<< April 2019 >>

Monday, April 1, 2019

Latinx History In California: New Research from LRC Visiting Scholars Ivón Padilla-Rodriguez And Lilia Soto

Lecture | April 1 | 12-1 p.m. |  The Shorb House

 2547 Channing way, Berkeley, CA 94720

 Ivón Padilla-Rodriguez, Columbia University; Lilia Soto, University of Wyoming

 The Latinx Research Center

Two lectures on Latinx history in California.

“The Legal Origins of the U.S. Agricultural Child Labor Force: U.S. Child Labor Policy and the of Making Child Migrants in California and Beyond." by Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez.

The U.S. currently employs between 200,000 and 500,000 mostly Latinx agricultural child laborers a year, in spite of the fact that a federal child labor ban was...   More >

Europe and Global Governance

Lecture | April 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

Carlo Monticelli, Vice Governor of the Council of Europe Development Bank, Paris

 Barry Eichengreen, Department of Economics, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, Department of Economics

Why has Europe played such a weak role in the transformation of global economic governance that was triggered by the 2008 financial crisis? Are there viable strategies to enhance Europe’s impact on world economic and financial affairs? Would a stronger European influence be detrimental or beneficial to global stability? Carlo Monticelli’s talk addresses these questions building on insights from...   More >

Carlo Monticelli

New Research from the Latinx Research Center

Lecture | April 1 – 29, 2019 every Monday with exceptions | 12-1 p.m. |  The Shorb House

 2547 Channing way, Berkeley, CA 94720

 The Latinx Research Center

Over the past year, Latinx Studies faculty and doctoral students have been advancing their research at the LRC, with visiting post-doctoral and doctoral students joining campus scholars in focused working groups to advance dissertation and book projects. Join us biweekly every Monday in April, for our "Lunch on the LRC" lecture series to learn about interdisciplinary cutting edge Latinx Studies...   More >

Lecture by Shirley Thompson: Race, Property, and Belonging in Creole New Orleans

Lecture | April 1 | 3-5:15 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

 Shirley Thompson, Associate Professor, Department of American Studies, UT Austin

 Department of English

Behind the Curtain Translational Medicine Lecture

Lecture | April 1 | 4-5 p.m. | 410 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Apr. 1 – Verna Manty Rodriguez (BS ‘82)
Boston Scientific, Stanford Photonics, BTG

These lectures highlight real-world experiences of leaders in the health technologies space. Looking beyond the initial excitement of a concept, industry veterans discuss the heavy lifting on many fronts that gets new ideas out of the lab and into the clinic.

Again for the First Time with Rhonda Holberton

Lecture | April 1 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

As artist Rhonda Holberton talks about her process—describing with her hands the arrangement and heft of the objects that appear in her images—it’s hard not to think of those things and that space as real. But everything, from the objects themselves to the flawlessly diffuse lighting and cool white marble ground, is digitally produced. Holberton makes 3D scans of real objects, then places them in...   More >

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Adventures in extracting punctuated histories at Çatalhöyük

Lecture | April 2 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Burcu Tung, Visiting Scholar, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

This talk will explore the preliminary results of the most recent dating program conducted at the Northern Area of the East Neolithic mound of Çatalhöyük. The results of this final excavation campaign have contributed greatly to the dating program, which utilizes a Bayesian statistics accentuated with an iterative approach to radiocarbon sampling and chronology modelling.

How Safe Are We?: Homeland Security Since 9/11

Lecture | April 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Goldman School of Public Policy, Room 250

 Goldman School of Public Policy

Join UC President, former US Secretary of Homeland Security and former Governor of Arizona Janet Napolitano for a lunchtime talk on Homeland Security since 9/11.

A sushi lunch will be served at 12:00pm and the lecture will begin at 12:30pm. This event is free and open to the public but you must RSVP to attend.

  RSVP online by April 1.

Inside the Black Box of Organizational Life: The Gendered Language of Performance Assessment

Lecture | April 2 | 4-6 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), Large Conference Room

 Shelley Correll, Stanford University

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Department of Psychology, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Department of Sociology

Do formal evaluation procedures really reduce bias? As an organizational practice, are they a smokescreen concealing bias or a great leveler that bolsters meritocracy?

While organizations formalize evaluation procedures to help achieve meritocratic outcomes, they often fail to eliminate bias in practice. Managers play a key role in applying such procedures, but researchers have been unable to...   More >

Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science: C++: an invisible foundation

Lecture | April 2 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Bjarne Stroustrup, Morgan Stanley, Columbia University

 Data Sciences

Designer and implementer of the C++ Bjarne Stroustrup will briefly explain what technical aspects make it so useful. He will focus on design principles, but also touch upon resource management and what it takes to be efficient in various contexts.

Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science: C++: an invisible foundation

Lecture | April 2 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Bjarne Stroustrup, Creator/Designer of C++, Morgan Stanley, Columbia University

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

C++ is one of the key foundations of our software – including much of the open source software becoming fundamental for data science. It is invisible to most people because they use it only indirectly. It's in your computer and your

Jorge Flores | Unwanted Neighbors: The Mughals, the Portuguese, and their Frontier Zones

Lecture | April 2 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Jorge Flores, Professor of Early Modern Global History, Department of History and Civilization, European University Institute, Florence

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Center for Portuguese Studies, Department of History

In December 1572 the Mughal emperor Akbar arrived in the port city of Khambayat. Having been raised in distant Kabul, Akbar had never in his thirty years been to the Ocean. Presumably anxious with the news about the Mughal military campaign in Gujarat, several Portuguese merchants in Khambayat rushed to Akbar’s presence. This encounter marked the beginning of a long, complex, and unequal...   More >

Robert Morrison: Scientific Exchange at the Courts of Mehmed II and Bayezid II

Lecture | April 2 | 5-7 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Robert Morrison, Bowdoin College

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The courts of the Ottoman sultans Mehmed II (d. 1481) and Bayezid II (d. 1512) were, on one hand, the site of significant developments of earlier scientific traditions inherited from Iran and Central Asia. On the other hand, scholars at the Ottoman court were more interested than their predecessors in the scientific culture of non-Islamic societies. Important science came east while the science...   More >

Fascism’s Global Moments: New Perspectives on Entanglements and Tensions between Fascist Regimes in the 1930s and 1940s

Lecture | April 2 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Sven Reichard, University of Konstanz, Germany

 GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Center for German and European Studies, Department of History

In his talk, Professor Reichardt will discuss how a global perspective can help us understand the nature of different fascist empires and the general character of fascism up to the end of World War II. He will focus on cooperation as well as competition between different fascist regimes, especially with regard to their imperial and colonial aspirations during the 1930s and 1940s. While a transfer...   More >

Jewish Identities in Israel: Confrontations, Crises and Novel Conceptions

Lecture | April 2 | 5:30 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Library

 Tomer Persico, Koret Visiting Assistant Professor of Jewish and Israel Studies, UC Berkeley

 Library, Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israel Studies

Over the past three decades the Israeli society witnessed significant revisions in the way it understands itself and its Jewish identity. The collapse of the peace process, the "disengagement" from Gaza and the growing emphasis on self fulfillment have changed social structures that were taken for granted in the past, and have propelled each of the different Jewish "tribes" in Israel - the...   More >

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

The Importance of Being Aryan:: Confronting Nazi Racial Law and the Determination of Iranian National Identity

Lecture | April 3 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall

 Mohammad Rafi, PhD, UC Irvine

 Near Eastern Studies

This lecture builds on Germany's historical relationship with Iran, specifically the politics of the Aryan discourse between Nazi-Germany and Iran in the 1930/40s, thereby exposing the tension between geopolitical strategy and racial politics. After an overview of the history of the term Aryan as it relates to Germany and Iran, this paper traces the Nazis struggle to
define the term Aryan in...   More >

If by Literally You Mean Figuratively: Pierre Bersuire’s Grammar of Allegory in the Latin Moralized Ovid

Lecture | April 3 | 5 p.m. | 6415 Dwinelle Hall

 Justin Haynes, Dr., UC Davis

 Medieval Studies Program

Haroon Mirza | The Creative Repercussions of Counterculture

Lecture | April 3 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 220, Geballe Room, Townsend Center for the Humanities

 Haroon Mirza, Artist

 Asma Kazmi, Assistant Professor, Practice of Art

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of Art Practice Wiesenfeld Lecture Series, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, South Asia Art Initiative, Asian Art Museum

A talk by Haroon Mirza that will examine how ideas seeded in the counterculture movement of the 1960s are now solidifying in contemporary culture and the influence that has had on his work.

Water is Another Word for Life: with Isha Ray

Lecture | April 3 | 6:30-7:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 College of Natural Resources

Thursday, April 4, 2019

The Village: Weaving Local Stories into Theater Epics with Stan Lai

Lecture | April 4 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Stan Lai

 Arts + Design

The Village is one of the most celebrated plays of the recent Chinese Theatre. Stan Lai will discuss the unique process he used to create this work, weaving personal stories and using improvisation as a creative tool. In a changing national and cultural context, he will also discuss the role of theatre, film and other cultural forms as vehicles for preserving fragile collective memories. Stan Lai...   More >

View from the Top: Judy Chou: Being a Biotech Entrepreneur in a 155-Year-Old Company

Lecture | April 4 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium, 3rd floor

 Judy Chou, Senior VP & Global Head of Biotech, Bayer Pharmaceuticals

 College of Engineering

In her talk, Judy will discuss her experience attempting to combine the strengths of a startup within a mature global organization.

The Village: Weaving Local Stories into Theater Epics with Stan Lai

Lecture | April 4 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Stan Lai’s The Village is one of the most celebrated plays of the recent Chinese theater. Lai—cocurator of this season of Arts + Design Thursdays—will discuss the unique process he used to create this work, weaving together personal stories and using improvisation as a creative tool. He will also consider the role of theater, film, and other cultural forms as vehicles for preserving fragile...   More >

Will China Save The Planet?

Lecture | April 4 | 4-5 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Barbara Finamore, Senior Strategic Director for Asia, Natural Resources Defense Council

 Ralph Cavanagh, Energy Co-Director of the Climate & Clean Energy Program, Natural Resources Defense Council

 Institute of International Studies, Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Now that Trump has turned the United States into a global climate outcast, will China take the lead in saving our planet from environmental catastrophe? Many signs point to yes. China, the world's largest carbon emitter, is leading a global clean energy revolution, phasing out coal consumption and leading the development of a global system of green finance.

But as leading China environmental...   More >

POSTPONED - Narratives of Progress and Protection, Contradiction and Refusal: Indigeneity, Gender and Citizenship

Lecture | April 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED TILL FURTHER NOTICE


Fantasia Painter, PhD Candidate in Ethnic Studies, Researcher for the Native/Immigrant/Refugee: Crossings Research Initiative in the Center for Race & Gender

Raquel Pacheco, President’s Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Anthropology, UC Santa Cruz

Brexit, Britain, Scotland: The Future of the UK

Lecture | April 4 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 220 (Geballe Room)

 Allan Little, Former BBC Correspondent

 Institute of European Studies, St. Andrews' Society of San Francisco, Center for British Studies, Anglo-American Studies Program - Berkeley Law

Will Brexit lead to the break-up of Britain and to the independence of Scotland? Allan Little, a prominent BBC journalist, will give a presentation about Brexit and its impact on the United Kingdom. In his talk, Little will focus on the history of the UK nation-state in a broader European, perspective, and will reflect on its future after Brexit. He will pay special attention to the consequences...   More >

Allan Little

The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe: Brittleness, Integration, Science and the Great War

Lecture | April 4 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 142 (Nestrick Room)

 Stefanos Geroulanos, Professor of History, NYU; Stefan-Ludwig Hoffman, Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Department of History, Department of Rhetoric, Center for New Media

The injuries suffered by soldiers during WWI were as varied as they were brutal. How could the human body suffer and often absorb such disparate traumas? Why might the same wound lead one soldier to die but allow another to recover? In The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe, Stefanos Geroulanos and Todd Meyers uncover a fascinating story of how medical scientists came to conceptualize the body...   More >

Avalokitasvara / Avalokiteśvara, Amitābha / Amitāyus and pratyekabuddha / pratyayabuddha: Misinterpretations of Gāndhārī Buddhism by Sanskrit Composers of the Mahāyāna Scriptures

Lecture | April 4 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Seishi Karashima, Soka University, Tokyo

 Center for Buddhist Studies

Śākyamuni seems to have preached in a colloquial language, namely Māgadhī. The scriptures of early Buddhism were transmitted also in various colloquial languages, e.g. Pāli. Probably, many of the early Mahāyāna scriptures were originally transmitted in colloquial languages as well, e.g. Gāndhārī, which were later gradually translated into...   More >

DCRP Lecture: Devanne Brookins

Lecture | April 4 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 106 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Thursday | April 4th | 5:30 pm | The Role of Informal Institutions in Change: Urban Land and Transportation in Ghana

Astronomy Night at UC Berkeley

Lecture | April 4 | 7-10 p.m. | 131 Campbell Hall

 Fatima Abdurrahman, UC Berkeley

 Department of Astronomy

Come join us at Campbell Hall on the UC Berkeley campus on April 4th for a FREE night of astronomy and stargazing on the roof with our fleet of telescopes. UC Berkeley graduate student Fatima Abdurrahman will be telling us all about black holes.

Caliban's Curse: with Viet Thanh Nguyen (2019 Jonathan Bedri Distinguished Writer in English)

Lecture | April 4 | 8 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife

 Viet Thanh Nguyen, University Professor, Aerol Arnold Chair of English, and Professor of English, American Studies and Ethnicity, and Comparative Literature, USC English

 Department of English

We are excited to announce that English alumnus Viet Thanh Nguyen will be giving a talk, "Caliban's Curse", on Thursday, April 4th at 8pm in Maude Fife room (315 Wheeler Hall). Viet is the 2019 Jonathan Bedri Distinguished Writer in English. His debut novel, The Sympathizer, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2016. He is also know for the short story collection, The Refugees. Currently, he is...   More >

Friday, April 5, 2019

Herta Müller, the Aktionsgruppe Banat, and Literary Cartographies in Late 20th-Century Romanian Literature

Lecture | April 5 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Dana Bizuleanu, Lecturer, Department of Applied Languages, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania; Marius Conkan, Research Assistant, Department of Comparative Literature, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Center for German and European Studies

In Communist Romania one had freedom, as long as one took freedom. This is what the members of the Aktionsgruppe Banat believed when they started a literary circle in the 1970s and gradually broke with the tradition of Rumäniendeutsche Literatur. Protest, experiment, and the German village stand at the core of their literature. Having come into contact with members of the group,...   More >

Household Reservoirs of Enteric Pathogens in Rural Bangladesh: Environmental Engineering Seminar

Lecture | April 5 | 12-1 p.m. | 534 Davis Hall

 Erica Fuhemeister and Jean van Buren, PhD candidate, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UC Berkeley

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

Language as Symbolic Power: What's in it for Foreign Language teachers?

Lecture | April 5 | 3-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 (Classroom side)

 Claire Kramsch, Professor Emerita, German & Graduate School of Education

 Berkeley Language Center

As I am transforming my Language & Power syllabus into a book for Cambridge UP series “Key Topics in Applied Linguistics”, I have been overwhelmed by the extent to which language these days is used to exert symbolic power, symbolic violence and even “symbolic warfare” (Brooks, 2017) both in politics and in everyday life. Yet as language teachers, we still teach language as if it consisted merely...   More >

Tony Stewart | Subjunctive Explorations - Fictive Sufi Tales of Early Modern Bengal: The 2nd ISAS-VSB Lecture on Religion in the Modern World

Lecture | April 5 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Tony K. Stewart, Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Chair in Humanities Professor and Chair, Department of Religious Studies, Vanderbilt University

 Robert Goldman, Professor of Sanskrit and Catherine and William L. Magistretti Distinguished Professor in South & Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Vedanta Society Berkeley, The Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Center for Dharma Studies, Center for the Study of Religion

A lecture by Prof. Tony K. Stewart, professor of religion at Vanderbilt University, and a specialist in the religions and literatures of the Bengali-speaking world.

Monday, April 8, 2019

The Two-Tier Faculty System: Is It Here To Stay?

Lecture | April 8 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 402 Barrows Hall

 Dan Clawson, Professor, U Mass, Amherst

 Berkeley Faculty Association, UC-AFT, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment

Employers everywhere use two-tier employment systems to divide employees, to avoid confronting the power of established workers with privileges, and to create a wedge that, over a period of years, destroys the conditions for all workers in the category. In today’s university this has meant, above all, the emergence of a tenure-system and non-tenure-system of employment. This has been an effective...   More >

Authoritarianism Accepted: Contextualizing EU and Russian Involvement in the Balkans

Lecture | April 8 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Branislav Radeljic, Reader in International Relations, University of East London

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Institute of European Studies

The EU and Russia have each sought to consolidate their influence in the Balkans and the relationship between Brussels, Moscow and Belgrade has never been straightforward. Back in the 1990s, the Brussels authorities helped the Milosevic regime stay in power and only decided to oust it when such a move appeared suitable, whereas the Russians have sided with their fellow Serbs throughout. More...   More >

Discrete Models of Concrete Materials and Structures

Lecture | April 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 Professor John Bolander, University of California, Davis

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

The Key to Shambhala: The Mystifier as a Cultural Problem

Lecture | April 8 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Ilya Vinitsky, Professor, Slavic Languages and Literatures, Princeton University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Slavic Graduate Colloquium Spring 2019 Series

John Ashbery, Non-Performer?: Prosody and Voice Studies

Lecture | April 8 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, D-Lab Convening Room

 D-Lab, https://dlab.berkeley.edu/event-host/d-lab

 Digital Humanities Lab

How and much might a poet’s reading style change over time, and how can it be studied? What role might be played by venue, media format, poetic content, authorship, audience, and so on?

Considering theoretical assumptions and empirical approaches in voice studies, this talk explores these questions through the unlikely example of John Ashbery, a poet with a reputation as a non-performative...   More >

Berkeley Journalism Showcase

Lecture | April 8 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Richard Koci Hernandez; Ken Light; Carrie Lozano; Dawn Porter

 Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

Free Berkeley Journalism showcase at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive with professors Richard Koci Hernandez, Ken Light, Carrie Lozano and Dawn Porter. Come be inspired by the power of visual storytelling.

Richard Koci Hernandez is an internationally recognized, award-winning innovator in journalism and multimedia. Koci...   More >

The Threat of Fascism and How to Fight It

Lecture | April 8 | 7:15-9:15 p.m. | 101 Moffitt Undergraduate Library

 Christoph Vandrier, Sozialistiche Gleichheitspartei

 International Youth and Students for Social Equality (UC Berkeley RSO) ASUC sponsored

Speaker: Christoph Vandreier, German Trotskyist, prominent leader of the fight against fascism and author of "Why Are They Back: Historical Falsification, Political Conspiracy and the Return of Fascism in Germany."

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Plants and People Lunchtime Lectures: Evolution and domestication of the pre-Columbian crop plant Bomarea edulis

Lecture | April 9 | 12-1 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

As a part of our "Year of Ethnobotany" celebrations, the Garden will be hosting monthly lunch time lectures featuring the research of UC Berkeley graduate students, post-docs, and faculty.

In April, join Carrie Tribble, NSF Graduate Research Fellow and PhD Candidate in Integrative Biology for a the evolution and domestication of the pre-Columbian crop plant Bomarea edulis.

Free with Garden Admission

  Register online or by calling 510-664-7606

Europe’s "Refugee Crisis" and the Colonial Archive or Is Art Universal?

Lecture | April 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Fatima El-Tayeb

 Institute of European Studies, The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington

Using the case study of the "Multaqa" project, which brought refugees from Iraq and Syria to the museums of Berlin exhibiting ancient art from these countries, Fatima El-Tayeb’s talk explores the connections between Europe’s colonial legacy, rising global inequality and the "universal museum" as a model of Enlightenment (and as exemplified in the controversial Humboldt Forum).

Fatima El-Tayeb...   More >

GUH Lecture: Showing is Knowing: The Curator as Designer & Scholar

Lecture | April 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Join us for this exciting public discussion on the curator as designer and scholar with former Getty Research Institute curator, Wim de Witt, and Assistant Curator of Asian Art at the Cantor Arts Center, Padma Maitland. This event is part of the...   More >

Objects of Special Note(s): Constructions of Containment, Writers and Readers by Late Roman Ivory Writing Tablets

Lecture | April 9 | 4-5 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Professor Ann Kuttner, University of Pennsylvania

 Department of History

Some 200 Late Antique ivory diptychs have survived to this day. The lecture intends to explore the rich visual language of these objects.

Rules for Wrongdoers: Tanner Lectures on Human Values by Arthur Ripstein

Lecture | April 9 | 4:10-6:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Arthur Ripstein, Professor of Law and Philosophy, University of Toronto

 University of California, Berkeley

Arthur Ripstein will present a three day lecture series with commentary by Christopher Kutz, Oona Hathaway, and Jeff McMahan. This event will be held on April 9, 10, & 11, 2019. There will be a seminar and discussion by Professor Ripstein and the commentators on the third day, April 11th. All days' events are free and open to the public. No tickets required.

Arthur Ripstein

Baxter Liberty Initiative: Power and the Politics of Education Reform: Learning from Katrina

Lecture | April 9 | 4:15 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Terry M. Moe, William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University

 Bruce Fuller, Professor, Graduate School of Education, UC Berkeley

 Department of Political Science, College of Letters & Science

Hurricane Katrina physically destroyed New Orleans' school buildings; in the process, it also lifted constraints of power. Decision makers turned into revolutionaries, creating the most innovative school system in the country.

Professor Terry Moe will share insights from his book and shed light on the city's path from failure to revolution, discussing the role of power shown through this...   More >

 LSEvents@berkeley.edu. Register online

Dimitri Gutas | The Qur'an of the Elite: Avicenna's "Isharat" and the Development of Paraphilosophy as "Islamic" Philosophy

Lecture | April 9 | 5-7 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Dimitri Gutas, Yale University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Near Eastern Studies

Avicenna's Isharat constitutes a turning point in the history of philosophy in Islam. It was at one point labeled as "the Qur'an of the elite," and Avicenna himself was dubbed as "the seal of the philosophers." The significance of these developments and the contents of the Isharat are analyzed in an effort to understand the direction which scientific thought took after Avicenna toward the...   More >

NOTE NEW DATE: Sadia Saeed | Politics of Desecularization: Law and the Minority Question in Pakistan

Lecture | April 9 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) | Note change in date

 Sadia Saeed, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, University of San Francisco

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Talk by Sociologist Sadia Saeed on her new book that examines how the contentious relationship between Islam, nationalism, and rights of religious minorities has been debated and institutionalized in colonial India and Pakistan.

Speaker Bio
Sadia Saeed is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the...   More >

Heavy Metal Bamboo: Making Archaic Bamboo Instruments Modern in Bandung, Indonesia

Lecture | April 9 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Henry Spiller, Professor of Music, UC Davis

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This lecture examines how musicians in West Java, Indonesia create localized, alternative modernities by putting old bamboo music technology to new uses. Two Bandung-based groups, Karinding Attack and Galengan Sora Awi, are contrasted - both of which have adapted traditional bamboo folkways and musical styles to localize some modern global values

Henry Spiller

The Economic and Political Impact of Migration in Romania

Lecture | April 9 | 5:15-6:45 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Gabriel Badescu, Professor, Faculty of Political Science and Public Administration, Babes-Bolyai University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Eastern Europe has the largest population loss in modern history and emigration is one of the main reasons behind the decline. Romania suffered one of the most severe population declines, with a 10 per cent loss in the fifteen years to 2007- the year in which Romania joined the EU.
I will discuss Romania’s case in a comparative perspective and analyze the likely outcomes of migration on short...   More >

Environmental Design Archives Gallery Talk - Edit Heath: Design is a System of Values

Lecture | April 9 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Wurster Hall, Room 112

 Human Resources

Novak an Oakland artist and scholar working with local clay and sustainable practices in ceramics, will be exploring the lesser-known work of Edith Heath, situate her practice within a historical context, and critique traditional narratives of mid-century ceramic history.

Edith Heath: Design is a System of Values

Lecture | April 9 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Wurster Hall, Wurster Gallery, Room 121

 Rosa Novak

 Environmental Design Archives

Join us for our final Gallery Talk of the academic year with Oakland artist and researcher Rosa Novak!

Tuesday, April 9, 2019
Wurster Gallery, Room 121

6:30 to 7pm - Light Refreshments
7 to 8pm - Lecture

Free to UC Berkeley Students, Staff, Faculty, and Friends of the EDA

Suggested $10 donation for those outside UC Berkeley

2019 Taubman Lectures: The Navel of the Dream: Freud's Jewish Languages

Lecture | April 9 | 7-9 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Professor Naomi Seidman, University of Toronto

 The Herman P. and Sophia Tuabman Chair in Jewish Studies, The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

The 2019 Taubman Lectures: April 9, 11, and 16:
These lectures explore the role of Jewish languages in Freud's writings and in the reception and translation of psychoanalysis. Were Hebrew and Yiddish translations a minor episode in the dispersion of psychoanalysis, or do they have a special place in this history, as the "lost originals" of Freud's German writings?

  RSVP online

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Looking for Law in all the Wrong Places: Marianne Constable, Leti Volpp, and Bryan Wagner, eds

Lecture | April 10 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for Race and Gender

For many, the right place to look for law is in constitutions, statutes, and judicial opinions. This book looks for law in the “wrong places” — in the realms of language, text, image, culture, and other sites in which no formal law appears.

German and U.S. Second World War Soldiers’ Cemeteries in Italy - Cultural Perspectives

Lecture | April 10 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Birgit Urmson, Art Historian

 Institute of European Studies

Styles of soldiers’ commemoration reveal national self-images. In this talk, Dr. Birgit Urmson analyzes US WWII military cemeteries in Italy and their German counterparts as art-historical artifacts. Their aesthetics, together with results of archival research, reveal a self-assured US united in values, projecting victory and Pax Americana,
while a struggling Germany searches for its democratic...   More >

Birgit Urmson

BIDS Data Science Lecture: Do as eye do: efficient content-adaptive processing and storage of large fluorescence images

Lecture | April 10 | 3:10-4 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Bevan Cheeseman, Applied Mathematician, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Modern microscopes create a data deluge with gigabytes of data generated each second, and terabytes per day. Storing and processing this data is a severe bottleneck, not fully alleviated by data compression. We argue th

Marijuana Legalization as Frontier Capitalism

Lecture | April 10 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Barrows Hall, 820/Social Science Matrix

 Dr. Erica Lagalisse, Postdoctoral Fellow, London School of Economics

 Michael Polson, Ciriacy-Wantrup Postdoctoral Fellow, UC Berkeley

 Cannabis Research Center, Berkeley Center for Social Medicine, UCB/UCSF Program in Medical Anthropology

Erica Lagalisse’s ongoing multi-sited ethnographic research of both medical(ized) and black-market marijuana production, distribution and consumption suggests that the legalization of marijuana functions as a form of frontier capitalism. Traditional producers are not granted rights to the marijuana strains and products they have developed; their appropriation by elites constitutes a form of...   More >

  RSVP by emailing Michael Polson at mpolson@berkeley.edu by April 10.

Just Compost: Pathways to Social Equity and Community Engagement through Soil-carbon Sequestration

Lecture | April 10 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Morgan Hall, Morgan Lounge

 Berkeley Food Institute, Center for Diversified Farming Systems

Janaki Jagannath will discuss the link between social equity and compost production in the most impacted regions of the state, including pathways to community engagement in disadvantaged communities and soil-carbon sequestration in the era of climate change.

Rules for Wrongdoers: Tanner Lectures on Human Values by Arthur Ripstein

Lecture | April 10 | 4:10-6:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Arthur Ripstein, Professor of Law and Philosophy, University of Toronto

 University of California, Berkeley

Arthur Ripstein will present a three day lecture series with commentary by Christopher Kutz, Oona Hathaway, and Jeff McMahan. This event will be held on April 9, 10, & 11, 2019. There will be a seminar and discussion by Professor Ripstein and the commentators on the third day, April 11th. All days' events are free and open to the public. No tickets required.

ARCHITECTURE LECTURE: Caroline O’Donnell

Lecture | April 10 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, APR 10, 6:30pm. Join us for a talk with the Director of the M.Arch program at Cornell University about dynamic architecture and recent work from her practice CODA. Sponsored by the Joan Draper Architectural Research Endowment. Open to all!

Thursday, April 11, 2019

Organic Design: A Dream like a Dream and Ago with Stan Lai and Sandra Woodall

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Sandra Woodall; Stan Lai

 Arts + Design

Stan Lai and Sandra Woodall will hold a lively conversation about “organic design” and how that plays out in the upcoming play being created at Berkeley, Ago.

Sandra Woodall is a visual artist and scenic and costume designer. Ms. Woodall has contributed scenic and costume designs to American Conservatory Theatre, Eureka Theatre, Magic Theater, San Francisco Ballet, Frankfurt Ballet, Stuttgart...   More >

Tripodi Lecture on Research Methodologies: The Afterlife of Incarceration

Lecture | April 11 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | Haviland Hall, Haviland Commons

 Dr. Reuben Jonathan Miller, University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration

 Social Welfare, School of

Dr. Miller will spend some time on methods, specifically the practice of ethnographic research, the debates on positionality and reflexivity and what we can learn by getting close to our work. He will draw from his field notes to make a case for proximity and to demonstrate his case methodologically and analytically. More specifically, Dr. Miller will discuss what it means to bring oneself into...   More >

Staging Justice

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

Deniz Göktürk
Associate Professor, German

Leti Volpp
Robert D. and Leslie Kay Raven Professor of Law in Access to Justice at the UC Berkeley School of Law, Director of Center for Race and Gender

Rules for Wrongdoers: Tanner Lectures on Human Values by Arthur Ripstein

Lecture | April 11 | 4:10-6:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Arthur Ripstein, Professor of Law and Philosophy, University of Toronto

 University of California, Berkeley

Arthur Ripstein will present a three day lecture series with commentary by Christopher Kutz, Oona Hathaway, and Jeff McMahan. This event will be held on April 9, 10, & 11, 2019. There will be a seminar and discussion by Professor Ripstein and the commentators on the third day, April 11th. All days' events are free and open to the public. No tickets required.

Buddhist Contemplation and Higher Education: Researching and Adapting Contemplation in Modern Universities

Lecture | April 11 | 5-7 p.m. |  Goldman Theater, Brower Center

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 David Germano, University of Virginia

 Center for Buddhist Studies

Buddhist contemplation has a long history with complex educational institutions, namely Buddhist monasteries all across Asia. In recent decades, there has been a surge of interest in the American academy in such practices, including scientific research on their efficacy and mechanism, possible adaptation for new pedagogical approaches in the classroom, and inspiration for fresh perspectives on...   More >

Over Sixty in the Sixties: The Older Generation and Youth Protest in West Germany

Lecture | April 11 | 5-6 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Christina von Hodenberg, Director at German Historical Institute, London

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Center for German and European Studies

Recent works on the German and European sixties are all about youth. Educated middle-class students, artists and bohemians face off against equally educated professors, intellectuals and politicians. The ‘establishment’ of the aged and middle-aged population is a barely sketched-out backdrop to a story that unfolds from the perspective of young activists.

Christina von Hodenberg

2019 Taubman Lectures: The Navel of the Dream: Freud's Jewish Languages

Lecture | April 11 | 7-9 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Professor Naomi Seidman, University of Toronto

 The Herman P. and Sophia Tuabman Chair in Jewish Studies, The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

The 2019 Taubman Lectures: April 9, 11, and 16:
These lectures explore the role of Jewish languages in Freud's writings and in the reception and translation of psychoanalysis. Were Hebrew and Yiddish translations a minor episode in the dispersion of psychoanalysis, or do they have a special place in this history, as the "lost originals" of Freud's German writings?

  RSVP online

Charles Mills Gayley lecture with Dorothy Hale

Lecture | April 11 | 8-10 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

 Dorothy Hale, Professor, Berkeley English

 Department of English

Professor Dorothy Hale will be delivering this year's Charles Mills Gayley Lecture on Thursday, April 11th at 8pm. Please join us in the Maude Fife room (315 Wheeler) for her talk entitled "'It is the otherness that is the challenge': J.M. Coetzee and Novelistic Ethics” with a reception following in the English Department Lounge (330 Wheeler Hall).

Friday, April 12, 2019

Plants, Bugs, and Molecules: The Chemistry of Plants and Insects with Greti Séquin

Lecture | April 12 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Greti Séquin will introduce the subject of her new book, The Chemistry of Plants and Insects: Plants, Bugs, and Molecules. With her enthusiastic and accessible way of connecting chemistry with plants and insects, she presents organic compounds in a motivating, understandable context that captures the interest of people who would like a deeper understanding of the natural world.

Free with Garden admission; Free for UCBG members, UC Berkeley students, staff, and faculty

  Register online

Problems, problem-solvers, and local impacts: A view from Peruvian Amazonia: Environmental Engineering Seminar

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 534 Davis Hall

 Dr. Christine Beier, Assistant Adjunct Professor, Department of Linguistics, UC Berkeley

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

From Enigma to Virtual Splendor - The Nazi-Era Theft and Restitution of Guillaume de Machaut’s Extraordinary Medieval Manuscript, the Ferrell-Vogüé

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Carla Shapreau, Institute of European Studies

 Institute of European Studies, Department of Music

The stunning Guillaume de Machaut medieval codex known as the Ferrell-Vogüé has been cloistered in private ownership for nearly all of its long life. It is a manuscript of exceptional importance to the fields of music, literature, and art. It was also one of the most significant musical losses suffered on French soil during World War II. This lecture will focus on a time in the life of this...   More >

Catherine B. Asher | The Qutb Complex: India and the Persianate World

Lecture | April 12 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Catherine Asher, Professor, Department of Art History, University of Minnesota

 Sugata Ray, Associate Professor, History of Art Department

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, South Asia Art Initiative, The Berkeley Urdu Initiative, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Department of History of Art

A talk by Dr. Catherine Asher, Professor in the Department of Art History at the University of Minnesota.

Confronting Chance: Models of Medicine in the Hippocratic Corpus

Lecture | April 12 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Mark Schiefsky, Department of Classics, Harvard University

 Department of Classics, Department of Philosophy

ERG 25th Annual Lecture with Thomas Lovejoy

Lecture | April 12 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Thomas Lovejoy, University Professor, Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University

 Energy and Resources Group

The Energy and Resources Group is delighted to present Thomas Lovejoy, Senior Fellow at the United Nations Foundation and University Professor in the Environmental Science and Policy department at George Mason University, as speaker for the 25th Annual Lecture on Energy and Environment.

Saturday, April 13, 2019

Cal Day Keynote: Storytelling, Design, and Social Change

Lecture | April 13 | 9:30-10:15 a.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Eric J. Cesal is a designer, writer, and noted post-disaster expert who has led on-the-ground reconstruction programs after the Haiti earthquake and Superstorm Sandy. This talk will explore using the art of storytelling and design for social change.

How to Apply Design Thinking to Your Career and Your Life: Cal Day

Lecture | April 13 | 10:45 a.m.-12 p.m. | UC Berkeley Extension (Golden Bear Center), Room 206

 Rebecca Andersen, Career Services at the UC Berkeley Information School

 UC Berkeley Extension

Explore the concepts of design thinking and how to apply them to career and life goals in this interactive Cal Day workshop.

Design thinking is a methodology for solving complex problems that's used by designers in developing new products. It relies on research, communicating with others, experimenting, and rapidly iterating solutions.

Come test drive design thinking concepts and identify...   More >

 Free Cal Day event. Register online

Monday, April 15, 2019

Who Dreams of Us? Reading, Inclusivity, and Contemporary Swedish-Language Literature

Lecture | April 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Saskia Vogel

 Institute of European Studies, Nordic Studies Program

In autumn 2017, a Neo-Nazi organization was given permit for a protest outside the annual Göteborg Book Fair. Leading up to this moment was the Book Fair’s controversial decision to yet again allow "Nya Tider" (New Times), a far-right extremist publication, to exhibit in the convention center. Debates raged for months and months in Sweden, as well as in Finland, the 2017 guest of honor at the...   More >

Saskia Vogel

New Research from the Latinx Research Center

Lecture | April 1 – 29, 2019 every Monday with exceptions | 12-1 p.m. |  The Shorb House

 2547 Channing way, Berkeley, CA 94720

 The Latinx Research Center

Over the past year, Latinx Studies faculty and doctoral students have been advancing their research at the LRC, with visiting post-doctoral and doctoral students joining campus scholars in focused working groups to advance dissertation and book projects. Join us biweekly every Monday in April, for our "Lunch on the LRC" lecture series to learn about interdisciplinary cutting edge Latinx Studies...   More >

Design Field Notes: Tom di Maria

Lecture | April 15 | 4-5 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Tom di Maria has served as Director of Creative Growth Art Center since 2000. He has developed partnerships with museums, galleries and international design companies to help bring Creative Growth's artists with disabilities fully into the contemporary art world. He speaks around the world about the Center’s major artists and their relationship to both Outsider Art and contemporary culture. Prior...   More >

From 'Daang Matuwid' Gone Crooked to 'Build Build Build': The Politics of Transport Infrastructure in the Philippines, 2010 to the Present

Lecture | April 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 John Sidel, Sir Patrick Gillam Chair in International and Comparative Politics, London School of Economics and Political Science

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This lecture examines the political dynamics, institutional arrangements, and economic interests which have shaped the varied and shifting patterns of transport infrastructure policy and politics in the Philippines under the Aquino (2010-2016) and Duterte (2016 to the present) administrations.

John Sidel

Behind the Curtain Translational Medicine Lecture

Lecture | April 15 | 4-5 p.m. | 410 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Apr. 15 – Carlos Schuler (PhD ‘91)
The agony and ecstasy of medical product development

These lectures highlight real-world experiences of leaders in the health technologies space. Looking beyond the initial excitement of a concept, industry veterans discuss the heavy lifting on many fronts that gets new ideas out of the lab and into the clinic.

Chilean Education Today: New Regulations, Social Movements, and Uncontested Emergencies

Lecture | April 15 | 4:30 p.m. |  2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies)

 Daniel Leyton; Alejandra Falabella; Maria Teresa Rojas; Cristobal Madero

 Center for Latin American Studies

The Chilean education system has gone through profound changes in the last decade. New regulations are now in place, but there are more challenges to overcome. Chilean Professors Leyton, Falabella, Rojas, and Madero will discuss these challenges from their various perspectives.

A classroom in Chile. (Photo by Ryan Greenberg.)

CANCELED - Neelam Khoja | Qandahar and New Sovereign Claims in Early Modern Iran and Hindustan

Lecture | April 15 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) | Canceled

 Neelam Khoja

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies; Associate Professor in the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by social and political historian, Neelam Khoja considers how Iranian and Afghan warlords legitimized emerging empires in Early Modern Iran and Hindustan by investigating 18th century Qandahar.

Gaining More Control Of Your Time: Strategies and tactics for living the life you'd like to live

Lecture | April 15 | 6:30-8 p.m. | UC Berkeley Extension (Golden Bear Center), Room 207

 Marty Nemko, host of the weekly radio program Work with Marty Nemko on KALW-FM

 UC Berkeley Extension

Some people feel like marionettes: pulled by external forces, with too little control over how they live their life, at work and outside of work. Other people aren’t even sure how they’d want to live their life. Still other people know what they’d ideally like but can’t pull the trigger on making it happen. Or they’re frustrated because they get less done than they wish they could.

In this...   More >

  Register online

Hate Speech, Algorithms, and Digital Connectivity

Lecture | April 15 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Zeynap Tufekci, Independent Writer and Public Scholar

 D- Lab and Digital Humanities at Berkeley, Berkeley Center for New Media, The Center for Technology and Society at the Anti-Defamation League, Digital Humanities Working Group, The Library, Office of the vice Chancellor for Research, The Visual Resources Center

Since the launch of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, reports of hate speech targeting various minority groups have risen dramatically. Although this surge is well-reported, it remains difficult to quantify the magnitude of the problem or even properly classify hate speech, let alone identify and measure its effects. Keyword searches and dictionary methods are often imprecise and overly blunt...   More >

$0

 Free Seat Reservation Required. Tickets go on sale April 5. Buy tickets online

Hate Speech, Algorithms, and Digital Connectivity with Zeynep Tufekci: Digital Humanities Faire Keynote

Lecture | April 15 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Zeynep Tufekci

 Data Sciences

In this keynote lecture for the spring 2019 Digital Humanities Faire, Zeynep Tufekci will enter into dialogue with hate speech research being conducted on campus through the Social Sciences D-Lab, focusing on corporate responsibility and the importance of preserving free speech.

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Ernest S. Kuh Distinguished Lecture: From Cory Hall to Silicon Valley: Building a Startup that Thrives

Lecture | April 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium, 3rd floor

 John Georges Ph.D., '94 EECS, Partner, QMC Telecom; David Curtrer, Ph.D., '98 EECS, CEO, Kumu Networks

 College of Engineering, Eta Kappa Nu (HKN)

In their talk, “From Cory Hall to Silicon Valley: Building a Startup that Thrives,” they will talk about Berkeley Engineering's role in their careers. While John and Dave were still graduate students at Berkeley, they founded LGC Wireless, a telecom equipment manufacturer. They also co-founded NextG Networks, which sold to Crown Castle for $1 billion in 2012. We are delighted to welcome them back...   More >

Deceptive Stability? Germany in Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Last Term

Lecture | April 16 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Niko Switek, University of Washington

 Institute of European Studies, Pacific Regional Office of the GHI Washington, Center for German and European Studies

Looking from the US to Germany many observers admire chancellor Angela Merkel as an element of stability in turbulent times. She is in her fourth term as chancellor and recently gave a passionate speech defending multilateralism and free trade at the Munich Security Conference - once main pillars of US foreign policy.
Yet politics in Germany turned turbulent themselves as result of the refugee...   More >

Niko Switek

Dancing Loyalty: Revolutionary Movements in Cuba after 1959

Lecture | April 16 | 4 p.m. |  2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies)

 Center for Latin American Studies

After the 1959 Cuban Revolution, new professional opportunities opened up for dancers of African descent. As Fidel Castro desegregated public parks and beaches, Cuban choreographers founded new companies with racially diverse casts.
Elizabeth Schwall is a Visiting Lecturer of Latin American History at UC Berkeley and a Fellow at the Center for Ballet and the Arts at New York University.

An integrated Cuban dance troupe employs revolutionary imagery. (Photo courtesy of Danza Contemporánea de Cuba, Havana, Cuba.)

The Last Whalers: Telling the Story of One of the World's Last Whaling Tribes

Lecture | April 16 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Doug Bock Clark, journalist

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Graduate School of Journalism

Award-winning journalist Doug Bock Clark will discuss his book The Last Whalers, which chronicles three years in the lives of the people of Lamalera, on the island of Lembata in eastern Indonesia, who hunt sperm whales with bamboo harpoons as they reckon with the encroachment of the modern world.

Doug Bock Clark

Knowing Me, Knowing You: Self-Knowledge, Authority, and Dialogue in Early Plato

Lecture | April 16 | 5-7 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Fiona Leigh, University College, London

 Department of Philosophy

Lunacy Administration: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry: A Lecture by Mab Segrest

Lecture | April 16 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

 Mab Segrest

 HIFIS Disability Studies Cluster

What does it mean that a culture that promoted slavery and lynching decided who was and was not sane? What do we see from an asylum in a slave-drenched culture such as Georgia's about how racism haunts American psychiatry in ways that impact us profoundly today? What can we know about the lives that patients lived in an institution segregated by race and gender, and in what ways did they resist,...   More >

Lunacy Administration: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry: A Lecture by Mab Segrest

Lecture | April 16 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler

 Mab Segrest

 Disability Studies Program

What do we see from an asylum in a slave-drenched culture such as Georgia's about how racism haunts American psychiatry in ways that impact us profoundly today? Mab Segrest addresses these questions based on her fifteen-year study of Georgia's state mental hospital at MIlledgeville, once the largest in the world, with a graveyard of 25,000 people.

Lunacy Administration: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry

Lecture | April 16 | 5 p.m. | 315 Wheeler Hall

 Mab Segrest

 Department of Psychology

Mab Segrest for four decades has worked in a range of settings organizing, teaching, and shaping scholarship as a public intellectual. Her new book, Administrations of Lunacy, will come out next Spring from the New Press. It is based on Segrest's 15-year study of the archives of Georgia's state mental hospital at Milledgeville. A 25th anniversary edition of Segrest’s award-winning book, Memoir of...   More >

2019 Taubman Lectures: The Navel of the Dream: Freud's Jewish Languages

Lecture | April 16 | 5:30-9 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Professor Naomi Seidman, University of Toronto

 The Herman P. and Sophia Tuabman Chair in Jewish Studies, The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

The 2019 Taubman Lectures
These lectures explore the role of Jewish languages in Freud's writings and in the reception and translation of psychoanalysis. Were Hebrew and Yiddish translations a minor episode in the dispersion of psychoanalysis, or do they have a special place in this history, as the "lost originals" of Freud's German writings?

  RSVP online

A Greek officer and an Egyptian lady: Ethnic diversity in a wealthy household in Hellenistic Egypt

Lecture | April 16 | 5:30-8 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Library

 Katelijn Vandorpe, Professor of Ancient History, KU Leuven

 Center for the Tebtunis Papyri

When Alexander the Great’s general Ptolemy sets up a new dynasty of pharaohs, many Greeks emigrate to the land of the Nile. In her CTP Distinguished Lecture, Professor Vandorpe outlines the policies of the Ptolemaic kings and queens in this early multicultural society and then focuses on the eventful life of a family that is richly documented by a bilingual papyrus archive. This bicultural...   More >

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

The Power of Plurality: Encounters, Emergence, and Boundary-Making in the Nineteenth-Century Industrial Far West

Lecture | April 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 David Hyde, Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

This talk situates industrial sites in the post-Gold Rush American West as dynamic, pluralistic spaces of encounter, negotiation, entanglement, and emergence- sites of creativity and community building (as much as control and exploitation) that re-configured boundaries of difference along multiple axes in important and lasting ways.

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Timothy Hampton: Bob Dylan's Poetics: How the Songs Work

Lecture | April 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Hampton’s close examination of Bob Dylan's songs locates the artist’s transgressive style within a long history of modern (and modernist) art.

Through the Window: People, Data, Technology, and National Security

Lecture | April 17 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Dr. Andrew L. Brooks, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

 Data Sciences

The U.S. intelligence community faces an increasingly complex and evolving national security landscape.

In this talk, Dr. Andrew L. Brooks, the Chief Data Scientist at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, details how his organization is navigating this landscape through efforts focused on people, data, and technology.

Through the Window: People, Data, Technology, and National Security

Lecture | April 17 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Dr. Andrew L. Brooks

 Information, School of

Dr. Andrew L. Brooks is the Chief Data Scientist at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Visual bilingualism and the funerary space: Keys to understanding the spatial semiotics of Central Asian tombs in 6th century China

Lecture | April 17 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Pénélope Riboud, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

The dominant religion of pre-Islamic Sogdiana was a local form of Zoroastrianism, and this has led most scholars to assume a correlation with the religious beliefs and practices within the Sogdian community settled in China. And indeed, many aspects of these tombs show that Central Asian funerary practices were maintained. However, some aspects of “Sino-Sogdian” tombs, such as the treatment of...   More >

The Great Chernobyl Acceleration

Lecture | April 17 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Kate Brown, Professor of History in the Science, Technology and Society Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

In April 1986, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded and sent upwards of 50 million curies into the surrounding environment. Brown argues that to call this event an “accident” is to sweep aside radioactive incidents in the region that occurred before and after the accident. In the 1960s, Soviet researchers learned that the people living in the Pripyat Marshes surrounding the Chernobyl Plant...   More >

Fact, Fiction, and Film: Turning History into Narrative: with Hallie Rubenhold

Lecture | April 17 | 6 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 330, Berkeley English Lounge

 Hallie Rubenhold, Author | Broadcaster | Historical Consultant

 Department of English

Hallie Rubenhold is a bestselling author, social historian, broadcaster and historical consultant for TV and film. Her most recent book, The Five is the first biography of the five victims of Jack the Ripper and reclaims the narrative in favour of the women, rather than the murderer. In addition to The Five, Hallie is the author of two works of non-fiction, including; The Covent Garden Ladies,...   More >