<< Week of November 12 >>

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Forced into Genocide

Lecture | November 12 | 1-3 p.m. |  St. Vartan Armenian Apostolic Church

 +650 Spruce Street, Oakland, CA 94610

 Adrienne G. Alexanian, Educator and daughter of Yervant Alexanian

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program, AGBU-Silicon Valley, AGBU-YPNC, St. Vartan Cultural Committee

Forced into Genocide is the riveting memoir of Yervant Edward Alexanian: an eye-witness to the massacre and dislocation of his family and countrymen in Ottoman Turkey during World War I. Incredibly, Alexanian experienced the Armenian Genocide as a conscript in the Turkish army. His memoir is a one-of-a-kind "insider's account," documenting the Genocide's astonishing cruelty, but also its...   More >

Monday, November 13, 2017

Salim v. Mitchell and Jessen: Legal Accountability for Torture in US Courts

Lecture | November 13 | 12:45-2 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Warren Room, 295 Boalt Hall

 Paul Hoffman, Schonbrun Seplow Harris & Hoffman LLP

 Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law

This lecture has been cancelled due to illness. We hope to reschedule for January 2018.

Towards Knowledge-Based Decision Support System using Propositional Analysis and Rhetorical Structure Theory

Lecture | November 13 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Cláudio Gottschalg-Duque, University of Brasilia

 Information, School of

The project's leading objective is to develop a natural language interface for knowledge-based decision support system (KBDSS) using rhetorical structure theory (RST) and propositional analysis. KBDSS is a system that provides specialized expertise (problem-solving) stored as facts, rules, procedures, or in similar structures that can be directly accessed by the user. The idea is to develop an...   More >

Devin Griffiths: The Ecology of Form

Lecture | November 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Devin Griffiths, Assistant Professor of English, University of Southern California

 Department of English

Based on Professor Griffiths's new book project, this talk is sponsored by the 19th Century and Beyond British Cultural Studies working group and the Florence Bixby Chair.

"Antifa: The History and Theory of Anti-Fascism”

Lecture | November 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Mark Bray, Dartmouth College

 Department of Spanish & Portuguese

MARK BRAY is a historian of human rights, terrorism, and political radicalism in Modern Europe who was one of the organizers of Occupy Wall Street. He is the author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook and Translating Anarchy: The Anarchism of Occupy Wall Street. His work has appeared in the Washington Post, Foreign Policy, Critical Quarterly, ROAR Magazine, and numerous edited volumes. He is...   More >

What is history?: the life and times of water hyacinth

Lecture | November 13 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Reading Room

 Anna L. Tsing, Professor of Anthropology, UCSC Department of Anthropology

 Department of Anthropology

2017 Distinguished Lecture: Anna L. Tsing

Re-Assemblage (Theory, Practice, Form): Arts + Design Mondays at BAMPFA

Lecture | November 13 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Bill Brown, Deputy Provost for the Arts and Karla Scherer Distinguished Service Professor in American Culture, University of Chicago

 Arts + Design

Brown excavates relations between assemblage theory in the social sciences and assemblage practice, focusing on the ways that assembly (in the visual, plastic, and discursive arts) can complicate and clarify the theoretical conversation. He assembles the work of Robert Rauschenberg, William Burroughs, Noah Purifoy, Theaster Gates, Rina Banerjee, and Tan Lin into a conversation that is newly...   More >

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

America's Next War and How to Prevent It

Lecture | November 14 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Dr. Paul Stares, Council on Foreign Relations

 Institute of International Studies

Paul B. Stares is the General John W. Vessey Senior Fellow for Conflict Prevention and director of the Center for Preventive Action at the Council on Foreign Relations. The author or editor of nine books on U.S. security policy and international relations as well as a regular commentator on current affairs, Dr. Stares has worked at leading think tanks and universities in the United States,...   More >

The Troubled Waters of Transformation: Shipyard Labor in East Central Europe from Late to Post Socialism

Lecture | November 14 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Ulf Brunnbauer, Director, Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, University of Regensburg

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Institute of European Studies

Practitioners of East European labor history are at risk of falling into deep depression. Under state-socialism, industrial workers were apparently let down by regimes that claimed to rule in their name. After the end of communist rule, many workers experienced large-scale dispossession because of deindustrialization and the emerging hegemony of neo-liberalism. In my talk, which is based on the...   More >

Causal Inference in the Age of Big Data: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | November 14 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Jas Sekhon, Professor of Political Science & Statistics

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Creative Solutions for Social Innovation: A View from Africa

Lecture | November 14 | 5-7 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Wells Fargo Room

 Center for African Studies, Center for Social Sector Leadership

Join us for a panel discussion and networking on Creative Solutions for Social Innovation: A View from Africa with three award-winning technology entrepreneurs who are driving social change and impact in Africa. The entrepreneurs, who are recipients of the King Baudouin African Development Prize, will share their innovative solutions to improve the lives of local communities through access to...   More >

$0

  Register online

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

CANCELLED! ARCH Lecture: Mary-Ann Ray

Lecture | November 15 |  Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

CANCELLED! WED, NOV 15. Please note: This lecture has been CANCELLED!

