<< Week of February 25 >>

Monday, February 26, 2018

The Green Initiative Fund (TGIF) Final Abstracts Due

Deadline | February 26 | -5 p.m. | 102 Sproul Hall

 Brian Gialketsis, The Green Initiative Fund (TGIF)

 Student Environmental Resource Center

Implementing the CA History-Social Science Framework

Workshop | February 26 | 8:30 a.m. |  Contra Costa County Office of Education

 77 Santa Barbara Road, Pleasant Hill, CA, CA 94523

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

The UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project (UCBHSSP) will introduce participants to the new History-Social Science framework, which was adopted in July 2016. A central aspect of both efforts is to support teaches in developing inquiry-driven courses that integrate the H-SS Standards (content and historical analysis) and Common Core Standards for Literacy in History while integrating ELD...   More >

PMB Special Seminar: "Gating Plant Immunity and Death at the Nuclear Boundary"

Seminar | February 26 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | Energy Biosciences Building, First Floor Conference Room

 Yangnan Gu, Tsinghua University

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

The Gu lab uses a combined molecular, cellular, genetic, biochemical, biostatistical and bioinformatic approach to study the intriguing mechanism behind host-pathogen interactions. They focus on the role of targeted membrane trafficking and coordinated nucleocytoplasmic transport in activation, regulation and termination of the innate immunity. They are also interested in the immune regulatory...   More >

Yangnan Gu

Combinatorics Seminar: Combinatorics of the 2-ASEP on a ring

Seminar | February 26 | 12-1 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Olya Mandelshtam, Brown University

 Department of Mathematics

The two-species asymmetric simple exclusion process (2-ASEP) on a ring is a Markov chain on Zn/Z with each site either vacant or occupied by one of two classes of particles, and whose dynamics are dictated by parameter q: particles can hop right at rate 1 or left at rate q. At q=0, the stationary probabilities of the states of the 2-ASEP can be described by multiline queues of Ferarri and Martin....   More >

Scalable Imaging of Molecular Order

Seminar | February 26 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Shalin Mehta, PhD, Platform Leader, Advanced Optical Microscopy, Chan Zuckerberg Biohub

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Abstract: Nanoscale alignment of molecules, or molecular order, underpins the directed functions of cells. Cells have the fascinating capacity of creating and sustaining molecular order at the expense of chemical energy, as illustrated by the planar organization of the lipid membrane and the three-dimensional organization of chromatin, cytoskeleton, and extracellular matrix. The molecular order...   More >

Attachment, Religion, and Spirituality: A Wider View

Colloquium | February 26 | 12:10-1:20 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Pehr Granqvist, Visiting scholar from Stockholm University

 Department of Psychology

I will outline a book on the attachment-religion connection that I am currently composing as a visiting scholar. The book has been contracted with Guilford and has Dist. Prof. Em. Phillip R. Shaver from UC Davis as editor. I will focus the talk on four reasons for choosing “A Wider View” as subtitle. First, I argue that Bowlby restricted attachment theory unnecessarily by insisting that...   More >

The Role of Attachment in Perceived Relationships with Deities

Colloquium | February 26 | 12:10-1:20 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Frances Nkara, Psychology Department

 Department of Psychology

Religious believers’ perceived relationships with deities likely promote the pervasiveness of theistic religions, especially if these relationships engender or promise attachment-related “felt security”. Specific expectations and behavior within these perceived relationships might be derived from individual differences in implicit, internal working models or states of mind regarding attachment...   More >

Political Economy Seminar

Seminar | February 26 | 12:30-2 p.m. | Moses Hall, Moses Hall 223

 Jorg Spenkuch, Northwestern

 Department of Economics

The Political Economy Seminar focuses on formal and quantitative work in the political economy field, including formal political theory.

Social Change in Post-Khomeini Iran: What to Expect in the Coming Years?

Lecture | February 26 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Mahmood Monshipouri, San Francisco State University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The post-Khomeini era has profoundly changed the socio-political landscape of Iran. Since 1989, the internal dynamics of change in Iran, rooted in a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic, and behavioral factors, have led to a noticeable transition in both societal and governmental structures of power, as well as the way in which many Iranians have come to deal with the...   More >

Ultra High-Field MRI - Open questions in engineering and multiphysics

Seminar | February 26 | 1-2 p.m. | Soda Hall, Wozniak Lounge (430 Soda Hall)

 Simone Angela Winkler, Staff Research Associate, Stanford University

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has emerged as one of the most powerful and informative diagnostic tools in modern medicine. While most clinical MR studies use magnetic field strengths of 1.5T or 3T, leading research is pushing these magnetic field strengths to 7T and beyond.

Autocratic Legalism: Kim Lane Scheppele, Princeton University

Lecture | February 26 | 2-4 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall

 Kim Lane Scheppele, Professor, Princeton University

 Social Science Matrix, Department of Sociology

Please join us on February 26 for "Autocratic Legalism," a presentation by Kim Lane Scheppele of Princeton University, with discussions by Dylan Riley and Jason Wittenberg. This event is presented as part of the UC Berkeley Department of Sociology's Departmental Colloquium Series.

Kim Lane Scheppele

Probabilistic Operator Algebra Seminar: On maximally amenable subalgebras in free products

Seminar | February 26 | 2-4 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Srivatsav Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

In a paper of 2014, Cyril Houdayer proved that any diffuse amenable von Neumann algebra can be concretely realized as a maximal amenable subalgebra with expectation inside a full nonamenable III1 factor. Only a year later, Narutaka Ozawa produced a very short proof of this realization (under less general circumstances). In this talk, we shall visit Ozawa's proof.

Panel on Innovative Uses of Media in Language Teaching

Panel Discussion | February 26 | 3-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 (Classroom side)

 David Kyeu, Lecturer, African American Studies; Margot Szarke, Lecturer, French; Lihua Zhang, Lecturer, East Asian Languages & Cultures

 Berkeley Language Center

Media in Swahili Teaching: Hegemonic Tendencies of the Internet
David Kyeu, Lecturer, African American Studies
Using examples from Swahili, this paper will show how the internet is slowly taking over to be the most popular form of media that instructors of Swahili are using for teaching Swahili.

Critical Thinking, Comprehension and Creativity: Multimedia in the L2 classroom
Margot Szarke,...   More >

STROBE Seminar Series: Hands-on Python Workshop: Image Analysis in the Jupyter Notebook

Seminar | February 26 | 3-4 p.m. | 433 Latimer Hall

 Antonino Ingargiola

 College of Chemistry

This hands-on workshop will give students a taste of modern scientific computing in python using the Jupyter Notebook environment. Jupyter notebooks are executable documents that interleave narrative (rich text, math equations, figures, links) with code.

Arithmetic Geometry and Number Theory RTG Seminar: Towards the global Gross-Prasad conjecture for orthogonal groups

Seminar | February 26 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Rahul Krishna, Northwestern University

 Department of Mathematics

Seminar Format: The seminar consists of two 50-minute talks, a pre-talk (3:10-4:00) and an advanced talk (4:10-5:00), with a 10-minute break (4:00-4:10) between them. The advanced talk is a regular formal presentation about recent research results to general audiences in arithmetic geometry and number theory; the pre-talk (3:10-4:00) is to introduce some prerequisites or background for the...   More >

Barna Saha - Efficient Fine-Grained Algorithms

Seminar | February 26 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 3108 Etcheverry Hall

 Barna Saha, University of Massachusetts Amherst

 Industrial Engineering & Operations Research

Abstract: One of the greatest successes of computational complexity theory is the classification of countless fundamental computational problems into polynomial-time and NP-hard ones, two classes that are often referred to as tractable and intractable, respectively. However, this crude distinction of algorithmic efficiency is clearly insufficient when handling today's large scale of data. We need...   More >

From using artifacts to mathematical meanings: The teacher’s role in the semiotic mediation process

Colloquium | February 26 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2515 Tolman Hall

 Maria Alessandra Mariotti, Università di Siena, Italy

 Graduate School of Education

The potential of artifacts for learning have been extensively studied, with a main focus on their possible use by students and the subsequent benefits for them. However, there has been the tendency to underestimate the complexity of exploiting this potential, and specifically the complexity of the teacher’s role orchestrating the teaching and learning process. Following Vygotsky’s seminal idea of...   More >

Dr. Mingfu Shao, Department of Computational Biology, Carnegie Mellon University: Efficient algorithms for large-scale transcriptomics and genomics

Seminar | February 26 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, HP Auditorium 306

 Center for Computational Biology, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Title:


Abstract:

I will present modeling and algorithmic designs for two challenging problems in biology and argue that efficient computational methods enable significant advances in our understanding of cell machinery and genome evolution. The first problem is the assembly of full-length transcripts -- the collection of expressed gene products in cells -- from noisy and highly...   More >

GraphXD Seminar: Vector Representations of Graphs and the Maximum Cut Problem

Seminar | February 26 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 David P. Williamson, Operations Research and Information Engineering, Cornell University

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

In this talk, I will look at a classical problem from graph theory of finding a large cut in a graph. We’ll start with a 1967 result of Erdős that showed that picking a random partition of the graph finds a cut that is at least half the largest possible cut. We’ll then describe a result due to Goemans and myself from 1995 that shows that by representing the graph as a set of vectors, one per...   More >

Rty Year Perspective on Medical Robotics: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow: Russ Taylor, Johns Hopkins University

Conference/Symposium | February 26 | 4-5 p.m. | 250 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Russ Taylor, Russ Taylor,

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

This talk will discuss insights gathered over nearly thirty years of research on medical robotics and computer-integrated interventional medicine (CIIM), both at IBM and at Johns Hopkins University. The goal of this research has been the creation of a three-way partnership between physicians, technology, and information to improve treatment processes. CIIM systems combine innovative algorithms,...   More >

IB Seminar: Rats! Systematics of an emerging adaptive radiation model

Seminar | February 26 | 4-5 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Kevin Rowe, Museums Victoria

 Department of Integrative Biology

Measuring activity of cortical layers in human brain with CBV-fMRI: method and first applications

Seminar | February 26 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Laurentius Huber, Postdoc Fellow at Section on Functional Imaging Methods, NIMH, NIH

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Layer-dependent fMRI allows measurements of information flow in cortical circuits, as afferent and efferent connections terminate in different cortical layers.
However, conventional high-resolution fMRI is challenged by its reactively high noise level and limited localization specificity of large draining veins.
In this presentation, I will discuss some recent methodological advancements of...   More >

Algorithms in Practice: Comparing Web Journalism and Criminal Justice

Special Event | February 26 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. |  470 Stephens Hall

 Angèle Christin

 Information, School of

AngÃle Christin documents a gap between the intended and actual effects of algorithms in two professions.

A talk by Micha Lazarus: Shakespeare’s Aristotle: the Poetics in Renaissance England

Lecture | February 26 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Micha Lazarus

 Department of English, Katharine Bixby Hotchkis Chair

Transcending Institutions: A Medieval Way to Individual Freedom.: A talk by Gert Melville, Feb. 26th 2018

Lecture | February 26 | 5 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Gert Melville, Technische Universität Dresden

 Medieval Studies Program

"Transcending Institutions: A Medieval Way to Individual Freedom."

Gert Melville, Senior Professor of Medieval History and Director of the Research Centre for the Comparative History of Religious Orders at the Technische Universität Dresden.

26 February 2018
5:00 pm in 3335 Dwinelle

East Side Sushi

Film - Documentary | February 26 | 5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium | Tickets sold out

 Anthony Lucero, Director; Tomoharu Nakamura, Chef

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

Join us for a screening of the a film East Side Sushi, followed by a Q&A with the Director Anthony Lucero and
Chef Tomoharu Nakamura of Wako Japanese Restaurant.

