<< October 2019 >>

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

From Revolution to Routine? Patterns of German Democracy in the 20th Century

Lecture | October 1 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Lutz Raphael, Trier University, Germany

 Institute of European Studies, Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington, Center for German and European Studies, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Lutz Raphael explores the specificities of 100 years of German Democracy. Modern democracy develops under the double impact of revolutionary moments and everyday routines. To better understand the interplay between these two central elements in the history of German Democracy three different layers of temporality or change are taken into consideration. Firstly, four moments of revolutionary...   More >

Lutz Raphael

Voices of Vietnam: A Century of Radio, Red Songs, and Revolution

Lecture | October 1 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Lonan O'Briain, Associate Professor of Music, University of Nottingham

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This lecture reconstructs an oral history of music production processes and listening practices during the Second Indochina War, when radio was the principal mass medium for sound-based communications and the primary source for new music. The research draws on interviews with current and former employees of the Voice of Vietnam radio, supplemented by recent print collections and archival documents.

Lonan O'Briain

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

What do Climate Change and Girls’ Education have to do with Food Security in the Sahel?

Lecture | October 2 | 12-2 p.m. | 5101 Berkeley Way West

 Daniel Perlman, PhD, Centre for Girls Education; Lawali Nassourou, PhD, University Abdou Moumouni; Alisha Graves, MPH, The OASIS Initiative

 The Bixby Center for Population, Health and Sustainability

Agricultural strategies and environmental change in the ancient eastern Mediterranean

Lecture | October 2 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 John M. Marston, Associate Professor, Anthropology, Boston University

 Archaeological Research Facility

Marston presents recent work from an ancient urban center in central Anatolia (modern Turkey), where complex agricultural strategies were employed to adapt to coincident environmental and social change on both local and regional scales.

Townsend Book Chat with Alva Noë: Infinite Baseball: Notes from a Philosopher at the Ballpark

Lecture | October 2 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Noë explores the many unexpected ways in which baseball is truly a philosophical kind of game — a window on language, culture, and the nature of human action, intertwined with deep and fundamental human truths.

Fung Institute presents: Engineering Leadership Speaking Series

Lecture | September 4 – December 4, 2019 every Wednesday with exceptions | 4-5:30 p.m. | 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership

Join UC Berkeley Master of Engineering students for an executive speaker series with leaders from different technology industries. The technology industry forms a vital part of the Northern California economy and these sessions provide an opportunity to deepen your understanding and connections. Engage with innovative leaders from top companies, deepen your industry and functional knowledge and...   More >

Ancient Amazons: Warrior Women in Myth, Art, and Archaeology

Lecture | October 2 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Adrienne Mayor, Stanford University

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Fierce Amazons are featured in some of the most famous Greek myths.
Every great hero, from Heracles to Achilles, battled these powerful warrior queens.
But were Amazons real? Join Adrienne Mayor as she recounts tales of women warriors and uncovers some realities behind the myths.

Janaki Bakhle | Gandhi, Savarkar and the Muslim Question: Celebrating the 150th Birth Anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi

Lecture | October 2 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Janaki Bakhle, Associate Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies; Associate Professor in the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Center for Initiative on Political Conflict, Gender and People's Rights Race and Gender, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Center for British Studies, Department of History

A talk by Professor Janaki Bakhle, Associate Professor of History at UC Berkeley.

Thursday, October 3, 2019

Lecture and Lecture-Demonstration with Dr. I Wayan Dibia, I Wayan Suweca, and Ni Made Wirathini, moderated by Dr. Lisa Gold: New Trends and Current Directions in Balinese Performing Arts

Lecture | October 3 | 3 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

Dr. I Wayan Dibia, renowned dancer and scholar will discuss ways that the contemporary Balinese performance scene incorporates past traditions while constantly innovating. In Bali the concept of “tradition” is defined by personal innovations in which performers explore their relationships with past practices in terms of the contemporary world. Dr. Dibia will present the latest trends in Balinese...   More >

Moscow Has Ears Everywhere: Olga Ivinskaya and the loss of Pasternak’s 'will'

Lecture | October 3 | 5-6 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Paolo Mancosu, Willis S. and Marion Slusser Professor of Philosophy, UC Berkeley; Harsha Ram, Associate Professor of Slavic and Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Program for the Study of Italy

The struggle between the Soviet Communist Party and Boris Pasternak over the publication of Doctor Zhivago did not end when he won the Nobel Prize, or even with his death. After the prize the Soviets vilified and impoverished him. After his death, they turned against Olga Ivinskaya, his literary assistant, companion, and the model for Zhivago’s Lara, sending her and her daughter to a labor camp...   More >

Paolo Mancosu

Deioces’ Ultimatum: How to Choose a King

Lecture | October 3 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Josiah Ober, Mitsotakis Professor of Classics and Political Science, Stanford University

 Department of Classics

The Sather Classical Lectures, part 3.

Astronomy Night at UC Berkeley

Lecture | October 3 | 7-9:30 p.m. | 131 Campbell Hall

 Miguel Zumalacarregui, UC Berkeley

 Department of Astronomy

This month's Astronomy Night @ UC Berkeley features a talk by Marie Curie Global Fellow Miguel Zumalacarregui. He'll discuss gravitational waves, the effort to detect them, and how they are providing new means of testing Einstein's ideas about gravity.

Friday, October 4, 2019

Julia Miele Rodas, “Autism and Narrative Invention in Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe.”

Lecture | October 4 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 330 Wheeler Hall

 Julia Miele Rodas, Professor, English Department, Bronx Community College / CUNY co-chair, University Seminar in Disability, Culture, and Society at Columbia University

 Department of English

Abstract: Is the novel a form of autistic innovation? Presenting work from the recently published Autistic Disturbances (UMichP, 2018), Julia Miele Rodas will explore autistic dimensions of Robinson Crusoe. Interweaving conversation and formal reading, this talk will first consider how the novel’s themes of human isolation and imprisonment play into autism stereotypes. Ultimately, however, the...   More >

Narkomania: Drugs, HIV, and Citizenship in Ukraine

Lecture | October 4 | 12:30-2 p.m. | Kroeber Hall, Garron Reading Room (346)

 Jennifer J. Carroll, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Elon University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), UCB Medical Anthropology Program, Berkeley Center for Social Medicine

