<< Week of January 28 >>

Sunday, January 28, 2018

Berkeley Innovative Solutions (BIS) Spring 2018 Student Application

Deadline | January 28 | -11:50 p.m. |  Haas School of Business

 Berkeley Energy and Resources Collaborative

The BIS Consulting program works to link company projects with teams of interdisciplinary graduate students from the UC Berkeley campus. The program is dedicated to working with clients to address strategic opportunities or challenges relating to the energy and resource industry, and for 2018 we’re proud to expand our offerings to include corporate sustainability and sustainable investing, in...   More >

The Four Treasures of Brush Painting: Bamboo with Karen LeGault

Workshop | January 28 | 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

While there are many lessons in Asian Brush Painting, there are four classics of flower painting in the tradition of Chinese Brush traditionally known as the 'Four Gentleman,' this series will introduce these plants, including bamboo, plum blossoms, orchid, and chrysanthemum.

$75, $65 members | $265, $235 members for all Four

  Register online or by calling 510- 664 - 9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Mushrooms in the Garden

Workshop | January 28 | 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Join us for a walk and talk on local mushrooms that occur in our Bay Area woods, lawns and yes, even gardens. We will walk the beautiful UC Botanical Garden and see just who has made themselves at home. Discover the fungus among us!

$25, $20 Garden members

  Register online or by calling 510-642-7082, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Exploration of Forms: Afro-Cuban with José Francisco Barroso: Public Movement Workshop Series

Workshop | January 28 | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Bancroft Studio (2401 Bancroft)

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies

TDPS presents a series of three spring workshops with Cuban dancer and choreographer José Francisco Barroso on January 28, February 18, and March 18, 2018. 10:30am-12pm. Free and open to the public. Live drumming.

Monday, January 29, 2018

The Green Initiative Fund Early Abstracts Due

Deadline | January 29 | 102 Sproul Hall

 Student Environmental Resource Center

TGIF awards grants for sustainability related projects on campus. During this spring, TGIF is launching an Environmental Justice Thematic Grant Cycle! There is $75,000 for Environmental Justice-themed grants (out of $300,000 available)

To learn more and apply, visit: http://tgif.berkeley.edu/index.php/apply/spring-grants

Long Term Adaptation in Vision

Seminar | January 29 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Stephen Engel, University of Minnesota, Dept. of Psychology

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Abstract: Experience with the environment dramatically influences how we act, think, and perceive; understanding the neural plasticity that supports such change is a long-standing goal in cognitive neuroscience. In the visual system, neural function alters dramatically as people adapt to changes in their visual world. Most past work, however, has altered visual input only over the short-term,...   More >

Combinatorics Seminar: Permutations, tensor products, and Cuntz algebra automorphism

Seminar | January 29 | 12-1 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Francesco Brenti, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”

 Department of Mathematics

We introduce and study a new class of permutations which arises from the automorphisms of the Cuntz algebra. I will define this class, explain its relation to the Cuntz algebra, present results about symmetries, constructions, characterizations, and enumeration of these permutations, and discuss some open problems and conjectures. This is joint work with Roberto Conti.

I see you: Social gaze as a window of opportunity in early brain development

Colloquium | January 29 | 12:15-1:15 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Ronny Geva, The Gonda Brain Research Center, Bar Ilan University, Israel

 Department of Psychology

Social bonding—including the social learning that underpins the creation of early emotional ties between infants and their caretakers—are among the most fundamental developmental processes for human survival and well-being. Social attention is thought to play a crucial role in these processes, but little is known about the neurodevelopmental mechanisms—particularly regarding the involvement of...   More >

Political Economy Seminar

Seminar | January 29 | 12:30-2 p.m. | Moses Hall, Moses Hall 223

 Matilde Bombardini, University of British Columbia

 Department of Economics

The Political Economy Seminar focuses on formal and quantitative work in the political economy field, including formal political theory.

Plant and Microbial Biology Student/Postdoc Seminar

Seminar | January 29 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 338 Koshland Hall

 Tim Jeffers, Graduate Student, PMB; Daniel Westcott, Graduate Student, PMB

 Plant and Microbial Biology Student Group

Come join us to hear research going on in PMB from graduate students and post docs. There will be snacks and coffee/tea. Please bring a mug. Hosted by the Plant and Microbial Biology Student Group (PMBG).

This event is sponsored by the UCB Graduate Assembly. Event is ADA accessible. For disability accommodation requests and information, please contact Disability Access Services by phone at...   More >

Probabilistic Operator Algebra Seminar: Monotone Convolution

Seminar | January 29 | 2-4 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Naofumi Muraki, Iwate Prefectural University

 Department of Mathematics

Monotone independence is another notion of independence in non-commutative probability theory which differs from classical, free and Boolean independences. In this talk I will derive a basic formula for monotone convolution of probability measures where the reciprocal Cauchy transform plays a role similar to the one played by the Fourier transform in classical probability.

