<< October 2018 >>

Monday, October 1, 2018

Systems and the Politics of Representation

Lecture | October 1 | 6:30 a.m.-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Charles Gaines

 Arts + Design

In this talk, Charles Gaines will discuss his early work in systems and numerals to his most recent work with language and representation. This will include a discussion of ways the work rethinks notions of subjectivity and how they are manifested in works of art. Additionally, there will be a discussion about the fine difference between chance and arbitrary judgments on the one hand and...   More >

The AI Trinity: Data + Algorithms + Infrastructure

Lecture | October 1 | 4-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Anima Anandkumar, California Institute of Technology

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

AI at scale requires a perfect storm of data, algorithms and cloud infrastructure. Modern deep learning has relied on large labeled datasets for training. However, such datasets are not easily available in all domains, and are expensive/difficult to collect. By building intelligence into data collection and aggregation, we can drastically reduce data requirements. Additionally, algorithmic and...   More >

Why Free Speech Matters Now: Lauren Cooley at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | October 1 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Lauren Cooley, Red Alert Politics Editor at the Washington Examiner

 The Berkeley Forum

While freedom of speech is upheld legally by the Constitution and the Supreme Court, the First Amendment is on trial in American culture - especially on campus. Join Lauren Cooley, editor at the Washington Examiner, at the Berkeley Forum as she speaks about the need for civil discourse and deep conversations, especially in higher education. In this talk, Lauren Cooley will separate emotion from...   More >

 Free

  Buy tickets online

Gaming, Edtech, and Cybersecurity UI/UX Design Lead Panel

Lecture | October 1 | 6:30-9 p.m. | UC Berkeley Extension (SF Campus at 160 Spear St.), 608/609

 UC Berkeley Extension

This event is sponsored by Epic. Epic is a mobile wallet and self-checkout app incorporating Computer Vision, Augmented Reality, and Blockchain related technologies.

The UI/UX Design Lead Fireside Chat and Panel includes comments from Minakshi Mukherjee - UX Design Manager, McAfee; former UX Architect at Walmart and Paypal; Carina Ngai - Product Design Lead, Growth & Discovery, Coursera;...   More >

  Register online

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Samia Huq | Thinking about the Secular: Practices, Dispensations, and Possibilities in Bangladesh

Lecture | October 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Samia Huq, Associate Professor at the Department of Economics and Social Science at BRAC University, Dhaka

 Raka Ray, Professor of Sociology and South and Southeast Asia Studies, UC Berkeley

 The Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

A talk by anthropologist Samia Huq.

Vanamala Viswanatha | Translating Kannada Literary Texts into English: Poetics and Politics

Lecture | October 2 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Vanamala Viswanatha, Visiting Professor, Azim Premji University, Bengaluru

 Bharathy Sankara Rajulu, Lecturer, Tamil and Telugu, Department of South and Southast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Telugu Studies at UC Berkeley, Tamil Studies at UC Berkeley

A talk by Vanamala Viswanatha, an award-winning translator, working with Kannada and English and currently a Visiting Professor, Azim Premji University, Bengaluru.

The challenge of big data and data science for the social sciences: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | October 2 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Henry Brady, Dean, Goldman School of Public Policy; Henry Brady, Dean, Goldman School of Public Policy

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

The 2005 National Science Foundation workshop report on "Cyberinfrastructure for the Social and Behavioral Sciences" (Fran Berman and Henry Brady) argued that the methods of doing research in the social sciences would be transformed by big data and data science and that the social sciences should be centrally involved in studying the impacts of big data and data science on society. In "The...   More >

Environmental Change and Migration in Historical Perspective

Lecture | October 2 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Uwe Lübken, LMU Munich

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Gerda Henkel Foundation, Center for German and European Studies

Current debates about "climate refugees" have triggered interest in the larger connections between environmental change and migration. But what can history contribute to this new field of research? Focusing on historical case studies of environmental migration in general and displacement after natural disasters in particular, Uwe Lübken’s talk will highlight the potential of historical research...   More >

  RSVP online or by calling Heike Friedman at 510-643-4558, or by emailing Heike Friedman at heike@berkeley.edu by October 1.

Colombia: Lessons from a Presidential Campaign

Lecture | October 2 | 5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Sergio Fajardo

 Center for Latin American Studies

Something extraordinary is happening in Colombia, and Sergio Fajardo has a unique perspective. Sergio has followed a nontraditional path in public life: from mathematician to presidential candidate. He will share his experiences as a public servant, his perspectives on the recent election, and an analysis of Colombia today.

