<< Week of April 15 >>

Monday, April 10, 2017

Kicking out the Rogues: Should Federations be Able to Expel Member States?

Lecture | April 10 | 12-1 p.m. |  Moses Hall

 Eva Marlene Hausteiner, Political Theory, University of Bonn

 Institute of European Studies, San Francisco Eric M. Warburg Chapter of the American Council on Germany

When, if at all, should members get expelled from a federation? While accession to or secession from a federal union – such as the United States – has long been the issue of heated debates, only recently have the federal center’s sanctions on members in violation of common rules and laws become an issue. How should, for example, the EU treat countries in violation of the rule of law? In her talk,...   More >

Diversified Farming Systems Roundtable with Matt Liebman

Lecture | April 10 | 4-5 p.m. | 112 Hilgard Hall

 Berkeley Food Institute, Center for Diversified Farming Systems

The development of modern, industrial agriculture has been characterized by large reductions in biological diversity, both across landscapes and within farming systems. Loss of biodiversity is particularly evident in the U.S. Corn Belt.

Dostoevsky And The Riddle Of The Self

Lecture | April 10 | 4-6 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 Dwinelle Hall Berkeley Language Center

 Yuri Corrigan, Boston University

 Department of Comparative Literature

Undergraduate Lecture Series (Math Monday): Quantum sets

Lecture | April 10 | 5-6 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Mariusz Wodzicki, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

A set is generally considered to be the simplest structure of Mathematics. Every set comes disguised under a number of other structures, however. While exploring some of them, we shall encounter what I propose to call “quantum sets”, by analogy with “quantum groups”.

ARCH Lecture: Kazuyo Sejima

Lecture | April 10 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Zellerbach Hall

 Kazuyo Sejima, SANAA

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), College of Environmental Design

MONDAY, APRIL 10, ZELLERBACH HALL -- Ms. Sejima, founding partner of SANAA, will lecture on her work. This lecture is presented with the Center for Japanese Studies and the UC Regents Lectures Program.

$3 General Admission

  Tickets go on sale April 1. Buy tickets online

ARCH Lecture: Kazuyo Sejima

Lecture | April 10 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Zellerbach Hall

 College of Environmental Design

MONDAY, APRIL 10, ZELLERBACH HALL -- Ms. Sejima, founding partner of SANAA, will lecture on her work. This lecture is presented with the Center for Japanese Studies and the UC Regents Lectures Program. Tickets $3, available on April 1.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Antisocial Computing: Explaining and Predicting Negative Behavior Online

Lecture | April 11 | 9:40-11 a.m. | 202 South Hall

 Justin Cheng

 Information, School of

New computational methods for understanding and predicting antisocial behavior and misinformation in online communities.

Blind Love, Romanticism, and Rousseau’s Julie

Lecture | April 11 | 12-2 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 4229 - French Department Library

 Alexandra Schamel, Visiting Scholar, Universität Munich

 Comparative Literature, French Studies Program, Institute of European Studies

The lecture examines to what extent Rousseau’s epistolary novel Julie ou la Nouvelle Héloïse modifies the visual paradigm of eighteenth-century anthropology, as seen in Rousseau’s ideology of substantial nature, by introducing dynamics which produce obscurité, an unattainable dimension of inwardness. The argument leads to the proposal that the subject’s strategies of hiding, masking and...   More >

Why Vikings, Frozen and Kahoot are Important for Norway’s Future – and What Norway can Learn from Silicon Valley

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Gro Dyrnes, Regional Director Americas, Director San Francisco and Silicon Valley, representing Norway in the Nordic Innovation House Board and in VisitNorway

 Institute of European Studies

The discussion over the last years in Norway has been centered around value creation “after oil”. This presentation will discuss advantages and challenges in Norway’s innovation system and culture and will also compare this to the Silicon Valley ecosystem and mentality.

Gro Dyrnes was formerly the Chief of Staff, Regional Director for Western Europe and the Nordics and IT-director, in...   More >

Blind Love, Romanticism, and Rousseau’s Julie

Lecture | April 11 | 12-2 p.m. | 4229 Dwinelle Hall

 Alexandra Schamel, Universität Munich, Dept. of Comparative Literature, French Studies & IES Visiting Scholar

 Institute of European Studies, Department of French

The lecture examines to what extent Rousseau’s epistolary novel Julie ou la Nouvelle Héloïse modifies the visual paradigm of eighteenth-century anthropology, as seen in Rousseau’s ideology of substantial nature, by introducing dynamics which produce obscurité, an unattainable dimension of inwardness. The argument leads to the proposal that the subject’s strategies of hiding, masking and...   More >

When Death Comes, He Steals the Infant: Children and Mortuary Practice on the Giza Plateau: AHMA Noon Colloquium

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Jessica Kaiser, UC Berkeley

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

The AHMA Noon Colloquium is a series of informal papers presented at noon in 7205 Dwinelle Hall.