Botanical Names Demystified

Lecture | November 15 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Do plant names ever seem intentionally obscure and hard to remember? Do you wonder how they got their names and why? This program will break down botanical nomenclature, looking at some of the most common Greek and Latin vocabulary and the rules for plant naming. We will also examine the ways that names reflect politics, patronage, and advances in the science of botany.

Free with Garden Admission

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Life and Labor in the Industrial Frontier: Archaeology of the Samuel Adams Limekilns, Santa Cruz, California

Lecture | November 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 David Hyde, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Beginning in the 1850s a lime extraction and processing industry took root in Santa Cruz County, California, supplying the American West Coast with a critical construction and manufacturing material. Over the subsequent 70 years, the industry shifted from being comprised of number of independently owned and operated operations to being monopolized by a single regional conglomerate. Throughout...   More >

Curating and Collecting Across Media: Arts + Design Wednesdays at BAMPFA

Lecture | November 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Aebhric Coleman, Director, Kramlich Collection

 Arts + Design

In Curating and Collecting Across Media, Aebhric Coleman will discuss collecting and curating artwork that mixes media forms across visual art objects, film, performance, and new technologies.

Biography
Aebhric Coleman is Director of Kramlich Collection, a collection of art by Richard and Pamela Kramlich recognized as one of the most important private international collections of media,...   More >

What is Adabiyāt?: Forging Persian Literature and Its Domain (1860-1920)

Lecture | November 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall

 Aria Fani, PhD Candidate, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

 Near Eastern Studies

What is literature? Posing this fundamental question allows me to critically delve into the conceptual history of literature in Persian in the mid-nineteenth and the early-twentieth centuries. In a way, this is a story of how a literary discourse was formed and later became an institution, casting its epistemic shadow over all modes of literary and cultural production in the Persian-speaking...   More >

Women in the Red Army, 1941-1945

Lecture | November 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Oleg Budnitskii, Professor of History, and Director, International Center for the History and Sociology of World War II and Its Consequences, National Research University - Higher School of Economics, Moscow

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

During the years of the Great Patriotic War about 500,000 women were called up to serve in the Red Army. In the Second World War, the Soviet Union was not the only country to enlist women in the military. But the Soviet experience was unique in the fact that a significant number of women served in combat units. Female pilots and snipers attained the greatest fame. Some women served as tank crew...   More >

Octavio Paz, Mexican Politics, and the Media: Lecture with Priscila Dorella

Lecture | November 15 | 4 p.m. | 2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies), Conference Room

 Priscila Dorella

 Center for Latin American Studies

The writing of Mexican poet Octavio Paz (1914-1998) reflects a constant engagement with social questions of his time. His ideas about the role of intellectuals, politics, and the media are expressed in poems, essays, radio programs, and television. In this lecture, Professor Dorella will present some of the controversies that were generated by Paz’s political position in the media.

American Identity in the Age of Trump: Jefferson Memorial Lecture featuring George Packer

Lecture | November 15 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 George Packer, Staff Writer, The New Yorker Magazine

 Graduate Division

George Packer will present the Jefferson lecture on Wednesday, November 15, 2017, in conjunction with the observance of Constitution Day. The lecture, entitled "American Identity in the Age of Trump," will be held in the Chevron Auditorium of International House and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

George Packer

The Good Neighbor: Addressing Global Poverty in an Age of Xenophobia

Lecture | November 15 | 6-7 p.m. | David Brower Center, Tamalpais Room

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94607

 William Easterly

 Goldman School of Public Policy

The fight against global poverty is connected to the contentious issue of migration from poor to rich countries. The connection of the war on poverty to the war on terror perpetrates a stereotype of poor people as violent, unintentionally fueling xenophobia and restrictions on migration. The good news is that economic ideas are the best antidote to xenophobia, opening the door again to migration...   More >

The Clean Energy Emergency: with Daniel Kammen

Lecture | November 15 | 6:30-7:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Master of Development Practice

Professor Dan Kammen, a global thought leader for clean energy and energy access, reflects on lessons learned from three decades on the frontlines of the clean energy debates and what those lessons portend for the future of global energy and the planet.