Differential Geometry Seminar: Continuous quantities with respect to measured Gromov-Hausdorff convergence

Seminar | January 29 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Shouhei Honda, Tohoku University

 Department of Mathematics

One of main purposes in the convergence theory (with uniform Ricci bounds from below) is to find geometric/analytic quantities which are continuous with respect to measured Gromov-Hausdorff convergence. The diameter is a trivial geometric example. On the other hand the \(k^{th}\) eigenvalue of the Laplacian is a nontrivial analytic example for all \(k\), which was proven by Cheeger-Colding. In...   More >

Arithmetic Geometry and Number Theory RTG Seminar: Arithmetic representations of fundamental groups

Seminar | January 29 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Daniel Litt, Columbia University

 Department of Mathematics

Let $X$ be an algebraic variety over a field $k$. Which representations of $\pi _1(X)$ arise from geometry, e.g. as monodromy representations on the cohomology of a family of varieties over $X$? We study this question by analyzing the action of the Galois group of $k$ on the fundamental group of $X$, and prove several fundamental structural results about this action.

As a sample application of...   More >

Laurent El Ghaoui- Lifted Neural Nets: Beyond The Grip Of Stochastic Gradients In Deep Learning

Seminar | January 29 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 3108 Etcheverry Hall

 Laurent El Ghaoui, UC Berkeley IEOR

 Industrial Engineering & Operations Research

Abstract: We describe a novel family of models of multi-layer feedforward neural networks, where the activation functions are encoded via penalties in the training problem. The new framework allows for algorithms such as block-coordinate descent methods to be applied, in which each step is composed of simple (no hidden layer) supervised learning problems that are parallelizable across layers, or...   More >

Seminar 208, Microeconomic Theory: "Thickness and Competition in Ride-sharing Markets"

Seminar | January 29 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Afshin Nikzad, Stanford University

 Department of Economics

This is a job market seminar. Note the change in location.

Snacking on Science

Colloquium | January 29 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2515 Tolman Hall

 Zeke Kossover, Exploratorium

 Graduate School of Education

Finding science activities that work is the first step for a new teacher. Putting activities into an order that maximizes understanding is next. A collaboration between experienced secondary teachers and scientists at the Exploratorium's Teacher Institute has created a collection of over 250 science activities we call "Snacks." Now we are working on creating sequences that help teachers learn how...   More >

Documenting A Precautionary Tale: How the Story of One Small Italian Town’s Fight for a Pesticide-Free Future Changed the International Narrative

Seminar | January 29 | 4-5:15 p.m. | Morgan Hall, Lounge

 Philip Ackerman-Leist, Green Mountain College; Douglas Gayeton, Lexicon of Sustainability

 Berkeley Food Institute, Center for Diversified Farming Systems

Philip Ackerman-Leist and Douglas Gayeton will share insights from their three-year collaboration in capturing the dramatic story of how the town of Mals in the Italian Alps became the first town in the world to ban all pesticides.

  Register online

Analysis and PDE Seminar: Fourier dimension for limit sets

Seminar | January 29 | 4-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Semyon Dyatlov, University of California, Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

For a finite measure \(\mu \) on the real line, its Fourier dimension is defined using the rate of polynomial decay of the Fourier transform \(\hat \mu \). The Fourier dimension of \(\mu \) may be much smaller than the Hausdorff dimension of the support of \(\mu \): a classical example is the Cantor measure on the mid-third Cantor set which has Fourier dimension equal to 0.

I will present a...   More >

Provably Secure Machine Learning

Seminar | January 29 | 4-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Jacob Steinhardt, Stanford University

 Department of Statistics

Deployed machine learning systems create a new class of computer security vulnerabilities
where, rather than attacking the integrity of the software itself, malicious actors exploit the
statistical nature of the learning algorithms. For instance, attackers can add fake training data,
or strategically manipulate input covariates at test time.

Attempts so far to defend against these...   More >

Biochemistry in the genomic era

Seminar | January 29 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Daniel Herschlag, Stanford University

 College of Chemistry

Job Market Seminar: "Thickness and Competition in Ride-sharing Markets"

Seminar | January 29 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Afshin Nikzad, Stanford University - Economics

 Department of Economics

Field(s): Microeconomic Theory, Market and Mechanism design, (Combinatorial) Optimization, Algorithms

UROC DeCal – Demystifying the Research Process: Decolonizing Methods in Academic Research (Hosted by UROC: Undergraduate Researchers of Color)

Course | January 29 – April 30, 2018 every Monday with exceptions | 6-8 p.m. | 174 Barrows Hall

 Istifaa Ahmed, UROOC

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Ethnic Studies 98/198
Class Time: Mondays, 6pm-8pm, 1/22/18 - 4/30/18
Course Control Number (CCN): 24251

Units: 1-3 units

Student Instructor: Istifaa Ahmed

Welcome to our student-led organization and DeCal, Underrepresented Researchers of Color (UROC) – Demystifying the Research Process: Decolonizing Methods in Academic Research! We seek to build a community of researchers of color...   More >

Research/Funding Opportunities Workshop (Hosted by UROC: Underrepresented Researchers of Color)

Workshop | January 29 | 6-8 p.m. | 174 Barrows Hall

 Istifaa Ahmed (Humanities/Social Science), UROC

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Celebrating 30 Years of Science for a Safer World: 2018 Update Meeting of the UC Berkeley Superfund Research Program

Conference/Symposium | January 30 | 9 a.m.-7 p.m. |  David Brower Center

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA

 UC Berkeley Superfund Research Center

We will showcase our innovative research into the effects of Superfund chemicals on human health and ways to remediate them in the environment. Guest speakers will discuss children's environmental health and the developmental effects of environmental chemicals. Panel discussions will address the human right to clean water and the interaction between socioeconomic factors and chemical exposures.

