<< November 2018 >>

Thursday, November 1, 2018

On Routes of Slavery: The African Cultural Diaspora with Ahmad Sikainga

Lecture | November 1 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Arts + Design

In collaboration with Cal Performances and the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, this lecture, presented by Ahmad Sikainga, will discuss the African Diaspora in relation to the performance The Routes of Slavery (1444–1888). Currently at the Department of History at the Ohio State University, Sikainga’s academic interests embrace the study of Africa, the African Diaspora, and the...   More >

Talking with the Trees: John Muir’s Nature Spirituality

Lecture | November 1 | 10-11:30 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden, and the Center for the Arts & Religion, Graduate Theological Union

The iconic hero of the wilderness, John Muir, held an ecstatic relationship to trees. While Muir’s writings about trees helped lay the foundations for federal laws that aimed to protect wilderness forests as national treasures, they also index Muir’s deeply religious response to trees as living, sentient beings. This talk explores Muir’s nature spirituality that endowed trees with a kind of...   More >

Free with Garden admission ($12); Free for UCBG members, GTU and UC Berkeley students, staff, and faculty

  Register online

The Nicaraguan Crisis and the Battle over History

Lecture | November 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. |  2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies)

 Myrna Santiago, UC Berkeley

 Center for Latin American Studies

Professor Myrna Santiago argues that the crisis in Nicaragua is not only a conflict over the fate of the Ortega-Murillo presidency, but also over the memory of the Sandinista Revolution and the country's political history. Nicaraguans’ perspectives on the presidential couple depends, at heart, on how they interpret the history and legacy of the Sandinista Revolution. In the process, various...   More >

Men outside the Museo de la Revolución in Léon, Nicaragua. (Photo by Alexander Schimmick.)

AHMA Colloquium - The Preservation of Disability

Lecture | November 1 | 4-5:15 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 David Gissen, California College of the Arts

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

This paper is part of a larger lecture series entitled "Digital Humanities and the Ancient World." The events are co-sponsored by the AHMA Colloquium and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Counter-memory and Justice in Armed Conflicts

Lecture | November 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

Angana P. Chatterji, Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Project and Visiting Research Anthropologist, Center for Race & Gender

Mariane C. Ferme, Professor of Anthropology and African Studies, Curator of African Ethnology at the Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Jorde Symposium: James Forman, Jr.: Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America

Lecture | November 1 | 4 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Booth Auditorium

 Devon Carbado, UCLA School of Law

 James Forman, Jr., Yale Law School; L. Song Richardson, UCI Law School; David Sklansky, Stanford Law School

 Ms.

The 2018 Jorde Symposium will feature Pulitzer Prize winner James Forman, Jr., Professor of Law at Yale Law School speaking about his book "Locking Up Our Own: Crime & Punishment in Black America." The lecture features comments by Devon Carbado of UCLA Law, L. Song Richardson of UC Irvine Law and David Sklansky of Stanford Law School. Book sales will follow the lecture

Daniel M. Kammen | The Clean Energy Transition in Bangladesh - Local and Global Impacts and Opportunities: The Chowdhury Center Distinguished Lecture for 2018

Lecture | November 1 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) | Note change in location

 Daniel M. Kammen, Director of Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL); Professor in the Energy and Resources Group (ERG); and Professor of Public Policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy

 Isha Ray, Associate Professor at the Energy and Resources Group and Co-Director of the Berkeley Water Center at University of California, Berkeley

 The Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies, Energy and Resources Group

A lecture by Distinguished Professor of Energy and Chair of the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California, Berkeley and a former Science Envoy for the State Department, Prof. Daniel M. Kammen.

The Wonder of the World: Merleau-Ponty, Cezanne, and the meaning of painting

Lecture | November 1 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, Library of French Thought, 4229 Dwinelle

 William D. Adams, Senior Fellow, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundationhttps://mellon.org/

 Department of French

William D. Adams is a Senior Fellow at the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and a former Chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Victoria Bergstrom, of the French Department, will be his respondent.

Searching for Dark Matter

Lecture | November 1 | 6:30-7:30 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Matt Pyle, Department of Physics

 Science@Cal

What is dark matter? For decades, firm astronomical evidence from observations of stars and galaxies has indicated that most of the matter in the universe cannot be seen directly in telescopes. Instead, this matter must be observed indirectly through its gravitational pull on the objects that we can see. This is how the term “dark matter” was coined…But how do we search for something we can’t...   More >

Evidence for dark matter in the Bullet Cluster

Astronomy Night at UC Berkeley

Lecture | November 1 | 6:30-9:30 p.m. | 131 Campbell Hall

 Dan Werthimer, UC Berkeley

 Department of Astronomy

The final UC Berkeley Astronomy Night of the 2018 season features a talk by Dan Werthimer, the Marilyn and Watson Alberts SETI Chair and chief scientist of the Berkeley SETI Research Center, on the search for extraterrestrial life with SETI@home.

As always, come join us at Campbell Hall on the UC Berkeley campus on the first Thursday of every month for a FREE night of astronomy and stargazing...   More >

Friday, November 2, 2018

Talk featuring composer/performer/improviser Tyshawn Sorey

Lecture | November 2 | 12:30-2 p.m. |  CNMAT (1750 Arch St.)

 Center for New Music and Audio Technologies (CNMAT)

Tyshawn Sorey is a composer and musician whose music assimilates and transforms ideas from a broad spectrum of musical idioms and defies distinctions between genres, composition, and improvisation in a singular expression of contemporary music.

Ultrafast Manipulation of Topological Phases in WTe2 Nanolayers: Nano Seminar Series

Lecture | November 2 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Prof. Aaron Lindenberg, Stanford Univ., Materials Science & Engineering

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

Manipulation of topological invariants in quantum materials plays a key role in topological switching applications and can stabilize emergent topological phases in otherwise trivial materials. Lattice strain has been proposed as one means of tuning these topological invariants. However, conventional means of applying strain are not extendable to controllable time-varying protocols. In particular,...   More >

Are New Vehicle Emissions Standards Effective and Efficient?