Sergio Fajardo on the campaign trail. (Photo courtesy of SergioFajardo.co)

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Shellfish for the Celestial Empire: A Deep History of the Birth, Collapse, and Future of Abalone Fishing in California

Lecture | October 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Todd J. Braje, Irvine Chair of Anthropology and Associate Curator, California Academy of Sciences

 Archaeological Research Facility

In the midst of the California Gold Rush, a small group of enterprising Chinese immigrants recognized untapped resources along our state’s coast. Freed from both human and sea otter predation for decades, coastal California was teeming with abalone stocks and commercial fishing of several species rose to become a multimillion dollar industry. By the late twentieth century, however, overfishing,...   More >

Systems and the Politics of Representation with Charles Gaines

Lecture | October 3 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Charles Gaines

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Join scholar and collector Alan Templeton and Columbia University Mellon Fellow Grace Harpster for an informative perspective on selected works in Old Masters in a New Light, including Juan de Borgoña’s Ecce Homo and BAMPFA’s magnificent late fifteenth-century tapestry of the same subject.

Harpster specializes in early modern Italian art as well as the Spanish empire and missionary networks....   More >

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Catherine Gallagher: Telling It Like It Wasn’t: The Counterfactual Imagination in History and Fiction

Lecture | October 3 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Inventing counterfactual histories—such as a Europe that never threw off Hitler, or a second term for JFK—is a common pastime of modern day historians. Gallagher probes how counterfactual history works and to what ends.

Supreme Court: Year in Review

Lecture | October 3 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison St, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Marshall Krause and Roy Ulrich will discuss the Supreme Court's 2018 term.

Why Do People Reject Good Science?: Charles M. and Martha Hitchcock Lectures by Eugenie Scott

Lecture | October 3 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Dr. Eugenie C. Scott, Founding Executive Director, National Center for Science Education, Inc.

 Graduate Division

Eugenie Scott will present the Hitchcock lectures on October 3 and 4, 2018. The second lecture is titled "Evolution and Creationism as Science and Myth" and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Spero’s Journey: Building a Biotech and Fighting Antimicrobial Resistance

Lecture | October 3 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  TBA

 Ankit Mahadevia, Spero Therapeutics

 The Berkeley Forum

Ankit Mahadevia, MD is CEO of Spero Therapeutics, a company that is dedicated to bring novel, life improving therapies to patients suffering from multidrug-resistant infections. He will discuss topics that are unique to the antibiotic field and the importance of bringing new therapies to patients while also speaking to the lessons learned from taking companies from development stage to the public...   More >

 Free

  Buy tickets online

ARCHITECTURE LECTURE: Jack Halberstam

Lecture | October 3 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, OCT 3, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk about the queer and trans* legacy of the work of Gordon Matta-Clark and the concept of anarchitecture to contemporary queer and trans* projects, aesthetic and activist. Open to all!

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Making the Movie Coco: Culture and Representation with Marcela Davison Aviles

Lecture | October 4 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Marcela Davison Aviles

 Arts + Design

Marcela Davison Aviles served as the lead consultant for Pixar’s animated feature, Coco (2017). In this talk, Aviles will discuss how her work as a cultural translator of Mexican heritage and culture impacted all aspects of production, including script development, casting, art direction, music as well as public relations, consumer products, and marketing. She also advised on the film’s music...   More >

Making the Movie Coco: Culture and Representation with Marcela Davison Aviles

Lecture | October 4 | 12-1:15 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 BAMPFA

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Marcela Davison Aviles served as the lead consultant for Pixar’s animated feature Coco (2017), and advised on the film’s music video with Miguel and Natalia Lafourcade. In this talk, Aviles will discuss how her work as a cultural translator of Mexican heritage and culture impacted all aspects of the production, including script development, casting, art direction, and music as well as public...   More >

Freedom and Ethics in the Era of Big Data

Lecture | October 4 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 170 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Peter Dabrock, Chair, German Ethics Council

 Institute of European Studies, Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law, Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity (CLTC), School of Information

In this talk, Peter Dabrock (Chair, German Ethics Council) explores the potential of big data to constrain the real-world exercise of freedom and self-determination in ways that raise the question whether humans can still act and decide freely and responsibly. Dabrock calls for a responsible shaping of the digital transformation based on concerted action which unites all forces of society,...   More >