  Register online

Climbing Tropical Trees in the Cloud Forest: Interview with Roxy Cruz, Department of Integrative Biology

Seminar | January 30 | 9-9:30 a.m. | Barrows Hall, Radio broadcast, ON-AIR ONLY, 90.7FM

 Roxy Cruz, PhD Candidate, Department of Integrative Biology; Tesla Monson, PhD, Department of Integrative Biology

 KALX 90.7FM

Tune in for another exciting episode of The Graduates as we speak with Roxy Cruz about her work climbing trees in the tropical cloud forests of Central and South America.

The Graduates, featuring graduate student research at Cal, is broadcast every other Tuesday on KALX 90.7 FM. Past episodes are available to listen and download free on iTunes or online.

Roxy in the field

Overcoming Barriers to Use of ORS to Treat Child Diarrhea: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial in Uganda

Colloquium | January 30 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 590L University Hall

 Zachary Wagner-Rubin, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Stanford University

 Public Health, School of

Diarrhea remains the second leading cause of death among children, although nearly all deaths could be prevented with the use of oral rehydration salts (ORS). There is little evidence demonstrating why ORS use remains low and what can be done to increase use. In this study, we conducted a field experiment designed to 1) measure the impact of several novel community health worker (CHW)...   More >

The role of chlorine in tropospheric chemistry

Seminar | January 30 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | Hildebrand Hall, Library Room E

 Lea Hildebrandt Ruiz, Assistant Professor, McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin

 College of Chemistry

More than 4 million people die prematurely every year by breathing outdoor particulate matter (PM) and ozone, both secondary pollutants formed from tropospheric oxidation chemistry. PM and ozone also play key and uncertain roles in Earth's radiative balance. In order to protect human health and reduce levels of these pollutants, their mechanisms of formation in the atmosphere need to be...   More >

Aldrich Seminar in Organic Chemistry: Bioactive Natural Products and New Reactions to Prepare Them: The Symbiotic Loop

Seminar | January 30 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Jeff Johnson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 College of Chemistry

Medicinal application of many complex organic molecules is precluded by the impracticality of their chemical synthesis. This lecture will endeavor to detail some recent case studies from our research group directed toward the efficient laboratory preparation of complex bioactive natural products and small molecule building blocks. Topics to be covered include complexity-building redox chemistry,...   More >

BiD Seminar: Computational Ecosystems: Tech-enabled Communities to Advance Human Values at Scale: Haoqi Zhang, Breed Chair of Design, Northwestern University

Seminar | January 30 | 12-1 p.m. | Hearst Memorial Mining Building, 354/360

 Haoqi Zhang, Northwestern University

 Berkeley Institute of Design

Directions: http://bid.berkeley.edu/directions/

Abstract: Despite the continued development of individual technologies and processes for supporting human endeavors, major leaps in solving complex human problems will require advances in system-level thinking and orchestration. In this talk, I describe efforts to design, build, and study Computational...   More >

Advanced PubMed

Workshop | January 30 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, Bioscience Library Training Room, 2101 VLSB

 Elliott Smith, Library

 Library

A hands-on workshop introducing advanced features of PubMed that can help your searching to be more effective and efficient.

Buying Your First Home (BEUHS341)

Workshop | January 30 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Section Club

 Patrick Ignacio, Banking Industry Expert

 Be Well at Work - Work/Life

California housing markets are constantly changing, and there are overwhelming amounts of information available to the public, making it hard to know where to start. During the most recent housing crisis, financing options also changed (and in some cases disappeared altogether). As a result you may be asking yourself, what programs are available to me and how will they fit my personal situation?...   More >

  Enroll online

A Story of Subversion, a Story of Anticipation

Colloquium | January 30 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Hallie Wells, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Center for African Studies

Slam—a performance poetry competition created in Chicago in the 1980s—has circulated around the world, but in Madagascar it has flourished in a context of a uniquely rich history of verbal arts that are thoroughly entwined with social and political life. As an artistic movement that emphasizes the co-production of authority between performer and audience, slam is part of a significant shift in...   More >

3-Manifold Seminar: Knottedness and Thurston norm in NP (continued)

Seminar | January 30 | 12:40-2 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Ian Agol, UC BERKELEY

 Department of Mathematics

Well continue the discussion of a proof that knot recognition is in NP, using a certificate that encodes a sutured manifold hierarchy.

