<< Week of January 20 >>

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Pseudorandomness Boot Camp

Workshop | January 17 – 20, 2017 every day |  Calvin Laboratory (Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing)

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

The Boot Camp is intended to acquaint program participants with the key themes of the program.

Organizers:
Jacob Fox (Stanford University), Ben Green (University of Oxford), Russell Impagliazzo (UC San Diego), Luca Trevisan (Simons Institute, UC Berkeley), Julia Wolf (University of Bristol), David Zuckerman (University of Texas, Austin).

  Register online

Instruction Begins

Course | January 17 |  UC Berkeley Campus

 Public Affairs

Chromatin dysregulation as driver of oncogenesis

Seminar | January 17 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 **Chao Lu**, The Rockefeller University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Marine Natural Products: Inspiration for Chemical and Biological Discovery

Seminar | January 17 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Joshua Pierce, Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University

 College of Chemistry

Marine natural products often have complex structures and potent biological activities; however, little is understood regarding how their molecular structure correlates with function or what biological targets or pathways are involved. Through rapid and efficient chemical syntheses of bioactive marine natural products we are able prepare ample quantities of material to explore both...   More >

Seminar 217, Risk Management: The Tax-Loss Harvesting Life Cycle: A 43-Year Retrospective of Equity Indexing Strategies for Taxable Investors

Seminar | January 17 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. | 639 Evans Hall

 Speaker: Lisa Goldberg (joint with Pete Hand & Alan Cummings), UC Berkeley & Aperio Group

 Center for Risk Management Research

Tax-loss harvesting aims to realize losses on individual stocks in conjunction with an investment objective such as index tracking. In this talk, we give a historical appraisal of the value of tax-loss harvesting to taxable investors with realized gains in their portfolios.

PMB Seminar : "Stressed! How plants acclimate through dynamic responses"

Seminar | January 17 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | Energy Biosciences Building, First Floor Conference Room

 Jose Dinneny, Carnegie Institution for Science

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

EH&S 403 Training Session

Course | January 17 | 1:30-2:30 p.m. | 370 University Hall

 Jason Smith, UC Berkeley Office of Environment, Health, & Safety

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This session briefly covers the UC Berkeley specific radiation safety information you will need to start work.​ In addition, dosimeter will be issued, if required.

An active approach to the self-assembly of colloidal matter

Seminar | January 17 | 2-4 p.m. | 100F Hildebrand Hall

 Mr. Stewart Mallory, Columbia University Department of Chemistry

 College of Chemistry

Student Harmonic Analysis and PDE Seminar (HADES): The lifespan of small data solutions for Benjamin-Ono

Seminar | January 17 | 3:40-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Mihaela Ifrim, UCB

 Department of Mathematics

This article represents a first step toward understanding the long time dynamics of solutions for the Benjamin-Ono equation. While this problem is known to be both completely integrable and globally well-posed in $L^2$, much less seems to be known concerning its long time dynamics. Here we prove that for small localized data the solutions have (nearly) dispersive dynamics almost globally in time....   More >

EPMS Weekly Seminar

Seminar | November 1, 2016 – December 5, 2017 every Tuesday | 5:10-6 p.m. | 212 O'Brien Hall

 Engineering and Project Management Society

Each week the Engineering and Project Management Society brings in a speaker to talk about topics related to construction and project management. Light refreshments will be provided.

Event is ADA accessible. For disability accommodation requests and information, please contact Disability Access Services by phone at 510.643.6456 (voice) or 510.642.6376 (TTY) or by email at...   More >

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Pseudorandomness Boot Camp

Workshop | January 17 – 20, 2017 every day |  Calvin Laboratory (Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing)

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

The Boot Camp is intended to acquaint program participants with the key themes of the program.

Organizers:
Jacob Fox (Stanford University), Ben Green (University of Oxford), Russell Impagliazzo (UC San Diego), Luca Trevisan (Simons Institute, UC Berkeley), Julia Wolf (University of Bristol), David Zuckerman (University of Texas, Austin).

  Register online

Computer Health Matters: User Friendly Workstations (BEUHS400)

Workshop | January 18 | 8:30-9:30 a.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Class of '42

 Greg Ryan, Ergonomics@Work; Mallory Lynch, Ergonomics@Work

 Ergonomics@Work, University Health Services

Learn how to set up a user-friendly workstation and practice stretches to help relieve computer-related aches and pains. This workshop is required to qualify for computer ergonomics matching funds.