Lecture | November 2 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 James Sallee, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Transportation Studies

UC Berkeley's James Sallee will present Are New Vehicle Emissions Standards Effective and Efficient? on November 2, 2018 at 4 p.m. in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building. Join us for cookies and beverages at 3:30 p.m.

Are New Vehicle Emissions Standards Effective and Efficient?

Lecture | November 2 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 James Sallee, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Transportation Studies

UC Berkeley's James Sallee will present Are New Vehicle Emissions Standards Effective and Efficient? on November 2, 2018 at 4 p.m. in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building. Join us for cookies and beverages at 3:30 p.m.

Work between National Socialism and the Economic Miracle: A Forgotten Crisis in the Early Federal Republic

Lecture | November 2 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Joerg Neuheiser, University of California, San Diego

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West

Joerg Neuheiser’s current research focuses on post-war Germany and the history of work in 20th century Europe. He is working on a book on the West German work ethic after 1945 in which he analyzes the legacy of Weimar and Nazi work experiences after 1945, the migration of so-called “guest workers” from the 1960s onwards and the German experience of economic, technological and cultural change in...   More >

Monday, November 5, 2018

Ethnic Studies At 50: Alumni Speaker Series: Native American Child Removal, Indigenous Activism, and the Creation of an Archive

Lecture | November 5 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall

 Amy Lonetree, Associate Professor of History, UC Santa Cruz

 Department of Ethnic Studies

The history of Indigenous child removal is a history of violence, and one that has taken different forms over time. This presentation focuses on those most affected by removal and separation through an analysis of oral histories of Native American adoptees collected in collaboration with the First Nations Repatriation Institute, a community based advocacy organization. These testimonies are...   More >

Two Lectures on Sor Juana:: Voices In Sor Juana's Planetarium: Listening to Primero sueño and On Being Woke: Sor Juana dos veces despierta

Lecture | November 5 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  The Latinx Research Center

 2547 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Ivonne Del Valle, Associate Professor, Colonial Studies, UC Berkeley; Emilie Bergman, Professor, Spanish, UC Berkeley

 The Latinx Research Center

In these lectures, Prof. Bergamann & Assoc. Prof. Del Valle contrast the nun’s writing about herself in relation to knowledge with that of Descartes’ in the Discourse on the Method & examine the way Sor Juana creates a powerful self...   More >

Sketching Big Data

Lecture | November 5 | 4-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Jelani Nelson, Harvard Universty

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

A "sketch" is a data structure supporting some pre-specified set of queries and updates to a database while consuming space substantially (often exponentially) less than the information theoretic minimum required to store everything seen, and thus can also be seen as some form of functional compression. The advantages of sketching include less memory consumption, faster algorithms, and reduced...   More >

Design Field Notes: Stephanie Chen

Lecture | November 5 | 4-5 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Stephanie Chen is a design researcher based in San Francisco. Over the last decade she has helped companies and organizations, including Nokia, Pepsi Co., and Tipping Point Community, uncover meaningful insights through human-centered design research. She currently leads user research and insights for the Immersive Computing group at HP Inc.

Broadening Our Impacts at UC Berkeley and Beyond: An Evening with Dr. France Córdova, Director of the U.S. National Science Foundation

Lecture | November 5 | 4:30-7:30 p.m. |  Lawrence Hall of Science

 France Córdova, National Science Foundation

 Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS)

Dr. France Córdova, Director of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), will speak about the importance of broader impacts to the work of the agency and science research overall. As the public science center for UC Berkeley, the Lawrence Hall of Science serves as a key part of the university’s robust infrastructure for education, public outreach, and broader impact activities. This event is...   More >

 Invitation only.

$0

  Register by calling Kalie Sacco at 510-642-4195, or by emailing Kalie Sacco at kaliesacco@berkeley.edu

LAEP Lecture Series: Dorothée Imbert

Lecture | November 5 | 6-7 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Mon, Nov 5, 6:00pm - Dorothée Imbert has carried out extensive research on landscape modernism with an emphasis on Europe and California.

Avenali Lecture: Todd Gitlin: The Other 1968s: Counterrevolution, Communism and Desublimation

Lecture | November 5 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

In his exploration of the political culture of the 1960s, Todd Gitlin (Columbia University) questions the popular image of that era as a politically progressive one. He traces the resurgence of white supremacy, rule by a wealthy elite, and other signs of a repressive “counterrevolution” which, in his view, led to the current political moment.

Todd Gitlin Photo by Edwin Tse

Richard Prum: The Evolution of Beauty

Lecture | November 5 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 315 Wheeler Hall

 Richard Prum, Yale University

 Global Urban Humanities

“Beauty happens.” So writes eminent ornithologist and MacArthur Fellow Richard O. Prum in his bestselling The Evolution of Beauty (2017), a New York Times Ten Best Books of the Year. Prum argues that the spectacular physical and behavioral variety of avian beauty represents not just genetic fitness but also the evolution of form through the purely aesthetic choices of female birds. He argues that...   More >

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Fall 2018 Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | October 30 – December 4, 2018 every Tuesday | 190 Doe Library

 Deb Agarwal, Department Head, Data Science and Technology, Computational Research Division, LBNL; Rosemary Gillespie, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy & Management; Rachel Slaybaugh, Assistant Professor, Nuclear Engineering

 Kristina Hill, Associate Professor, Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning and Urban Design

 Data Sciences

The Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science, co-hosted by the The Berkeley Division of Data Sciences and the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), return for the Fall 2018 series. Lectures feature Berkeley faculty doing visionary research that illustrates the character of the ongoing data revolution.

Tales from the front lines of wrangling earth science data: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | November 6 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Deb Agarwal, Senior Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, LBNL

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Building the data capabilities and products needed to help enable understanding of watershed dynamics, tropical forests, carbon flux, and soil carbon. are just a few of the areas where we are working. This talk will describe the role inter-disciplinary data science is playing in helping to address these challenges. Many challenges encountered are not addressed by the tools available today.