Annual Martin Meyerson Faculty Research Lectures

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Thomas W. Laqueur

 Academic Senate

Thomas W. Laqueur
Helen Fawcett Distinguished Professor of History

How Dogs Make Us Human

100 Years Later: The Lynching of Grandpa Crawford

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | D-37 Hearst Field Annex

 College of Environmental Design

TUE, APR 11, 4:00pm. Using her family’s painful story as a lens through which we can examine our nation’s history, US History Scholar Doria Dee Johnson will describe how past injustices propelled her from the role of daughter to genealogist to activist to

Making Fit, Pricing Air: High-Rises Explode Across Phnom Penh

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Sylvia Nam, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, UC Irvine

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This talk examines pent-up expertise and upward pressures on land prices that have generated the market dynamics leading to the expansive rollout of condominium towers in Phnom Penh. The speaker received her Ph.D. in City & Regional Planning from UC Berkeley.

Sylvia Nam

100 Years Later: The Lynching of (Grandpa) Anthony Crawford: Has racial difference ended or simply evolved?

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Hearst Field Annex, Room D-37

 Doria Dee Johnson, Public Historian and Activist

 The On The Same Page Program, Equity and Inclusion, Vice Chancellor, College of Environmental Design, Department of African American Studies, Fannie Lou Hamer Black Resource Center, Department of Sociology

Doria Dee Johnson’s great-grandfather was lynched in South Carolina in 1916. Using her family’s painful story as a lens through which we can examine our nation’s history, Johnson will describe how past injustices propelled her from the role of daughter to genealogist to activist to scholar, and now international human rights and restorative justice agent.

 The talk and reception are free and open to all UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, and community members.

Public historian and activist Doria Dee Johnson

Neighbourhood Perceptions of the Ukraine Crisis: From the Soviet Union into Eurasia?

Lecture | April 11 | 4:30-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Katarzyna Stoklosa, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Public Management, Centre for Border Region Studies, University of Southern Denmark, Sønderborg; Jussi Laine, Assistant Professor of Multidisciplinary Border Studies at the Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland; James Scott, Professor of Multidisciplinary Border Studies at the Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland; Gerhard Besier, Director, Sigmund Neumann Institute (Berlin, Dresden, Flensburg); Steen Bo Frandsen, Head of Centre for Border Region Studies, University of Southern Denmark, Sønderborg

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Recent events in Ukraine and Russia and the subsequent incorporation of Crimea into the Russian state, with the support of some circles of inhabitants of the peninsula, have shown that the desire of people to belong to the Western part of Europe should not automatically be assumed. Discussing different perceptions of the Ukrainian-Russian war in neighbouring countries, this book offers an...   More >

“Advancing Human Rights in a Rightward World: Challenges for International Institutions and Civil Society”: A Talk By: NAVANETHEM PILLAY

Lecture | April 11 | 5-7 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Goldberg Room

 Center for Race and Gender, Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Human Rights Center, International and Area Studies (IAS)

“Advancing Human Rights in a Rightward World: Challenges for International Institutions and Civil Society”

A Talk By: NAVANETHEM PILLAY
United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 2008-2014 and Judge of the International Criminal Court, 2003-2008

Opening Remarks: PAUL ALIVISATOS, Vice Chancellor for Research and Samsung Distinguished Professor of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, UC,...   More >

CALIFORNIA Live! A Dream Denied? The Immigrant Experience in the Campus Community

Lecture | April 11 | 7-9:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Robert D. Haas ’64, Chairman-Emeritus, Levi Strauss & Co.; Saira Hussain ’09, J.D. ’13, Staff Attorney, Asian Law Caucus; Meng So ’10, M.A, Director, Undocumented Student Program, UC Berkeley; Seth Grossman, Chief of Staff, University of California President Janet Napolitano; Valeska Castaneda-Puerto ’16, Program Manager, Student Support, Cal Alumni Association

 Diane Dwyer ’87, Veteran Bay Area journalist, Dwyer Media Consulting

 Cal Alumni Association

Join the Cal Alumni Association as we present our first CALIFORNIA Live! event of 2017 — an exciting panel discussion, “A Dream Denied? The Immigrant Experience in the Campus Community.”