Archives of Justice and Abolition

Lecture | October 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

Lesbian Spaces: An Archive of Abolition
Kerby Lynch, Geography

Memory, Belonging, and Archive Justice: Towards a Liberatory Archival Practice
Sine Hwang Jensen, Ethnic Studies Library

Late Antiquity, Then and Now

Lecture | October 4 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Arnaldo Marcone, Professor of Roman History, Universitá Roma Tre

 Department of History, The Center for the Tebtunis Papyri

No one doubts the convenience and indeed necessity of historical periodizations. Nor the validity and usefulness of well-established categories: (Late) Antiquity, the early Middle Ages, Byzantium/East Rome, Sasanid Iran, early Islam.

We can be sure that, when Alois Riegl invented Late Antiquity in his "Spätrömische Kunstindustrie" (1901), his famous study of late Roman art, he could never have...   More >

Evolution and Creationism as Science and Myth: Charles M. and Martha Hitchcock Lectures by Eugenie Scott

Lecture | October 4 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Dr. Eugenie C. Scott, Founding Executive Director, National Center for Science Education, Inc.

 Graduate Division

Eugenie Scott will present the Hitchcock lectures on October 3 and 4, 2018. The second lecture is titled "Evolution and Creationism as Science and Myth" and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Double Amnesia: Rethinking the History of Zionism and Human Rights

Lecture | October 4 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 105 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 James Loeffler, University of Virginia

 Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israel Studies, Center for the Study of Law and Society, Kadish Center for Morality, Law, and Public Affairs

The year 2018 marks the seventieth anniversary of two momentous events in twentieth-century history: the birth of the State of Israel and the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Both remain tied together in the ongoing debates about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, global antisemitism, and American foreign policy. Yet the surprising connections between Zionism and the origins...   More >

  RSVP online by October 3.

Corporate Style: The Effect of Comp Titles on Contemporary Literature with Laura McGrath

Lecture | October 4 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 220 Geballe Room

 Laura McGrath, Stanford University, Literary Lab

 Digital Humanities at Berkeley, D-Lab, Department of Comparative Literature, Information, School of, Library, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Laura McGrath will use large-scale computational methods to analyze comp title data obtained from publishers' quarterly catalogues between 2013-2019.

The New Gold Standard in Basketball: Golden State Warriors CFO Jennifer Cabalquinto at the Forum

Lecture | October 4 | 7-8:30 p.m. |  TBA

 Jennifer Cabalquinto, Golden State Warriors

 The Berkeley Forum

Winning three national championships in four years is no easy feat, not only for a team’s athletes but also for its front office. Nonetheless, that’s precisely what the Golden State Warriors have accomplished since 2014, cementing themselves as one of the most competitively and commercially successful franchises in the history of American sports. As the Chief Financial Officer of the Warriors...   More >

 Free

  Buy tickets online

Astronomy Night at UC Berkeley

Lecture | October 4 | 7-9:30 p.m. | 131 Campbell Hall

 Department of Astronomy

This month's Astronomy Night @ UC Berkeley features a Halloween-themed talk by Berkeley postdoctoral fellow Stephen Ro on the spooky and mysterious of our universe.

As always, come join us at Campbell Hall on the UC Berkeley campus on the first Thursday of every month for a FREE night of astronomy and stargazing on the roof with our fleet of telescopes.

When: Thursday, October 4th
Talk:...   More >

Friday, October 5, 2018

Claims of Armenian-ness in Turkey: An Ethnography of Identification and Boundary-Making

Lecture | October 5 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Hrag Papazian, Doctoral Student, Oxford University; Visiting Lecturer, USC Institute of Armenian Studies, USC Institute of Armenian Studies

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

Armenian identity in Turkey has recently been going through a process of diversification. Whereas the long-established Christian Armenian community was for decades the sole explicit bearer of 'Armenian-ness' in the country, that monopoly is now challenged by ‘newcomers.’ The latter are Muslim citizens of Turkey, either by only categorization or by also belief, who self-identify as Armenians, and...   More >

Mexico 1968

Lecture | October 5 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Susana Draper, Princeton University; Bruno Bosteels, Columbia University

 Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Mexico: Radical Politics and/or Rule of Law

Susana Draper, Princeton University, “Emancipation of Memory: Experiments on Freedom and Democracy”
Bruno Bosteels, Columbia University, "From Ayotzinapa to Tlatelolco: A Memorial of Grievances against the State?"