The...   More >

The Invention of God

Lecture | November 6 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220

 Thomas Römer, Professor of the Hebrew Bible at the Collège de France and the University of Lausanne

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Who invented God? And what does “inventing” a god mean? This talk will trace the evolution of the deity of the great monotheisms―Yhwh, God, or Allah―by tracing Israelite beliefs and their context from the Bronze Age to the end of the Old Testament period in the third century BCE. We will draw on a long tradition of historical, philological, and exegetical work and on recent...   More >

Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Study of Tamil Nadu’s Village Assemblies

Lecture | November 6 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Vijayendra Rao, World Bank

 Institute of International Studies

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Remembering Queen Mary: Heritage Conservation of Free Blacks on St. Croix, U.S.V.I.

Lecture | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 William White, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

This talk explores the ways positionality plays a central role in the way heritage conservation is practiced by black Crucians and white Danish scholars.

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Anne Nesbet: The Orphan Band of Springdale

Lecture | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Nesbet’s historical novel for younger readers takes place during World War II in Springdale, Maine. It tells the story of eleven-year-old Gusta, who is sent to live in an orphanage run by her grandmother after her labor-organizer father is forced to flee the country.

Translation Strategies for Filmic Text: Idiom vs. Explicit Meaning in English Subtitles

Lecture | November 7 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 María Labarta Postigo, Professor, Faculty of Philology, Translation, and Communication, University of Valencia, Spain

 Berkeley Language Center

In this presentation, I will examine how idioms in original Spanish and German filmic texts are translated in English subtitles. My goals are to shed to light on strategies used in the translation process and to explore how translation can affect understanding and reception by the audience.

Between Center and Periphery? Higher Education, Social Sciences and Intellectuals from Islamic Habitus in Turkey

Lecture | November 7 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Deniz Ilhan, Stony Brook University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The modernization program endorsed by the Republic of Turkey, and the institutions which established the infrastructure for educational, cultural and scientific development went hand in hand with a nationalist interpretation of Westernization and secularization agenda. Parallel to those in other Muslim-majority contexts throughout the world, the reactions to this program has been diverse, which...   More >

New Literary History at 50

Lecture | November 7 | 1-2 p.m. | 306 Wheeler Hall

 Bruce Holsinger, LINDEN KENT MEMORIAL PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH; EDITOR, NEW LITERARY HISTORY, New Literary History

 Department of English

Please join Bruce Holsinger, incoming editor of New Literary History, for an informal presentation and discussion about the journal’s current direction and future prospects as NLH begins its fiftieth anniversary year. Intended primarily for early career scholars in the literary humanities (advanced graduate students, instructors, and assistant professors) though open to all, the hour-long session...   More >

Facing the Limits of Decoloniality from a Southeast Asian Peri-urban Forest

Lecture | November 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Juno Salazar Parrenas, Assistant Professor, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Ohio State University

 Nancy Lee Peluso, Henry J. Vaux Distinguished Professor of Forest Policy, UC Berkeley

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This talk argues that recent scholarly efforts to center decoloniality and indigenous knowledges risk romanticization when universalized. The research is drawn from transdisciplinary ethnographic field research in Sarawak, East Malaysia, with Malay and Iban orangutan-handlers and orangutans between 2010-2016.

Shuddhabrata Sengupta | Kinetic Contemplation: Raqs Media Collective in Medias Res

Lecture | November 7 | 5-7 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, Room 315

 Shuddhabrata Sengupta, Artist and writer, and member of Raqs Media Collective

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Arts Research Center, Department of English, Department of Art Practice, University of California Humanities Research Institute, The South Asia Art Initiative at UC Berkeley

A talk by Shuddhabrata Sengupta, artist and writer, and member of Raqs Media Collective.

Illuminating Biology at the Nanoscale and Systems Scale by Imaging: 2018 Emilio Segrè Lecture

Lecture | November 7 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Xiaowei Zhuang, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, David B. Arnold Jr. Professor of Science, Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Professor of Physics, Harvard University

 Department of Physics

As a fundamental unit of life, a cell is comprised of numerous different types of molecules that form intricate interaction networks, which function collectively to give the cell its life. Dissecting the inner workings of a cell thus requires imaging methods with molecular specificity, molecular-scale resolution, and dynamic imaging capability such that molecular interactions inside the cell can...   More >

The Art of Giving Feedback: Thriving in Science Monthly Lecture: November, 2018

Lecture | November 7 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Stanley Hall, 105 & Atrium

 Cal Facilitation Team, LEAD Center

 Thriving in Science

Is your team or group finding it challenging to communicate expectations? Do some team members volunteer for tasks, but not follow through? If these situations sound familiar, then let us teach you how to give effective feedback. In the workshop, you will learn the best language to use when addressing difficult situations in team settings. We will go over the best way to approach these issues and...   More >

Theoretically Speaking Series — Training Artificial Intelligence by Playing Games

Lecture | November 7 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  David Brower Center

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Thore Graepel, Google DeepMind

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

Intelligence can be viewed as the ability of agents to achieve goals in a wide range of environments. If we wish to use machine learning to train intelligent agents, we need ways of creating rich environments that provide appropriate challenges and feedback signals to learning agents. Just as in real life (and evolution), the most challenging environments for learning agents arise from...   More >

Free

  Registration opens October 22. Register online by November 6.

ARCHITECTURE LECTURE: Neeraj Bhatia

Lecture | November 7 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, NOV 7, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk with the Fall 2018 Joseph Esherick Visiting Professor of Practice, a Professor at the California College of the Arts, co-director of The Urban Works Agency, and founder of The Open Workshop. Open to all!

Midterm Elections: Moving Forward

Lecture | November 7 | 8-9:30 p.m. | 222 Wheeler Hall

 Darren Zook, Bridge USA

 Bridge USA

In the wake of one of the most anticipated midterm elections in modern American history, BridgeUSA invites you to join Professor Darren Zook as he talks about the impact these elections will have moving forward. Key to the discussion will be the issues surrounding political diversity, increasing partisanship in Washington, and influence on future generations.