East Side Sushi introduces us to Juana, a working-class Latina single mother who strives to become a sushi chef.

Years of working in the food industry have made Juana’s hands fast—very fast. She can...   More >

Free

  Sold out. Sold Out Buy tickets online

Transcending Institutions: A Medieval Way to Individual Freedom

Lecture | February 26 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Gert Melville, Senior Professor of Medieval History and Director of the Research Centre for the Comparative History of Religious Orders, Technische Universität Dresden

 Department of History, Medieval Studies Program, San Francisco Theological Seminary / Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Swahili Weekly Social Hour

Social Event | January 22 – April 30, 2018 every Monday with exceptions | 5:30-6:30 p.m. |  Jupiter

 2181 Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley

 Center for African Studies

Speak Swahili with your fellow Swahili students and enthusiasts over a drink at Jupiter (check for location updates). This is an informal gathering to connect with other Swahili speakers on campus and in Berkeley. Each person will support their own beverage purchases (water, soda, coffee, tea, beer, etc.), but we will provide the good company! And of course, Swahili speaking only! All skill and...   More >

Information Session: Berkeley Social Welfare Post-Master's Pupil Personnel Services Credential (PPSC) Program

Information Session | February 26 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Haviland Hall, Room 2

 Social Welfare, School of

A Post-MSW PPSC Program is also offered for certain qualified school social work credential seekers who did not complete a school social work program as part of their regular MSW degree.

This information session will address the application requirements, program structure, and offer an opportunity for applicants to ask questions.

What happened before the big bang and other big questions about the universe: 2018 Oppenheimer Lecture

Lecture | February 26 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Michael S. Turner, Professor, Director, University of Chicago, Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics

 Department of Physics

Big ideas like the deep connections between quarks and the cosmos and powerful instruments like the Hubble Space Telescope and Large Hadron Collider have advanced our understanding of the universe.  We can now trace its history from the big-bang beginning 13.8 billion years ago through an early state of quantum fluctuations to a soup of quarks and other particles, from the formation of nuclei and...   More >

UC's 150th Anniversary Reception

Reception | February 26 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. |  Tsakopoulos Library Galleria

 828 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

 UC Office of the President

Join us at a lively reception for University of California advocates, alumni and friends as we celebrate UC’s 150th anniversary.

$10

  Register online

UROC DeCal – Demystifying the Research Process: Decolonizing Methods in Academic Research (Hosted by UROC: Undergraduate Researchers of Color)

Course | January 29 – April 30, 2018 every Monday with exceptions | 6-8 p.m. | 174 Barrows Hall

 Istifaa Ahmed, UROOC

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Ethnic Studies 98/198
Class Time: Mondays, 6pm-8pm, 1/22/18 - 4/30/18
Course Control Number (CCN): 24251

Units: 1-3 units

Student Instructor: Istifaa Ahmed

Welcome to our student-led organization and DeCal, Underrepresented Researchers of Color (UROC) – Demystifying the Research Process: Decolonizing Methods in Academic Research! We seek to build a community of researchers of color...   More >

Neha Choksi | Artist Talk: On Exploring Absence, Loss, and Transformation

Lecture | February 26 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 120 Kroeber Hall

 Neha Choksi, Performance Artist/Sculptor

 Asma Kazmi, Assistant Professor, Department of Practice of Art, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of Art Practice

A public lecture by Performance Artist/Sculptor Neha Choksi.

Research Ethics and Library Database Workshop (Hosted by UROC: Undergraduate Researchers of Color)

Workshop | February 26 | 6-8 p.m. | 174 Barrows Hall

 Sine Hwang Jensen, librarian, Ethnic Studies Library

 Under-represented Researchers of Color (UROC): student group sponsored by Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

In this workshop, we will explore library resources that can support you in your research like article databases, how to access archives, and more. We will also explore concepts around research justice and questions of knowledge production and power.

The Natural History Museum and the Future of Nature

Lecture | February 26 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Beka Economopoulos, Co-founder and Director, The Natural History Museum; Dan Kammen, Professor, Energy & Chair Energy and Resources Group

 Arts + Design

In a post-truth era, the role of trusted institutions of science is more important than ever. Drawing on recent initiatives organized by The Natural History Museum, a mobile and pop-up museum founded by the activist art collective Not An Alternative, this talk will explore how The Natural History Museum leverages the symbolic and infrastructural power of science museums to transform them into...   More >

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Asphalt Pavement Materials, Design, Construction, and Maintenance

Special Event | February 27 – March 1, 2018 every day | 8 a.m.-5 p.m. |  Holiday Inn, Rancho Cordova

 11269 Point East Drive, Rancho Cordova, CA 95742

 James Signore, PhD, PE, Associate, NCE; Irwin Guada, Laboratory and Field Operations Manager, UC Pavement Research Center - Berkeley; Frank Farshidi, PhD, Project Manager, City of San Jose

 Technology Transfer Program

This three-day course is aimed at covering the full range of topics related to asphalt concrete pavements from materials and mix design to construction, maintenance, and rehabilitation. Asphalt concrete pavements are a vital part of an agency's assets and constitute about 90% of the local streets in California. The numerous topics in this class will be presented in sufficient detail to assist the...   More >

$475.00 CA Public Agency, $950.00 Standard Fee

  Register online or by calling 510-643-4393, or by emailing registrar-techtransfer@berkeley.edu

Traffic Control for Safer Work Zones

Special Event | February 27 | 8 a.m.-5 p.m. |  City of Santa Clarita: Activities Center

 20880 Centre Pointe Pkwy, Santa Clarita, CA 91350

 Dave Royer, TE, CE, Consulting Traffic and Highway Engineer, Retired Principal Engineer, LADOT

 Tech Transfer Program

Traffic Control for Safe Work Zones is designed to keep the workers and public safe during road construction and maintenance, utility work, landscaping and railway maintenance work along roadways in California. This training course is compliant with the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CAMUTCD), Cal-OSHA Sections 1598 & 1599, and California Vehicle Code Section 21400; it also...   More >

$150.00 Standard Fee

  Register online

Human- Nature Interactions

Seminar | February 27 | 9-9:30 a.m. | Barrows Hall, Radio broadcast, ON-AIR ONLY, 90.7 FM

 Kaitlyn Gaynor, PhD Candidate, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management; Erik Sathe, PhD Candidate, Department of Integrative Biology

 KALX 90.7 FM

Kaitlyn Gaynor speaks on The Graduates about her work observing large mammals in Mendocino County, Kenya, and Mozambique. Kaitlyn studies interactions between humans and nature.