Differential Geometry Seminar: Ricci flow and Ricci limit spaces

Seminar | January 30 | 1:10-2 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Peter Topping, University of Warwick

 Department of Mathematics

Ricci flow theory has been developing rapidly over the last couple of years, with the ability to handle Ricci flows with unbounded curvature finally becoming a reality. This is vastly expanding the range of potential applications. I will describe some recent work in this direction with Miles Simon that shows the right way to pose the 3D Ricci flow in this setting in order to obtain applications....   More >

Seminar 218, Psychology and Economics: "Diagnostic Expectations and Stock Returns"

Seminar | January 30 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Nicola Gennaioli, Bocconi University

 Department of Economics

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Econ 235, Financial Economics: Diagnostic Expectations and Stock Returns

Seminar | January 30 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Nicola Gennaioli, Universita Bocconi and IGIER

 Department of Economics

Joint with Psychology and Economics Seminar

STEM Research Proposal Writing Workshop for SURF Fellowship

Workshop | January 30 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Justin Lopez

 Office of Undergraduate Research

In this workshop, undergraduates will receive detailed guidance on how to construct a research proposal in the STEM disciplines for the SURF Fellowship.

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Where

Colloquium | January 30 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Patrick Cavanagh, Department of Psychology, Glendon College and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College

 Department of Psychology

How do we know where things are? Recent results indicate that an object’s visual location is constructed at a high level where, critically, an object’s motion is discounted to recover its current location, much like we discount the illumination when we perceive color. As a result we sometimes see a target far from its actual location. These predictions operate differently for eye movements,...   More >

Time resolution in cryo-EM and resolution in state space

Seminar | January 30 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Joachim Frank, Columbia University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Student Harmonic Analysis and PDE Seminar (HADES) - Note change in date and place: An Introduction to Time-Frequency Analysis through a Proof of Carleson's Theorem

Seminar | January 30 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Kevin O'Neill, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Carleson's theorem (1966) states the Fourier series of an L^2 function converges to the original function almost everywhere. In this talk, we will go over the essentials of a proof of this theorem, emphasizing the concepts of orthogonality and respecting symmetries. The techniques found in this proof have given rise to the area of research known as time-frequency analysis and some time will be...   More >

Job Market Seminar: "Learning by Trading: The Case of the US Market for Municipal Bonds"

Seminar | January 30 | 3:40-5 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Giulia Brancaccio, Princeton University - Economics

 Department of Economics

Field(s): Industrial Organization, Econometrics, Economic Theory

Commutative Algebra and Algebraic Geometry: The Fellowship of the Ring: On the Lex-plus-powers conjecture

Seminar | January 30 | 3:45-4:45 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Alessio Sammartano, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Let $I$ be a homogeneous polynomial ideal containing a regular sequence of forms of prescribed degrees. The Lex-plus-powers conjecture predicts upper bounds for the Betti table of $I$, in terms of the Betti table of a monomial ideal with the same Hilbert function as $I$ and containing the appropriate monomial regular sequence. I will give a brief overview of the conjecture and discuss some cases....   More >

Electronic Dynamics in Complex Environments: From Electron Transfer to Singlet Fission

Seminar | January 30 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Troy Van Voorhis, Department of Chemistry, MIT

 College of Chemistry

Some of the most basic chemical reactions are those that involve primarily the motion of electrons with little rearrangement of the nuclei. Prominent examples include electron transport and excitonic energy transfer as well as more exotic phenomena such as singlet fission. These reactions are the centerpiece of artificial photosynthetic complexes, organic PVs and essentially all of redox...   More >

Design Field Notes: Alexander Reben

Seminar | January 30 | 4-5 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Artist and roboticist Alexander Reben will speak at Jacobs Hall.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

How, Where, and What to Publish: UC Berkeley Scholarly Publishing Symposium

Conference/Symposium | January 31 | 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | Sproul Hall, 309 (Graduate Professional Development Center)

 Rachael Samberg, Scholarly Communication Officer, Library

Editors from Elsevier, Springer-Nature, PLOS, UC Press, and more

 Library

Hear from scholarly journal and book publishers Elsevier, Springer-Nature, PLOS, UC Press, and more during a half-day symposium in which editors cover all aspects of how, where, and what to publish. Panel presentations and discussions will include:

• Intro to Scholarly Publishing: Targeting the “right” journal for submission; overview of the editorial process (Submission to...   More >

  Register online

CACS Event: The How and Why of Developing Zero-net Carbon UC Student Housing

Panel Discussion | January 31 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 305 Wurster Hall

 Jason E. Smith, Partner, KieranTimberlake; Peter Rumsey, Founder, Point Energy Innovations; Beth Piatnitza, UCSF's Capital Programs Housing Program Manager & Project Manager, UCSF

 Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Sustainability (CACS)

Across the UC system student housing is under development and UC's sustainability practices policy is calling on these new facilities to be zero-net carbon buildings. UC Berkeley's Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Sustainability (CACS) is hosting a conversation to explore this timely topic with UC San Francisco's Minnesota Street Graduate Student and Trainee Housing project design team.

