environmental Design

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

In light of our current political crisis around climate change, what can architecture and design contribute toward a new planetary imaginary of our contemporary environment? If climate change is a crisis of imagination, as literary historian Amitav Ghosh states, or a profound mutation in our relation to the world, as put by Bruno Latour, can design imagination provide any insights in this dilemma...   More >

Spatial Data Science: Mapping for Impact: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | February 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Maggi Kelly

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Spatial data collection, analysis and visualization has changed dramatically in the last decade. We now have, for example, high spatial and temporal resolution imagery, integrated smart phones as data collectors, and cloud-based analytical platforms to work with. Collectively, these developments make up our 21st century mapping toolkit that is in increasing demand to address contemporary...   More >

The Afterlives of Fetishism: A Conversation

Lecture | February 27 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Rosalind Morris, Professor of Anthropology, Columbia University

 The Program in Critical Theory

A conversation with Rosalind Morris about her new book, The Returns of Fetishism: Charles de Brosses and the Afterlives of an Idea.

Fanon in the Algerian War: A Painful Gender Issue

Lecture | February 27 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Seloua Luste-Boulbina, Researcher in the Department of Political and Social Change, Denis Diderot University

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The colony operates with a double standard. Women are both largely excluded from schooling and supposed to be protected by their male fellow citizens. Everything then happens as if, according to the old despotic saying, colonial politics were benevolent toward them: they must be protected from their own. But how? And in what sense?

Magic Spells: A Research Workshop on Hebrew Amulets: With Magnes curators Shir Gal Kochavi, Zoe Lewin, and Francesco Spagnolo

Lecture | February 27 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Join Magnes curators in discovering the elaborate texts and imagery, magic formulas, and kabbalistic sources in Hebrew amulets.

Worn on one’s person or placed in homes, Jewish amulets are used at moments of vulnerability and transition, like childbirth, marriage, or illness. They feature texts including biblical verses, Psalms, divine names, and invocations of powerful figures like angels, and...   More >

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Mobility, Expulsion and Claims to Home: Migrant Organizing in an Era of Deportation and Dispossession

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues)

 Monisha Das Gupta, Professor of Ethnic Studies and Women’s Studies, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

 Center for Research on Social Change, Center for Race and Gender, Asian American Studies

I examine the relationship among mobility, forced removals, and claims to space by analyzing how high school-age members of Khmer Girls in Action in Long Beach interrogate the school to prison to deportation pipeline. In their activism, they link the criminalization of Khmer refugees to the legacies of US wars in southeast Asia and the failures of the US refugee resettlement program.

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: Mark Danner with Joyce Carol Oates: Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

George W. Bush's War on Terror has led to seventeen years of armed conflict, making it the longest war in US history. Professor Mark Danner examines this state of perpetual struggle and its widespread acceptance in the name of American security.

Shellfish and Seaweed at Sand Hill Bluff: A Deeper Look at Shell-Matrix Sites of California's Central Coast

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Mike Grone, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Along the Central Coast of California, changes in shoreline management practices and their subsequent effects on fisheries can be examined in the context of long-term human occupation, climatic and environmental variability, and the development of Indigenous, Spanish, Mexican, and American relationships with the environment. While extensive archaeological investigation regarding indigenous...   More >

The 'Global 1968' at Fifty: What it Meant and What it Means

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Institute of European Studies

Timothy Scott Brown will discuss the global revolt of 1968 on both sides of the Cold War divide, identifying basic principles that underpinned the revolt in its diverse national and regional locations. Exploring the transnational exchanges and communities of the imagination that make it possible to speak of a global 1968, he will place the events of fifty years ago in historical perspective with...   More >

A Talk with Jeanne C. Finley and John Muse

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Jeanne C. Finley, Professor of Film and Graduate Fine Arts, California College of Arts; John Muse, Visual Media Scholar, Haverford College, Haverford PA

 Arts + Design

Since 1988 Jeanne C. Finley and John Muse have worked collaboratively on numerous experimental documentaries and installations. These works have been exhibited nationally and internationally, at festivals and museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Guggenheim Museum, The Whitney Biennial, San Francisco International Film Festival,...   More >

Who Names the Public Space?

Lecture | February 28 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

From Confederate memorials to Berkeley's Boalt Hall, culture wars are being fought. We need to take a stand, but what stand?

ARCH Lecture: Daniel M. Abramson

Lecture | February 28 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, FEB 28, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk with Professor Abramson about why the idea of architectural obsolescence was invented in early-twentieth-century America and how it has influenced design and urbanism up to the present age of sustainability.

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Robert Louis Stevenson in Samoa

Lecture | March 1 | 4-6:30 p.m. | 306 Wheeler Hall

 Joseph Farrell

 Department of English, C. 19 & Beyond British Cultural Studies Working Group

The C.19 & Beyond British Cultural Studies Working Group is pleased to invite you all to hear our guest speaker Joe Farrell present work from his forthcoming book, "Robert Louis Stevenson in Samoa," which analyzes the author's final years in Samoa and his relationship to British Colonialism.