Science and Literacy Playgroup

Meeting | October 31, 2017 – May 15, 2018 every Tuesday with exceptions | 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Youth Alternatives (BYA)

 1255 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94702

 Chancellor's Community Grant, Trybe Inc.

Have fun and meet other families in West and South Berkeley.
For Children ages 05 and their caregivers.
Free, drop-in, snacks, circle time, arts and crafts and science activities.

Enhancing Seismic Performance through Protective Structural Systems

Seminar | February 27 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 542 Davis Hall

 Tracy Becker

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

While major advances have been made in seismic design, there still exists a large disconnect between the performance level that buildings are designed to achieve and the performance level required for community resiliency. Although current building codes limit fatalities in new construction, they do little to limit socioeconomic losses.

Total Synthesis of Neurologically Active Terpenoid Natural Products

Seminar | February 27 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Tim Newhouse, Department of Chemistry, Yale University

 College of Chemistry

This talk will describe the total synthesis of neurologically active terpenoid natural products using novel strategies and methodologies for step-efficient syntheses. Methodological developments in the area of allyl-palladium catalysis will be described in detail that have allowed for alpha,beta-dehydrogenation of a variety of carbonyl compounds. Unique strategies and key retrosynthetic...   More >

Gender and Ethnic Equity at the University of California: A Historical Accounting

Seminar | February 27 | 12-1 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, Academic Innovation Studio, 117 Dwinelle Hall (Level D)

 Zachary Bleemer, Director, UC Cliometric History Project, Center for Studies in Higher Education

 Center for Studies in Higher Education

The University of California, in all of its departments, has been open to students of all types and backgrounds since it opened. More than 10 percent of graduates of UC's medical schools were women almost every year after the 1890s, and the proportion of female undergraduates at UC campuses has historically been much higher than that of most private universities in California. Evidence of ethnic...   More >

  RSVP online

Threatened Scholars: A Panel on Responses to Attacks on Academic Freedom Around the World

Panel Discussion | February 27 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall

 Karen Barkey, Haas Distinguished Chair of Religious Diversity, University of California, Berkeley; Liora Israël, Senior Researcher in Sociology, School of Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS)

 Thomas W. Laqueur, Helen Fawcett Professor of History, University of California, Berkeley; Kim Lane Scheppele, Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University

 Social Science Matrix

Scholars working around the world often come under threat of persecution or harassment, whether from oppressive governments or other sources. This panel will address different types of threats facing scholars around the world, as well as as solutions that have been developed by governments, academic institutions, and non-governmental organizations.

Campanile at Dusk

Historicizing the Realist Imagination: Hans Morgenthau in the Early Cold War

Lecture | February 27 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Matthew Specter, Institute of European Studies

 Institute of European Studies

International relations has recently enjoyed a “historical turn,” in which the intellectual biographies of major figures like E.H. Carr and Hans Morgenthau, as well as the origins of central concepts like “internationalism” and “realism” have been reconstructed. Figures from Henry Kissinger to Barack Obama have claimed the mantle of “realist,” but the figure who gave its most distinctive modern...   More >

Mindfulness Meditation Group

Meeting | February 20, 2018 – January 5, 2021 every Tuesday | 12:15-1 p.m. | 3110 Tang Center, University Health Services

 Tang Center (University Health Services)

The Mindfulness Meditation Group meets every Tuesday at 12:15-1:00 pm at 3110 Tang Center on campus. All campus-affiliated people are welcome to join us on a drop-in basis, no registration or meditation experience necessary. We start with a short reading on meditation practice, followed by 30 minutes of silent sitting, and end with a brief discussion period.

Measure for the Anthropocene: Planetary Imagination and Design

Lecture | February 27 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Neyran Turan, College of Environmental Design

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

In light of our current political crisis around climate change, what can architecture and design contribute toward a new planetary imaginary of our contemporary environment? If climate change is a crisis of imagination, as literary historian Amitav Ghosh states, or a profound mutation in our relation to the world, as put by Bruno Latour, can design imagination provide any insights in this dilemma...   More >

Development Lunch: "Managers in the public sector"

Seminar | February 27 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Alessandra Fenizia

 Department of Economics

Understanding the Tunisian Anomaly: An Inquiry into a History of Reform

Colloquium | February 27 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Safwan Masri, Executive Vice President, Columbia Global Centers and Global Development

 Center for African Studies, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The Arab Spring began and ended with Tunisia. In a region beset by brutal repression, humanitarian disasters, and civil war, Tunisia's Jasmine Revolution alone gave way to a peaceful transition to a functioning democracy. Within four short years, Tunisians passed a progressive constitution, held fair parliamentary elections, and ushered in the country's first-ever democratically elected...   More >

Mobile Health Technologies to Improve Behavioral Health in Underserved Populations

Colloquium | February 27 | 12:40-2 p.m. | 104 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Adrian Aguilera, Assistant Professor, University of California, Berkeley

 Public Health, School of

Dr. Aguilera will discuss his research developing and testing an automated text messaging intervention as an adjunct to treatment in a public sector integrated behavioral healthcare clinic. He will detail findings from a clinical trial and discuss how data can be utilized to improve monitoring of depression and detection of key intervention points. Key findings are that 1) automated texting...   More >

3-Manifold Seminar: Tait colorings and instanton homology (continued)

Seminar | February 27 | 12:40-2 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Ian Agol, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

We'll continue discussion Kronheimer-Mrowka's instanton homology of webs and a version with twisted coefficients.