In the last few years, Ukraine has born witness to the major geopolitical crises of our decade: revolution; state-sponsored killings; foreign invasion; forceful occupation by a major world power; and ongoing war. Ukraine is also experiencing an enormous opioid epidemic and is home to the fastest growing HIV epidemic in the world. Despite all of our differences, Ukraine’s ongoing struggles with...   More >

Monday, October 7, 2019

Dark Pasts: Changing the State’s Story in Turkey and Japan

Lecture | October 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Jennifer M. Dixon, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Villanova University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

Over the past two decades, many states have heard demands that they recognize and apologize for historic wrongs. Such calls have not elicited uniform or predictable responses. While some states have apologized for past crimes, others continue to silence, deny, and relativize dark pasts. What explains the tremendous variation in how states deal with past crimes? When and why do states change the...   More >

Lecture - The Law of the Sea: A Multi-Faceted Discipline and a Promising Field for Practitioners

Lecture | October 7 | 12:50-2 p.m. | Simon Hall, Warren Room (295)

 Berkeley Law - Center for Law, Energy & the Environment

Join us at Berkeley Law for a lecture on ocean law & policy with Judge Tullio Treves, who served on the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea from 1996 to 2011. Lunch is catered and a reception will follow the lecture. RSVP at law.berkeley.edu/scheiberlecture

BIDS Forum: Statistics and Machine Learning Forum

Lecture | October 7 | 1:30-2:30 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Full details about this meeting will be posted here: https://bids.berkeley.edu/events.

Inequality and Habitus in Thailand

Lecture | October 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Boike Rehbein, Professor of Society and Transformation in Asia and Africa, Humboldt University

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Thailand is a country of the global South but has never come under colonial rule, even as it emulates Western modernization. The result is a double-faced social structure, one part consisting of a precapitalist structure (baan muang) and the other comprising a hierarchy of social classes. People manage to move between the two components. This talk will explore Thai social structure and the...   More >

Prof. Dr. Boike Rehbein

Raghu Karnad | Reporting Against the Machine: Decoding 2019 and the Future of Indian Elections

Lecture | October 7 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Raghu Karnad, Journalist and Writer

 Abhishek Kaicker, Assistant Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Art Forum SF, Masters of Development Practice

A talk by Indian journalist and writer, and a recipient of the Windham–Campbell Literature Prize for Non-Fiction for 2019, Raghu Karnad on the real factors behind the 2019 election result, and their implications for the future of India’s democracy.

Transcending Patterns: Silk Road Cultural and Artistic Interactions through Central Asian Textile Images

Lecture | October 7 | 5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Mariachiara Gasparini, San Jose State University

 Joyce Ertel Hulbert, Textile Conservator

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Tang Center for Silk Road Studies, UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

In her book "Transcending Patterns: Silk Road Cultural and Artistic Interactions through Central Asian Textiles," author Mariachiara Gasparini investigates the origin and effects of a textile mediated visual culture that developed at the heart of the Silk Road between the seventh and fourteenth centuries. Through the analysis of the Turfan Textile Collection in the Museum of Asian Art in...   More >

Transcending Patterns cover

I Was Brought Here to Stay: Nona Faustine

Lecture | October 7 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Nona Faustine, Artist

 Arts + Design

Presented by the UC Berkeley Department of Art Practice

Nona Faustine, Artist

Situated inside a photographic tradition while questioning the culture that bred that tradition, Nona Faustine’s practice walks the fine line between past and present, beginning where intersecting identities meet history. Exploring her family album in relationship to collective belonging, and self-portraiture in...   More >

Half-Earth Day: How to Save the Natural World

Lecture | October 7 | 7-9 p.m. |  Zellerbach Hall

 Edward O. Wilson, Biologist and Naturalist; Sally Jewell, Interim Chief Executive Officer, The Nature Conservancy

 College of Natural Resources

Presented by The Horace M. Albright Lecture in Conservation and the James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Foundation Distinguished Lectureship in Biodiversity, with biologist and naturalist Edward O. Wilson and other special guests for a discussion moderated by Sally Jewell.

General admission $25, Students $15

  Tickets go on sale September 4. Buy tickets online

E.O. Wilson

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

From the Inside Out: (Some of) What I have learned in 23 years of Research with Youth Experiencing Homelessness

Lecture | October 8 | 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Berkeley Way West

 Public Health, School of

Colette (Coco) Auerswald, MD, MS, Associate Professor in the School of Public Health at UCB where she is co-Director and co-Founder of i4Y (Innovations for Youth, i4y.berkeley.edu), a collaborative academic/community hub focused on improving youth wellbeing through structural change. She is a pediatrician and specialist in adolescent medicine. For the last twenty years, she has studied the social...   More >

Social Impact, Social Justice and Organizational Decisions with Robert Reich

Lecture | October 8 | 12-1 p.m. | B100 Blum Hall

 Robert Reich, Chancellor's Professor of Public Policy and Blum Center Senior Fellow

 Blum Center for Developing Economies, Center for Responsible Business at Haas

Join the Blum Center Perspectives event featuring Robert Reich, Chancellor's Professor of Public Policy and Blum Center Senior Fellow. What are the differences between social impact and social justice? How do organizations or movements understand the achievement of either goal? And do the differences between the terms matter significantly? Robert Reich provides history, context, nuance.

Advancing the 60-year Curriculum: How long should the relationship between a student and their university last?

Lecture | October 8 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Oakland City Center’s Conference Center, Suite 105, Paramount Conference Room

 555 12th Street, Oakland, CA

 Gary Matkin, Vice Provost, Division of Career Pathways, and Dean, Division of Continuing Education,, UC Irvine

 UCOP

According to Gary Matkin, Ph.D. — vice provost, Division of Career Pathways, and dean, Division of Continuing Education, UC Irvine — at least 60 years.