Econ 235, Financial Economics: Job Market Seminar

Seminar | January 31 | 12-1:30 p.m. | C330 Haas School of Business

 Matteo Benetton, LSE

 Department of Economics

Joint with Haas Finance Seminar and Real Estate Seminar

Dissecting the form and function of host–microbe relationships within the intestine

Seminar | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 **Travis Wiles**, University of Oregon

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR - Michael Harvey: Ecology as a driver of evolutionary diversity within Amazonian bird species

Seminar | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Michael Harvey (MVZ/IB Faculty Candidate)

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Evolution in rapidly adapting populations"

Seminar | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Michael Desai, Harvard University

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Natural selection and other evolutionary forces lead to particular patterns of evolutionary dynamics, and they leave characteristic signatures on the genetic variation within populations. We use a combination of theory and experiments to study the dynamics and population genetics of natural selection in asexual populations such as microbes and viruses.

Sensory Integration, Density Estimation, and Information Retention

Seminar | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Joe Makin, UCSF

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

A common task facing computational scientists and, arguably, the brains of primates more generally is to construct models for data, particularly ones that invoke latent variables. Although it is often natural to identify the latent variables of such a model with the true unobserved variables in the world, the correspondence between the two can be more complicated, as when the former are...   More >

“Comprehensive Computational Design of Ordered Peptide Macrocycles”

Seminar | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Parisa Hosseinzadeh, University of Washington

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Mixed chirality peptide macrocycles such as cyclosporine are among the most potent therapeutics identified to-date, but there is currently no way to systematically search through the structural space spanned by such compounds for new drug candidates. Natural proteins do not provide a useful guide: peptide macrocycles lack regular secondary structures and hydrophobic cores and have different...   More >

Indigenous Rights, Gender Violence, and American Outrage: Canadian Studies Colloquium

Colloquium | January 31 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Cheryl Suzack, University of Toronto

 Canadian Studies Program (CAN))

Canadian Studies Colloquium.
"Indigenous Rights, Gender Violence, and American Outrage."

Speaker:
Prof. Cheryl Suzack
English & Indigenous Studies
University of Toronto

Wednesday, January 31, 2018
223 Moses Hall | 12 Noon
Co-Sponsored by Ethnic Studies
Buffet lunch at 12 noon followed by lecture at 12:10.
Free Event | Open To Everyone
Part of the Canadian Studies Colloquium...   More >

Fear and the Safety Net: Evidence from Secure Communities: Marcella Alsan MD, MPH, PhD

Colloquium | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 2232 Piedmont, Seminar Room

 Marcella Alsan MD, MPH, PhD, Professor of Medicine, Stanford University

 Population Science, Department of Demography

A lunch time talk and discussion session, featuring visiting and local scholars presenting their research on a wide range of topics of interest to demography.

Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right

Colloquium | January 31 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Arlie Hochschild, Professor Emerita, UC Berkeley Department of Sociology

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Arlie Hochschild's latest book, Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right (The New Press, September 2016) focuses on the rise of the American right. Based on intensive interviews of Tea Party enthusiasts in Louisiana, conducted over the last five years and focusing on emotions, Hochschild scales an “empathy wall” to learn how to see, think and feel as they do. What do...   More >

Keys Track 3d- Supervising in a Union Environment

Course | January 31 | 1-4 p.m. | 24 University Hall

 Julie Hoxie

 Human Resources

Supervisors will learn how to manage their represented employees within the constraints of the laws and the labor contracts. They will also learn about management rights, employee rights and union rights, and how to communicate with represented employees and unions. This workshop addresses the following Core Competencies: * Inclusiveness * Managing People * Communication

How to Email a Professor to Get a Positive Response: Workshop

Workshop | January 31 | 2-3 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Do you need to email a professor you've never met before to ask for their help, but you don't know where to start? Have you ever written a long email to a professor, only to receive no response, or not the one you hoped? If so, this workshop is for you! We will discuss how to present yourself professionally over email to faculty and other professionals ...   More >

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Ricci flow with surgery and the classification of 3-manifolds

Seminar | January 31 | 2-3 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Richard Bamler, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

I will give an accessible introduction to Ricci flow in low dimensions, highlighting its connection to the study of the corresponding static equation, the Einstein equation, and to related topological theorems, such as the Uniformization theorem and the Poincaré and Geometrization Conjectures. I will then discuss the singularity formation of such flows and provide an overview of Perelman’s...   More >

Computational psychiatry: When good decisions go bad

Seminar | January 31 | 3 p.m. |  5101 Tolman Hall

 **Peter Dayan**

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Abstract: Substantial efforts across the fields of computer science, artificial intelligence, statistics, operations research, economics, and control theory have provided us with a psychologically- and neurobiologically-grounded account of how humans and other animals learn to predict rewards and punishments, and choose actions to maximize the former and minimize the latter. It becomes an obvious...   More >

Big Data and Cartography

Colloquium | January 31 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 575 McCone Hall