  Register online

Keyboards and Mice: Ergonomic Alternatives (BEUHS401)

Workshop | January 18 | 9:45-10:45 a.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Class of '42

 Greg Ryan, Ergonomics@Work

 Ergonomics@Work, University Health Services

Learn about the ergonomics of keyboards and pointing devices, including appropriate workstation set-up, postures, and techniques for using them. Find out about the keyboards and pointing devices covered by the Computer Ergonomics Matching Funds Program.

  Register online

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research and Finding a Mentor Workshop

Workshop | January 18 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 1229 Dwinelle Hall

 Leah Carroll

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research

If you are thinking about getting involved in undergraduate research, this workshop is a great place to start! You will get a broad overview of the research opportunities available to undergraduates on campus, and suggestions on how to find them.

We will also let you know about upcoming deadlines and eligibility requirements for some of...   More >

Pasteur's quadrant: Advancing basic cognitive neuroscience with real-world relevance

Seminar | January 18 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Melina Uncapher, Assistant Professor of Neurology, UCSF CEO, Institute of Applied Neuroscience

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Researchers of cognition and the brain likely consider our efforts as advancing mechanistic understanding, with the hope that they will eventually impact real-world problems. However, this dichotomous viewpoint between basic and applied research is becoming less appropriate with increasing advances in science and technology, and increased dialog between researchers and practitioners. In this...   More >

Matrix Computations and Scientific Computing Seminar: Fastest algorithms for structured matrices via algebra

Seminar | January 18 | 11:10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 380 Soda Hall

 Lek-Heng Lim, University of Chicago

 Department of Mathematics

We show that in many instances, at the heart of a problem in numerical computation sits a special 3-tensor, the structure tensor of the problem that uniquely determines its underlying algebraic structure. For example, the Grothendieck constant, which plays an important role in unique games conjecture and SDP relaxations of NP-hard problems, arises as the spectral norm of such a structure tensor....   More >

The neurobiology of homeostasis

Seminar | January 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Zachary Knight, University of California, San Francisco

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Characterizing ion sequestration in mitochondria: A deep view into cell ultrastructure with cryo-scanning transmission electron tomography

Seminar | January 18 | 2-3 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Sharon Wolf, Senior Research Fellow and Head of the Electron Microscopy Unit, Weizmann Institute of Science

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Group actions on the circle and surfaces

Seminar | January 18 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Sebastian Hurtado, University of Chicago

 Department of Mathematics

A smooth group action on a manifold M is a group-morphism from a group G to the group of diffeomorphisms of M. If G = Z, the study of such actions is just the study of smooth dynamics and classification is impossible. However, if the group G is sufficiently rich or under some hypothesis in the type of action, classification is sometimes possible. A classical example is Holder's theorem (1901),...   More >

Applied Math Seminar: Nonequilibrium stochastic processes at single-molecule and single-cell levels

Seminar | January 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Hao Ge, Peking University

 Department of Mathematics

Stochastic process has a glorious history in physics, chemistry and biology. Due to the advance of single-molecule techniques, stochastic modeling and computation become more and more useful and popular recently. I will talk about several different issues related to stochastic processes at single-molecule and single-cell levels, including stochastic theory of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics,...   More >

Endogenous retroviruses as catalysts of gene regulatory evolution

Seminar | January 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 **Edward Chuong**, University of Utah

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Nonequilibrium stochastic processes at single-molecule and single-cell levels

Seminar | January 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Hao Ge, Peking University

 Department of Mathematics

Stochastic process has a glorious history in physics, chemistry and biology. Due to the advance of single-molecule techniques, stochastic modeling and computation become more and more useful and popular recently. I will talk about several different issues related to stochastic processes at single-molecule and single-cell levels, including stochastic theory of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics,...   More >

Seminar: Dr. Edward Chuong, University of Utah

Seminar | January 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Center for Computational Biology

Title: Endogenous retroviruses as catalysts of gene regulatory evolution

Abstract: Changes in gene regulatory networks underlie many biological adaptations, but the mechanisms promoting their emergence and evolution are not well understood. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are prolific genomic parasites that constitute 6-14% of vertebrate genomes, and harbor sequences capable of modulating...   More >

Number Theory Seminar: Integral relations between p-adic cohomology theories

Seminar | January 18 | 3:40-5 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Kestutis Cesnavicius, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

I will give an introduction to this semester's number theory learning seminar, whose goal is to discuss the relations that result from the techniques of Bhatt–Morrow–Scholze between different integral cohomology theories (p-adic etale, de Rham, crystalline...) of varieties over p-adic fields. Such relations may be viewed as refinements of the comparison theorems of "rational" p-adic Hodge...   More >