$20 CAA Member, $10 Current Student or Young Cal Alumni (Classes of 2006-2016), $25 General Admission

 View Free Live Streaming Event: https://californialiveonline.eventbrite.com. Register online or by calling David Smith at 510-900-8256, or by emailing David Smith at david.smith@alumni.berkeley.edu

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Howison Lectures in Philosophy

Lecture | April 12 | TBA Moses Hall

 Gisela Striker, Harvard University

 Department of Philosophy

Invisible Hands: Townsend Book Chat with Jonathan Sheehan

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Invisible Hands traces the rise in eighteenth-century Europe of a belief in self-organization—such that large systems, whether natural or human-made, are seen as capable of creating their own order, without any need for external direction.

Beyond the American Era in the Middle East: An Evolving Landscape of Turbulence: CMES Visiting Scholars Lecture Series

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Waleed Hazbun, CMES Visiting Scholar, American University of Beirut

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Lecture by Waleed Hazbun, Associate Professor of Political Studies at American University of Beirut and CMES Visiting Scholar.

The Digital Dilemma and the Future of Archaeological Publication: Stories from the Gabii Excavation

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Matt Naglak, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Classical Art and Archaeology

 Archaeological Research Facility

In the past month, the first major publication of the Gabii Project excavation was released, a large-scale international archaeological initiative led by Nicola Terrenato and the University of Michigan since 2009. What makes this publication unique is its entirely digital nature, where the standard textual narrative is intricately combined with the 3D recording and reconstruction inherent to our...   More >

USAID Learning Lab

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310, Banatao Auditorium

 Ticora Jones, Chief, Global Development Lab, USAID

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Ticora Jones is the Chief of Higher Education Solutions Network, Global Development Lab - ‎USAID

---------
Free and open to the public. Register online by Monday for a free lunch at UC Berkeley. The CITRIS Research Exchange Seminar Series is a weekly dialogue highlighting leading voices on societal-scale research issues. Each one-hour seminar starts at 12pm Pacific time and is hosted...   More >

Free

 Free lunch at UC Berkeley if you register by the Monday before the talk (lunches limited). Register online

California Countercultures: Diggers, Communes, and Counterculture and the Death of Hope with Peter Coyote

Lecture | April 12 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Get an inside view on the counterculture from Peter Coyote, an acclaimed actor, Emmy Award–winning narrator of documentary films, and author.

Admission to this lecture is free.

Reconsidering and Re-Framing Taiwan and its History: Aborigines, Colonial Rulers and Democratization

Lecture | April 12 | 12 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 J. Bruce Jacobs, School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University, Australia

 Wen-hsin Yeh, History, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Although Chinese, such as Chiang Kai-shek and Mao Zedong, insisted that Taiwan had been part of China since time immemorial, in fact both only claimed Taiwan as a part of China in 1942. Genuine historical research (as opposed to political “historical” research) demonstrates that no permanent Han Chinese communities existed in Taiwan until after 1624, when the Dutch arrived and imported Han...   More >

Brexit and its Aftershocks: Reimagining British Politics

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Matt Beech, Director of the Centre for British Politics at the University of Hull (UK) and Visiting Scholar at the Center for British Studies in the Institute for European Studies

 Institute of European Studies

The United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union undoubtedly poses an existential problem for the EU. It is also likely that the institutions of the oldest and most stable multi-nation state will require reform in the post-Brexit era. In other words, the aftershocks of Brexit will probably necessitate a reimagining of British politics in each nation and region of the United Kingdom. At...   More >

Learning from Legends: Bill Somerville in conversation with Margaret Jenkins

Lecture | April 12 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94705

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Philanthropist Bill Somerville in conversation with Margaret Jenkins of the Margaret Jenkins Dance Company as OLLI @Berkeley celebrates local legends of the Fourth Age (80 and above) who continue to lead their diverse disciplines.