 James Cheshire, University College London

 Department of Geography

Maps are an increasingly important tool for interrogating, disseminating and communicating large and complex geographic datasets. This talk will outline the ways in which innovative cartography can be used to inform researchers, and the public more broadly, about the value, and pitfalls, of “Big Data”. It will draw insights from three highly successful mapping projects that have sought to...   More >

Engineering the Entropic Bond

Colloquium | January 31 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 Sharon Glotzer, University of Michigan

 Department of Chemical Engineering

Entropy, information, and order are important concepts in many fields, relevant for materials to machines, for biology to econophysics. Entropy is typically associated with disorder; yet, the counterintuitive notion that a thermodynamic system of hard particles might - due solely to entropy - spontaneously assemble from a fluid phase into an ordered crystal was first predicted in the mid-20th...   More >

Statistical Inference for Finite Alphabet Structures

Seminar | January 31 | 4-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Merle Behr, University of Göttingen

 Department of Statistics

A challenging problem in cancer genetics is that tumors often consist of a few different groups of cells, so called clones, where each clone has different mutations, like copy-number (CN) variations. In whole genome sequencing the mutations of the different clones get mixed up, according to their relative unknown proportion in the tumor. However, CN's of single clones can only take values in a...   More >

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): Classification of diffeomorphism groups of 3-manifolds through Ricci flow

Seminar | January 31 | 4-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Richard Bamler, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

I will present recent work of Bruce Kleiner and myself in which we classify the homotopy type of all spherical and hyperbolic 3-manifolds, except for $RP^3$. This partially resolves the Generalized Smale Conjecture in the spherical case and reproves a theorem due to Gabai in the hyperbolic case.

Our proof is based on a uniqueness theorem for singular Ricci flows, which we established in previous...   More >

EECS Colloquium: Pen- and Touch-Interaction with 2D Information Spaces

Colloquium | January 31 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, 306 (HP Auditorium)

 Andries van Dam, Brown University

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

This presentation covers two of my graphics group’s projects, Vizdom and Dash. Rather than a formal exposition of completed research we will present two demos of work-in progress that are intended to illustrate directions we think will be fruitful for information exploration and sensemaking.

Biography

Andries van Dam, is the Thomas J. Watson Jr. University Professor of Technology and...   More >

Applied Math Seminar: Efficient solvers and preconditioners for the implicit time integration of discontinuous Galerkin methods

Seminar | January 31 | 4-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Will Pazner, Brown University and UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Implicit time integration for discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretizations is important in the context of boundary layer flows, anisotropic, unstructured meshes, and high degree polynomial approximations. Effective preconditioning strategies are essential to the efficient iterative solution of the resulting large, sparse linear systems. In this talk, I will discuss two topics: (1) fully implicit...   More >

Job Market Seminar: "Reputation Effects under Interdependent Values"

Seminar | January 31 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Harry Di Pei, MIT Economics

 Department of Economics

Field(s): Theory, Organizational Economics, Political Economy

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Econ 235, Financial Economics: Job Market Seminar

Seminar | February 1 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | C330 Haas School of Business

 Niels Gormsen, Copenhagen Business School

 Department of Economics

Joint with Haas Finance Seminar

Mendeley Citation Management Workshop

Workshop | February 1 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 2101, Bioscience Library Training Room

 Becky Miller, Bioscience and Natural Resources Library

 Library

Mendeley is a reference manager that enables you to organize, read, share, annotate, and cite your research papers. It is also an academic discovery and collaboration tool.

This hands-on workshop will give beginning Mendeley users practice importing citations and creating bibliographies. Experienced users should bring their Mendeley questions!

  Register online

2018 Distinguished ESPM Faculty Lecture - Carolyn Merchant

Seminar | February 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 132 Mulford Hall

 Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM)

Carolyn Merchant shares her lecture, "The Anthropocene: The Age of Humanity".

Refreshments will be served at 11:30 am in 139 Mulford.

This event is open to the public.

Oliver E. Williamson Seminar

Seminar | February 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | C325 Haas School of Business

 Erika Deserranno, Northwestern

 Department of Economics

The Oliver E. Williamson Seminar on Institutional Analysis, named after our esteemed colleague who founded the seminar, features current research by faculty, from UCB and elsewhere, and by advanced doctoral students. The research investigates governance, and its links with economic and political forces. Markets, hierarchies, hybrids, and the supporting institutions of law and politics all come...   More >

Seminar 217, Risk Management: Interpretable proximate factors for large dimensions

Seminar | February 1 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Speaker: Markus Pelger, Stanford

 Center for Risk Management Research

This papers deals with the approximation of latent statistical factors with sparse and easy-to-interpret proximate factors. Latent factors in a large-dimensional factor model can be estimated by principal component analysis, but are usually hard to interpret. By shrinking the factor weights, we obtain proximate factors that are easier to interpret. We show that proximate factors consisting of...   More >

2018 UC Berkeley Geotechnical Engineering Research Symposium

Conference/Symposium | February 1 | 1-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 Banatao Auditorium