Kernel methods for spatiotemporal learning with public policy applications

Seminar | January 18 | 4-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Seth Flaxman, Department of Statistics, Oxford

 Department of Statistics

In this talk I will highlight the statistical machine learning methods that I am developing, in response to the needs of my social science collaborators, to address public policy questions. My research focuses on flexible nonparametric modeling approaches for spatiotemporal data and scalable inference methods to be able to fit these models to large datasets. Most critically, my models and...   More >

Michael Kiparsky-Colloquium

Colloquium | January 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 126 Barrows Hall

 Michael Kiparsky, Director, Wheeler Water Institute

 Energy and Resources Group

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): Burnside problem for diffeomorphism groups

Seminar | January 18 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Sebastian Hurtado, University of Chicago

 Department of Mathematics

Suppose G is a finitely generated group such that every element has finite order. Must G be a finite group?

This is known as the burnside problem, it was formulated around 1902 by Burnside himself and it was central in the development of group theory during the 20th century. The answer in general turned out to be negative, G might be infinite. Nonetheless, if one restricts G to be a linear group...   More >

From Direct Action to Social Movements

Panel Discussion | January 18 | 5-7 p.m. |  2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment)

 Rachel Herzing, Co-Director, Center for Political Education

 Danielle Mahones, Labor Education Specialist, Labor Center; Tina Sandoval, Worker Leader, Fight for $15

 American Cultures, UC Berkeley Labor Center, Office of Undergraduate Research

The AC Center and The UC Berkeley Labor Center are pleased to announce an evening discussion 'From Direct Action to Social Movements,' which will include a panel of community organizers, faculty and labor leaders, addressing movement building is created and sustained.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Pseudorandomness Boot Camp

Workshop | January 17 – 20, 2017 every day |  Calvin Laboratory (Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing)

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

The Boot Camp is intended to acquaint program participants with the key themes of the program.

Organizers:
Jacob Fox (Stanford University), Ben Green (University of Oxford), Russell Impagliazzo (UC San Diego), Luca Trevisan (Simons Institute, UC Berkeley), Julia Wolf (University of Bristol), David Zuckerman (University of Texas, Austin).

  Register online

RAPDP - Foundational - F1 Research Administration Overview

Course | January 19 | 9 a.m.-12 p.m. | University Hall, Room 24

 Human Resources

Synopsis: An introductory workshop that provides an overview of the RAPDP curriculum, roles and responsibilities of central campus offices, the award lifecycle, and the campus systems relevant to Research Administration.

  Register online

(CANCELED) IB SEMINAR: Title to be announced

Seminar | January 19 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building | Canceled

 (CANCELED) Robert Holt, University of Florida

 Department of Integrative Biology

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research and Finding a Mentor Workshop

Workshop | January 19 | 1-2 p.m. | 1229 Dwinelle Hall

 Leah Carroll

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research

If you are thinking about getting involved in undergraduate research, this workshop is a great place to start! You will get a broad overview of the research opportunities available to undergraduates on campus, and suggestions on how to find them.

We will also let you know about upcoming deadlines and eligibility requirements for some of...   More >

Student Applied Math Seminar: Mathematical Introduction to Many Body Perturbation Theory

Seminar | January 19 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Lin Lin, University of California, Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

In this series of lectures, we discuss quantum many body perturbation theory from a mathematical perspective. The starting point is Feynman diagrams for Gaussian integrals. This only requires the knowledge of freshman calculus. Then assuming basic knowledge of quantum mechanics, we discuss Feynman diagrams for quantum statistical mechanics, and proceed to many body perturbation theory for...   More >

Seminar 251, Labor: "The More We Die, The More We Sell? A Simple Test of the Home-Market Effect"

Seminar | January 19 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Haas School of Business, C325 Cheit Hall | Note change in time and location

 Heidi Williams, MIT

 Department of Economics

joint w/ Haas Oliver Williamson Seminar - C325 Cheit Hall

Job Market Seminar: "The Numerical Delta Method and Bootstrap"

Seminar | January 19 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Jessie Li, Stanford University - Economics

 Department of Economics

Field(s): Econometrics, Machine Learning

Mathematics Department Colloquium: Calabi-Yau metrics and algebraic singularities

Colloquium | January 19 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Song Sun, Stony Brook

 Department of Mathematics

A Calabi-Yau manifold is a compact complex manifold with trivial canonical bundle. Yau’s solution to the Calabi conjecture gives rise to canonical Ricci-flat Kahler metric (Calabi-Yau metric) on such a manifold, and this has deep applications in algebraic geometry and mathematical physics. It is an interesting question to understand how the Ricci-flat metrics develop singularities when the...   More >

Applied Algebra Seminar: Does Antibiotic Resistance Evolve in Hospitals?