Prof. Darren Zook lectures in the...   More >

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Picturing Franklin Lloyd Wright: Pedro Guerrero, Photographer with Ray Telles

Lecture | November 8 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Ray Telles

 Arts + Design

Raymond Telles’ thirty-five year career in film and television includes the production of numerous documentaries and segments for PBS, ABC, NBC, National Geographic, Discovery and Univision. Among the documentaries Telles has produced and directed are: The Storm that Swept Mexico; The Fight in the Fields: Cesar Chavez and the Farmworkers; Struggle, Children of the Night (Frontline); The Peril and...   More >

History Painting in 21st-Century Cuba

Lecture | November 8 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 2 LeConte Hall

 Alexis Esquivel

 Department of History

Renowned Cuban painter and performance artist Alexis Esquivel discusses his work in the genre of history painting, at the intersection of arts, politics, and race. In Spanish with simultaneous translation available. Sponsored by the Department of History and CLAS

The Digital Future of the European Union – Will There be Any?

Lecture | November 8 | 4-5 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Peter Fatelnig, Minister-Counsellor for digital economy policies at the Delegation of the European Union to the United States

 Institute of European Studies

Over the last three years the European Union has embarked on an unprecedented number of initiatives to modernize the old continents' digital rulebook. Dubbed the "Digital Single Market Policy" it includes a massive package of legislative and non-legislative measures. The conversation will start with major legislation such as the GDPR, the new copyright rules or net neutrality, but also include...   More >

From Rio to Ulm: Brazilian Poetry, Design, and State Development

Lecture | November 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. |  2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies)

 Nathaniel Wolfson, UC Berkeley

 Center for Latin American Studies

In this talk, Wolfson focuses on the experiences of Brazilian students at the Ulm School of Design in the 1960s and the corresponding transnational debates concerning form and semantics in literature and design.

A building at the Ulm School of Design in Germany. (Photo from modernist design.)

AHMA Colloquium - Tools for Georeferencing and Preserving the Ancient Mediterranean

Lecture | November 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Sarah Bond, University of Iowa

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

This paper is part of a larger lecture series entitled "Digital Humanities and the Ancient World." The events are co-sponsored by the AHMA Colloquium and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Rock and Rule: Popular Music in Cold War Poland and East Germany

Lecture | November 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Kyrill Kunakhovich, Assistant Professor, Corcoran Department of History, University of Virginia

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

We often hear that rock and roll helped bring down communist regimes, but they themselves believed that it could help their cause. For much of the Cold War, communist states taught rock in schools, organized popular music festivals, and held singing competitions on TV. However, things did not always go as planned. This talk considers what rock looked like on the other side of the Iron Curtain,...   More >

The Sea Ranch and Theories of Place

Lecture | November 8 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Wurster Hall, Gallery, Room 121

 Patricia Morton, University of California, Riverside

 Environmental Design Archives

Join us for our first Gallery Talk this academic year with architectural historian Patricia Morton!

Thursday, November 8, 2018
Wurster Gallery, room 121

6:30 to 7 pm - Light refreshments
7 to 8 pm - Lecture

Free to UC Berkeley Students, Staff, Faculty, and Friends of the EDA

Suggested $10 donation for those outside UC Berkeley

Morton will draw on the EDA's Turnbull / MLTW...   More >

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN ARCHIVES GALLERY TALK: THE SEA RANCH AND THEORIES OF PLACE

Lecture | November 8 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 121 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

THU, NOV 8, 6:30pm. Morton will draw on EDAs Turnbull / MLTW Collection to discuss how the design of The Sea Ranch was informed by contemporaneous theories of place as posited by Charles Moore, Donlyn Lyndon, Lawrence Halprin and others. Open to all!

Financial Innovation: The Convergence of Environment and Finance: with Richard Sandor

Lecture | November 8 | 6:30-7:30 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Richard Sandor, American Financial Exchange

 College of Natural Resources

This talk will focus on programs and financial markets that have facilitated the building of institutions for the minimization of transactional costs to achieve better air quality (e.g. US Acid Rain program and Chicago Climate Exchange). It will also discuss new frontiers and opportunities in areas such as water quality and quantity; and the application of new technologies such as blockchain to...   More >

Imperial Powers: The Roles of Deputies, Substitutes, the Sun God, and the King in the Assyrian Empire

Lecture | November 8 | 7:30-8:30 p.m. | 155 Kroeber Hall

 Mikko Luukko, University of Helsinki

 Near Eastern Studies, The Assyrian Heritage Fund

Dr. Luukko will consider the importance of deputies and substitutes, and the relationship between the sun god, who is the divine judge, and the Assyrian king, the supreme judge on earth. This lecture will offer a new interpretation of the nature of and interconnections between the powers of the Assyrian empire. Mikko Luukko (PhD, University of Helsinki 2004) studied Assyriology, Semitics, and...   More >

Friday, November 9, 2018

Designs of Destruction: The Making of Monuments in the 20th Century

Lecture | November 9 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 104 Wurster Hall

 Lucia Allais, University of Princeton

 Center for New Media

Between 1943 and 1945, the Allied Air Forces produced aerial photographs of 79 Italian cities, annotated them with the location of monuments, and appended them with elaborate instructions for aerial bombers on “how to miss cultural sites.” Similar lists and maps of monuments were produced by the Allies for almost every country in Europe, alternatively expanding and shrinking to fit various phases...   More >

'Nano' Implies Nonlinear Dynamics: Nano Seminar Series

Lecture | November 9 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 R Stanley Williams, HP Labs

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

One thing that we who have worked in the nano area for the past 20 years keep claiming is that new properties and opportunities arise from materials crafted at the nanometer scale. One of the major changes is that the response of materials to stimuli becomes increasingly nonlinear, and that leads to a completely new set of dynamical properties.