 Christie Hale, PhD Student, UC Berkeley, GeoSystems, Civil and Environmental En

 Michael Gardner, PhD Student, UC Berkeley; Amr Ewais, Researcher, UC Berkeley, GeoSystems, Civil and Environmental En; Estefan Garcia, PhD Student, UC Berkeley, GeoSystems, Civil and Environmental En; Nella Pierre Louis Desruisseaux, PhD Student, UC Berkeley, GeoSystems, Civil and Environmental En; James Fern, Researcher, UC Berkeley, GeoSystems, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), Graduate Assembly

On behalf of the graduate students of the UC Berkeley GeoSystems program, we are pleased to announce our first annual Geotechnical Engineering Research Symposium. This event is an opportunity for current PhD students and Research Associates to share their research with the geotechnical engineering industry. There will be short oral presentations as well as time for one-on-one interactions via a...   More >

$ 25 General Admission, $ 0 Full Time Students, $ 0 Faculty

  Buy tickets online or or by emailing info@geostudents.berkeley.edu

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Embedded domain specific languages: A Blueprint for Robust Performance of Scientific Computations

Seminar | February 1 | 2-3 p.m. | Soda Hall, 430-438 Wozniak Lounge

 Dr. Scott Baden, Leader, Computer Languages and System Software Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

I will describe custom source-to-source translators targeting different
performance programming problems arising in large scale computation.
I will conclude the talk with earlier work on run times, that led to the
research in domain specific translation.

Late Medieval Publishing Culture In Japan During The 14th And 16th Centuries

Colloquium | February 1 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 3401 Dwinelle Hall

 Sumiyoshi Tomohiko, Keiō Univeristy

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures, Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Books printed in Japanese Zen monasteries during the medieval period are known as Gozan-ban or “Five Mountains” editions. Originally, Gozan-ban were printed for the self-education of Gozan monks who were expected to imitate the latest Chinese scholarship and act out another culture in Japan. At this time, in the 13th to 14th centuries, Chinese Zen masters visited Japan very often, while Japanese...   More >

The Gendered Politics of Socialist Consumption in North Korea, 1953-1965

Colloquium | February 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Andre Schmid, University of Toronto

 Laura Nelson, UC Berkeley

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

How was ‘proper’ consumption conceived in the newly emergent socialist order of North Korea? Despite the desire of the Party-state to represent a population united around the Kim family and the (not unrelated) tendency of foreign observers to see North Korea as an extreme case of totalitarianism, there was in fact no straightforward answer to this question in the early postwar years.

Mathematics Department Colloquium: Largeness of 3-manifold group that resemble free groups”

Colloquium | February 1 | 4-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Shelly Harvey, Rice University

 Department of Mathematics

A group is called large if it has a finite index subgroup which surjects onto a non-abelian free group. By work of Agol and Cooper-Long-Reid, most 3-manifold groups are large; in particular, the fundamental groups of hyperbolic 3-manifolds are large. In previous work, the first author gave examples of closed, hyperbolic 3-manifolds with arbitrarily large first homology rank but whose fundamental...   More >

Critical Discussions in Food Systems Co-hosts: Friends of the ATC!

Colloquium | February 1 | 4-6 p.m. | Morgan Hall, Morgan Lounge

 Friends of the ATC

Join the discussion organized by the Nicaragua Center for Community Action, SOCLA-North America, and the Task Force on the Americas to welcome the Asociación de Trabajadores del Campo (ATC) and voices from Via Campesina in a conversation on food sovereignty and agroecology!

On this tour, the ATC’s Marlen Sanchez and Dionys Melgara will be speaking and exchanging on the importance of La Via...   More >

Friday, February 2, 2018

SERC DeCal Fellowship Deadline

Deadline | February 2 |  Sproul Hall

 Student Environmental Resource Center

The SERC Decal Fellowship awards $200 budgets to DeCals covering topics of sustainability and environmentalism. Four DeCals will be selected for the fellowship. To learn more and apply visit: https://serc.berkeley.edu/decal-fellowship-program/

United Against White Supremacy Symposium

Conference/Symposium | February 2 | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Booth Auditorium: Room 175

 Richard Rothstein, Author of The Color of Law; Professor Ian Haney-López, Earl Warren Professor of Public Law at Berkeley; Eva Patterson, President/Co-Founder, Equal Justice Society

 ACLU of Northern California, East Bay Community Law Center, Haas Institute for a Fair & Inclusive Society, UC Berkeley Center for Race & Gender, Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice, California Law Review

Racism has been the blueprint and the foundation of the United States since its inception. This symposium is being convened in order to discuss ways to dismantle racism and white supremacy in a series of four panels: Gentrification, Immigration, Incarceration, and Affirmative Action.

Social Science and Humanities Proposal Writing Workshop for SURF Fellowship

Workshop | February 2 | 9:30-11 a.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Jeff Vance Martin, SURF Advisor

 Office of Undergraduate Research

In this workshop, undergraduates will receive detailed guidance on how to construct a research proposal in social science and humanities disciplines for the SURF Fellowship.