Seminar | January 19 | 5:15-6:15 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Bernd Sturmfels, University of California, Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

We present a joint paper with Anna Seigal, Portia Mira and Miriam Barlow, aimed at addressing the question in the title. Nosocomial outbreaks of bacteria and the heavy usage of antibiotics suggest that resistance evolves in hospital environments. To test this assumption, we studied resistance phenotypes of bacteria collected from patient isolates at a community hospital. A graphical model...   More >

“Separating fact from fantasy: Is fake news undermining the truth?”

Panel Discussion | January 19 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Laura Sydell, digital culture correspondent, National Public Radio

Edward Wasserman, moderator, Graduate School of Journalism

 Adam Mosseri, Vice president of News Feed, Facebook; Craig Newmark, Web pioneer, speaker and philanthropist; Catherine Crump, professor and co-director, Berkeley Law’s Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic; Jeffrey MacKie-Mason, University Librarian, Chief Digital Scholarship Officer, University Library

 Graduate School of Journalism, Library

Incentives to spread misinformation include great financial and political gain. Do tech companies and news sites have the ability and/or the responsibility to contain a flood of inaccuracy? Can they without bias or censorship?

 Space is limited.

Friday, January 20, 2017

Pseudorandomness Boot Camp

Workshop | January 17 – 20, 2017 every day |  Calvin Laboratory (Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing)

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

The Boot Camp is intended to acquaint program participants with the key themes of the program.

Organizers:
Jacob Fox (Stanford University), Ben Green (University of Oxford), Russell Impagliazzo (UC San Diego), Luca Trevisan (Simons Institute, UC Berkeley), Julia Wolf (University of Bristol), David Zuckerman (University of Texas, Austin).

  Register online

Essig Brunch: Dr. Carolina Reisenman, MCB Dept.: Kissing bugs and risk of Chagas Disease transmission in southwestern USA, and tools for monitoring and control

Seminar | January 20 | 10-11 a.m. | 1101 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Dr. Carolina Reisenman, Associate Researcher, Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology

 Entomology, Essig Museum of, Entomology Students' Organization

The Entomology Students' Organization is pleased to present the Essig Brunch, UC Berkeley's only entomology-themed seminar series. Join us once a week to hear about exciting new research on a broad range of insect-related topics, from evolution to conservation to ecology to pest management, and much more. Refreshments are provided and all are welcome!

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research and Finding a Mentor Workshop

Workshop | January 20 | 10-11 a.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research

If you are thinking about getting involved in undergraduate research, this workshop is a great place to start! You will get a broad overview of the research opportunities available to undergraduates on campus, and suggestions on how to find them.

We will also let you know about upcoming deadlines and eligibility requirements for some of...   More >

Cognition Colloquium: Can science explain the human mind? Intuitive judgments about the limits of science.

Colloquium | January 20 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Department of Psychology

Can science ever fully explain romantic love, morality, and religious belief? What about motor skills or perception? In this talk, I will present research documenting intuitive beliefs about the limits of science in explaining the human mind.

Conversation with Dr. Fatima Alleyne about Equity and Justice in Education: Motivation to be a Changemaker

Seminar | January 20 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 240 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Department of Mechanical Engineering (ME)

Dr. Fatima Alleyne will speak at UC Berkeley on Jan. 20, addressing her experiences running a grass roots effort for office. With a message to push for equity and justice, Dr. Fatima Alleyne was elected to the Contra Costa County Board of Education, Area 1 in the last election. She won over 46% of the vote. She received many endorsements, including the East Bay Times. She was also recognized as a...   More >

Academic Engagement for Our Changing Times

Panel Discussion | January 20 | 2-3:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, Equity & Inclusion, and American Cultures Center

Academic Engagement for Our Changing Times is a faculty panel planned for Inauguration Day to discuss the ways in which our academic lives and work might be affected in these changing political times. Moderated by Na’ilah Nasir, Vice Chancellor for Equity & Inclusion and co-chair of the HIFIS Race, Diversity and Educational Policy cluster, this session is designed to...   More >

Student Arithmetic Geometry Seminar: Organizational Meeting

Seminar | January 20 | 2-3 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Martin Olsson, UCB

 Department of Mathematics

This semester we will again have a paper seminar. I will hand out the list of papers at the meeting, and we will organize the schedule of talks.