I will show how a single nanoscale device can be...   More >

ZenIT: Mindful Work through Zen Meditation and Collaboration

Lecture | November 9 | 4-5 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Amil Khanzada, ZenIT

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

CS alumnus Amil Khanzada, now Evolution Ambassador of Eiheiji Town in Japan, will talk about ZenIT, a new movement to define a style of working that is highly productive *and* peaceful, by combining Japanese Soto Zen meditation and Silicon Valley software development pairing/collaboration principles.

Shaping a 21st Century Workforce – Is AI Friend or Foe?: Barbara Weinstock Lectures on the Morals of Trade by Jennifer Granholm

Lecture | November 9 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Jennifer Granholm, Former Governor of Michigan

 Graduate Division

Jennifer Granholm will present the Weinstock lecture on November 9, 2018. Her lecture is titled "Shaping a 21st Century Workforce – Is AI Friend or Foe?" The lecture is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Raghuram Rajan | Is India Ready for the Twenty First Century?: The 2nd Bhattacharya Lecture on the "Future of India"

Lecture | November 9 | 6-8 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center | Note change in location

 Raghuram Rajan, Professor of Finance at Chicago Booth and the former Governor of the Reserve Bank of India

 Pranab Bardhan, Professor of Graduate School, Department of Economics, University of California, Berkeley.

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Bhattacharya India Fund at UC Berkeley

Raghuram Rajan delivers the 2nd lecture in this newly established lecture series on the Future of India.

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Fall 2018 Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | October 30 – December 4, 2018 every Tuesday | 190 Doe Library

 Deb Agarwal, Department Head, Data Science and Technology, Computational Research Division, LBNL; Rosemary Gillespie, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy & Management; Rachel Slaybaugh, Assistant Professor, Nuclear Engineering

 Kristina Hill, Associate Professor, Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning and Urban Design

 Data Sciences

The Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science, co-hosted by the The Berkeley Division of Data Sciences and the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), return for the Fall 2018 series. Lectures feature Berkeley faculty doing visionary research that illustrates the character of the ongoing data revolution.

Historiography and Migration: Explaining the Present through the Lens of History

Lecture | November 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Paul Voerkel

 Institute of European Studies

Discussions about migration have dominated the public discourse in Germany since the “refugee crisis” of 2015. There is a growing acceptance of empiric data on migration, collected by research institutions like the IMIS at Osnabrück University. On the other hand, the public discourse – including from the government – is getting more emotional and often denies proven facts and figures.
After a...   More >

Precarious Inclusion as a Strategy of Government

Lecture | November 13 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

To what extent and how can those excluded from membership in the welfare state, but who are still present within its territorial borders, be lives to be cared for? How is the decision to care for certain lives made? What role do front line service providers play in (re)producing, defining, and negotiating state borders?

Building a Nation, Effacing a Race: The "Chinaman" Question of the U.S. in the Philippines, 1898-1905

Lecture | November 13 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Richard Chu, Five College Associate Professor of History, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Filipino and Philippine Studies Working Group

The lecture focuses on the first few years of American colonial rule in the Philippines. In particular, it looks into the “Chinaman” labor question facing the colonial rulers. How were the Chinese exclusion laws applied in the Philippines? How were the Chinese and other ethnic groups racialized to justify these laws in the Philippines?

Richard Chu

Environmental Justice: What can we do about the disproportionate impact of climate change on low-income communities?: By Van Jones, President and Founder, Dream Corps

Lecture | November 13 | 1:30-2:30 p.m. | David Brower Center, Goldman Theater

 2150 ALLSTON WAY, SUITE 100, Berkeley, CA 94720

 Van Jones, Dream Corps

 College of Natural Resources

Across America, low-income and minority communities are being hit hardest by the economic and health impacts of climate change. Join us for an afternoon with Van Jones—news commentator, author, and founder of Dream Corps —and learn how we can seek environmental justice for the country’s most vulnerable communities.

Van Jones is president and founder of the nonprofit, Dream Corps, a social...   More >

Anthropology from Portugal, on Portugal and beyond Portugal: racialized relations and representations

Lecture | November 13 | 3-5 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Paula Mota Santos; Cristiana Bastos

 Institute of European Studies, Portuguese Studies Program

Paula Mota Santos will speak about "Slavery as dark heritage in Post-colonial Portugal". The Lagos, Southern Portugal slavery exhibition is only the second European-located museum space dedicated to the transatlantic slave trade, and one institutionally linked to UNESCO’s Slave Route program. I will carry out an analysis of the images, texts and forms of display of the Lagos exhibition will be...   More >

Rewriting History in the Age of #MeToo

Lecture | November 13 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Amy Stanley, Associate Professor of History, Northwestern University

 Department of History, Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Department of History Committee on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (CEDI), History Graduate Association (HGA)

The #MeToo movement is now over a year old, but over the past few weeks its stakes have become increasingly clear, not only in American culture and politics but also in many of our intellectual lives as historians. This talk considers how the rallying call “believe women” challenges our epistemology and might lead us to a different approach to our evidence. The sources are drawn from an early...   More >

Presence and Memory: Commemorating the Buddha in Late Burmese Wall Paintings

Lecture | November 13 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Alexandra Green, Henry Ginsburg Curator for Southeast Asia, British Museum

 Center for Buddhist Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Department of History of Art, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies

This presentation draws upon art historical, anthropological, and religious studies methodologies to analyze Burmese temple wall paintings from the late 17th to early 19th centuries and elucidate the contemporary religious, political, and social concepts that drove the creation of this lively art form.

The bodhisatta Bhuridatta meditating

Integrating eco-evolutionary data from islands to infer biodiversity dynamics: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | November 13 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Rosemary Gillespie, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, UC Berkeley

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

A central challenge in understanding the origins of biodiversity is that, while we can observe and test local ecological phenomena, we must usually infer the longer-term outcomes of these ecological forces indirectly. My colleagues and I have been developing inferential models at the interface between macroecology and population-level processes, and applying them to data from geological...   More >

Twentieth-Century Anti-Utopianism and its West German Antidote

Lecture | November 13 | 5 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Jennifer Allen, Yale University

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West, the Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

This talk picks up a melancholic thread in assessments of the end of the Cold War, when the triumph of liberal democracy and capitalism over “really existing socialism” led academics and public intellectuals to pronounce the end of utopian ambitions. Margaret Thatcher captured this idea in her claim that “there is no alternative.” Some West Germans, however, resisted this logic. Facing the...   More >

Poland at 100: The Continuing Challenges of Nationhood

Lecture | November 13 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Graduate Theological Union, Dinner Board Room

 John Connelly, Professor, History, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), SF-Krakow Sister City Association, Taube Philanthropies, Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies, Graduate Theological Union

This talk will consider the meanings and consequences of the reemergence of a Polish state in 1918 in new boundaries, after 125 years of rule by foreign powers. The event is celebrated as liberation, but what did it mean for ethnic minorities like Jews and Ukrainians? What did it mean for women? That Poland lasted barely twenty years before being overwhelmed by its totalitarian neighbors. Could...   More >

The Archaeology of Megiddo: New Light on the History of Ancient Israel

Lecture | November 13 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 Banatao Auditorium

 Israel Finkelstein, Tel Aviv University

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

By far the most important ancient city in Israel, Megiddo has worn many hats over the past five thousand years. During the Bronze Age, the city hosted cosmopolitan Canaanite kings whose relationships extended to Egypt, Turkey, and Mesopotamia. One thousand years later, ancient Israel's kings garrisoned the city, noting its strategic military position. Later writers so revered the city that they...   More >

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Daniel Boyarin: Judaism: The Genealogy of a Modern Notion

Lecture | November 14 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Boyarin argues that the very concept of a religion of “Judaism” is an invention of the Christian church that was adopted by Jews only with the coming of modernity and the spread of Christian languages.

The Political Consequences of the Moratorium on the Death Penalty in 18th Century Russia

Lecture | November 14 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Elena Marasinova, Professor of History, Faculty of Humanities, School of Philology, Higher School of Economics, Moscow

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Elena Marasinova, Professor of History, works at the Institute of Russian History (Russian Academy of Sciences) and the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. Professor Marasinova graduated from Moscow Lomonosov University and had a fellowship at the Max-Planck-Institut für Geschichte in Göttingen and Institut für osteuropäische Geschichte und Landeskunde at Tübingen Universität. She is a...   More >

Discovery and Digital Curation of Textual Archives

Lecture | November 14 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall

 Adam Anderson, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, UC Berkeley, Digital Humanities

 Near Eastern Studies

In this talk I will introduce examples of "at-risk" textual archives from the ancient Near East. By exploring two ancient sites which have yielded large bodies of textual and material culture through illicit excavations, I will describe the latent archival organization found in the hoards of cuneiform tablets. Then, I will describe the computational methods that I and my colleagues have used to...   More >

The Influence of Prevailing Ideology on Definitions in Duden Monolingual Dictionaries From the Third Reich Through the Reunification

Lecture | November 14 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Laura Sacia Bonicatto, Lecturer, Department of German, UC Berkeley

 Berkeley Language Center

Since 1880, the Duden dictionary has set the official standard for orthography and language use in German-speaking countries. Over the course of 138 years, there have been 27 editions of the Duden, including 7 separate editions that were published during Germany’s split into the East German GDR and the West German FRG. Since the publication of the first Duden, German-speaking countries have...   More >

Anti-Asian Racism at Berkeley: The Case for Renaming Boalt Hall: Presented by Asian American Law Journal

Lecture | November 14 | 12:50-2 p.m. | 100 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Charles Reichmann, Lecturer, UC Berkeley Law

 Asian American Law Journal

Most people familiar with UC Berkeley School of Law know its traditional name and the name of its primary classroom building, Boalt Hall. Yet few know much about the man who gave the law school its name. A closer look at John Boalt’s legacy, however, calls for a reexamination of the law school’s continued association with the Boalt name, given the contrast between UC Berkeley’s values of...   More >

Homeward: Life in the Year After Prison: IRLE Speaker Series

Lecture | November 14 | 4-6 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), Director's Room

 Bruce Western, Columbia University

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice

What happens when people return to a community after incarceration? How do they look for work and housing? How do they manage their addictions or mental illness, and why do some return to prison?


In his talk, Western will bear witness to the lives held captive in America’s experiment with mass incarceration. Homeward: Life in the Year After Prison tells the stories of the men and women he...   More >

The Real Story of Trump and Russia

Lecture | November 14 | 4:30-6 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, 315

 David Corn, Journalist and Political Commentator

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

David Corn is a veteran Washington journalist and political commentator. He is the Washington bureau chief for Mother Jones magazine and an analyst for MSNBC. He is the author of three New York Times bestsellers, including Showdown: The Inside Story of How Obama Battled the GOP to Set Up the 2012 Election and Hubris: The Inside Story of Spin, Scandal, and the Selling of the Iraq War (co-written...   More >

Radical Transformations of Self and Society: Towards a Critical Theory of Democratic Protest

Lecture | November 14 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Maeve Cook, Professor of Philosophy, University College Dublin, Ireland

 The Program in Critical Theory

Why should we pursue a critical theory of democratic protest? Assuming that we should, what would such a critical theory look like today? My paper considers both questions, offering some partial answers. On my understanding, critical theory addresses normative questions relating to the good life for humans, to the kind of society that would enable a good life, and to protest as a means for the...   More >

ARCHITECTURE LECTURE: Carl Anthony

Lecture | November 14 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, NOV 14, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk with architect, environmental and social activist, and the co-founder of Breakthrough Communities Project. Co-sponsored by the Kenneth Simmons Community Lecture Endowment &amp; CED Alumni of Color. Open to all!