His novel concept, the 60-year curriculum (60YC), is gaining recognition across institutions as more people find value in the concept of lifelong learning. The 60YC calls for universities to remain relevant to students throughout their lives as...   More >

  RSVP online

The Problem of Democracy and the Politics of Neoliberalism

Lecture | October 8 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Thomas Biebricher, Professor of Political Theory and Philosophy at the Goethe University, Frankfurt

 The Program in Critical Theory, Department of Political Science, International and Area Studies (IAS)

Neoliberal thinkers developed numerous agendas for the reform of – most notably – democracy and the state. But what is the neoliberal view of politics and, especially, the kind of politics that would bring about these reforms? This is the main question that the talk seeks to address; it does so in three sections. The starting point is a theoretical and historical conceptualization of...   More >

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Zelia Nuttall, The Drake Plate of Brass, and the Hunt for Drake's Fair Bay

Lecture | October 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility) | Canceled

 Melissa Darby, Visiting Research Scholar, Department of Anthropology, Portland State University

 Archaeological Research Facility

The theory that Francis Drake and the crew of the Golden Hind landed in California was not always universally accepted. In the early twentieth century new clues to Drake’s movements in the Pacific came to light with the findings of anthropologist Zelia Nuttall, one of the founders of the anthropology department at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research in Mexican and European...   More >

Neoliberalism, Ordoliberalism, and the Future of the European Union

Lecture | October 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Thomas Biebricher, Professor of Political Theory and Philosophy at the Goethe University, Frankfurt

 The Program in Critical Theory, Department of Political Science, International and Area Studies (IAS)

In this seminar we will investigate the role that neoliberal, ordoliberal and conservative ideas play in the political economy of the European Union. This entails an examination of the basic set up of European Union and Eurozone and how they correspond to neoliberal designs of a supranational federation, and, particularly, an analysis of the institutional restructuring of the Eurozone in response...   More >

EVENT CANCELED: Raj Rewal | Alternate Modernity: Space, Structures, Sustainability and Traditional Values

Lecture | October 9 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Raj Rewal, Architect

 Andrew Shanken, Professor of Architecture and Acting Vice-Chair for Faculty, College of Environmental Design; Atreyee Gupta, Assistant Professor of Global Modern Art and South and Southeast Asian Art, History of Art Department

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, South Asia Art Initiative, Department of History of Art, College of Environmental Design, Global Urban Humanities

A talk by one of India's best-known architects, Raj Rewal

LAEP Lecture Series: Brad Samuels

Lecture | October 9 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Wed, Oct 9, 6:30pm - Brad Samuels is Founding Partner at SITU. Trained as an architect, he leads a team of designers, computer scientists, researchers and researchers and planners to develop new tools and methods for human rights fact finding and reportin

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Aza Raskin: Human Protective Design

Lecture | October 10 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Aza Raskin

 Arts + Design

Aza Raskin, cofounder of Center for Humane Technology

This week’s speaker is Aza Raskin, a cofounder of the Center for Humane Technology, which is leading the charge in reversing the digital attention crisis and realigning technology with humanity’s best interests. Among his previous accomplishments, Raskin helped build the web at Mozilla as head of user experience; foundin Massive Health (an...   More >

EVENT CANCELED - Purushottam Agrawal | In Vernacular: Kabir, Mahabharata and much more

Lecture | October 10 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) | Canceled

 Purushottam Agrawal, Writer and Scholar

 Robert Goldman, Professor of Sanskrit and Catherine and William L. Magistretti Distinguished Professor in South & Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Catherine and William L. Magistretti Distinguished Professor in South and Southeast Asian Studies, The Saraswati Dalmia Graduate Student Support Fund for South and Southeast Asian Studies

A talk by renowned Hindi literary historian and scholar of Kabir and Bhakti, Prof. Purushottam Agrawal

DCRP / Terner Center Lecture: Lawrence Vale

Lecture | October 10 | 5:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Does Public Housing Redevelopment Purge the Poorest?

Cleisthenes’ Wager: Democratic Rationality

Lecture | October 10 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Josiah Ober, Mitsotakis Professor of Classics and Political Science, Stanford University

 Department of Classics

The Sather Classical Lectures, part 4.

Poetry and the Senses Program Launch|Readings and Conversation: Featuring Indira Allegra, Chiyuma Elliott, and Robert Hass

Lecture | October 10 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Library

 Indira Allegra; Chiyuma Elliott; Robert Hass

 Arts Research Center, Engaging the Senses Foundation

Join the Arts Research Center for the launch party celebrating our new “Poetry and the Senses” program, sponsored by the Engaging the Senses Foundation! This event will include local poets Indira Allegra, Chiyuma Elliott, and Robert Hass, who will offer readings and comments followed by a conversation.

Indira Allegra, Chiyuma Elliott, & Robert Hass

Lecture - Sudan on the Path of Democratic Transition: Crises, Challenges, Solutions (Arabic)

Lecture | October 10 | 7-8:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Dr. Barakat Mousa ElHawati

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Dr. Barakat Mousa ElHawati earned his PhD in Administrative Law at Université Rennes-I in France in 1978. He was the dean of the College of Law at Juba University when it was located in Khartoum, and founded and headed the Scientific Assembly for the College of Law in Sudan.

In his lecture, Dr. Elhawati will discuss the aspects of the crisis that Sudan is currently suffering from. He will...   More >

Friday, October 11, 2019

CANCELED - Sandhya Gajjar and Rahul Gajjar | Champaner-Pavagadh: From the unknown to the well-known

Lecture | October 11 | 12-2 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) | Canceled

 Sandhya Gajjar, Curator and art historian; Rahul Gajjar, Photographer

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, South Asia Art Initiative at UC Berkeley, Department of History of Art, Art Forum SF

Talk on the archeological, heritage, environmental, architectural aspects of Champaner-Pavagadh as well as the man-heritage conflict issues raised.

How Language Centers Thrive: Notes from the Field

Lecture | October 11 | 3-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 (Classroom side)

 Rosemary Feal, Executive Director Emerita, Modern Language Association

 Berkeley Language Center

During my years as executive director of the Modern Language Association, I learned a great deal about what makes language teaching effective on college and university campuses in the United States. I recently completed a project looking at language centers to determine what makes them thrive, what challenges they face, and what role they might play in the future as language departments are...   More >

Monday, October 14, 2019

Cities of the Dead: The Moscow and Paris Cemeteries

Lecture | October 14 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Olga Matich, Professor Emerita of Slavic, Professor of the Graduate School, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

The third lecture in the Fall 2019 Slavic Graduate Colloquium Series.

