<< May 2019 >>

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

CANCELED: From planarians to parasites: stem cells and developmental plasticity in flatworms

Seminar | May 1 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building | Canceled

 Phil Newmark, Morgridge Institute for Research

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Foreign student emigration to the United States: pathways of entry, demographic antecedents, and origin-country contexts: A Brown Bag Talk

Colloquium | May 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 2232 Piedmont, Seminar Room

 Kevin Thomas, Professor, Sociology, Demography, African Studies, Penn State University

 Population Science, Department of Demography

In this study, we use information from a uniquely developed database to examine recent trends in international student migration to the United States. Our results highlight the differential contributions to these trends made by various entry pathways.

Plant and Microbial Biology Seminar: "Predicting Antibiotic Resistance"

Seminar | May 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Roy Kishony, Israel Institute of Technology

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Roy Kishony is the Marilyn and Henry Taub Professor of Life Sciences, the director of the Lorry I. Lokey Interdisciplinary Center for Life Sciences and Engineering, and a Faculty of Biology. Combining novel quantitative experimental techniques and clinical studies with mathematical modeling and advanced data analysis, Kishony's lab is studying microbial evolution with a specific focus on...   More >

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR - Noelle Bittner (CANCELLED): Tba

Seminar | May 1 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Noelle Bittner

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

Moving Towards Open Scholarship: UC, Elsevier and All the Rest

Presentation | May 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, Social Science Matrix, 8th Floor

 Jeff MacKie-Mason

 Center for Studies in Higher Education

The movement to make new scholarship freely available to all readers began at least by 1994 with Stevan Harnad's "Subversive proposal". In 2013 the UC Academic Senate adopted one of the first mandatory OA policies in the US, requiring that a copy of all newly authored research be deposited in an open archive regardless of where it is published. In Winter 2018 the University Libraries published an...   More >

Nanomaterials Enable Delivery of Functional Genetic Material Without Transgenic DNA Integration in Mature Plants

Seminar | May 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Markita Landry, University of California, Berkeley

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Genetic engineering of plants is at the core of sustainability efforts, natural product synthesis, and agricultural crop engineering. The plant cell wall is a barrier that limits the ease and throughput with which exogenous biomolecules can be delivered to plants. Current delivery methods either suffer from host range limitations, low transformation efficiencies, tissue regenerability, tissue...   More >

Long Distance Caregiving (BEUHS121)

Workshop | May 1 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Class of '42

 Maureen Kelly, ED.D., LCSW, Elder Care Program, Be Well @ Work

 Elder Care Program

Being a long distance caregiver to an elder brings its own set of challenges. Assessing needs and navigating resources from afar can be stressful and complicated. This interactive workshop examines when and how to help, how to locate resources in your elder’s area, and how to seek support for yourself.

Harmonic Analysis Seminar: The multilinear Kakeya inequality

Seminar | May 1 | 1:10-2 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Kubrat Danailov, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

A short proof of the multilinear Kakeya inequality of Bennett-Carbery-Tao will be presented. This proof (due to Guth, 2015) is based on induction on scales and the Loomis-Whitney inequality, without the nonlinear heat flow of the original proof. In a future lecture, this result will serve as an ingredient in the proof of the multilinear restriction and decoupling inequalities.

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Background for main topology talk

Seminar | May 1 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Claudia Scheimbauer, NTNU

 Department of Mathematics

I will start by motivating cobordism categories by recalling the notion of topological field theories. Then I will explain why “higher” categories appear naturally in this context (and what they are).

Rapidly mixing random walks on matroids and related objectsidly mixing random walks on matroids and related objects

Seminar | May 1 | 3-4 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Nima Anari, Stanford University

 Department of Statistics

A central question in randomized algorithm design is what kind of distributions can we sample from efficiently? On the continuous side, uniform distributions over convex sets and more generally log-concave distributions constitute the main tractable class. We will build a parallel theory on the discrete side, that yields tractability for a large class of discrete distributions. We will use this...   More >

Number Theory Seminar: Algebraicity of values of the Gamma function II

Seminar | May 1 | 3:40-5 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Rahul Dalal, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

CBE Colloquium

Colloquium | May 1 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 Marc Martin Casas, Ph.D. student in the Mesbah Group; James Lincoff, Ph.D. student in the Head-Gordon Group

 Department of Chemical Engineering

Bayesian experiment design and estimation for probabilistic modeling of biological systems/Development and Application of a Novel Enhanced Sampling Method and Bayesian Analysis for Characterizing Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

Solving Hard Computational Problems using Oscillator Networks

Seminar | May 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Tianshi Wang, EECS, UC Berkeley

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Over the last few years, there has been considerable interest in Ising machines, ie, analog hardware for solving difficult (NP hard/complete) computational problems effectively. We present a new way to make Ising machines using networks of coupled self-sustaining nonlinear oscillators. Our scheme is theoretically rooted in a novel result that connects the phase dynamics of coupled oscillator...   More >

Japan's Imperial Underworlds: Intimate Encounters at the Borders of Empire

Colloquium | May 1 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 David Ambaras, North Carolina State University

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In this lecture, David Ambaras reveals how the movement of migrants, smugglers, pirates, and trafficked people between China and Japan -- and their sensationalization in the popular press -- created surprising cross-currents in the politics of Sino-Japanese relations during the years of Japanese imperial expansion.

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): A complete model for the cobordism category

Seminar | May 1 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Claudia Scheimbauer, NTNU

 Department of Mathematics

Lurie’s approach to the Cobordism Hypothesis builds upon a suitable higher category of cobordisms. The model of \((\infty,1)\)-categories given by complete Segal spaces (and their higher analogs) are a very natural choice for constructing cobordism categories. A drawback is that the first natural definitions only give Segal spaces, which, for high dimensions, are not complete. This follows...   More >

Center for Computational Biology Seminar: Sohini Ramachandran, Associate Professor, Brown University

Seminar | May 1 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Center for Computational Biology

Leveraging linkage disequilibrium to identify adaptive and disease-causing mutations

Abstract:
Correlation among genotypes in human population-genetic datasets complicates the localization of both adaptive mutations and disease-causing mutations. I will describe our latest efforts to develop new methods for localizing adaptive and disease-causing mutations, motivated by (1) incorporating...   More >

Reporting in India: Berkeley Journalism Students Present their Stories

Presentation | May 1 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Geeta Anand, Acting Professor of Reporting, UC Berkeley School of Journalism

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Graduate School of Journalism, Global Poverty and Practice Minor, Master of Development Practice, Department of Rhetoric

Showcasing UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism students reporting on India.

Linguistic Anthropology and Literary and Cultural Studies: A Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar: Session 7: Ethics and History of Linguistic Anthropology

Conference/Symposium | May 1 – 2, 2019 every day | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Charles Briggs, UC Berkeley; Mary Bucholtz, UC Santa Barbara; Jillian Cavanaugh, CUNY-Brooklyn College; Laura Graham, University of Iowa; Barbra Meek, University of Michigan; Beth Piatote, UC Berkeley

 Department of Comparative Literature, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

This is the last of seven two-day meetings of a Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar taking place throughout 2018-2019. The seminar aims to explore the potential of a set of concepts, tools, and critical practices developed in the field of linguistic anthropology for work being done in the fields of literary and cultural criticism.

Thursday, May 2, 2019

The Art of Arranging with Edible Flowers

Workshop | May 2 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Explore the world of edible flowers for use in both the kitchen and vase. Join Stefani Bittner, owner of Homestead design collective and author of The Beautiful Edible Garden and Harvest, and lead gardener Sierra Zackzewski for a hands-on discussion and tasting of many of the exquisite edible flowers that grow here in the Bay Area.

$65 / $60 UCBG Member

  Register online or by calling 510-664-7606

UC Alumni Career Fair

Career Fair | May 2 | 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. |  South San Francisco Conference Center

 255 South Airport BLVD, South San Francisco, CA 94080

 University of California Office of the President

This expo-style hiring event provides a unique opportunity for UC alumni of all career levels to connect with a wide variety of employers. Participation is free for all UC alumni but you must register to attend.

Econ 235, Financial Economics Seminar: Granular Instrumental Variables

Seminar | May 2 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | C330 Haas School of Business

 Xavier Gabaix, Harvard University

 Department of Economics

Joint with Haas Finance Seminar

Are There Different Education Policies for the West and the Rest?

Seminar | May 2 | 12-1 p.m. | Evans Hall, CSHE Conference Room, 768

 Center for Studies in Higher Education

This presentation draws from Inna’s comparative analysis of higher education in the US and Ukraine, specifically on issues of academic integrity and access to higher education. Based on that analysis she will present major differences between the two systems of higher education. Comparative analysis accentuates major challenges facing each system but also highlights structural limitations and...   More >

Oliver E. Williamson Seminar: Quality, Variety and Quantity from the Industrial Revolution to the Digital Revolution

Seminar | May 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | C325 Haas School of Business

 Aloysius Siow, University of Toronto

 Department of Economics

The Oliver E. Williamson Seminar on Institutional Analysis, named after our esteemed colleague who founded the seminar, features current research by faculty, from UCB and elsewhere, and by advanced doctoral students. The research investigates governance and its links with economic and political forces. Markets, hierarchies, hybrids, and the supporting institutions of law and politics all come...   More >

Lunch Poems: Student Reading

Workshop | May 2 | 12:10-1 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Library

 Human Resources

One of the year’s liveliest events, the student reading includes winners of the following prizes: Academy of American Poets, Cook, Rosenberg, and Yang, as well as students nominated by Berkeley’s creative writing faculty, Lunch Poems volunteers, and representatives from student publications.

AmpEquity Speaker Series with Nancy Green of Athleta

Panel Discussion | May 2 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Spieker Forum

 Nancy Green, Athleta

 Center for Equity, Gender, and Leadership

Join Nancy Green (President and CEO of Athleta) and Kellie McElhaney (Founding Executive Director, Center for Equity, Gender, and Leadership) as they discuss Nancy's Equity Fluent Leadership journey.

This event will be held in the Spieker Forum (6th Fl or Chou Hall) at Berkeley Haas. Doors will open at 12:15pm. A light lunch will be served. This event will feature a fireside chat discussion...   More >

AmpEquity Speaker Series with Nancy Green of Athleta

Panel Discussion | May 2 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Spieker Forum

 Nancy Green, Athleta

 Center for Equity, Gender, and Leadership

Join Nancy Green (President and CEO of Athleta) and Kellie McElhaney (Founding Executive Director, Center for Equity, Gender, and Leadership) as they discuss Nancy's Equity Fluent Leadership journey.

This event will be held in the Spieker Forum (6th Fl or Chou Hall) at Berkeley Haas. Doors will open at 12:15pm. A light lunch will be served. This event will feature a fireside chat discussion...   More >

Communicating Goals and Expectations: BPM104

Workshop | May 2 | 12:30-4:30 p.m. | 24 University Hall

 Human Resources

The content identifies how goals and performance standards fit into the UC Berkeley performance management cycle and performance evaluation process.

How the brain represents objects

Seminar | May 2 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Doris Tsao, Caltech

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

How the Brain Represents Objects

Seminar | May 2 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Doris Tsao

 Human Resources

Mathematics Department Colloquium: A theory of hydrodynamic turbulence based on nonequilibrium statistical mechanics

Colloquium | May 2 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 David Ruelle, IHES

 Department of Mathematics

I shall cover some well-known facts about hydrodynamic turbulence, and present a physically coherent view of intermittency in the energy cascade as a cascade of eddies governed by ideas of statistical mechanics. The approach presented is close to the ideas of Kolmogorov but gives a satisfactory estimate of the intermittency exponents and of the Reynolds number at the onset of turbulence. I shall...   More >

Linguistic Anthropology and Literary and Cultural Studies: A Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar: Session 7: Ethics and History of Linguistic Anthropology

Conference/Symposium | May 1 – 2, 2019 every day | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Charles Briggs, UC Berkeley; Mary Bucholtz, UC Santa Barbara; Jillian Cavanaugh, CUNY-Brooklyn College; Laura Graham, University of Iowa; Barbra Meek, University of Michigan; Beth Piatote, UC Berkeley

 Department of Comparative Literature, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

This is the last of seven two-day meetings of a Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar taking place throughout 2018-2019. The seminar aims to explore the potential of a set of concepts, tools, and critical practices developed in the field of linguistic anthropology for work being done in the fields of literary and cultural criticism.