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Crossings: Facing the Boundaries of Gender, Culture, and Family with Carla Lucero

Lecture | November 15 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Carla Lucero

 Arts + Design

Join us for a lecture and recorded musical highlights with opera-composer Carla Lucero. Lucero is originally from Los Angeles, graduating from CalArts in 1986, where she studied with Rand Steiger, Morton Subotnick and the late, legendary film composer, Leonard Rosenman. In LA, she spent 5 years as a composer in residence at Collage Dance Theater. Carla's love of opera and classical music drew her...   More >

The New Research Compact: Social Science Partnerships for the Common Good

Lecture | November 15 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall

 Alondra Nelson, President, Social Science Research Council

 Social Science Matrix

Please join us on Thursday, November 15 from 10am-noon for the Social Science Matrix Distinguished Lecture, which will be delivered by Alondra Nelson, president of the Social Science Research Council and professor of sociology at Columbia University.

Abstract

For decades, the social sciences have generated knowledge vital to guiding public policy, informing business, and...   More >

Alondra Nelson

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Pictures of a Gone City: Tech and the Dark Side of Prosperity in the San Francisco Bay Area

Lecture | November 15 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Richard A. Walker, Professor Emeritus, Geography, UC Berkeley, and Director, Living New Deal Project

 Bancroft Library

The SF Bay Area is currently the jewel in the crown of capitalism — the tech capital of the world and a gusher of wealth from the Silicon Valley Gold Rush. But there is a dark side of success: overheated bubbles and spectacular crashes; exploding inequality and millions of underpaid workers; a delusional tech elite; and complicity with the worst in American politics.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

Critical Language Pedagogy: Teaching about Dialect Variation, Identity and Power

Lecture | November 15 | 3-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 (Classroom side)

 Amanda Godley, Professor, English Education & Language, Literacy and Culture, University of Pittsburgh

 Berkeley Language Center

Language and literacy education scholars have long called for the teaching of language to be more critical, raising students’ awareness of how language choices and varieties convey power, identity and ideologies. In this talk, I focus specifically on Critical Language Pedagogy, an approach to teaching about dialect variation and language ideologies. I will share curriculum materials...   More >

Predicting, stabilizing, and enhancing restoration outcomes on degraded drylands

Lecture | November 15 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 132 Mulford Hall

 Dr. Jeremy James, Director of Sierra Foothills Research & Extension Center

 Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM)

Is There A Light At The End Of The North Korean Nuclear Tunnel?

Lecture | November 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Siegfried S. Hecker, Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University

 Institute of International Studies, Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Nuclear Science and Security Consortium, Public Law and Policy Program

After a disastrous and dangerous 2017, diplomatic initiatives have opened a window for resolution of the North Korean nuclear crisis. But will the Trump administration's diplomacy succeed or fail as have all attempts over the past 25 years? I will offer my perspective based on seven visits to North Korea and our comprehensive study of North Korea's nuclear program.

Raza Rumi | Democracy and its Discontents - Project Naya Pakistan: The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture for 2018

Lecture | November 15 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Raza Ahmad Rumi, Pakistani writer and a public policy specialist

 Munis Faruqui, Chair, Institute for South Asia Studies, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture

Pakistani writer and a public policy specialist, Reza Ahmad Rumi delivers our sixth Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture.

The Honorable Willie Brown

Lecture | November 15 | 6-7 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 The Honorable Willie Brown

 Goldman School of Public Policy, The Berkeley Forum

Join the Goldman School of Public Policy and the Berkeley Forum as they host the Honorable Willie Brown for the 2018 Michael Nacht Distinguished Lecture in Politics and Public Policy on Thursday, November 15. Two-term Mayor of San Francisco and Speaker of the California State Assembly Willie Brown will discuss the midterm elections and share his knowledge of California politics,...   More >

MRED+D Visiting Fellow Lecture: Architect as Developer

Lecture | November 15 | 7-8:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Distinguished Visiting Fellow Jonathan Segal has designed some of the most livable and highly regarded residential, live/work, and mixed-use housing in California. His talk will pose the question: “What if architects could leverage their training and skil

AIA Lecture - Pottery, Paintings, and Pinakides: the latest dirt from the excavation of Petsas House, Mycenae

Lecture | November 15 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Kim Shelton, Associate Professor of Classics and Director, the Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

This elaborately illustrated lecture will present the results of ten seasons of excavation by the Archaeological Society of Athens at ‘Petsas House’ in the settlement of the famous Bronze Age palatial center at Mycenae. A look into a complex structure of the 14th century BCE reveals domestic and workshop use together with an expanding role in the socio-political life of the palace. Pottery, as...   More >

Friday, November 16, 2018

Mortal Doubt: Transnational Gangs and Social Order

Lecture | November 16 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies), Conference Room | Canceled

 Anthony Fontes

 Center for Latin American Studies

By providing cover for a host of other actors taking advantage of extreme violence, maras help create a sense of order in the midst of chaos. Fontes will explore how these gangs have become so crucial for making and mooring collective terror in Central American cities, while tracing the ties that bind violence to those residing in far safer environs.

A man stops at a grave in Guatemala City. (Photo by Anthony Fontes.)

Jacobs Design Conversations: Elizabeth Churchill

Lecture | November 16 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Elizabeth Churchill, Director of User Experience at Google, will give a talk on Empowering Creators: Research & Material Design at Jacobs Hall.

Towards Comparative Legal Institutionalism: Featuring Katharina Pistor

Lecture | November 16 | 2-4:30 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Warren Room 295

 Katharina Pistor, Columbia Law School

 Law, Boalt School of

Please join us for the Inaugural Irving Tragen Lecture on Comparative Law featuring Katharina Pistor
Towards Comparative Legal Institutionalism
Comparative law today leads only a shadow existence at law schools in the US and elsewhere. This has been true especially for the last three decades when globalization and global law have gained prominence, diminishing the interest in (foreign) local...   More >

Rethinking America’s 20th-Century Highway Institutions

Lecture | November 16 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Robert Poole, Reason Foundation

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Director of Transportation Policy at Reason Foundation Robert Poole will present Rethinking America’s 20th-Century Highway Institutions on November 16, 2018 at 4 p.m. in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building. Join us for cookies and beverages at 3:30 p.m.