Gauri Mahulikar | Ramakatha in the Oral Tradition of Maharashtra

Lecture | October 14 | 4-6 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Gauri Mahulikar, Sanskrit Scholar and Officiating Vice Chancellor & Dean of Faculty, Chinmaya Vishwavidyapeeth

 Robert Goldman, Professor of Sanskrit and Catherine and William L. Magistretti Distinguished Professor in South & Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Catherine and William L. Magistretti Distinguished Professor in South and Southeast Asian Studies, Townsend Working Group “South Asia Studies: Theories and Methods

A talk by eminent scholar of Sanskrit, Prof. Gauri Mahulikar

Contemporary Indigenous Arts Showcase with Tanya Lukin Linklater and Friends

Lecture | October 14 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Tanya Lukin Linklater; Sarah Biscarra Dilley; Alan Palaez Lopez; Patrick V. Naranjo; Beth Piatote

 Arts + Design

Presented by the UC Berkeley America Indian Graduate Program and Native American Studies

Tanya Lukin Linklater, Artist; Alutiiq; Native Villages of Afognak and Port Lions.
Sarah Biscarra Dilley, Artist, Independent Curator, Writer.
Alan Palaez Lopez, Poet, Visual Performance Artist; Comparative Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley.
Patrick V. Naranjo, Santa Clara Pueblo; Executive Director of UC...   More >

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Thermal thresholds increase the vulnerability of coastal Los Angeles to temperature-linked increases in West Nile virus transmission

Lecture | October 15 | 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Berkeley Way West

 Public Health, School of

Dr. Skaff is a postdoctoral scholar in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences in the Berkeley School of Public Health. His expertise spans the ecology, evolution and epidemiology of vector-borne diseases in changing environments.

Temperature variation across critical threshold ranges can generate highly localized discontinuities in infectious disease transmission. Here, we present...   More >

Book Talk with Michelle Steinbeck: My Father was a Man on Land and a Whale in the Water

Lecture | October 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 303 Doe Library

 Library, Institute of European Studies

Michelle Steinbeck is a Swiss author, curator, and editor whose 2016 debut novel My Father was a Man on Land and a Whale in the Water (Mein Vater war ein Mann an Land und im Wasser ein Walfisch), published by Lenos Verlag, was nominated for both the Swiss and the German Book Prize. It has been described by one reviewer as ". . .one of the most audacious, exuberant and thrilling novels I’ve read...   More >

Ali Asgar (Tara) | In Between Lands and Territories: Love, Loss and Survival

Lecture | October 15 | 5-7 p.m. | 10 Stephens Hall

 Ali Asgar (Tara), Transdisciplinary artist and cultural producer

 Lawrence Cohen, Professor in Anthropology and South and Southeast Asian Studies and the co-director of the Medical Anthropology Program

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, The South Asia Art Initiative, Arts Research Center

A talk by Ali Asgar (Tara), a transdisciplinary artist and cultural producer whose work focuses primarily on the body and the relationship between body and space.

Beyond the Pressure to Perform: On the Concept of "Leistung" in 19th Century Germany

Lecture | October 15 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Nina Verheyen, Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities (KWI), Essen, Germany

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington

"Leistung" is a key concept of public debates in Germany today, and even though the term itself has a rather neutral or positive meaning – « work performance » would be an adequate translation – the debates it is used in very often have a negative connotation. These debates deal with the quantification of performance in so-called neoliberal times, the spreading of all forms of competition...   More >

Nina Verheyen

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Blade(let) Makers and Communities of Practice at Kharaneh IV

Lecture | October 16 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Felicia De Peña, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

Educational processes like teaching and learning are important components of enculturational processes. The act of learning a skill, practicing the skill in daily life, and transmitting a body of knowledge is a dynamic and ever-changing representation of sociocultural practices that reflects the doxa and habitus of a practicing group. In this talk, I will discuss the current methods I employ to...   More >

Job Competency Training and Inequality: How California Can Lead

Lecture | October 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Barrows Hall, 8th Floor, Social Science Matrix Conference Room

 Heather Hiles, Calbright College

 Center for Studies in Higher Education

Calbright College President & CEO Heather Hiles will discuss how California's newest community college is shaking up traditional approaches to competency-based education (CBE). Calbright is designed to connect stranded California workers to better-paying careers with full benefits, serving a demographic traditionally unable to access higher education, specifically the California Community College...   More >

  RSVP online

Armenians in Ethiopia: Foreignness, Politics, and the Making of a Homeland in Diaspora

Lecture | October 16 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Boris Adjemian, Director, AGBU Nubar Library (Paris)

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

In the academic literature and typologies, the Armenian diaspora is widely characterized as a classical example of trading diaspora, middlemen minority, and/or victim diaspora. In this conception diasporas are supposed to be de-territorialized, inextricably linked to the remote fatherland of their ancestors, whereas their attachment to the host society would remain superficial and depoliticized....   More >

Townsend Book Chat with Stephen Best: None Like Us: Blackness, Belonging, Aesthetic Life

Lecture | October 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Questioning the assumption that the slave past provides an explanatory prism for understanding the black political present, Best offers a new way of understanding the constitution of black subjectivity.

Jefferson Memorial Lecture featuring Paul Butler: Prison Abolition, and a Mule

Lecture | October 16 | 4:10 p.m. |  Bancroft Hotel, Great Hall

 2680 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Paul Butler, The Albert Brick Professor in Law, Georgetown Law

 Graduate Division

Paul Butler will present the Jefferson lecture on Wednesday, October 16, 2019. The lecture, entitled "Prison Abolition, and a Mule," will be held in the Great Hall of the Bancroft Hotel and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Paul Butler

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Refik Anadol: Space in the Mind of a Machine

Lecture | October 17 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Refik Anadol

 Arts + Design

Refik Anadol, artist, director

A talk by Refik Anadol, an Istanbul-born media artist, director, and pioneer in the aesthetics of machine intelligence. Anadol’s work locates creativity at the intersection of humans and machines. In taking the data that flows around us as his primary material and the neural network of a computerized mind as his collaborator, Anadol paints with a thinking brush,...   More >

Bancroft Library Roundtable: An Invaluable Resource: Reporting on Recent Archival Processing of Environmental Collections at The Bancroft Library

Lecture | October 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Lisa Monhoff, Environmental Collections Project Archivist, The Bancroft Library

 Bancroft Library

The University of California at Berkeley’s Bancroft Library is a leading resource in documenting U.S. environmental movements and home to the records of many significant environmental organizations and the papers of a range of environmental activists. This talk will focus on the recently processed records of grassroots conservation campaigns whose collections range from the 1960s to 2000s.