How Chemistry Can Revolutionize Electronics and Opto-Electronics: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | January 20 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Prof. Eli Yablonovitch, UC Berkeley, EECS

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

Since the beginning of Solid State Electronics, with the invention of the transistor, chemical bonding structures have actually played the key enabling role. This lecture will outline how chemical bonds were critical for the computing revolution, the internet revolution, and are of great importance for the forthcoming energy revolution. I will try to answer the following question: What does...   More >

Job Market Seminar: "The Unequal Gains from Product Innovations: Evidence from the US Retail Sector"

Seminar | January 20 | 2:10-3:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall | Note change in time

 Xavier Jaravel, Harvard University - Economics

 Department of Economics

Field(s): Labor Economics, Public Economics, Economics of Innovation, Macroeconomics

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research and Finding a Mentor Workshop

Workshop | January 20 | 3-4 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research

If you are thinking about getting involved in undergraduate research, this workshop is a great place to start! You will get a broad overview of the research opportunities available to undergraduates on campus, and suggestions on how to find them.

We will also let you know about upcoming deadlines and eligibility requirements for some of...   More >

Mechanistic and Electronic Structural Insights into the Metallobiochemistry of Nitrification

Seminar | January 20 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Kyle Lancaster, Department of Chemistry, Cornell University

 College of Chemistry

Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate, is a key entry point for fixed nitrogen to return to the atmosphere as dinitrogen. Nitrification is the root of tremendous economic loss in agriculture as well as a major ecological hazard via nitrogenous eutrophication. Molecular details concerning the elementary, multi-electron chemical steps whereby ammonia is oxidized to...   More >

Analysis Seminar: Spectral gap without the pressure condition

Seminar | January 20 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall | Note change in location

 Semyon Dyatlov, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Department of Mathematics

We show that every convex co-compact hyperbolic surface has an essential spectral gap. This means there exists some $\beta >0$, depending on the surface, such that the Selberg zeta function has only finitely many zeroes with $\Re s > 1/2 - \beta $. This is the first result of this kind that makes no restrictions on the dimension $ \delta $ of the corresponding limit set. Previously gaps were...   More >

RTGC Seminar: Mirror symmetry for minuscule flag varieties

Seminar | January 20 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Nicholas Templier, Cornell

 Department of Mathematics

We prove cases of Rietsch mirror conjecture that the Dubrovin-Givental quantum connection for projective homogeneous varieties is isomorphic to the pushforward D-module attached to Berenstein-Kazhdan geometric crystals. The idea is to recognize the quantum connection as Galois and the geometric crystal as automorphic. The isomorphism then comes from global rigidity results where a Hecke eigenform...   More >

Saturday, January 21, 2017

Amgen Biotech Experience Workshop: Teacher Professional Development: Abridged ABE Series

Workshop | January 21 – 22, 2017 every day | 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | 150 Lawrence Hall of Science

 Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS)

This event is open to all Bay Area high school science teachers interested in teaching the Amgen Biotech Experience curriculum (amgenbiotechexperience.com). The curriculum includes basic biotechnology laboratories and techniques through the lens of learning about diabetes and the manufacturing of insulin through recombinant technology. This workshop...   More >

Semiotic Circle of California

Conference/Symposium | January 21 | 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. | Faculty Club, Seaborg Room

 Department of German

University of California, Berkeley
Seaborg Room, Faculty Club


9:30 Denise Warren (UC San Diego): “The Outlaw Couple in Film Noir: Gun Crazy (Joseph H.Lewis, 1950)”

9:50 Ritwik Banerji (UC Berkeley): “Two Divergent Interpretants of Egalitarian Ethics in Musical Free Improvisation”

10:10 William Watt (UC Irvine): "Semiotic Sets & Supersets: An Assessment."

10:30 Cara Tovey (UC...   More >

Critter Corner

Workshop | December 31, 2016 – May 27, 2017 every Saturday | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | Lawrence Hall of Science, Niche Classroom

 Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS)

What is it like to live underwater? How does it feel to warm yourself on a rock? Get an introduction to the living world by meeting small mammals, reptiles, and arthropods. In the Critter Corner, which is perfect for ages 8 and under, you can observe how animals move, feel, and eat. Read stories and role-play with toy animals and habitats so that you can better understand animal life.

Animal Discovery Room at the Lawrence Hall of Science