Zaytuna College Lecture Series with Professor Alexander Key: Language Between God and the Poets

Lecture | November 15 | 7-9 p.m. | Zaytuna College, Sanctuary

 2401 Le Conte Ave., Berkeley, CA 94709

 Professor Alexander Key, Professor, Stanford University

 Graduate Theological Union

Zaytuna College invites you to their upcoming Lecture Series, occurring on Wednesday evenings from 7:00pm - 9:00pm at 2401 Le Conte Ave. Berkeley, CA 94709 throughout the Fall semester with renowned speakers such as UC Berkeley Anthropology Professor Laura Nader, Political Science Professor Steven Fish, CAIR Director Zahra Billoo, Stanford Comparative Literature and Classical Arabic Professor...   More >

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Native Claims Across Nations: Indigenous Land Ownership in Mexican and U.S. California, 1840-1860

Lecture | November 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Julia Lewandoski, doctoral candidate, History, UC Berkeley

 Bancroft Library

The vast majority of indigenous Californians never received land promised to them after Mexico secularized California's missions in 1834. Drawing mainly from land case files in The Bancroft Library, Julia Lewandoski will trace the stories of those who did receive grants from Mexico in the 1840s. These communities used legal systems to gain and keep land after California became a U.S. state in 1850.

Benjamin Siegel | Hungry Nation: Food, Famine, and the Making of Modern India

Lecture | November 16 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Benjamin Siegel, Assistant Professor of History, Boston University

 Institute of International Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

Benjamin Siegel is a historian of modern South Asia, with particular interests in the politics and economic life of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh in global contexts. His first book project, Hungry Nation: Food, Famine, and the Making of Modern India (Cambridge University Press, 2018), interrogates the ways in which problems of food and scarcity has structured Indian citizens’...   More >

Precarity and Dependence in the "Sharing" Economy

Lecture | November 16 | 4-6 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), IRLE Director's Room

 Juliet Schor, Professor of Sociology, Boston College

 Ruth Berins Collier, Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley; Annette Bernhardt, Director, Low-Wage Work Program, The Labor Center at IRLE

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, The Scholars Strategy Network

The sharing economy debuted to grand claims about its ability to change the world for the good--it would encourage social connection, use assets more efficiently, and be better for the environment. For earners on platforms, it promised flexibility, freedom and the ability to become a "micro-entrepreneur." Ten years in, the reality is far more complex. In this talk, Schor discusses her...   More >

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Cripping the Renaissance: Lamentation, Consolation, and Disability in Cervantes and Milton: a talk by Elizabeth B. Bearden

Lecture | November 16 | 6-8 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Elizabeth B. Bearden, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 Department of English, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Program in Disability Studies

"In this talk, I focus on works by two disabled authors of the early modern period: Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra and John Milton. I propose that these authors draw on the art of consolation—particularly Petrarch’s De Remediis and the Psalms—to depict the lows and highs of their lived experience of disability. Furthermore, they employ transgressive reappropriation when responding to ablist...   More >

Phoebe's Cast Collection: Two Millennia of Copies and Replicas at the Hearst Museum

Lecture | November 16 | 6-8 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

This talk will provide an introduction to UC Berkeley's collection of nearly 300 casts of Greek and Roman sculptures from the Classical period - examining both how these plaster copies were made from original sculptures in Europe, and how they travelled to California at the turn of the 20th century. This will be contextualized within a larger discussion of the copying tradition, starting in the...   More >

Friday, November 17, 2017

The Moral Imperative of Better School Quality Measures

Lecture | November 17 | 10-11:30 a.m. | 2515 Tolman Hall

 Jack Schneider, Assistant Professor, College of the Holy Cross

 Graduate School of Education

Today, parents and policymakers can access school- and district-level data in historically unprecedented quantities. Yet available information largely consists of student standardized test scores, which offer a limited picture of school performance and often indicate more about student demography than about educational practice. Consequently, such data may produce a distorted picture of school...   More >

Postindustrial Language Socialization

Lecture | November 17 | 3-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 (Classroom side)

 Elinor Ochs, UCLA

 Berkeley Language Center

*Message form Claire Kramsch*
Foreign language teachers are used to seeing themselves as teaching language acquisition (SLA), not language socialization (LS). Success in second language acquisition is developing full command of the linguistic and communicative aspects of language, whereas for language socialization it is acculturation and blending into a speech community. However, in both cases,...   More >

How Ride-Sharing Technology is Impacting Transportation in Africa: The case of Uber in Nairobi

Lecture | November 17 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Kagure Wamunyu, OxfordUniversity

 Institute of Transportation Studies


Saturday, November 18, 2017

Science at Cal Lecture - How to Find a Habitable Planet

Lecture | November 18 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Courtney Dressing, Astronomy Department

 Science@Cal

Several decades of ground- and space-based investigations have revealed that our galaxy is teeming with planetary systems and that Earth-sized planets are common. Dr. Dressing will review our understanding of small planets and then chart a path towards the detection and characterization of habitable planets orbiting nearby stars.

Relative sizes of Kepler habitable zone planets discovered as of 2013 April 18. Except for Earth, these are artists' renditions. Image: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech