<< January 2019 >>

Saturday, January 5, 2019

Decolonize the Imagination: Future Landscapes with Tosha Stimage

Film - Feature | January 5 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Do you ever imagine that the world could be radically different for generations to come? Future Landscapes is a practical community exercise engaging difficult social problems through dialogue and art. Interdisciplinary artist Tosha Stimage leads a collage and weaving workshop that focuses on imagining the reconstruction of historical, social, and geographic inequity.

Tosha Stimage’s work...   More >

Sunday, January 6, 2019

Science Film Festival: Contact

Film - Series | January 6 | 5 p.m. |  Lawrence Hall of Science

 Dr. Jill Tarter, SETI Institute

 Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS)

During its 50th anniversary year, the Lawrence Hall of Science is presenting a series of inspiring science films, introduced by scientists from UC Berkeley and beyond.

Contact tells the story of a mysterious radio signal discovered by Dr. Ellie Arroway, and the implications of first contact.

This film will be introduced by Dr. Jill Tarter, Emeritus Chair for SETI Research at the SETI...   More >

$12

  Buy tickets online or by calling 510-642-5132

Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Harakiri

Film - Feature | January 9 | 7-9 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Based on the Puccini opera Madame Butterfly (but changing the title character from geisha to noblewoman) and one of the first European films to depict Japanese culture, Harakiri was considered a lost film for decades until it was discovered in the mid-1980s in the Netherlands Film Museum. Intrigued with Asian design motifs and obsessed with authenticity, Lang obtained sets and costumes from the...   More >

Thursday, January 10, 2019

The Golem

Film - Feature | January 10 | 7-8:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

This visually astounding retelling of the Golem myth was inventively brought to life through the collaboration of codirector/actor Paul Wegener, set designer Hans Poelzig, and gifted cinematographer Karl Freund (The Last Laugh; Metropolis), whose work here is some of his best. In medieval Prague, a rabbi creates a monster to protect his people from destruction, but the monster, of course, soon...   More >

Friday, January 11, 2019

Ikiru

Film - Feature | January 11 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Ikiru is a searing portrait of modern society in which individual will is the vassal to an impotent bureaucracy. It tells of a municipal government functionary, Mr. Watanabe (the marvelous actor Takashi Shimura), who wraps red tape around the most urgent entreaty: a mother’s plea for a park where a cesspool now exists. Watanabe is looking at his watch when we meet him, a habitual gesture that...   More >

Ikiru

Film - Feature | January 11 | 7-9:20 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Ikiru is a searing portrait of modern society in which individual will is the vassal to an impotent bureaucracy. It tells of a municipal government functionary, Mr. Watanabe (the marvelous actor Takashi Shimura), who wraps red tape around the most urgent entreaty: a mother’s plea for a park where a cesspool now exists. Watanabe is looking at his watch when we meet him, a habitual gesture that...   More >

Saturday, January 12, 2019

Bicycle Thief

Film - Feature | January 12 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

De Sica’s neorealist tale finds the despair of postwar Italy evident in the faces of its men. Though the film also explores how women cope with poverty, it devotes most of its energy to documenting Rome’s streets and the depressed, unemployed men who populate them, anxiously waiting for work. One such man is Antonio Ricci (Lamberto Maggiorani), who miraculously lands a job hanging movie posters...   More >

Not Wanted

Film - Feature | January 12 | 8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Last year we paid tribute to Ida Lupino, an actress turned independent producer and director who created “problem” films of a uniquely hard-edged variety, dealing with such subjects as rape, bigamy, and unwed motherhood, and shot on location with low budgets and a telegraphic film language that put every penny to work. At that time her first feature production, Not Wanted, was unavailable; it is...   More >

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Destiny

Film - Feature | January 13 | 1 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Made shortly after Lang’s mother died, Destiny is “the director’s most thoughtful and compassionate meditation on mortality” (Patrick McGilligan). Inspired by a dream from Lang’s childhood, the film is a fantasy/allegory set in three historical periods—ancient Baghdad, seventeenth-century Venice, and imperial China—bracketed by a modern-day framing story. Destiny was Lang’s first film to gain him...   More >

Hall of Mirrors: Four Films by Warren Sonbert

Film - Feature | January 13 | 4 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Warren Sonbert (1947–1995) was one of the seminal figures working in American experimental film before his premature death from complications relating to AIDS. Hall of Mirrors (1966), made while Sonbert was a student at New York University, is a triptych in which each part rhymes beautifully with the whole; it features cameos by Warhol superstars Rene Ricard and Gerard Malanga. Divided Loyalties...   More >

Ugetsu

Film - Feature | January 13 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

In sixteenth-century Japan, with the pandemonium of civil wars a looming presence in their lives, the potter Genjuro and his wife long to be “rich and safe,” respectively. But artistic vanity draws Genjuro into the paradisiacal realm of a phantom enchantress. In a parallel tale, Genjuro’s brother-in-law Tobei, out for military glory, achieves a general’s rank for his fraudulent exploits—another...   More >

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Artist’s Talk: Masako Miki

Film - Feature | January 16 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

In conjunction with her current MATRIX exhibition, Japan-born, Berkeley-based artist Masako Miki will talk about Shinto traditions in Japan, how they address questions of boundaries in life, and how these ideas have developed and manifested in her felt sculptures and installation work.

Everlasting Moments

Film - Feature | January 16 | 3:10 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Based on the life of Maria Larsson—wife, mother, and pioneering photographer—Everlasting Moments is a lovingly detailed portrait of a Finnish woman in early twentieth-century Sweden, a volatile place marked by war, temperance movements, and labor uprisings. Married to the erratic Sigfrid Larsson, alcoholic manual laborer and consummate charmer, Maria struggles to provide for her ever-expanding...   More >

Workingman's Death

Film - Feature | January 16 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Michael Glawogger (who died in 2014) wondered if, in the digital age, heavy manual labor is disappearing, or maybe just becoming invisible. In this film the megadirector offers portraits of grueling work and fearless workers, allowing us to reimagine what work is and what survival means in the twenty-first century, when it’s every man for himself, and God has replaced the state. In illegal...   More >

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Harp of Burma

Film - Feature | January 17 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

A fatalistic elegy for the war dead, Harp of Burma links beauty with a sense of loss, and loss with salvation. Burma at the close of World War II is a no-man’s-land, a quiet emptiness where there used to be life. But the Himalayas still move villagers to dream and captured Japanese soldiers to sing in sweet harmony; Burma is still “Buddha’s country.” Mizushima, a harp-playing scout with the...   More >

Friday, January 18, 2019

Bicycle Thief

Film - Feature | January 18 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

De Sica’s neorealist tale finds the despair of postwar Italy evident in the faces of its men. Though the film also explores how women cope with poverty, it devotes most of its energy to documenting Rome’s streets and the depressed, unemployed men who populate them, anxiously waiting for work. One such man is Antonio Ricci (Lamberto Maggiorani), who miraculously lands a job hanging movie posters...   More >

Nosferatu

Film - Feature | January 18 | 8:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

In Nosferatu, F. W. Murnau departed from the artifice associated with German Expressionism to invest the natural world with an unnerving incandescence that surpasses any studio-created image. Filming on location, he managed to draw from the jagged profiles of the Carpathian Mountains, and the narrow streets and distorted architecture of a Baltic village, the most horrific sense of all: that of a...   More >

Saturday, January 19, 2019

The Gold Rush

Film - Feature | January 19 | 3:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Charlie Chaplin said that The Gold Rush was the film for which he would like to be remembered; it glitters with some of his most memorable nuggets of comedy. In the frozen wastes of the Klondike, where hordes endure hardship in the quest for gold, Chaplin's hapless Lone Prospector takes shelter in the cabin of a hungry giant, who hallucinates Charlie into a startlingly convincing chicken. In...   More >

Megacities

Film - Feature | January 19 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Mexico City has grown so enormous that no one knows where it ends. Bombay’s population is so dense it can’t be counted. Michael Glawogger takes us deep into these and the other “megacities,” Moscow and New York, telling stories of people struggling at the bottom of the urban food chain. These are the working poor, with jobs that keep them and their families barely alive—like Babu Khan, who sifts...   More >

When a Woman Ascends the Stairs

Film - Feature | January 19 | 8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Hideko Takamine portrays the consummate Mikio Naruse heroine: high-minded, determined, and out of her element in a sordid world. Here it is the back-street bars of Tokyo’s Ginza district, which Naruse re-creates in all its busy detail and nighttime poetry. Keiko is a mama-san, or bar hostess, a modern, lower-scale incarnation of the geisha. A widow at thirty, and exploited by her selfish family,...   More >

Sunday, January 20, 2019

M

Film - Feature | January 20 | 2 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Lang’s masterpiece is a terrifying excursion into an urban underworld where it is difficult to distinguish morally between the activities of organized crime and organized law enforcement. Peter Lorre gives his immortal performance as a pathetic child murderer pursued by both the law and the syndicate. In the rigor of its construction, where theme, style, and mood all express a kind of entrapment...   More >

Not Wanted

Film - Feature | January 20 | 4:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Last year we paid tribute to Ida Lupino, an actress turned independent producer and director who created “problem” films of a uniquely hard-edged variety, dealing with such subjects as rape, bigamy, and unwed motherhood, and shot on location with low budgets and a telegraphic film language that put every penny to work. At that time her first feature production, Not Wanted, was unavailable; it is...   More >

Workingman's Death

Film - Feature | January 20 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Michael Glawogger (who died in 2014) wondered if, in the digital age, heavy manual labor is disappearing, or maybe just becoming invisible. In this film the megadirector offers portraits of grueling work and fearless workers, allowing us to reimagine what work is and what survival means in the twenty-first century, when it’s every man for himself, and God has replaced the state. In illegal...   More >

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

The Fallen Idol

Film - Feature | January 23 | 3:10 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

The New Yorker’s Anthony Lane called The Fallen Idol “the most tightly drawn of all” the collaborations between writer Graham Greene and director Carol Reed. Lane writes, “Ralph Richardson plays Baines, the butler at a foreign embassy in London. The ambassador has gone away, leaving his young son, Philippe (Bobby Henrey), in the care of Baines and the hectoring Mrs. Baines (Sonia Dresdel). The...   More >

One Way or Another

Film - Feature | January 23 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

This masterpiece of Cuban cinema ingeniously integrates documentary and fiction to offer an unflinching analysis of the problems of urban life in Castro’s Cuba and the changes that are coming, one way or another. With the revolution barely a decade old, a woman and a man come to grips with racial, sexual, religious, and class conflicts carried over from the old society. Sara Gómez (the first...   More >

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Metropolis

Film - Feature | January 24 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Lang’s futuristic superproduction is an anxiety dream of urban dystopia expressed as science fiction. Set in the year 2026, Metropolis envisions a repressive techno-oligarchy in which soaring Art Deco towers and overhead freeways mock an underclass of techno slaves ruled by a “supertrustee” (Alfred Abel), who lives with his collaborators in the paradisiacal nightclub of Yoshiwara. Lang even...   More >

Friday, January 25, 2019

Nasser’s Republic: The Making of Modern Egypt

Film - Feature | January 25 | 4 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

An intriguing overview of Egypt’s political history in the modern age, Nasser’s Republic examines the transformative influence of Gamal Abdel Nasser (1918–1970) on the Arab world. Through his leadership of the 1952 revolution and rise to power as Egypt’s second president, Nasser challenged Western powers and championed Arab and African liberation. He fought against unemployment, poverty, and...   More >

The Mother and the Whore

Film - Feature | January 25 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

A mammoth account of three castaways from the sixties and the sexual revolution. Jean-Pierre Léaud is at the center of the maelstrom for nearly the entire three and a half hours as a narcissistic, perpetually unattached cafe denizen who waffles between two women—the girlfriend with whom he lives (Bernadette Lafont) and a promiscuous nurse he brings home (Françoise Lebrun). The film makes an...   More >

Saturday, January 26, 2019

Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind

Film - Feature | January 26 | 3 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Hayao Miyazaki might consider his single greatest work to be not one of his films, but rather the thousand-page manga epic Nausicaä that he labored to complete between 1982 and 1994. In Nausicaä, genetically engineered weapons have burned civilization to the ground, leaving behind the seeds of a new global ecology that has made humans aliens on their own planet. A thousand years after the...   More >

Things to Come

Film - Feature | January 26 | 5 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

A busy philosophy professor, Nathalie (impeccably embodied by Isabelle Huppert), moves purposefully between classes, lunches with her husband and grown children, meetings with her publisher, and the apartment of her ailing mother, expertly balancing her time. But a series of unexpected upsets forces her to rethink her relationships and herself. Nathalie’s unspoken grief, fear, and anger are...   More >

Cafe Lumiere

Film - Feature | January 26 | 8:15 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Coffee, Time, and Light is the original Japanese title of Hou Hsiao-hsien’s gentle tribute to Yasujiro Ozu, which seamlessly weaves those three themes into a meditative look at love—or the absence of it—in contemporary Tokyo. Living alone in the city, the strong-willed Yoko (pop singer Yo Hitoto) wanders its streets, coffee houses, and train stations, seemingly paying more attention to random...   More >

Sunday, January 27, 2019

The Films of Frank Stauffacher

Film - Feature | January 27 | 2 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

A commercial artist, Frank Stauffacher started the groundbreaking Art in Cinema series of experimental and independent film at the San Francisco Museum of Art (now SFMOMA) in 1946 to help foster a community of adventurous cinemagoers. The series also encouraged a number of local artists to begin making films, and by 1948, Stauffacher too had picked up a camera, first photographing two films for...   More >

Goodbye First Love

Film - Feature | January 27 | 4 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Subtle modulations of emotion and the search for meaning in the face of adversity, themes that recur throughout Hansen-Løve’s films, are particularly well expressed in her semiautobiographical masterpiece Goodbye First Love. The nuanced coming-of-age story focuses on a young woman, Camille (Lola Créton), and the effects of an enduring teenage love affair. Camille’s frustrated commitment to her...   More >

Double Suicide

Film - Feature | January 27 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Masahiro Shinoda’s first film for Japan’s avant-garde Art Theatre Guild, Double Suicide strikingly reinterprets Monzaemon Chikamatsu’s famed 1720 bunraku puppet play involving the doomed love between a married paper-shop owner and a courtesan; here, it’s not just the play that is presented, but the entire presentation of the play. We begin with the kurogo (men dressed in black who traditionally...   More >

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Things to Come

Film - Feature | January 30 | 3:10 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

A busy philosophy professor, Nathalie (impeccably embodied by Isabelle Huppert), moves purposefully between classes, lunches with her husband and grown children, meetings with her publisher, and the apartment of her ailing mother, expertly balancing her time. But a series of unexpected upsets forces her to rethink her relationships and herself. Nathalie’s unspoken grief, fear, and anger are...   More >

Film Screening and Director's Talk: Watergate: with Academy-Award winning director Charles Ferguson (U.S., 2018)

Film - Documentary | January 30 | 6 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Charles Ferguson; Harley Shaiken

 Center for Latin American Studies

Watergate tells the comprehensive story of the scandal, from the first troubling signs in Richard Nixon’s presidency to his resignation and beyond. Crucially, the film also situates Watergate in the context of all the issues it raised – many of which, of course, now resonate powerfully with current events.

After the screening, Academy Award-winning director Charles Ferguson will speak in...   More >

Watergate: Film Screening and Director's Talk

Film - Feature | January 30 | 6-9 p.m. | Bechtel Engineering Center, Sibley Auditorium

 Charles Ferguson; Maria Echaveste; Harley Shaiken

 Center for Latin American Studies

Watergate tells the comprehensive story of the scandal, from the first troubling signs in Richard Nixon’s presidency to his resignation and beyond. After the screening, Academy Award-winning director Charles Ferguson will speak in conversation with Harley Shaiken and Maria Echaveste.

(Image courtesy of Representational Pictures.)

Out on the Street

Film - Feature | January 30 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

During an acting workshop, ten Egyptian workers distill their experiences of injustice and exploitation at the hands of bosses, police, and the court system into a series of vignettes. The resulting film integrates workshop exercises and reenactments, with the men shifting between roles and stories, and with various factory spaces marked out on the floor of the rooftop “studio.” The filmmakers...   More >

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Father of My Children

Film - Feature | January 31 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Inspired by the life of the independent film producer Humbert Balsan, Father of My Children depicts a producer struggling to balance his unflagging dedication to independent cinema with the need for time with his beloved wife and daughters. The film, which won a special jury prize at Cannes, is a tribute to one man’s vocation and a bittersweet love letter to filmmaking itself. The chaos and...   More >

On Screen: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth

Film - Documentary | January 31 | 7-8:30 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

The Pruitt-Igoe Myth revisits the history of the public housing complex of the same name in St. Louis, Missouri. Famous within architectural history as an iconic failure of modernist planning and cited as an example of the inefficacy of public assistance in political circles, the buildings were demolished in the 1970s. The film questions these myths, calling for a more complex understanding of...   More >