 The Lewis Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

Nazism: A Dark Comedy in Liechtenstein

Lecture | October 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Edith Sheffer, Institute of European Studies

 Institute of European Studies, Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington

Humor, whether dark or satirical, can be a trenchant analytical device. It is a tool for exposing facades, revealing contradictions between envisioned and actual reality. Satires of Nazism have been especially resonant, and controversial — from Charlie Chaplin’s "The Great Dictator" to Hannah Arendt’s "Eichmann in Jerusalem". They upend familiar narratives, pointing to human folly at the heart of...   More >

Edith Sheffer

Tripodi Lecture on Research Methodologies: Developing Empathetic Tech with Communities of Color for Gun Violence Prevention: A social work approach

Lecture | October 17 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | Haviland Hall, Haviland Commons

 Dr. Desmond Patton, The Columbia School of Social Work, Columbia University

 Social Welfare, School of

Desmond Upton Patton is Associate Professor at Columbia University. His research uses qualitative and computational data collection methods to examine the relationship between youth and gang violence and social media; how and why violence, grief, and identity are expressed on social media; and the real-world impact these expressions have on well-being for low-income youth of color. He studies the...   More >

  RSVP online or or by emailing Lia Swindle at lia.swindle@berkeley.edu

From Bat-Mitzvah to the Bar:: How Religion Shapes Women's Educational Aspirations and Attainment

Lecture | October 17 | 3-4 p.m. | Barrows Hall, 8th Floor, Social Science Matrix Conference Room

 Ilana Horwitz, Fellow at Stanford Center on Longevity, Stanford University

 Center for Jewish Studies, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, Department of Anthropology

It is well known that educational attainment in the United States is stratified based on race, class, and gender. But many people are surprised to learn that educational attainment rates also vary according to religious denomination. For example, American Jews are among the most highly educated religious groups, with 31% earning graduate degrees. The rates for other religious groups are much...   More >

  RSVP online

The New Jim Code?: Race, Carceral Technoscience, and Liberatory Imagination in Everyday Life

Lecture | October 17 | 3-5:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Dr. Ruha Benjamin, Princeton University

 Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, CITRIS Policy Lab, Center for Science, Technology, Medicine and Society CSTMS

From everyday apps to complex algorithms, technology has the potential to hide, speed, and even deepen discrimination, while appearing neutral and even benevolent when compared to racist practices of a previous era. In this talk, I present the concept of the “New Jim Code” to explore a range of discriminatory designs that encode inequity: by explicitly amplifying racial hierarchies, by ignoring...   More >

The Fiume Crisis: How It’s a Key to Rethinking post-WWI Europe

Lecture | October 17 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Dominique Kirchner Reill, Associate Professor, History, University of Miami

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

The Fiume Crisis recasts what we know about the birth of fascism, postwar nationalist activism, and the fall of empire after 1918 by telling the story of the three-year period when the Adriatic port-city Fiume (today known by its Croatian name Rijeka) became an international fiasco that stalled negotiations at the 1919 Paris Peace Conference and became the setting for the fifteen-month...   More >

Douglas Hyde in California

Lecture | October 17 | 5-7 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Brian Ó Conchubhair, University of Notre Dame; Cuan Ó Seireadáin, Conradh na Gaeilge / Douglas Hyde Foundation

 Irish Studies Program - Institute of European Studies

To mark the release of the new edition of "Douglas Hyde: My American Journey," the editors of Douglas Hyde's newly published diary and travelogue across North America shed light on his time and experiences at Berkeley and San Francisco and what they tell us about the local Irish community before the 1906 earthquake.

Melos’ Prospects: Rational Domination

Lecture | October 17 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Josiah Ober, Mitsotakis Professor of Classics and Political Science, Stanford University

 Department of Classics

The Sather Classical Lectures, part 5.

The Great Decoupling and Sino-US Race for Technological Supremacy

Lecture | October 17 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Spieker Forum, 6th floor Chou Hall

 Carol Christ, Chancellor, UC Berkeley

 UC Berkeley Institute for Business Innovation, Office of Chancellor, Financial Times, Asia Society

After nearly 40 years of engagement, a "great decoupling" is underway between the United States and China. A focus on strategic competition is undermining bilateral links built up over decades in trade, investment, education and other areas. If the current trend toward superpower estrangement is carried to its conclusion, it could tear the world apart. But which side — the U.S. or China — is...   More >

  Make reservations online by October 17.

Friday, October 18, 2019

Building a Forest Positive Future:: Strategies for Nature, Climate and People

Lecture | October 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Clark Kerr Campus, Garden Room

 Kerry Cesareo, Senior Vice President, Forests, World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

 College of Natural Resources

Healthy forests are critical to addressing the climate crisis, ensuring human well-being and providing wildlife with what they need to survive. Yet efforts to conserve forests are not delivering at the speed or scale that’s needed to do so. We need new "forest positive” approaches that align public and private efforts, go beyond doing less harm and strive for reaching science-based targets.

Senior Vice President, Forests, WWF

Climate Crisis, Designer Babies, Our Common Future.

Lecture | October 18 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | Berkeley Way West, First Floor Colloquia

 Public Health, School of, The Center for Genetics and Society, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society

The Center for Genetics and Society, the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, and the School of Public Health at UC Berkeley are pleased to host a conversation between john a. powell and Bill McKibben, two advocates and scholars who have written extensively about why we must join together to secure a just and fair future — before it’s too late. Join them in person for “Climate Crisis,...   More >

  Register online

Saturday, October 19, 2019

Career Clinic: Making a Successful Career Transition: Roadmap for Change

Lecture | October 19 | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. | 207 UC Berkeley Extension (Golden Bear Center)

 Rebecca Andersen, Career Services at the UC Berkeley Information School; RuthAnn Haffke, UC Berkeley School of Public Health

 UC Berkeley Extension

Making a career transition can be bewildering: how do you find jobs? How can you stand out as a candidate? And, if you finally get an interview, how do you showcase yourself as the best candidate? This workshop will walk participants through each step of making a career transition. Through interactive exercises, we will cover strategies in personal branding, networking, résumé and LinkedIn...   More >

$50

  Register online

The Surprises of the Sunflower

Lecture | October 19 | 10-11 a.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Benjamin K. Blackman Assistant Professor, Plant and Microbial Biology

 College of Natural Resources

Five thousand years ago, early farmers took a special interest in sunflowers. Through its continued cultivation since that time, the sunflower has evolved into an essential crop that permeates human life, whether in beautiful bouquets, as salty snacks, or as a primary source of cooking oil in many parts of the world. This lecture will examine how the sequencing of modern and archaeological...   More >

Science Lecture - Exploring the local universe with the Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes

Lecture | October 19 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. |  Campbell Hall

 Dan Weisz, Department of Astronomy

 Science@Cal

Most galaxies are so far away that they appear to us only as faint smudges. However, for the nearest galaxies in our cosmic neighborhood, the clarity and sensitivity of the Hubble Space Telescope transforms them galaxies from smudges into spectacular collections of individual stars. These observations allow astronomers to study how galaxies form and evolve one star at a time. In this talk, I will...   More >

Image credit: NASA/Desiree Stover

What's Next for the Blue Bin?