Friday, May 3, 2019

18th Annual Transactional Clinical Conference: Classrooms, Campuses and Communities

Conference/Symposium | May 3 | 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. |  David Brower Center

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA

 Law, Boalt School of

Join clinical law professionals from around the country at the 18th annual Transactional Clinical Conference

Futures of Academic Making: Connecting Educational Research and Practice

Conference/Symposium | May 3 | 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Join UC Berkeley’s Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation and Graduate School of Education for a half-day symposium exploring the future of making-based educational research and practice across the student experience. The day will include keynote talks from Kylie Peppler (UC Irvine) and Paulo Blikstein (Columbia University), project spotlights, and interdisciplinary dialogue.

Refreshments and...   More >

Alcohol and Amine Derivatives Guide Position-Selective C–H Functionalization Reactions

Seminar | May 3 | 10-11 a.m. | 775 Tan Hall

 Prof. Jennifer Roizen, Dept. of Chemistry, Duke University

 College of Chemistry

Free radical reactions represent an important and versatile class of chemical transformations. Nitrogen-centered radical applications remain underexplored due to the lack of convenient methods for their generation. Recent advances have improved access to nitrogen-centered radicals through photoredox-mediated oxidation of two such directing groups: amides and sulfonamides. Guided by this approach,...   More >

Mithra, Buddha, and Mani Walk into a Desert...: Indo-Iranian and Sino-Iranian Encounters in Central Asia

Conference/Symposium | May 3 – 4, 2019 every day | 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Tang Center for Silk Road Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

All panels held at 180 Doe Library (*except where indicated)

Friday May 3, 10am–12:00pm
Introductory Remarks
Sanjyot Mehendale, UC Berkeley

Changing Vocabulary of Manichaean Visual Syntax in Uyghur East Central Asia
Zsuzsanna Gulácsi, Northern Arizona University

Manichaean Official Documents in their Central Asian Context
Adam Benkato, UC Berkeley

Manichaean Evidence for Kushan...   More >

History Adrift: A Conversation with Namwali Serpell

Seminar | May 3 | 12-2 p.m. | 113 César E. Chávez Student Center

 Namwali Serpell

 Human Resources

The SLC Language Exchange and Writing Programs are honored to host a conversation with author Namwali Serpell about her debut novel, The Old Drift. Join us on May 3rd from 12-2PM as she reads from her book, shares insight into her writing process, and discusses how reimagining the past can enhance our understanding of the present and future.

About the Author
Namwali Serpell is an associate...   More >

Yoga for Tension and Stress Relief (BEUHS664)

Workshop | May 3 | 12:10-1 p.m. | 251 Hearst Gymnasium

 Laurie Ferris

 Be Well at Work - Wellness

Practicing yoga can release tension in your joints, give you greater range of motion, and offer increased comfort in all aspects of your life. Learn basic yoga poses and breathing techniques to transform your practice into a moving meditation. Optional: Join the Passport Yoga Passport Challenge and get a different stamp for each class to be entered into a drawing for a yoga prize! Please bring...   More >

  Register online

Solid State Technology and Devices Seminar: 24/7 Electricity Produced by Intermittent Power Requires Its Energy Storage

Seminar | May 3 | 1-2 p.m. | Cory Hall, The Hogan Room, 521

 Jerry Woodall, Electrical and Computer Engineering, UC Davis

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

This is a simple story with a no-brainer punchline included in the title. Except for geothermal and nuclear energy, the sun is, and has been, the source of nearly all energy used on our planet. The problem is that the earth receives plenty of intermittent solar power, but not as solar energy.

Dissertation Talk: Approximate counting, phase transitions and geometry of polynomials

Seminar | May 3 | 1:30-2:30 p.m. | 306 Soda Hall

 Jingcheng Liu, UC Berkeley

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In classical statistical physics, a phase transition is understood by studying the geometry (the zero-set) of an associated polynomial (the partition function). In this talk I will show that one can exploit this notion of phase transitions algorithmically, and conversely exploit the analysis of algorithms to understand phase transitions. As applications, I will give efficient deterministic...   More >

DNA Origami Tools for Cryo-EM: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | May 3 | 2-3 p.m. | 4 LeConte Hall

 Prof. Shawn Douglas, UC San Franciscso, Cellular Molecular Pharmacology

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

Watch a brief animated explainer of bionanotechnology at http://www.shawndouglas.com

Ocean Wave Turbulence – From Theory to Computation: E201 Ocean Engineering Seminar Series, Spring 2019

Seminar | May 3 | 2:30-4 p.m. | 3109 Etcheverry Hall

 Dr. Yulin Pan, Assistant Professor of Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering, University of Michigan

 Department of Mechanical Engineering (ME)

Abstract: In this presentation, we seek a first-principles understanding of the stationary and invariant form of ocean wave spectrum based on wave turbulence theory, which describes the statistical property of an ensemble of waves in weakly nonlinear interactions. The starting point of the research is on capillary waves, which dominate the small-scale dynamics of ocean surface. Allowing triad...   More >

Dissertation Talk: Modular and Safe Event-Driven Programming

Seminar | May 3 | 2:30-3:30 p.m. | 531 Cory Hall

 Ankush Pankaj Desai, University Of California, Berkeley

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Asynchronous event-driven systems can be found in myriad domains including cloud computing systems, device drivers, and robotics.
These systems are notoriously hard to get right as the programmer needs to reason about numerous control paths resulting from the complex interleaving of events (messages) and failures.
Unsurprisingly, it is easy to introduce subtle errors while attempting to fill...   More >

Fiction or Reality: Thinking Fukushima through Art

Seminar | May 3 | 2:30-4 p.m. | 226 Dwinelle Hall

 Saeko Kimura, Professor, Tsuda University

 Miryam Sas, Professor, UC Berkeley

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

While we share the sense that fiction and plastic arts reflect a different relationship to reality than that of documentary or journalistic writing, writing on Fukushima often encounters a difficulty in distinguishing between the fictional and the real. How have recent Japanese artists and writers after 3-11 broached and responded to this difficulty in dividing the real from the imaginary? Is...   More >

https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/nhknewsline/backstories/sunchild/ (accessed April 29, 2019)

Composition Colloquium: Katie Balch

Colloquium | May 3 | 3 p.m. | 250 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

Called "intricate" and an "exquisite sound world" by icareifyoulisten, Katherine's music has been commissioned and performed by the Tokyo, Minnesota, Oregon, and Albany Symphony Orchestras, American Composer's Orchestra, Ensemble Intercontemporain, Antico Moderno, FLUX Quartet, International Contemporary Ensemble, wild Up, Contemporaneous, and Concert Artists Guild, among others, in such venues...   More >

MENA Salon: Reflections on Egyptian-Turkish Relations

Workshop | May 3 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday the CMES hosts an informal guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa, open to all.

Egypt and Turkey’s relations since 2011 have had both change and strain. For our last salon of the semester, former Egyptian Ambassador to Turkey, Abdul-Rahman Salah will be our guest. We will discuss his experiences in the field and the future of Egyptian-Turkish...   More >

Arithmetic Geometry and Number Theory RTG Seminar: The unipotent Albanese map and rational points on varieties

Seminar | May 3 | 3-5 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Daniel Hast, Rice University

 Department of Mathematics

Given a curve of genus at least $2$ over a number field, Faltings' theorem tells us that its set of rational points is finite. Provably computing the set of rational points remains a major open problem, as does the question of whether the number of rational points can be uniformly bounded. We will survey some recent progress and ongoing work using the Chabauty–Kim method, which uses the...   More >

The Concept of Context

Seminar | May 3 | 3-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Michael Buckland

 Human Resources

Information is inevitably created in a context and, whenever used, is necessarily used in some context. Intermediaries, too, have their own contexts. The literature on information-related behavior mentioning context is vast and varied. Nevertheless the concept of âcontextâ itself seems underdeveloped in information studies beyond the simple case of spatial and temporal metadata. Formal models of...   More >

The Concept of Context

Seminar | May 3 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Michael Buckland

 Information, School of

Information is inevitably created in a context and, whenever used, is necessarily used in some context. Intermediaries, too, have their own contexts. The literature on information-related behavior mentioning context is vast and varied. Nevertheless the concept of âcontextâ itself seems underdeveloped in information studies beyond the simple case of spatial and temporal metadata. Formal models...   More >

Information Access Seminar: Niloufar Salehi

Seminar | May 3 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Niloufar Salehi

 Information, School of

FOUNDATIONS FOR CHANGE: Thomas I. Yamashita Prize and KIDS FIRST: David L. Kirp Prize Award Ceremony

Presentation | May 3 | 4-6 p.m. |  The Latinx Research Center

 2547 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA 94720

 Genevieve Negrón-Gonzales, Associate Professor of Education, University of San Francisco

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, Public Health, School of, Latinx Research Center, Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program

Please join us as we honor Joel Sati and Rosa M. Jiménez, recipients of the FOUNDATIONS FOR CHANGE: Thomas I. Yamashita Prize, and Gabriel Santamaria, Alejandra León Herrera, and Nolan Pokpongkiat, recipients of the KIDS FIRST: David L. Kirp Prize.

With Keynote by Genevieve Negrón-Gonzales, Associate Professor of Education, University of San Francisco

Free

  Register online

Music Studies Colloquium: Svanibor Pettan (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia): Minorities in a War-Peace Continuum: How Applied Ethnomusicology Can Help

Colloquium | May 3 | 4:30 p.m. | 128 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

Svanibor Pettan studied ethnomusicology in Croatia (B.A.), Slovenia (M.A.), and USA (Ph.D.). He researched music in his native Croatia, Slovenia, in the Balkans (particularly in Kosovo), Africa (Tanzania, Egypt), Australia, and USA. At the University of Oslo he became involved with applied ethnomusicology through the Bosnian-Norwegian project" Azra."
His specialties include Balkan Gypsy music,...   More >

Three Debut Speculative Fiction Writers: A Conversation with Carmen Maria Machado, Lesley Nneka Arimah, and Alice Sola Kim

Panel Discussion | May 3 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Carmen Maria Machado; Lesley Nneka Arimah; Alice Sola Kim

 Department of English, Peripheral Futures Group

Carmen Maria Machado is the author of *Her Body and Other Parties*; Lesley Nneka Arimah is the author of *What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky*; Alice Sola Kim is a recipient of a Whiting Award and has been published in the *Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2017*.

Email serpell@berkeley.edu to receive copies of the stories we will be discussing.

Saturday, May 4, 2019

Mithra, Buddha, and Mani Walk into a Desert...: Indo-Iranian and Sino-Iranian Encounters in Central Asia

Conference/Symposium | May 3 – 4, 2019 every day | 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Tang Center for Silk Road Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

All panels held at 180 Doe Library (*except where indicated)

Friday May 3, 10am–12:00pm
Introductory Remarks
Sanjyot Mehendale, UC Berkeley

Changing Vocabulary of Manichaean Visual Syntax in Uyghur East Central Asia
Zsuzsanna Gulácsi, Northern Arizona University

Manichaean Official Documents in their Central Asian Context
Adam Benkato, UC Berkeley

Manichaean Evidence for Kushan...   More >

What's Race Got to Do with It: Shifting drug coverage from crime to health

Panel Discussion | May 4 | 3-6 p.m. | North Gate Hall, Logan Multimedia Center (Room 142)

 Graduate School of Journalism, National Association of Black Journalists at UC Berkeley, Bay Area Black Journalists Association

A panel conversation around the ways news media covers drug addiction in and outside of the Black community, and how that coverage is evolving.