Qigong with Director Eric Siegel

Workshop | February 2 | 10-11 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Join UCBG Director, Eric Siegel, for a morning practice in Qigong (pronounced cheegong), a form of meditative exercise with repeated movements, gently stretching the core and limbs and building body awareness.

Free with Garden Admission

  Register online

“Why The Mind Evolved: The Evolution Of Navigation”: Psychology 229A

Colloquium | February 2 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Lucia Jacobs, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

NCBI Bioinformatics Tools: An Introduction

Workshop | February 2 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, Bioscience Library Training Room, 2101 VLSB

 Elliott Smith, Emerging Technologies and Bioinformatics Librarian, Library

 Library

A hands-on workshop introducing NCBI bioinformatics tools such as PubMed, Gene, Protein, Nucleotide, and BLAST.

Novel Demonstration of Decentralized Direct Potable Water Reuse: Environmental Engineering Seminar

Seminar | February 2 | 12-1 p.m. | 534 Davis Hall

 Dr. Andrea Corral, Carollo Engineers, Inc

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

Solid State Technology and Devices Seminar: Semiconductor Thin-Film Transfer Technology has Finally Arrived

Seminar | February 2 | 1-2 p.m. | Cory Hall, 521 Hogan Room

 Eli Yablonovitch, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Dept., University of California, Berkeley

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

For years, lattice mismatched hetero-epitaxy has been regarded as the correct approach for heterogeneous integration, but the mismatch led to material quality problems. At around the same time a competing approach, thin-film epitaxial layer transfer began to be developed, but the handling of free-standing thin films was a primitive art. Over the period of decades the discipline of processing...   More >

Talking About Combinatorial Objects Student Seminar: Introduction to Coxeter Groups

Seminar | February 2 | 1-2 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Katrina Biele, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Modulating Electron Beams in Space and Time to Probe for Genuine Structures and Function at the Atomic Scale: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | February 2 | 2-3 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall | Note change in time and location

 Dr. Christian Kisielowski, LBNL / Molecular Foundry

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

In high resolution electron microscopy objects are actively altered by the intense electron irradiation that is necessary to reach single atom sensitivity. In these circumstances a control of beam-sample interactions is no longer a commodity but a necessity. Therefore, it is of outstanding interest to develop new tools and concepts that strive for a stricter control of the probing electron beam...   More >

Student Probability/PDE Seminar: Large Deviation Principle for Stochastic Growth Models II

Seminar | February 2 | 2:10-3:30 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Fraydoun Rezakhanlou, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Composition Colloquium: Anna Clyne

Colloquium | February 2 | 3 p.m. | 135 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

After studying piano and composition at the Ecole Normale de Musique in Paris, Raphael Cendo studied composition at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Paris (2000-2003), from which he graduated in composition, analysis and orchestration. He then joined the composing and computer music class of IRCAM (2003-2006). During his training, he was taught by Allain Gaussin, Brian Ferneyhough, Fausto...   More >

MENA Salon: War Comes to Afrin

Workshop | February 2 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

In this week's MENA Salon, we will discuss the events leading to the recent military operation in Afrin, the international community's reaction, and its likely consequences for individuals on the ground in Syria.

Issues and Opportunities Facing the School of Information

Seminar | February 2 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 AnnaLee Saxenian

 Information, School of

Dean Saxenian will comment on some of the challenges and opportunities facing the campus and the School.

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | February 2 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for...   More >

Supercharging Future Mobility: Tailoring Charge Transport for Highly Efficient Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

Seminar | February 2 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Xiangfeng Duan, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA

 College of Chemistry

Supercapacitors, batteries and fuel cells represent three distinct electrochemical energy conversion devices of increasing importance for applications in mobile electronics, electric vehicles, and renewable energy industry. A common feature of these devices involves coupled ion transport (and storage) and electron transport in active electrode materials.

Student / postdoc PDE seminar: Multivalued harmonic functions

Seminar | February 2 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Brian Krummel, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Dirichlet energy minimizing multivalued functions were introduced by Almgren in his proof that the singular set of an n-dimensional area minimizing submanifold has Hausdorff dimension at most n-2. Such functions play a crucial role in the study of area minimizing submanifolds at branch point singularities, at which at least one tangent cone is a plane with integer multiplicity > 1. We will...   More >

Student Arithmetic Geometry Seminar: Hochschild and cyclic homology for log schemes

Seminar | February 2 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Martin Olsson, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

In this talk I will discuss recent work on developing a theory of Hochschild and Cyclic homology for log schemes, extending the definitions for ordinary schemes.

Music Studies Colloquium Pierpaolo Polzonetti (UC Davis): Something Tastes Funny: A Gastromusicological Approach to Comic Opera

Colloquium | February 2 | 4:30 p.m. | 128 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

Pierpaolo Polzonetti specializes on opera and eighteenth-century music and culture. His research work has been funded by the Earhart Foundation, the American Council for Learned Societies, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

His book, Italian Opera in the Age of the American Revolution (Cambridge University Press, 2011), is a study of representations of America in Eighteenth-century...   More >