Seminar 237/281, Macro/International Seminar: Topic Forthcoming

Seminar | February 27 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 597 Evans Hall

 Vincenzo Quadrini, USC Marshall

 Department of Economics

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Seminar 218, Psychology and Economics: "Coming apart? Cultural distances in the United States over time"

Seminar | February 27 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Emir Kamenica, University of Chicago Booth School of Business

 Department of Economics

Global Internships Program Information Session

Information Session | February 27 | 3-4 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Berkeley Study Abroad

Earn academic credit while gaining practical internship experience domestically or abroad. Learn more about UC Berkeley Global Internships at this event and see how your summer can transform you!

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: 3rd year talks

Colloquium | February 27 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Nick Angelides, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley; Vinitha Rangarajan, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Commutative Algebra and Algebraic Geometry: The Fellowship of the Ring: Divisors on matroids and their volumes

Seminar | February 27 | 3:45-5 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Christopher Eur, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

The classical volume polynomial in algebraic geometry measures the volumes of ample (and nef) divisors on a smooth projective variety. We introduce an analogous volume polynomial for matroids, and give a complete combinatorial formula. For a realizable matroid, we thus obtain an explicit formula for the classical volume polynomial of the associated wonderful compactification. We then define an...   More >

IMS-MS as a means of revealing new states during the melting of proteins

Seminar | February 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall | Canceled

 David Clemmer, Department of Chemistry, Indiana University

 College of Chemistry

One of the most challenging problems in biochemistry involves understanding how proteins fold. After more than 50 years of work, experimental characterization of protein folding usually leads to results which are described as a cooperative, two phase, transition between the folded and unfolded states – i.e., the protein appears to melt. Here we present new data from an IMS-MS analysis of simple...   More >

Design Field Notes: Paula Te

Seminar | February 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Paula Te, an interaction designer who is driven to make technology accessible in the widest possible sense, will speak at Jacobs Hall.

Spatial Data Science: Mapping for Impact: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | February 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Maggi Kelly

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Spatial data collection, analysis and visualization has changed dramatically in the last decade. We now have, for example, high spatial and temporal resolution imagery, integrated smart phones as data collectors, and cloud-based analytical platforms to work with. Collectively, these developments make up our 21st century mapping toolkit that is in increasing demand to address contemporary...   More >

Functional Topological Light Sources and Devices

Seminar | February 27 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, HP Auditorium, 306 Soda Hall

 Boubacar Kante, Assistant Professor, University of California, San Diego

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In this talk, I will discuss how geometrical and topological approaches to the control of light-matter interaction enable the construction of novel photonic devices with unique and enhanced functionalities.

Berkeley Sophomore Semester - Global Studies London Info Session

Information Session | February 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Berkeley Study Abroad

Learn more about this unique fall semester opportunity designed for rising sophomores to gain a global perspective, fulfill major & degree requirements, and obtain professional experience through an internship in London.

A Journey of Pain, Purpose, and Perseverance: A special seminar in memory of Shakir Cannon, sickle cell patient advocate and leading voice in discussions on CRISPR Genome Editing, Precision Medicine, and Social Justice.

Seminar | February 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 115 Energy Biosciences Building

 Michael Friend, Co-founder, Minority Coalition for Precision Medicine, Health Ministries Network

 Innovative Genomics Institute

Despite being the first “molecular disease” ever discovered, and despite being the most common genetic disease in the US, sickle cell disease (SCD), a disease that predominantly affects people from African descent, is still a truly devastating disease with no universal cure. Long under- and unequally-served by the medical and research communities, SCD is getting renewed attention as CRISPR...   More >

How I Became a Quant: A Panel Discussion and Q&A Session on Career Paths in Finance/Data Science/Fintech

Panel Discussion | February 27 | 5-7 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Spieker Forum, Chou Hall (N640)

 Rajat Agarwal, Senior Director - Investor Group, Capital Markets, LendingClub

 Andrew Alden, Head of Quantitative Research, WeatherStorm Capital

 Ben Gum, Director of Portfolio Optimization and Risk Modeling, AXA Rosenberg; Ariel Pavlicevich, Portfolio Manager, Walleye Trading; Emmanuel Vallod, Head of Research, Mortgage & Securitized Credit, Systematic Fixed-Income, BlackRock

 Master of Financial Engineering (MFE) Program

Practitioners at top firms will share their experiences, how to prepare for a career in finance and data science, and trends emerging in the field. Networking and Q&A will follow. If you are interested in a career in finance or data science, don't miss this opportunity!

  RSVP online by February 27.

The Afterlives of Fetishism: A Conversation

Lecture | February 27 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Rosalind Morris, Professor of Anthropology, Columbia University

 The Program in Critical Theory

A conversation with Rosalind Morris about her new book, The Returns of Fetishism: Charles de Brosses and the Afterlives of an Idea.

Commutative Algebra and Algebraic Geometry: The Fellowship of the Ring: The excess intersection formula

Seminar | February 27 | 5-6 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Ritvik Ramkumar, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

We will give examples of situations where intersections do not have the expected codimension. We will describe the excess intersection formula which allows us to compute the portion of the intersection that has the expected codimension. Time permitting, we will compute the Chow ring of a blowups along smooth subschemes.

Fanon in the Algerian War: A Painful Gender Issue

Lecture | February 27 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Seloua Luste-Boulbina, Researcher in the Department of Political and Social Change, Denis Diderot University

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The colony operates with a double standard. Women are both largely excluded from schooling and supposed to be protected by their male fellow citizens. Everything then happens as if, according to the old despotic saying, colonial politics were benevolent toward them: they must be protected from their own. But how? And in what sense?