Pendarvis Harshaw (MJ ’14): KQED Arts columnist and 2018 USC Center for Health Reporting Fellow.

Rochelle Riley: Detroit Free Press columnist and author of “The Burden: African Americans and the Enduring Impact of Slavery.”

Douglas Butler: Former...   More >

Sunday, May 5, 2019

Family Workshop: Kaleidoscope Making

Workshop | May 5 | 11 a.m.-2 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Join this month’s Family Workshop at the Hearst Museum! Make your own kaleidoscope and learn how changes in vision can affect your perception of reality. This is a drop-in workshop for all ages. Bring the whole family for this activity included free with museum admission.



Find out more about events at the Hearst Museum by going to hearstmuseum.berkeley.edu/events.

  RSVP online

Monday, May 6, 2019

Between-individual variation in the human retina ultrastructure: the key for understanding everything from myopia to AMD?

Seminar | May 6 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Rigmor Baraas, OD, PhD, National Centre for Optics, Vision and Eye Care, Department of Optometry, Radiography and Lighting Design, University of South-Eastern Norway, Kongsberg, Norway

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) have become invaluable tools for mapping the ultrastructure of the retina in living humans. OCT imaging has revealed considerable variation in retinal layer thickness, foveal shape and morphology. AOSLO imaging has revealed large variation in cone mosaics, both peak and eccentricity dependence density...   More >

Combinatorics Seminar: LLT Polynomials, k-Schur Functions, and Positivity

Seminar | May 6 | 12:10-1 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Christopher Miller, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Both LLT polynomials and k-Schur functions were derived from the study of Macdonald polynomials, and have proved to be fruitful areas of study. A conjecture due to Haglund and Haiman states that k-bandwidth LLT polynomials expand positively into k-Schur functions. This is trivial in the case k=1 and has been recently proved for k=2. In this talk, I will present a proof for the case k=3. To this...   More >

PERL Seminar: "Moral Tribes: Why Do People Join Armed Groups?"

Seminar | May 6 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 David Qihang Wu, UC Berkeley

 BCEP

Political Economy Research Lunch:PERL is an opportunity for PhD students to present work in progress and receive valuable feedback from faculty and peers.

String-Math Seminar: Searching for Lie groups of the XXI century

Seminar | May 6 | 2-3 p.m. | 402 LeConte Hall

 Andrei Okounkov, Columbia University

 Department of Mathematics

It has been understood for some time now that many highlights of Lie theory, such as the representation-theoretic theory of special functions, or the Kazhdan–Lusztig theory, have a natural extension to a much broader setting, the boundaries of which are yet to be explored. In this extension, the focus is shifting from a group \(G\) to various classes of algebraic varieties that possess the key...   More >

Northern California Symplectic Geometry Seminar: Divisor complements in Calabi-Yau symplectic manifolds

Seminar | May 6 | 2:30-3:30 p.m. | 384H STANFORD

 Umut Varolgunes, Stanford

 Department of Mathematics

Let $(M,\omega )$ be a closed symplectic manifold. Consider a closed symplectic submanifold $D$ whose homology class is a positive multiple of the Poincare dual of $[\omega ]$. The complement of $D$ can be given the structure of a Liouville manifold, with skeleton $S$. We prove that $S$ cannot be displaced from itself inside $M$ by a Hamiltonian isotopy if we assume that $c_1(M)=0$. Under the...   More >

Between Shannon and Hamming: how bad can the channel be?: BLISS Seminar

Seminar | May 6 | 3-4 p.m. | 540 Cory Hall

 Anand Sarwate, Rutgers

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

The information theory community has traditionally studied two different models for communication. The Shannon-theoretic model treats the channel’s impact as random, so codes must correct almost all error patterns of a given weight; this is an average-case analysis. The coding-theoretic (Hamming-theoretic?) model treats the channel as adversarial, so codes must correct all error patterns of a...   More >

Differential Geometry Seminar: Moduli spaces of spherical surfaces with conical singularities

Seminar | May 6 | 3:10-4 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Dmitri Panov, University College London

 Department of Mathematics

A spherical surface with $n$ conical singularities is a surface $S$ with cone points $x_1, \dots ,x_n$ and a metric $g$, such that $g$ has curvature 1 on the complement $S \setminus (x_1,...,x_n)$ and has a conical singularity of angle $2\pi (\theta _i)$ at each $x_i$. Moduli spaces of spherical metrics with fixed angles are intriguing objects. Up to very recently the most basic questions about...   More >

Quantitative chemical imaging in live cells

Seminar | May 6 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Yamuna Krishnan, The University of Chicago

 College of Chemistry

A French Revolution for the Third Millennium?: The Reimagining of Higher Education in Contemporary France

Colloquium | May 6 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 1215 Berkeley Way West

 Grace Neville

 Human Resources

In 2009 the President of France, Nicolas Sarkozy, invited two highly respected, leading French politicians, Michel Rocard and Alain Juppé, both former Prime Ministers, one centre-left and the other centre-right, to identify the national priorities to be followed over the ensuing years. The Rocard-Juppé report was accepted by the French parliament with immediate effect. Most of its initial budget...   More >

A French Revolution for the Third Millennium?: The Reimagining of Higher Education in Contemporary France

Colloquium | May 6 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Berkeley Way West, Room 1215 (2121 Berkeley Way, Berkeley, CA 94720)

 Grace Neville, University College Cork / National University of Ireland

 Graduate School of Education

In 2009 the President of France, Nicolas Sarkozy, invited two highly respected, leading French politicians, Michel Rocard and Alain Juppé, both former Prime Ministers, one centre-left and the other centre-right, to identify the national priorities to be followed over the ensuing years. The Rocard-Juppé report was accepted by the French parliament with immediate effect. Most of its initial budget...   More >

IB Finishing Talk: Title to be announced

Seminar | May 6 | 4-5 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building | Canceled

 Lindsey Hendricks-Franco, UCB (Sousa Lab)

 Department of Integrative Biology

Northern California Symplectic Geometry Seminar: Quantum topology from symplectic geometry

Seminar | May 6 | 4-5 p.m. | 383N STANFORD

 Vivek Shende, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

The discovery of the Jones polynomial in the early 80s was the beginning of "quantum topology": the introduction of various invariants which, in one sense or another, arise from quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. There are many mathematical constructions of these invariants, but they all share the defect of being first defined in terms of a knot diagram, and only subsequently shown by...   More >

Space Tech Symposium 2.0 at Berkeley: Hosted by Space Technologies at Cal

Conference/Symposium | May 6 | 4:30-8:30 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Space Technologies at Cal, Berkeley SkyDeck

Come expand your network at Space Tech Symposium 2.0 @ Berkeley (https://stac.berkeley.edu/sts2) on May 6 by meeting researchers, CEOs of the hottest space startups, and Berkeley faculty as they discuss their visions for the future of space development.