Lecture | October 19 | 1:30-2:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Kate O’Neill Professor, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management

 College of Natural Resources

Last year, China stopped taking most foreign recyclables. Previously, 40 percent of the United States’s paper, plastics, and other recyclable materials were sent there. Beijing’s decision threw U.S. recycling into a crisis that reaches from global political decision-making all the way down to what we decide to put into our blue bins. This lecture draws on O’Neill’s new book, Waste, to talk about...   More >

Kate O’Neill Professor, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management

Sunday, October 20, 2019

El Arte y la Política, y el Caso de César Vallejo: Poetry and the other Arts; Critique; Activism; Legacies

Lecture | October 20 | 12:30-2 p.m. |  Latinx Research Center

 2547 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 César Vallejo

 Latinx Research Center

César Vallejo (1892-1938)–the incomparable Peruvian poet, critic-essayist, and radical political activist–created an extraordinary body of poetic art, along with a series of essays on aesthetics and politics, that have had great influence in the Americas and worldwide since the 1940s. Vallejo’s rich, brilliant, experimental, challenging work and his extraordinary life brought him to the...   More >

AIA Lecture - Commerce in Color: the economy of Roman pigment shops

Lecture | October 20 | 2-4 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Hilary Becker, Classics, SUNY Binghamton

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

The discovery of the only known pigment shop in ancient Rome revealed an
array of colors in their raw, mineral form waiting to be sold to wall painters. Ancient pigments provide a surprising opportunity to understand how science can be used in archaeology, revealing what pigments were present in the shop and, potentially, the source from which they originated, as well as exploring the...   More >

Monday, October 21, 2019

Industry 4.0 and the Extension of Malaysia's Economic Success Story: With Malaysia's Minister of Finance

Lecture | October 21 | 1-2 p.m. | B100 Blum Hall

 Lim Guan Eng, Malaysia's Minister of Finance, Malaysian Government

 AMENA Center for Entrepreneurship & Development, Blum Center for Developing Economies

Lim Guan Eng, Malaysia's Minister of Finance and the Secretary General of the Democratic Action Party (DAP), will deliver a talk on the investment environment in Malaysia. His talk will include the causes behind Malaysia’s success in reducing its dependence on extractive resources and agriculture, diversifying its economy, and transitioning to a knowledge based, competitive, and innovative...   More >

  RSVP online or or by emailing Syreen Ponferrada at ponferrada.syreen@berkeley.edu by October 19.

Lim Guan Eng, Malaysia's Minister of Finance

BIDS Forum: Statistics and Machine Learning Forum

Lecture | October 21 | 1:30-2:30 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Full details about this meeting will be posted here: https://bids.berkeley.edu/events.

Jagdish Patel | Workers’ health and safety in the state of Gujarat, India

Lecture | October 21 | 4:30-6 p.m. | Berkeley Way West, Room 5400, 5th floor (2121 Berkeley Way / 1919 Shattuck Avenue), UC Berkeley School of Public Health

 Jagdish Patel, Executive Director, People’s Training and Research Centre, Vadodara, India, http://www.peoplestraining.org/

 Garrett Brown, Lecturer at the School of Public Health, and Coordinator of the Maquiladora Health & Safety Support Network

 UC Berkeley School of Public Health, The Institute for South Asia Studies

Talk by Indian labor activist and director of Peoples Training and Research Centre, Mr. Jagdish Patel.

"Maybe Esther": Storytelling and the Unpredictability of the Past

Lecture | October 21 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Alumni House

 Katja Petrowskaja

 Institute of European Studies, The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington, ZEIT-Stiftung Ebelin und Gerd Bucerius, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

In this year’s Bucerius lecture, Kiev-born German writer Katja Petrowskaja deals with the conundrums of making history. In her acclaimed novel "Maybe Esther", a modern person undertakes a road trip through European landscapes of memory, languages, and family stories. The “maybe” introduces remembering as an act of defiance, as personal resistance against the firmly established, inevitable pace of...   More >

  RSVP online by October 20.

Katja Petrowskaja, photo: Sasha Andrusyk

Non-Human Art

Lecture | October 21 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Leonel Moura

 Arts + Design

Presented by the Berkeley Center for New Media

Leonel Moura, Artist, Lisbon

Can a machine create its own art? This question, raised around the year 2000 by Lisbon-born artist Leonel Moura, is at the core of his work with robotics and artificial intelligence. With the development of artificial intelligence in recent years, the possibility of machines being intelligent but also creative is at...   More >

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Research to Regulation: A Physician-Scientist’s Search for Health Equity in Air Quality and Climate Change

Lecture | October 22 | 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Berkeley Way West

 Public Health, School of

Dr. John Balmes is a Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) where he is on the faculty of the Divisions of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. He is also Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley where he is the Director of the...   More >

Life at the Border: Farmers and Nomads at the Edges of the Bukhara Oasis during Antiquity

Lecture | October 22 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Sören Stark, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU

 Tang Center for Silk Road Studies

The oasis of Bukhara in present-day Uzbekistan was a major node in the network of ancient and medieval communication lines across Eurasia, located at an important crossroad where routes between eastern Iran and Samarqand met with routes which ran between Bactria/Tokharistan (and India) and Lake Aral and further on to eastern Europe. Archaeological and historical studies on this region have long...   More >

Julie Mehretu In conversation with Julia Bryan-Wilson

Lecture | October 22 | 5-7 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, Room 315

 Julie Mehretu

 Arts Research Center

Julie Mehretu
In conversation with Julia Bryan-Wilson
Tuesday, October 22, 2019
5:00-7:00pm
Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler Hall, UC Berkeley

In this conversation, billed as a continuation of their 2019 CCA “Distinguished Artist Interviews” where esteemed artists discuss their work with a colleague, internationally acclaimed painter Julie Mehretu will be interviewed by Julia Bryan-Wilson.