A Report from the Front Lines of Abortion Care: Lunch Talk with Julie Burkhart

Lecture | April 12 | 12:45-2 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Room 110

 Julie Burkhart, Trust Women Foundation

 If/When/How: Lawyering for Reproductive Justice

Please join the Berkeley Law chapter of If/When/How: Lawyering for Reproductive Justice for a lunch event with Julie Burkhart. Ms. Burkhart has opened abortion clinics in Kansas and Oklahoma, two of the states most hostile to reproductive health care access. She worked closely with Dr. George Tiller, an abortion provider in Kansas who was murdered for his work in 2009. Ms. Burkhart will share her...   More >

if/when/how presents Julie Burkhart

Lecture | April 12 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 110 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Law, Boalt School of

Please join the Berkeley Law chapter of If/When/How: Lawyering for Reproductive Justice for a lunch event with Julie Burkhart. Ms. Burkhart has opened abortion clinics in Kansas and Oklahoma, two of the states most hostile to reproductive health care access. She also worked closely Dr. George Tiller, an abortion provider in Kansas who was murdered for his work in 2009. Ms. Burkhart will share her...   More >

At the Edge of the Nation: The Southern Kurils and the Search for Russia’s National Identity

Lecture | April 12 | 4-6 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Paul Richardson, Lecturer, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

This paper takes up the issue of the remote and beguiling Southern Kuril Islands in order to explore divergent and contradictory ideas, convictions, and beliefs on what constitutes “national” identity in post-Soviet Russia. These islands – which are administered by Russia but claimed by Japan – present us with unique insights into the ways in which competing territorial visions of the nation are...   More >

Data Science and User Research at Facebook: The Two Cultures and the Hacker Way

Lecture | April 12 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 210 South Hall

 Danny Ferrante and Umer Farooq, Facebook

 Information, School of

Insight from data science director Danny Ferrante and user research manager Umer Farooq.

Critical Theory in Times of Crisis Working Group | Historical Gestures in the Cinematic Present | A Talk by Noa Steimatsky

Lecture | April 12 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Noa Steimatsky, Visiting Associate Professor of Italian Studies, UC Berkeley

 The Program in Critical Theory

In the flexible realms of cinematic time and movement, in oceans of contingent detail and the overwhelming expressivity of bodies and gestures—does history risk drowning in sensory response, in ritualistic absorption, in pleasure or in shock? The experience of presentness of the screened, time-based moving image can be maneuvered and intensified in ways that cut across a range of articulations,...   More >

Strange Alliances: Demons, Exorcists, and the Fight against Unbelief in Eighteenth-Century Italy

Lecture | April 12 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Federico Barbierato, University of Verona

 Department of Italian Studies, Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography, Bancroft Library, Designated Emphasis in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies

Presented by the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography.

Join us for Dr Barbierato’s lecture, followed by a round table discussion with UC Berkeley faculty:

Thomas Dandelet, History
Diego Pirillo, Italian Studies
Jonathan Sheehan, History

Co-sponsored by the Bancroft Library, the Department of Italian Studies, and the Renaissance and Early Modern Studies Designated...   More >

Applied History And The Uses (And Misuses) Of The Past

Lecture | April 12 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Dr. Fredrik Logevall, Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs and Professor of History, Harvard Kennedy School

 Institute of International Studies

Fredrik Logevall is the Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs at Harvard University, where he holds joint appointments in the Kennedy School of Government and the Department of History. He is the author or editor of nine books, most recently Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam (Random House, 2012), which won the Pulitzer Prize for History and...   More >

Cicero’s De Officiis – Stoic Ethics for Non-Stoics: Howison Lectures in Philosophy by Gisela Striker

Lecture | April 12 | 5:10 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Gisela Striker, Walter C. Klein Professor of Philosophy and the Classics, Emerita, Harvard University

 Graduate Division

Gisela Striker will present the Howison lecture on April 12, 2017 at 5:10 pm. Her lecture, titled "Cicero’s De Officiis – Stoic Ethics for Non-Stoics" is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

About the Lecture
Professor Striker will show how the Stoic philosopher Panaetius, on whose work Cicero based his own treatise, actually presented what might be seen as a...   More >

Gisela Striker

The Case Against the Supreme Court: Uci Law Dean Erwin Chemerinsky at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | April 12 | 6-7:15 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Hass C230

 ERWIN CHEMERINSKY, Founding Dean of UCI Law School

 The Berkeley Forum

Although UC Irvine School of Law Dean Erwin Chemerinsky has always regarded the law as “the most powerful tool for social change,” in recent years he has become a notable critic of the Supreme Court. In light of current events such as Obergefell v. Hodges, the 2015 case that legalized same-sex marriage, and the unsuccessful nomination of Chief Judge Merrick Garland, the Supreme Court has come...   More >

Thursday, April 13, 2017

EU State aid investigation into Apple's tax arrangement with Ireland

Lecture | April 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Helena Malikova, CFA, case manager with the Directorate General for Competition of the European Commission (EC) and EU Fellow at UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies

In August 2016 the European Commission requested Ireland to claim EUR 13 billion in unpaid taxes from Apple. Helena Malikova will present the European Commission's investigations under EU State aid rules into tax arrangements of companies and explain the Commission's recent decision in the Apple case. Apple’s case has raised numerous issues in the public debate such as: Why did EU chose to tackle...   More >

Roots of the Mongolian State: Genghis Khan's Survival and Pragmatism as Related in the Secret History of the Mongols

Lecture | April 13 | 4 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Robert Bedeski, Professor Emeritus, University of Victoria , Canada; Affiliate Professor, University of Washington (Jackson School of International Affairs); Honorary Doctorate, Mongolia Academy of Science

 UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

The year 1206 marked the beginning of the first Mongol State. Its genesis was overseen and led by Genghis Khan, whose conquests remain a formidable historical series of events. The Secret History narrates his biography as a tale of surviving repeated life threats and overcoming major enemies. From this history, I have extracted an existential framework to explain how he survived in a...   More >

Chingghis Khan

Vandals, Looters, Protestors, and Police: Consumer Culture and Street Politics Collide in Berlin, 1914-1945

Lecture | April 13 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Molly Loberg, Associate Professor of History at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, Austrian Marshall Foundation

After the First World War and 1918 Revolution, political partisans and commercial entrepreneurs took to the streets of Berlin and fought for the attention of crowds with posters, light displays, parades, traffic obstructions, and violence. New freedoms had transformed city streets into the primary medium of communication, lens of perception, and stage of action for both political and economic...   More >

We Have Two Hands: Coping with the Present While Building Toward the Future of College Opportunity

Lecture | April 13 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium,Sutardja Dai Hall

 Michael S. McPherson, President, Spencer Foundation

 Center for Studies in Higher Education

If we were to start today to provide high-quality early education to every disadvantaged child and then follow that through with effective education through the elementary and secondary years, letting success build on success, we could in twenty years provide a much firmer grounding for equal college opportunity than we have now. But of course we can’t wait twenty years. Young people are...   More >

A Critical Theory of Justice

Lecture | April 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 220 Stephens Hall

 Rainer Forst, Professor of Political Theory and Philosophy, Goethe Universität

 The Program in Critical Theory

In this lecture, Forst will reflect on some of the basic issues for a critical theory of justice. What are the basic normative concepts for such an approach, and does it proceed by way of immanent critique? What kind of social realism is required for it to be sociologically grounded? What notion of emancipation is driving it?

Rainer Forst is Professor of Political Theory and Philosophy at...   More >

HTNM Lecture with Eden Medina, "Technology and Forensic Evidence Chilean Human Rights Investigations": History and Theory of New Media Lecture Series

Lecture | April 13 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Eden Medina, Indiana University, Bloomington

 Center for New Media

In 1991, Chilean forensic scientists began the exhumation of 126 skeletons from Patio 29, a plot in the General Cemetery where the military ordered the burial of hundreds the disappeared and executed. The exhumations began shortly after Chile returned to democracy and provided proof of the human rights crimes that had taken place during the Pinochet dictatorship. By 2002, the Chilean government...   More >

Breathing New Life Into Ancient Instruments: Ocarinas of Mesoamerica

Lecture | April 13 | 5:30 p.m. | Badè Museum of Biblical Archaeology, Pacific School of Religion, Holbrook Hall

 1798 Scenic Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94709

 Jose Cuellar, Professor Emeritus of Latina/Latino Studies, San Francisco State University

 Badè Museum of Biblical Archaeology

The Badè Museum is proud to host Dr. Jose Cuellar, Professor Emeritus of Latina/Latino Studies at San Francisco State University for an evening discussion and demonstration of ancient musical instruments from Mesoamerica.In 2012, Dr. Jose Cuellar was awarded the prestigious Hrdy Curatorial Fellowship by Harvard University’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology to research and record a...   More >

Friday, April 14, 2017

Can You Sing the Brabançonne? The Politics of Linguistic Nationalism in Belgium

Lecture | April 14 | 9-10 a.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Christopher R. Jackson, Ph.D., De Anza College

 Institute of European Studies, European Union Center

A new sort of nationalism seems to be on the rise in Europe and the United States, one based on racial and religious differences. How does this differ from the “old nationalism” of Europe? How did nationalism originally arise in a bilingual country such as Belgium? What is the future of nationalism in Belgium, and has English become the unofficial language of Brussels? Chris Jackson will...   More >

Modeling the Impact of Major Technological and Infrastructural Changes on Travel Demand

Lecture | April 14 | 4-5 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Feras El Zarwi, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Transportation Studies