Mobility between space and non-space fields is at an all-time high and we'd love to have you join this conversation. Panelists from NASA,...   More >

$10 Student Tickets, $30 Industry / Faculty Tickets

  Buy tickets online

Join us on May 6th for Space Tech Symposium!

Mobile Augmented Reality Makers Panel

Panel Discussion | May 6 | 6:30-9 p.m. |  UC Berkeley Extension (SF Campus at 160 Spear St.)

 Mayan Shay May-Raz, Augmented Reality SDK Product Manager, Lenovo; Nicholas Butko, Director of Engineering, 8th Wall; Rigel Benton, Interaction Designer, 8th Wall

 Sheng Huang, Head o Business Operations & Partnerships, Sturfee

 UC Berkeley Extension

Come join fellow Augmented Reality and Computer Vision/Machine Learning folks and learn about the world of mobil augmented reality.

  Register online

Tuesday, May 7, 2019

Psychology Department Annual Poster Session

Presentation | May 7 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Department of Psychology

You’re cordially invited to come to the 2019 psychology poster session, where our 2nd year graduate and honors students will present their newest research. Snacks and refreshments will be served.

BIO Express Travel Signature Day

Workshop | May 7 | 10 a.m.-2 p.m. | International House, Hall of History | Note change in location

 Berkeley International Office(BIO))

Berkeley International Office has set aside this special day for *express* travel signatures just for you! Stop by any time during the hours below to get your documents signed on the spot (please read below—""Do You Really Need a Travel Signature?"").

Come to the I-House Great Hall during the following days and times for your Express Travel Signature.
Tuesday, May 7, 10am -...   More >

Twists and Ripples: Self-Organization of 1- and 2D Structures into New Multi-Functional Materials

Seminar | May 7 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 3110 Etcheverry Hall

 Assistant Professor Sameh Tawfick, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 Department of Mechanical Engineering (ME)

Abstract: The bottom-up synthesis and self-organization of precisely engineered 1D and 2D materials enables new multi-functional designs. In particular, owing to their low dimensionality, the use of carbon nanotubes and graphene in load-bearing materials requires deep understanding of their mechanics from the atomic to micron scales.

I will demonstrate extremely reconfigurable materials made...   More >

Webnet: What a UC Berkeley Webdev needs to know

Workshop | May 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 303 Doe Library

 TBD

 Director of Staff Learning and Development

Zed Lopez, Web Architect, Office of Communications and Public Affairs will talk about campus and UC policies, accessibility, technologies, and just plain what to request from whom. A web developer at UC Berkeley needs to know a lot. Join us for this brief survey of what we need to know and more importantly, where to find more.

Please feel free to bring your lunch to the meeting. Please keep it...   More >

Building Teams: BPM204

Workshop | May 7 | 12:30-4:30 p.m. | 24 University Hall

 Kathy Mendonca

 Human Resources

The content covers the characteristics of and the tools necessary for building an effective team.

Dissertation Talk: On Systems and Algorithms for Distributed Machine Learning

Presentation | May 7 | 1-2 p.m. | 521 Cory Hall

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

The advent of algorithms capable of leveraging vast quantities of data and computational resources has led to the proliferation of systems and tools aimed to facilitate the development and usage of these algorithms. Hardware trends, including the end of Moore's Law and the maturation of cloud computing, have placed a premium on the development of scalable algorithms designed for parallel...   More >

Seminar 237/281: Macro/International Seminar - "Fiscal Rules and Discretion under Limited Enforcement"

Seminar | May 7 | 2-4 p.m. | 597 Evans Hall

 Pierre Yared, Professor of Business, Columbia University

 Department of Economics

We study a fiscal policy model in which the government is present-biased towards public spending. Society chooses a fiscal rule to trade off the benefit of committing the government to not overspend against the benefit of granting it flexibility to react to privately observed shocks to the value of spending. Unlike prior work, we examine rules under limited enforcement: the government has full...   More >

  RSVP by emailing Joseph G. Mendoza at jgmendoza@berkeley.edu

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Collaborating Effectively in the Workplace

Workshop | May 8 | 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 24 University Hall

 Sara Thacker, Staff Ombuds Office

 Staff Ombuds Office

To be successful in the rapidly changing workplace, where jobs and people change fast – staff must be able to collaborate with a variety of people within and outside the organization who have the skills, resources, and influence to tackle increasing complex challenges. Collaboration is a skill and a set of practices that are rarely taught in the workplace. In this course staff will learn about...   More >

ICBS Seminar

Seminar | May 8 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. | Berkeley Way West, 2121 Berkeley Way, Room 1217

 Anca Dragan, EECS; Emily Cooper, Vis Science

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Optimal Robot Action for and around People, Anca Dragon

3D Vision in Natural Environments, Emily Cooper

Contact lens optics and binocular vision in childhood myopia

Seminar | May 8 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  100 Minor Addition

 Kate Gifford, Clinical Optometrist - Gerry & Johnson Optometrists, Visiting Research Fellow - Queensland University of Technology (QUT) School of Optometry and Vision Science

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

A globally growing prevalence of myopia has led to increasing investigation and development of optical corrections which slow its progression. Overnight orthokeratology (OK, also known as corneal reshaping) and multifocal soft contact lenses (MFSCLs) show the most consistent results for reducing axial and refractive progression in childhood myopia, by around 50%, with only some understanding of...   More >

The James R. Boyce Housing Studio Symposium

Conference/Symposium | May 8 | 11 a.m.-7:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Please join the Terner Center for Housing Innovation and the College of Environmental Design for a panel discussion, networking lunch, and presentation of student work focused on developing and supporting affordable housing.