Julie Mehretu: Of Other Planes of There (S.R.), 2018-2019, ink and acrylic on canvas, 108 x 120 inches. Photo: Tom Powel Imaging. Courtesy Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, © Julie Mehretu

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Berkeley Boosts Webinar: SCOTUS Update and Constitutional Law Primer with Dean Erwin Chemerinsky

Lecture | October 23 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Online Program

 Dean Erwin Chemerinsky, Berkeley Law

 Berkeley Law Executive Education

Berkeley Boosts is a monthly series of free webinars (with MCLE credit) and articles for legal practitioners and organizational leaders. Berkeley Boosts content is carefully curated by the Berkeley Center for Law and Business and Berkeley Law Executive Education to ensure engaging discussions on subjects that matter.

Sunflower Domestication in Space and Time

Lecture | October 23 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Benjamin Blackman, Assistant Professor, Plant and Microbial Biology, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

This talk will focus on how the genomic libraries obtained from a time series of archaeological samples and from ethnographic collections from the historic period are proving fruitful for examining hypotheses about where in North America sunflower was domesticated and for highlighting reductions in sequence diversity at multiple time points in the history of sunflower cultivation.

Townsend Book Chat with Mark Schapiro: Seeds of Resistance: The Fight to Save Our Food Supply

Lecture | October 23 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Three-quarters of the seed varieties on earth in 1900 are now extinct, and more than half of the remaining commercial seeds are owned by three large companies. Schapiro examines the fate of our food supply under the pressures of corporate consolidation.

Fung Institute presents: Engineering Leadership Speaking Series

Lecture | September 4 – December 4, 2019 every Wednesday with exceptions | 4-5:30 p.m. | 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership

Join UC Berkeley Master of Engineering students for an executive speaker series with leaders from different technology industries. The technology industry forms a vital part of the Northern California economy and these sessions provide an opportunity to deepen your understanding and connections. Engage with innovative leaders from top companies, deepen your industry and functional knowledge and...   More >

Blending Implementation and Health Disparities Research to Improve the Health of Latinx with Serious Mental Illness

Lecture | October 23 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Haviland Hall, Commons 116

 Dr. Leo Cabassa, Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis

 Social Welfare, School of

Implementing health care interventions in public mental health clinics is a pressing need since people with serious mental illness (e.g., schizophrenia) face persistent health disparities. Local adaptations and customization are needed to increase the reach and impact of these interventions in the public mental health system and across racial and ethnic minority communities. In this talk, Dr....   More >

Blending Implementation and Health Disparities Research to Improve the Health of Latinx with Serious Mental Illness

Lecture | October 23 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Haviland Hall, Haviland Commons

 Leo Cabassa, PhD, Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis

 Social Welfare, School of

Implementing health care interventions in public mental health clinics is a pressing need since people with serious mental illness (e.g., schizophrenia) face persistent health disparities. Local adaptations and customization are needed to increase the reach and impact of these interventions in the public mental health system and across racial and ethnic minority communities. In this talk, Dr....   More >

In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa’s Food Legacy in the Atlantic World - The 23rd Carl O. Sauer Memorial Lecture

Lecture | October 23 | 4 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Judith Carney, Department of Geography, UCLA

 Department of Geography, Department of African American Studies, Center for African Studies, Center for Research on Social Change, Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM), Berkeley Food Institute, 400 Years of Resistance to Slavery and Injustice

A striking feature of plantation era history is the number of first-person accounts that credit the enslaved with the introduction of specific foods, all previously grown in Africa. This lecture
lends support to these observations by identifying the crops that European witnesses attributed to slave agency and by engaging the ways that African subsistence staples arrived, and...   More >

  RSVP online

Truth, Lies, and Cultural Appropriation: Christopher L. Miller on Impostors

Lecture | October 23 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Christopher L. Miller, Yale University

 Department of French, Department of Comparative Literature, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Christopher L. Miller, Frederick Clifford Ford Professor of African American Studies and French at Yale University, will give a public lecture related to his most recent book, Impostors (Chicago University Press, 2018).

Thursday, October 24, 2019

Yanni Loukissas: All Data Are Local

Lecture | October 24 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Yanni Loukissas

 Arts + Design

Yanni Loukissas, author

Yanni Loukissas delivers a talk drawing on his new monograph from MIT Press, All Data Are Local: Thinking Critically in a Data-Driven Society, which is addressed to a growing audience of practitioners who want to work with unfamiliar data both effectively and ethically. Loukissas is an assistant professor of digital media in the School of Literature, Media, and...   More >

Brown Lecture in Education Research

Lecture | October 24 | 3-6 p.m. |  Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center

 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20004

 Prudence L. Carter, Dean, Graduate School of Education

 American Educational Research Association

Prudence L. Carter, dean and professor of the Graduate School of Education at UC Berkeley, and national expert on inequality in education, will present the American Educational Research Association's (AERA) 2019 Brown Lecture in Education Research.

Carter’s research focuses on factors that shape and reduce economic, social, and cultural inequalities among social groups in schools and society....   More >

Capitalism and the Question of Genealogy

Lecture | October 24 | 4 p.m. | Barrows Hall, MATRIX/Room 820

 Melinda Cooper, Associate Professor, Sociology and Social Policy, The University of Sydney

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Department of Sociology, Department of History, Department of Geography, The Program in Critical Theory, Berkeley Network for a New Political Economy

The paper asks why periods of capitalist breakdown are so often experienced as crises of reproduction and why the imagined solutions to such crises so predictably involve a return to reproductive order, with its attendant hierarchies of gender and race.

Cultural Expertise on Southeast Asia and Asylum Expert Witnessing

Lecture | October 24 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 ChorSwang Ngin, Professor of Anthropology, CSU Los Angeles

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

What is "cultural expertise"? And what is Southeast Asian Studies useful for? This talk will review these questions illustrated with asylum cases from Indonesia, Myanmar, and Malaysia, to advocate for the teaching and learning of Southeast Asian Studies within the framework of “Cultural Expertise in Litigation”— a current project Prof. Ngin is involved in at Oxford University.

ChorSwang Ngin

Agamemnon’s Cluelessness: Reason and Eudaimonia

Lecture | October 24 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Josiah Ober, Mitsotakis Professor of Classics and Political Science, Stanford University

 Department of Classics

The Sather Classical Lectures, part 6.

Seeing Shamanic Practices in Ancient Peruvian Pottery

Lecture | October 24 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Cathy Costin, California State University, Northridge

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

The Lounge Lecture series, hosted alongside the current exhibit Pleasure, Poison, Prescription, Prayer: The Worlds of Mind-Altering Substances, provides an opportunity to explore contemporary subjects related to mind-altering substances with leading experts in their fields.