Quo Vadis Armenia?: What May Come after the Velvet Regime Change?

Lecture | November 16 | 7:30-9 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Aghasi Yenokyan, Political Analyst, South Caucasian and Russian Affairs, and Voice of America

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

This talk will analyze what has been called the "Velvet Revolution" in Armenia. It will assess the current situation and the possible developments resulting from the forthcoming parliamentary elections.

Aghasi Yenokyan graduated from the Department of Physics of Yerevan State University and earned an MBA from the American University of Armenia. Mr. Yenokyan served as chief of the Yerevan...   More >

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Science at Cal Lecture - Earthquake Mythbusters

Lecture | November 17 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building | Canceled

 Dr. Jennifer Strauss, Seismological Laboratory

 Science@Cal

Get an overview on earthquake hazards in the Bay Area, some cool science the seismological lab is working on to help increase knowledge and safety, and bust some common myths about earthquakes and preparedness. Also find out the latest news about the status of Shake Alert, the earthquake early warning system now being rolled out on the West Coast.

The ShakeAlert system is being developed with...   More >

Shake Alert - Earthquake early warning system

Undocumented Tales: A Panel on Comedy and Joy in the Wake of Illegality

Lecture | November 17 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 391 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

“Undocumented Tales” is a YouTube web series that follows the journey of Fernando Gutierrez, an undocumented queer immigrant from Mexico living in Los Angeles. Fernando’s story is one that is rarely told in the broader immigrant and LGBTQ communities, and one that is almost never told in mainstream media. The series serves as an online platform that brings together the intersections of...   More >

Monday, November 19, 2018

CANCELED:Aditi Saraf | Trust Amidst Trust-Deficit: Credit, Conflict and Improvidence in Kashmir

Lecture | November 19 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room) | Canceled

 Aditi Saraf, Postdoctoral Fellow, Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People's Rights

A talk by Dr. Aditi Saraf, postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich.

Jasmine Syedullah: Job Talk in Gender and Women's Studies

Lecture | November 19 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Jasmine Syedullah, Visiting Assistant Professor in Sociology, Vassar College

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies

JOB TALK IN GENDER & WOMEN'S STUDIES

Jasmine Syedullah is a black feminist political theorist of abolition, as well as co-author of "Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation" (North Atlantic Books, 2016). She is currently Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Vassar College. Her research brings a black feminist approach to questions of political theory to ask how the carceral...   More >

The Tumultuous Sixties: 1968 Around The Globe

Lecture | November 19 | 12-1 p.m. | 202 UC Berkeley Extension (Golden Bear Center)

 Christina Gerhardt, Visiting Scholar at the University of California at Berkeley and Associate Professor of Film and German Studies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa

 UC Berkeley Extension

In 1964, the Free Speech Movement at UC Berkeley achieved national visibility with a series of student protests responding to the administration’s decision to ban information tables regarding the Civil Rights Movement. They mark the first time that the civil disobedience tactics of the Civil Rights Movement were brought to a college campus and served as a foundation for future protests such as...   More >

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Efficient Computational Methods with Provable Guarantees for Data-Driven Problems

Lecture | November 19 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 3108 Etcheverry Hall

 Somayeh Sojoudi, Berkeley IEOR and EECS

 Industrial Engineering & Operations Research

The area of data science lacks efficient computational methods with provable guarantees that can cope with the large-scale nature and the high nonlinearity of many real-world systems. Practitioners often design heuristic algorithms tailored to specific applications, but the theoretical underpinnings of these methods remain a mystery and this limits their usage in safety-critical systems. In this...   More >

The Limits of Proof

Lecture | November 19 | 4-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Paul Beame, University of Washington

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

In the early part of the 20th century, Gödel, Turing, and Tarski showed that no consistent system of reasoning can contain proofs of important properties of the natural numbers or of computations. In these cases, the difficulty stems from the need to reason about infinities of numbers or time that don't show up in our everyday world. In contrast, proofs of properties in a bounded size world...   More >

Design Field Notes: Nick Seaver

Lecture | November 19 | 4-5 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Nick Seaver is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology and Program on Science, Technology, and Society at Tufts University. He has conducted ethnographic fieldwork with the developers of algorithmic music recommender systems in the US, which is the subject of a forthcoming book titled Computing Taste.

Image taken from 38th Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology.

Del Chiaro Lecture Fall 2018: Etrusco-Corinthian Pottery in Context - A Corinthianising Phenomenon in Etruria

Lecture | November 19 | 5:30-8:30 p.m. | Faculty Club, The Seaborg Room

 Szilvia Lakatos, Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest

 Department of History of Art, Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

Daemons Tools Art Tech

Lecture | November 19 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Osher Theater, BAMPFA | Canceled

 Marisa Morán Jahn

 Berkeley Center for New Media

A “daemon” for ancient Greeks referred to a divinity or being betwixt and between humans and the supernatural, an inner spirit or inspiring force. Today, “daemon” commonly refers to a discrete background process that handles requests for services such as print spooling and file transfers, and is dormant when not required.

A tool is a device or implement used to carry out a specific function....   More >

CANCELED: Mario Savio Memorial Lecture and Young Activist Award: Free Speech in Angry Times

Lecture | November 19 | 8-10 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Pauley Ballroom | Canceled

 Robert Reich, Chancellor's Professor of Public Policy, UC Berkeley

 College of Letters & Science, Goldman School of Public Policy, Library

This event has been postponed until the spring semester due to poor air quality.

The Mario Savio Memorial Lecture and Young Activist Award are presented annually to honor the memory of Mario Savio (1942-
1996), a spokesperson for Berkeley's Free Speech Movement of 1964, and the spirit of moral courage and vision which he and
countless other activists of his generation exemplified...   More >

 Free admission. Open to the public; first come, first served.

Professor Robert Reich