Dissertation Talk: Learning to Predict Human Behavior from Video

Seminar | May 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 337A Cory Hall

 College of Engineering

In recent times, the field of computer vision has made great progress with recognizing and tracking people and their activities in videos. However, for systems designed to interact dynamically with humans, tracking and recognition are insufficient; the ability to predict behavior is requisite. In this talk, I will present my work on learning to make predictions from visual input. Using team...   More >

No MVZ Lunch Seminar: Tba

Seminar | May 8 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 TBA

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

Mad cows and crazy proteins: understanding how the prion protein folds and misfolds at the single-molecule level

Seminar | May 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Michael T. Woodside, University of Alberta

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Prion diseases like "mad cow" disease are caused by the protein PrP, which forms an incorrect structure that is both toxic to neurons and infectious, in the sense that it can propagate the misfolding. The mechanisms by which misfolded PrP forms and spreads remain poorly understood. I will discuss our studies of PrP misfolding in the single-molecule regime, using high-resolution optical tweezers...   More >

UCOP Virtual Career Series: Your Culture + Your Career

Workshop | May 8 | 12-1 p.m. |  Virtual

 Cal Alumni Association, University of California Office of the President

This high-impact, online series is designed to provide UC alumni with the insights, information, and connections to launch, grow and expand your career opportunities.

Communication Skills to Support Your Quiet Teens (BEUHS372)

Workshop | May 8 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Section Club

 April Snow

 Jessica Weikers

 Be Well at Work - Work/Life

Many parents are looking for more connection, communication and clarity when interacting with their Quiet Teens, but don’t know how to reach them or be a more central figure in their lives. In this dynamic workshop led by two teen therapists, you will learn how to feel more confident engaging in open conversations with your teen that don’t feel forced, invasive, or strained. When parents and...   More >

  Enroll online

Be Well at Work: Communication Skills to Support Your Quiet Teen

Workshop | May 8 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. |  Tang Center, University Health Services

 April Snow; Jessica Weikers

 Human Resources

Many parents are looking for more connection, communication and clarity when interacting with their Quiet Teens, but don’t know how to reach them or be a more central figure in their lives. In this dynamic workshop led by two teen therapists, you will learn how to feel more confident engaging in open conversations with your teen that don’t feel forced, invasive, or strained. When parents and...   More >

Dissertation Talk: Coded Illumination for Multidimensional Quantitative Phase Microscopy

Seminar | May 8 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | Soda Hall, Visual Computing Lab (VCL)

 Michael Chen, UC Berkeley

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Imaging biological samples under optical microscopes is challenging, since the absorption is too weak to form images with informative contrast. Besides fluorescent imaging techniques, label-free phase contrast imaging methods have been proposed to greatly improve the contrast of transparent samples. In order to efficiently recover quantitative properties, such as 2D phase projection and 3D...   More >

Harmonic Analysis Seminar: Multilinear Restriction and its Use in Decoupling

Seminar | May 8 | 1:10-2 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Kevin O'Neill, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Multilinear restriction estimates are an important tool in the proof of the decoupling inequality for the paraboloid. This talk will introduce and provide a heuristic proof of a multilinear restriction estimate, relying on the multilinear Kakeya inequality discussed in last week's talk. If time permits, attention will be given to applications to decoupling and multilinear decoupling (the latter...   More >

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Scissor Congruence and Mixed Tate Motives

Seminar | May 8 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Daniil Rudenko, University of Chicago

 Department of Mathematics

Scissor congruence theory of polytopes is an old subject going back to 19th century. One of its first major achievements was appearance of so-called Dehn invariant. This mysterious invariant could be properly understood and generalized in the context of the theory of mixed Hodge structures of mixed Tate type. I will explain this relation and show some applications to hyperbolic geometry.

Last Passage percolation: modulus of continuity and the slow bond problem

Seminar | May 8 | 3-4 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Sourav Sarkar, UC Berkeley

 Department of Statistics

The talk has two parts. In the first part we will speak on the modulus of
continuity in Poissonian last passage percolation, a model lying in the
KPZ universality class. In the second part we speak on the “slow bond”
model, where Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process (TASEP) on
$\mathbb{Z}$ (a model which can be thought to simulate a one-way traffic
movement) is modified by adding...   More >

Arithmetic Geometry and Number Theory RTG Seminar: Etale and crystalline companions

Seminar | May 8 | 3:10-5:10 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall | Note change in date, time, and location

 Kiran Kedlaya, UCSD

 Department of Mathematics

Deligne's "Weil II" paper includes a far-reaching conjecture to the effect that for a smooth variety on a finite field of characteristic $p$, for any prime $\ell $ distinct from $p$, $\ell $-adic representations of the etale fundamental group do not occur in isolation: they always exist in compatible families that vary across $\ell $, including a somewhat more mysterious counterpart for $\ell =p$...   More >

"The Multifaceted Roles of Adipocytes: Therapeutic Targets for Diabetes and Beyond”.

Seminar | May 8 | 4-5 p.m. | 114 Morgan Hall

 Philipp Scherer, UT-Southwestern

 Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): Non-Euclidean tetrahedra, mixed Hodge structures and rational elliptic surfaces

Seminar | May 8 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Daniil Rudenko, University of Chicago

 Department of Mathematics

I will explain how to construct a rational elliptic surface out of every non-Euclidean tetrahedra. This surface "remembers" the trigonometry of the tetrahedron: the length of edges, dihedral angles and the volume can be naturally computed in terms of the surface. The main property of this construction is self-duality: the surfaces obtained from the tetrahedron and its dual coincide. This leads to...   More >

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Paris/Berkeley/Bonn/Zürich Analysis Seminar: Multiphase mean curvature flow: From numerical schemes to analysis

Seminar | May 9 | 9:10-10 a.m. | 238 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Tim Laux, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Multiphase mean curvature flow has, due to its importance in materials science, received a lot of attention over the last decades. In this talk, I will show how the gradient-flow structure allows to prove convergence results for several numerically relevant schemes, including phase-field models and thresholding schemes in codimensions one and two. The methods combine basic geometric measure...   More >

Botanical Illustration: Flowers with Catherine Watters

Workshop | May 9 – 10, 2019 every day | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

This two-day class will focus on flowers and introduce you to the fascinating world of Botanical Art. Catherine Watters will teach you to observe, measure and draw plants in great detail and with botanical accuracy. Students will work with graphite, colored pencil and watercolors. All levels are welcome.