What You Lose When You Lose Your Job: The Lasting Impacts of Unemployment

Lecture | March 1 | 4-6 p.m. |  2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment)

 Jennie Brand, Professor of Sociology, UCLA

 Danny Yagan, Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley

 Sandra Smith, Director, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Center for the Study of Law and Society, Department of Economics, Berkeley Population Center

As the US economy improves, the unemployment rate continues to fall. But job loss has far-reaching and long-lasting consequences, and many Americans are still dealing with the economic, social, and psychological effects of layoffs. Professor Brand will explore the complex ways that the shock of job loss impacts workers’ career achievement, economic outcomes, and wellbeing, and how these effects...   More >

  RSVP online

Mosse-Lecture: Can Architecture Be Democratic?: 2nd Annual Mosse-Lecture

Lecture | March 1 | 4:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jan-Werner Mueller, Professor, Political Science, Princeton University

 Martin Jay, Professor, History, UC Berkeley

 Department of German, The Mosse Foundation

Many people have an intuitive sense that the built environment is bound up with politics. The lecture poses the question how we might think more systematically (and normatively) about the relationship between democracy and architecture as well as public spaces as a particular form of the built environment.

Leaving Religion and Losing Culture: Secular Conversion among Hispanic Freethinkers, Black Atheists, and Ex-Muslims: Joseph Blankholm

Lecture | March 1 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Relying on years of ethnographic research among avowedly secular people, Blankholm argues that becoming secular is a transformative process akin to conversion, and that secular Americans who are not white or who convert from non-Christian religions face unique challenges that lead to new forms of secularism.

HTNM: "The Software Arts" with Warren Sacks

Lecture | March 1 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall

 Warren Sacks, UCSC

 Center for New Media

Sacks argues computing grew out of the arts. This argument will be a provocation for some, especially for those who see a bright line dividing the “two cultures” of the arts and the sciences. For others, the argument will not seem provocative at all.

Ferdinand de Saussure and the Phonic Harmony of Archaic Latin Poetry: Sather Lecture #4

Lecture | March 1 | 5:30 p.m. |  Alumni House | Note change in time and location

 Maurizio Bettini, Università degli Studi di Siena

 Department of Classics

SOLD OUT - The Science of Cannabis: Cannabis as Medicine

Lecture | March 1 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

What are the potential therapeutic benefits of Cannabis to ameliorate physical and psychological illnesses? Because of the constraints on conducting medical research on Cannabis and related products, much available information is empirical and has not been subjected to the rigors of the scientific method.

$30 / $25 UCBG Members / $15 Current students

 SOLD OUT.

Pioneering Tech Journalist and Author Kara Swisher

Lecture | March 1 | 6:15-7:45 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Graduate School of Journalism, Taube Philanthropies

Seating is first come, first served. Advance registration does not guarantee seating.

About Kara Swisher
Kara Swisher is one of the country's most influential journalists covering Silicon Valley, the focus of her reporting for over two decades. She is the executive editor of Recode, host of the Recode Decode podcast and co-executive producer of the high-profile Code Conference. Swisher...   More >

  RSVP online by February 26.

Friday, March 2, 2018

Espalier and Pollarding Techniques

Lecture | March 2 | 10-11:30 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Join UCBG's landscape horticulturist, Mathew McMillan for a talk on the history, advantages, and techniques to espalier and pollard trees.

$20 / $15 UCBG Member

  Register online

Jacobs Design Conversations: Allison Arieff

Lecture | March 2 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Allison Arieff, editorial director of SPUR and contributing opinion writer for the New York Times, will speak on “Solving All the Wrong Problems” as part of the Jacobs Design Conversations series.

The Killing Season: A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66

Lecture | March 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Geoffrey Robinson, Professor of History, UCLA

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Prof. Robinson will discuss his new book, which examines the shocking anti-leftist purge that gripped Indonesia in 1965–66, leaving some 500,000 people dead and more than one million others in detention.

Geoff Robinson

Beyond Insiders and Outsiders: Rethinking Nationalism and the Politics of “Othering” in the Modern Balkans

Lecture | March 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Edin Hajdarpasic, Associate Professor of History, Loyola University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

During the nineteenth century, Serbian and Croatian national movements defined themselves against the specter of “the Turk.” Yet even as they explicitly named “the Turks” as sworn enemies, many Serbian-Croatian nationalists simultaneously described Bosnian Turks or Muslims as their “brothers,” pointing to their shared language, traditions, and ancestry. As one leading South Slavic nationalist...   More >

Managing Transportation in a New Era of Innovation

Lecture | March 2 | 4 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 Jeff Morales, ITS Senior Fellow

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: A combination of forces is affecting the development and delivery of infrastructure and transportation services and presenting the industry with new challenges. Forces such as politics, budgetary constraints, organizational and workforce issues, and technology continue to change and require innovative approaches and solutions. With a new and different level of engagement by the private...   More >