Magic Spells: A Research Workshop on Hebrew Amulets: With Magnes curators Shir Gal Kochavi, Zoe Lewin, and Francesco Spagnolo

Lecture | February 27 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way) | Canceled

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Join Magnes curators in discovering the elaborate texts and imagery, magic formulas, and kabbalistic sources in Hebrew amulets.

Worn on one’s person or placed in homes, Jewish amulets are used at moments of vulnerability and transition, like childbirth, marriage, or illness. They feature texts including biblical verses, Psalms, divine names, and invocations of powerful figures like angels, and...   More >

Oracle Tech Talk and Info-Session

Information Session | February 27 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Soda Hall, Wozniak Lounge (430)

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

This is your chance to discover what everyday life at Oracle is like. We’ll also talk about Database In-Memory, an Oracle product that provides a unique, dual-format architecture and leverages state-of-the-art algorithms for scans, joins, and aggregations to deliver leading-edge, in-memory analytic performance for Real Time Enterprises. See you there!

Dinner will be served. Bring your resume...   More >

Founder of craigslist Craig Newmark at the Berkeley Forum: From craigslist to Philanthropy

Colloquium | February 27 | 6-7 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Craig Newmark

 The Berkeley Forum

Craig Newmark is a Web pioneer, philanthropist, and a leading advocate on behalf of trustworthy journalism, veterans and military families, and other civic and social justice causes. His post-craigslist endeavors continue to exemplify how entrepreneurship and philanthropy go hand-in-hand. Join us on Tuesday, February 27 for a conversation with one of the most successful Internet entrepreneurs...   More >

$0

  Buy tickets online

Mills College info session: BCPA and BASE fast-tracked master's degree

Information Session | February 27 | 6:15-7 p.m. | Faculty Club, O'Neill Room

 Summer Sessions, Mills College

What if you could graduate with your MBA in just one year? Or earn your master of management degree in just one semester? At Mills College, you can! Join us and learn more about the exciting opportunities available to you through the Mills College Fast Track Business Programs for UC Berkeley students. At this information session, Mills College admissions counselors will discuss the graduate...   More >

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Earth Week 2018 Planning Committee

Meeting | January 31 – April 18, 2018 every Wednesday with exceptions |  Sproul Hall

 Student Environmental Resource Center

Are you interested in planning UC Berkeley's 2018 Earth Week? SERC is recruiting individual student leaders and/or student representatives from environmental student organizations to join the Earth Week 2018 Planning Committee. Sign up at tinyurl.com/EarthWeekCommittee

Asphalt Pavement Materials, Design, Construction, and Maintenance

Special Event | February 27 – March 1, 2018 every day | 8 a.m.-5 p.m. |  Holiday Inn, Rancho Cordova

 11269 Point East Drive, Rancho Cordova, CA 95742

 James Signore, PhD, PE, Associate, NCE; Irwin Guada, Laboratory and Field Operations Manager, UC Pavement Research Center - Berkeley; Frank Farshidi, PhD, Project Manager, City of San Jose

 Technology Transfer Program

This three-day course is aimed at covering the full range of topics related to asphalt concrete pavements from materials and mix design to construction, maintenance, and rehabilitation. Asphalt concrete pavements are a vital part of an agency's assets and constitute about 90% of the local streets in California. The numerous topics in this class will be presented in sufficient detail to assist the...   More >

$475.00 CA Public Agency, $950.00 Standard Fee

  Register online or by calling 510-643-4393, or by emailing registrar-techtransfer@berkeley.edu

Computer Workstation Evaluator Training (BEUHS403)

Workshop | February 28 | 8 a.m.-12 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Class of '42

 Greg Ryan, Ergonomic Campus Ergonomist, Be well at Work - Ergonimics; Mallory Lynch, MA, Campus Ergonomist, Ergonomics@Work

 Be Well at Work - Ergonimics

Specifically for Departmental Computer Workstation Evaluators, learn the basics of how to evaluate and modify computer workstations according to campus ergonomic guidelines in this practical, hands-on workshop. Enroll online through the UC Learning Center

  Register online

Shellfish and Seaweed at Sand Hill Bluff: A Deeper Look at Shell-Matrix Sites of California's Central Coast

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Mike Grone, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Along the Central Coast of California, changes in shoreline management practices and their subsequent effects on fisheries can be examined in the context of long-term human occupation, climatic and environmental variability, and the development of Indigenous, Spanish, Mexican, and American relationships with the environment. While extensive archaeological investigation regarding indigenous...   More >

“Understanding and Programming Multicellular Patterning from the Bottom Up”

Seminar | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Pulin Li, California Institute of Technology

 Bioengineering (BioE)

How genes, operating in individual cells, generate coordinated multicellular behavior is a fundamental question in biology. In every cell, a set of genes ('genetic circuits') interact with one another to control specific cellular functions, and combinations of these functional modules create population-level behavior, ranging from biological patterns to physiological rhythms. Applying a bottom-up...   More >

The 'Global 1968' at Fifty: What it Meant and What it Means

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Institute of European Studies

Timothy Scott Brown will discuss the global revolt of 1968 on both sides of the Cold War divide, identifying basic principles that underpinned the revolt in its diverse national and regional locations. Exploring the transnational exchanges and communities of the imagination that make it possible to speak of a global 1968, he will place the events of fifty years ago in historical perspective with...   More >

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Harnessing plant immune receptors for resistance to wheat stem rust"

Seminar | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Peter Dodds

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Dr Dodds' focus is on fungal rust diseases, which constitute one of the most significant threats to cereal crops worldwide. The recent emergence of the highly virulent wheat stem rust strain Ug99 is of particular concern to world food security.
Dr Dodds' research has used the pathogenic interaction between flax and the flax rust fungus as a model for understanding the basis of rust disease as...   More >