$190, $175 members

  Register online or by calling 510-664-7606

Dissertation Talk: Building Interactive Query Systems at Scale

Seminar | May 9 | 10-11 a.m. | 465H Soda Hall

 Anurag Khandelwal, University of California at Berkeley

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Modern cloud data services aim to support increasingly sophisticated queries with interactive response times. These services can be broadly divided into two categories: read-intensive applications such as web services, and write-intensive applications such as real-time monitoring of event streams. In both cases, supporting sophisticated queries interactively and at scale raises significant...   More >

EH&S 403 Training Session

Course | May 9 | 10:30-11:30 a.m. | 370 University Hall | Note change in date

 Jason Smith, UC Berkeley Office of Environment, Health, & Safety

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This session briefly covers the UC Berkeley specific radiation safety information you will need to start work.​ In addition, dosimeter will be issued, if required.

Dissertation Talk: Faster Algorithms and Graph Structure via Gaussian Elimination

Colloquium | May 9 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 606 Soda Hall

 Aaron Schild

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Applied Math Seminar: Four “better” ways to solve the Navier-Stokes equations: simulation of Richardson pair dispersion, ensemble discretization methods, an auxiliary equation approach for UQ, and filtered regularizations.

Seminar | May 9 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Max Gunzburger, Florida State University

 Department of Mathematics

The facetious and self-serving title refers to four approaches for Navier-Stokes simulations. The first involves the analysis, numerical analysis, and an efficient implementation strategy for a recently proposed fractional Laplacian closure model that accounts for Richardson pair dispersion observed in turbulent flows. The second is the exploitation of accurate and widely applicable ensemble...   More >

Dissertation Talk: Constructive Formal Control Synthesis through Abstraction and Decomposition

Presentation | May 9 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 531 Cory Hall

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

It is often easier to describe what we want an autonomous system to do rather than how to do it. A control synthesizer bridges that gap by automatically constructing control software so the closed loop dynamics enforce a desired behavior such as safety or reachability. While many specific instances of control synthesis have elegant mathematical solutions, designing tractable algorithms to compute...   More >

Econ 235, Financial Economics Seminar: Topic Forthcoming

Seminar | May 9 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | C330 Haas School of Business

 Emanuele Colonelli, Chicago Booth

 Department of Economics

Joint with Haas Finance Seminar

Combining C++ and R with Rcpp

Seminar | May 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Sean Wu, Epidemiology

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

This Computational Biology Skills Seminar is taught by graduate students and focuses on software tools, techniques, and libraries that are useful for researchers performing computation and data analysis. There is an emphasis on subjects related to the biological sciences, but many of the techniques are general and the seminar is open to researchers in other disciplines. RSVP for lunch.

Oliver E. Williamson Seminar

Seminar | May 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | C325 Haas School of Business

 Emily Breza, Harvard

 Department of Economics

The Oliver E. Williamson Seminar on Institutional Analysis, named after our esteemed colleague who founded the seminar, features current research by faculty, from UCB and elsewhere, and by advanced doctoral students. The research investigates governance and its links with economic and political forces. Markets, hierarchies, hybrids, and the supporting institutions of law and politics all come...   More >

The Trouble With Testosterone

Seminar | May 9 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Ignacio Moore, Virginia Tech

 Department of Integrative Biology

Dissertation talk: Untethered Microrobots of the Rolling, Jumping and Flying Kinds

Presentation | May 9 | 1-2 p.m. | Cory Hall, 521 Hogan room

 Palak Bhushan, EECS Dept, UC Berkeley

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In this talk we will look at the design of 0.1gram centimeter-scale microbots utilizing different locomotion strategies as a means of transport. The focus won't be on the brain or useful payloads for these bots, but instead on the electro-mechanical design to make these tether-less, which is a necessary precursor to making autonomous microbots.

We start with the design of a micro-ratcheting...   More >

Nanoscale Devices based on Two-dimensional Materials and Ferroelectric Materials

Seminar | May 9 | 1-2 p.m. | 775 Tan Hall

 Dr. Wenjuan Zhu, Assistant Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 College of Chemistry

Further scaling of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) dimensions will soon lead to a tremendous rise in power consumption while limited gain in the performance of integrated circuits. “Beyond-CMOS” devices, based on new materials, device concepts and architectures, can potentially overcome these limitations and further improve the performance, reduce energy consumption, and add novel...   More >

Special Seminar: From signal representations to musical creation: a geometric approach

Seminar | May 9 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Carmine Cella, CNMAT, UC Berkeley Music

 Department of Mathematics

Carmine Emanuele Cella, assistant professor in music and technology at CNMAT, will present work done in the last years in searching good signal representations that permit high-level manipulation of musical concepts. After the definition of a geometric approach to signal representation, the theory of sound-types and its application to music will be presented. Finally, recent research on assisted...   More >

East Bay Science Cafe - the Nature of UC

Presentation | May 9 | 7-8:30 p.m. |  Cafe Leila

 1724 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley, CA 94702

 Peggy Fiedler, Director, UC Natural Reserve System; Kathleen M. Wong, Communication Director, UC Natural Reserve System

 Science@Cal

In the late 1940s, a young University of California researcher watched in dismay as the research plot where he had been studying desert iguanas was bulldozed to build a motel. The experience galvanized him and other UC scientists to establish a library of ecosystems dedicated to research, teaching, and public service. The University of California Natural Reserve System now includes examples of...   More >

Angelo Coast Range Reserve image: Christopher Woodcock