This October, join archaeologist Dr. Cathy Costin who in this lecture will make the argument that a large proportion of...   More >

  Buy tickets online

Friday, October 25, 2019

PLANTS + PEOPLE Lunchtime Talks: Biocultural Diversity in the Central Valley

Lecture | October 25 | 12-1 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

While many people may think of California’s Central Valley as mostly monocultures of almonds and tomatoes, the landscape is also dotted with small-scale diversified farms. On these farms, you can find 50-100 different types of crops –– from jujube to jicama, from papaya to moringa, from water spinach to taro, and many more.

Free with Garden Admission; Free for UC Berkeley Students, Staff and Faculty

  Register online

Thinking about Composition: Creative Work, Scholarship, and the Art of Putting Things Together

Lecture | October 25 | 3 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities, Department of Music

The second of a series of conversations focusing on the "how" of composition by bringing together a group of master practitioners working across a wide range of forms and media.

Painting by Kara Maria

Atif Mian | What to do about Pakistan’s Economy?: The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture for 2019

Lecture | October 25 | 6-8 p.m. | The Bancroft Hotel, The Great Hall

 2680 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94720

 Atif R. Mian, Professor, Economics, Public Policy and Finance (Princeton University) and Co-Founder & Board Member, Center for Economic Research in Pakistan (CERP)

 Munis Faruqui, Chair, Institute for South Asia Studies, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Umair Khan, Founding Partner, Mentors Fund

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture

Princeton economist, Prof. Atif Mian delivers our seventh Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture.

Monday, October 28, 2019

Security in the High North: A Norwegian Perspective

Lecture | October 28 | 5-6 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Kristian Åtland, Norwegian Defense Research Establishment

 Institute of European Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Strategically located on NATO’s northern flank, and sharing a land and sea border with Russia, Norway is an Arctic power with a front-row seat. The country controls vast and resource-rich maritime areas north of the Arctic Circle and is an active participant in regional cooperation arrangements such as the Arctic Council and the Barents Euro-Arctic Council. However, as elsewhere in the Arctic,...   More >

Kristian Åtland

The San Quentin Project

Lecture | October 28 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Nigel Poor; Michael Nelson

 Arts + Design

Presented by BAMPFA

Nigel Poor, Artist
Michael Nelson, Writer and Activist

Artist Nigel Poor presents various collaborative projects she has worked on inside San Quentin Prison, including the San Quentin archive project currently on view at BAMPFA, and talks about the award winning podcast Ear Hustle, which she co-created and co-hosts with residents of San Quentin.

The exhibition The...   More >

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Advancing Environmental Health through Youth Participatory Action Research

Lecture | October 29 | 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Berkeley Way West

 Public Health, School of

Working with youth can be an effective way to improve environmental health literacy and community engagement while also shining light on community concerns and building local capacity. Dr. Harley will discuss her work conducting youth-driven research and advocacy projects with high school students in Salinas including researching how local residents are exposed to pesticides and chemicals in...   More >

Redefining Political Space in Post-Crisis Europe: Is There Hope for EU Democracy?

Lecture | October 29 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Ludvig Norman, Stockholm University

 Institute of European Studies

In recent years, the European Union has found itself in a state of seemingly chronic crisis, including the economic and financial crisis unleashed on Europe in 2008, the political crisis with the rise of populist and extremist parties across the continent, the migration crisis as well as Brexit. It is widely held that the response to these crises has led to a considerable strengthening of...   More >

Ludvig Norman

Surviving the Sidewalk: Latino Streetvendors in Los Angeles

Lecture | October 29 | 4-5:30 p.m. |  Latinx Research Center

 2547 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Professor Rocio Rosales, Assistant Professor, University of California, Irvine

 Center for Ethnographic Research

New research by Prof. Rocío Rosales (UC Irvine) sponsored by the Center for Ethnographic Research (CER).

Global Borderlands: Fantasy, Violence, and Empire in Subic Bay, Philippines

Lecture | October 29 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Victoria Reyes, Assistant Professor of Sociology, UC Riverside

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This talk, derived from Prof. Reyes' new book, draws on archival and ethnographic data to describe the everyday experiences of people living and working in Subic Bay in the Philippines (a former U.S. military base, now a Freeport Zone), to make the case for critically examining similar spaces across the world.

Conceptualizing an Era: A Preface to Early Twentieth-century German History

Lecture | October 29 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Helmut Walser Smith, Department of History | Vanderbilt University

 Institute of European Studies, Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Center for German and European Studies, Department of History

Drawn from the author’s "Germany. A Nation in its Time: Before, During, and After Nationalism, 1500-2000" (forthcoming, W.W. Norton, March, 2020), this lecture attempts to lay out elementary historical structures of “the nationalist age.” Shadowing Kant’s famous distinction between an age of enlightenment and an enlightened age, it is argued that in the nationalist age, war shaped the era...   More >

Helmut Walser Smith

Una's Lecture with artist Paul Chan: The Bather’s Dilemma

Lecture | October 29 | 5 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife, 315 Wheeler Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Artist Paul Chan is the winner of the 2014 Hugo Boss Prize, awarded biennially by the Guggenheim Foundation to an artist who has made a visionary contribution to contemporary art. His Una’s Lecture explores the figure of the bather as an embodiment of pleasure that is linked to the act of renewal.

Cultural Legacy of the Pre-Ashkenazic Jews in Eastern Europe: 2019 Taubman Lectures: Moshe Taube

Lecture | October 29 | 7-9 p.m. |  Easton Hall

 2401 Ridge Road, Berkeley, CA 94709

 Moshe Taube, Hebrew University

 Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Chair in Jewish Studies, Department of History, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Center for Jewish Studies, Jewish Studies at UC Davis, Taube Center for Jewish Studies at Stanford University, Hamaqom

Lecture 1: Tuesday, October 29th, 7:00 pm
Jewish Presence in Eastern Europe: The Beginnings

Lecture 2: Thursday, October 31st, 7:00 pm
Translations from Hebrew in Russia in the 13th-15th Centuries CE: By Converts?

Lecture 3: Tuesday, November 5th, 5:30 pm
Translations from Hebrew in Russia in the Second Half of the 15th Century and the Heresy of the Judaizers

  RSVP by emailing TaubmanLectures@gmail.com