How Exceptional is Judicial Review in Canada? Past, Present and Future

Colloquium | February 28 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Han-Ru Zhou, Université de Montréal Faculty of Law

 Canadian Studies Program (CAN)), Center for the Study of Law and Society, Berkeley Law

In the vast majority of legal systems, judicial review has become the principal mechanism through which most constitutional debates are eventually settled or at least receive some form of resolution. However, the terms of our national constitutions seldom provide for how the courts are to scrutinize the laws challenged before them. In Canada, the modern practice of judicial review is the result...   More >

For Better or Worse, Richer or Poorer: The Future of Tech for Good: CITRIS Spring 2018 Research Exchange Series

Seminar | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Brandie Nonnecke, Research & Development Manager, CITRIS

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Dr. Nonnecke will share examples of how tech--from AI and digital identity systems to social media platforms--can be applied to change our world for good, but also provides caution on how tech must be designed and applied in ways that are inclusive, fair and just.

Noon Concert: Spring Choral Collage

Performing Arts - Music | February 28 | 12 p.m. |  Hertz Concert Hall

 Fall welcome misc.

 Department of Music

Featuring the Chamber Chorus, Magen Solomon, director and University Chorus, Nikolas Nackley, director, presenting music from the last 600 years


FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC  

Featuring the Music Department’s varied and diverse performance activities, the Department of Music presents a series of free weekly concerts each semester in Hertz Hall. Inaugurated in 1953, these concerts are very...   More >

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: Mark Danner with Joyce Carol Oates: Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

George W. Bush's War on Terror has led to seventeen years of armed conflict, making it the longest war in US history. Professor Mark Danner examines this state of perpetual struggle and its widespread acceptance in the name of American security.

A Talk with Jeanne C. Finley and John Muse

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Jeanne C. Finley, Professor of Film and Graduate Fine Arts, California College of Arts; John Muse, Visual Media Scholar, Haverford College, Haverford PA

 Arts + Design

Since 1988 Jeanne C. Finley and John Muse have worked collaboratively on numerous experimental documentaries and installations. These works have been exhibited nationally and internationally, at festivals and museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Guggenheim Museum, The Whitney Biennial, San Francisco International Film Festival,...   More >

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR - Kevin Rowe: Conserve the Collector: Natural history collections and historical change

Seminar | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Kevin Rowe (MVZ/IB Faculty Candidate)

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

Mobility, Expulsion and Claims to Home: Migrant Organizing in an Era of Deportation and Dispossession

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues) | Canceled

 Monisha Das Gupta, Professor of Ethnic Studies and Women’s Studies, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

 Center for Research on Social Change, Center for Race and Gender, Asian American Studies

I examine the relationship among mobility, forced removals, and claims to space by analyzing how high school-age members of Khmer Girls in Action in Long Beach interrogate the school to prison to deportation pipeline. In their activism, they link the criminalization of Khmer refugees to the legacies of US wars in southeast Asia and the failures of the US refugee resettlement program.

On the Quantity and Quality of Girls: New Evidence on Abortion, Fertility, and Parental Investments: S. Anukriti, Boston College

Colloquium | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 2232 Piedmont, Seminar Room

 S. Ankruti, Professor, Department of Economics, Boston College

 Population Science, Department of Demography

A lunch time talk and discussion session, featuring visiting and local scholars presenting their research on a wide range of topics of interest to demography.

You take my breath away: How healthy guts exclude oxygen

Seminar | February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 **Mariana Byndloss**, University of California, Davis

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Creating a Successful Co-Parenting Relationship (BEUHS361

Workshop | February 28 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Section Club

 Marlies Rosmark, MFT

 Work/Life Program

This workshop is intended to help adults develop and utilize the skills needed to cooperatively parent their children following separation and divorce. Using a combination of discussion, role play and small group exercises we will explore children’s perspectives and experiences of divorce and identify different co-parenting styles, the skills needed to be better single parents and what parents...   More >

Who Names the Public Space?

Lecture | February 28 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

From Confederate memorials to Berkeley's Boalt Hall, culture wars are being fought. We need to take a stand, but what stand?

Workshop for Undergraduates on Preparing Human Subjects Research eProtocol Application

Workshop | February 28 | 2-4 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Office of Undergraduate Research

This workshop is for UC Berkeley undergraduates who are carrying out a research project that may involve human subjects and, therefore, may require you to submit an application for approval from the campus' Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. Staff from OPHS will lead this workshop. To begin to familiarize yourself with the issues and processes please see this website:...   More >

Gilman Scholarship Essay Review

Information Session | February 28 | 2-4 p.m. | 160 Stephens Hall

 Berkeley Study Abroad

Are you applying to the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship?

Come to the Gilman Scholarship Essay Review and get feedback on your application essays from recent Gilman Scholars from UC Berkeley.

The Gilman Scholarship deadline for Summer 2018, Fall 2018 and Year 18-19 study abroad programs and internships is 9:59 p.m. on Tuesday, March 6, 2018.
For more information or to apply,...   More >

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Univalent functions, surfaces in hyperbolic space and Schwarzian derivatives

Seminar | February 28 | 2-3 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Ken Bromberg, University of Utah

 Department of Mathematics

An elegant construction of C. Epstein associates a surface in hyperbolic space to a univalent (injective, holomorphic) function. One can use this Epstein surface to derive properties of the univalent function and conversely use properties of the univalent function to study surfaces in hyperbolic space. The key tool to translate between them is the Schwarzian derivative. We will define both the...   More >

Markovian Solutions to Scalar Conservation Law

Seminar | February 28 | 3:10-4 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Fraydoun Rezakhanlou, U C Berkeley

 Department of Statistics

According to a classical result of Bertoin (1998), if the initial data for Burgers equation is a Levy Process with no positive jump, then the same is true at later times and there is an explicit equation for the evolution of the associated Levy measures. In 2010, Menon and Srinivasan published a conjecture for the statistical structure of solutions to scalar conservation laws with certain Markov...   More >

Film: October

Film - Feature | February 28 | 3:10 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Made to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the October Revolution, October has taken on newsreel status: its famously excerptable scenes of the storming of the Winter Palace are said to be more spectacular and better attended than the actual event. But to see the film now is to re-experience the shock with which its experimentation was met on its initial release. (That release was held up while...   More >

Algorithmic Regularization in Over-parameterized Matrix Recovery and Neural Networks with Quadratic Activations

Seminar | February 28 | 4-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Tengyu Ma, Facebook AI Research

 Department of Statistics

Over-parameterized models are widely and successfully used in deep learning, but their workings are far from understood. In many practical scenarios, the learned model generalizes to the test data, even though the hypothesis class contains a model that completely overfits the training data and no regularization is applied.

In this talk, we will show that such phenomenon occurs in...   More >

Applied Math Seminar: Integrated computational materials engineering

Seminar | February 28 | 4-5 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Karel Matous, University of Notre Dame

 Department of Mathematics

With concentrated efforts from the material science community to develop new multi- functional materials using unique processing conditions, the need for modeling tools that accurately describe the physical phenomena at each length scale has only further been emphasized. For example, additive manufacturing and shock synthesis lead to unique material morphologies that need to be understood for...   More >

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): Bounds on renormalized volume and the volume of the convex core

Seminar | February 28 | 4-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Ken Bromberg, University of Utah

 Department of Mathematics

A conformally compact hyperbolic 3-manifold will have infinite volume (at least if the conformal boundary is non-empty). Krasnov and Schlenker defined a renormalized volume (motivated by work of Graham and Witten on conformally compact Einstein manifolds) that assigns a finite volume to such manifolds. This defines a function on the space of all conformally compact hyperbolic 3-manifolds. We will...   More >

Opening UC History and Success to the World: Book Discussion with Jud King

Presentation | February 28 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Library

 Judson King, Former Provost (Berkeley, UC), Former Director CSHE, Center for Studies in Higher Education

 Carol T. Christ; Jeff Mackie-Mason

 Library

In his new book, The University of California: Creating, Nurturing, and Maintaining Academic Quality in a Public University Setting, Judson King, former Berkeley and University of California Provost, explores the most important factors for this academic success, and what makes UC tick.

  RSVP online or or by emailing schol-comm@berkeley.edu by February 26.

Judson King

Mariannes Noires: Afropean Mosaics

Film - Documentary | February 28 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Mame-Fatou Niang, Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies, Carnegie Mellon University

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies

What is it to be Black in France? Black and French? Mariannes Noires follows seven French women of African and Caribbean descent. They are filmmakers, dancers, entrepreneurs and intellectuals whose Frenchness is rooted in a cultural space stretching from Metropolitan France to Africa and its mama diasporas.

Career Connections: Consulting

Miscellaneous | February 28 | 6-8 p.m. |  Alumni House

 Cal Alumni Association, Career Center, The Berkeley Network

CAA has teamed up with the UC Berkeley Career Center to help students make connections and gain clarity in their career pursuits.

For each of these casual networking events, we are seeking a diverse group of alumni to showcase a variety of careers. The events require no prep—simply chat with interested students, share your path from Cal to career, and offer advice to those who hope to follow...   More >

  Register online

Toastmasters on Campus Club: Learn public speaking

Meeting | July 2, 2014 – December 26, 2018 every Wednesday with exceptions | 6:15-7:30 p.m. | 3106 Etcheverry Hall

 Toastmasters on Campus

Toastmasters has been the world leader in teaching public speaking since 1924. Meetings are an enjoyable, safe, self-paced course designed to get you up and running as a speaker in only a few months.

How to Read a Film: In the Year of the Pig

Workshop | February 28 | 6:20-9:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 ORIAS

In many ways, film (or TV or video) is the first language of information acquisition for students. Do you help students critically view film in your classroom, just as you would help them read critically or analyze data? Would you like to learn more about how to analyze and discuss film?

ORIAS is seeking teachers to participate in a short pilot workshop about critical film viewing. You will...   More >

 This event is for k-14 teachers.

free

  Registration opens January 31. Register online by February 28.

ARCH Lecture: Daniel M. Abramson

Lecture | February 28 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, FEB 28, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk with Professor Abramson about why the idea of architectural obsolescence was invented in early-twentieth-century America and how it has influenced design and urbanism up to the present age of sustainability.

Holloway Poetry Reading: Tongo Eisen-Martin and Ismail Muhammad

Reading - Literary | February 28 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife

 Tongo Eisen-Martin; Ismail Muhammad

 Department of English, Holloway Reading Series

The Holloway Series in Poetry invites you to a reading with Tongo Eisen-Martin and Ismail Muhammad. The reading will take place this Wednesday, February 28th at 6:30 pm in the Maude Fife room (315 Wheeler Hall). All readings are free and open to the public. We hope to see you there!

Tongo Eisen-Martin is the author of someone’s dead already (Bootstrap Press, 2015) and Heaven Is All Goodbyes...   More >

Film: In the Year of the Pig

Film - Feature | February 28 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Emile de Antonio’s Academy Award–nominated In the Year of the Pig makes the case against US intervention in Vietnam using an incendiary montage style. The film “connects the bloody dots between politicians and business leaders, Western imperialists, and puppet governments, using a collage of rare archival footage from the French colonial period, film dispatches from the current conflict, and...   More >

Emanuel Ax, piano, Leonidas Kavakos, violin, and Yo-Yo Ma, cello

Performing Arts - Music | February 28 | 8-10 p.m. |  Zellerbach Hall

 Cal Performances

Program:
Schubert/Piano Trio No. 1 in B-flat Major, D. 898
Brahms/Piano Trio No. 1 in B Major, Op. 8

$40–$195 prices subject to change

  Buy tickets online or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@calperformances.org