Smart Additive Manufacturing: Bioinspired Algorithmic - Driven Design of Composites: Nano Seminar Series

Lecture | October 5 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Prof. Grace X. Gu, UC Berkeley, Mechanical Engineering

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

I will discuss ways we have mimicked nature’s designs using simulation, additive manufacturing, and testing to investigate how to create synthetic materials with superior mechanical properties (e.g. toughness, strength, impact resistance).

Early results from the LongROAD study: A five-city observational study of 2990 older drivers

Lecture | October 5 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Linda Hall, University of California San Diego

 Institute of Transportation Studies

University of California San Diego's Linda Hill will present Early results from the LongROAD study: A five-city observational study of 2990 older drivers on October 5, 2018 in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building at 4 p.m. Join us for cookies and beverages at 3:30 p.m.

Reading: Cyrus Armajani and Ari Banias

Lecture | October 5 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 BAMPFA

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Oakland-based Cyrus Armajani is a Pushcart Prize nominee and a Jefferson Award recipient for his literary work with incarcerated youth. His first book, Benefits of Doubt, appeared in 2016. Ari Banias’s book Anybody was nominated for the PEN Center USA literary award. The Berkeley-based poet has been awarded fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts and Stanford’s Wallace Stegner...   More >

Sunday, October 7, 2018

Artist’s Talk: Tsherin Sherpa

Lecture | October 7 | 3-4:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 BAMPFA

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Tibetan artist Tsherin Sherpa, whose works are featured in Boundless: Contemporary Tibetan Artists at Home and Abroad, explores themes of displacement and identity as he recounts his artistic journey. Trained as a traditional Tibetan thangka painter, Sherpa is now an artist whose work brings together both sacred and profane or, in his words, “the icon and the ordinary.”

Sherpa has exhibited...   More >

Monday, October 8, 2018

Sarover Zaidi | Towards an Anthropology of Horizons: Politics and Poetics of Space in Bombay

Lecture | October 8 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Sarover Zaidi, Assistant Professor of Art and Architecture, Jindal School of Art and Architecture, Sonipat, Haryana, India

 Lawrence Cohen, Professor in Anthropology and South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by social anthropologist, Sarover Zaidi on muslim settlements in Bombay

AHMA Colloquium - Discovery and Digital Curation of Textual Archives

Lecture | October 8 | 4-5 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Adam Anderson, UC Berkeley

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

This is the second paper in a lecture series entitled "Digital Humanities and the Ancient World." The event is co-sponsored by the AHMA Colloquium and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Abstract: I introduce the Ur III (250,000 tot.; Drehem 15,000) and Old Assyrian (23,000 tot.; 10,000 published) texts as examples of large bodies of cuneiform tablets that were...   More >

Then and Now: Fred Korematsu's Story and Its Relevance to the Injustices of Today: Karen Korematsu at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | October 8 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 107 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Karen Korematsu, Fred T. Korematsu Institute

 The Berkeley Forum

On Indigenous People’s Day, Karen Korematsu will share her father’s story and the realities of Japanese American incarceration during World War II. She will also talk about her father’s coram nobis case in 1983, where he successfully overturned his federal conviction in court by correcting a falsified government narrative. During her talk, Karen will go into detail about why teaching the history...   More >

$0

 https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fred-t-korematsu-institute-founder-karen-korematsu-at-the-forum-tickets-50771319383.

The Networked Avant-garde

Lecture | October 8 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Osher Theater, BAMPFA

 Kelani Nichole, The Current

 Berkeley Center for New Media, Wiesenfeld Visiting Artist Lecture Series

Kelani Nichole, NYC design strategist and exhibition maker, will discuss the networked culture that emerged at the end of the 20th century introduced a generation of artists who employ open, distributed, virtualized, and highly collaborative techniques.

The Networked Avant-garde

Lecture | October 8 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Kelani Nichole

 Arts + Design, Berkeley Center for New Media

The networked culture that emerged at the end of the 20th century introduced a generation of artists who employ open, distributed, virtualized, and highly collaborative techniques. Their studios are built on commercial software, CGI aesthetics, online public exhibition, and peer-to-peer sharing and critique. They simultaneously embrace and subvert technology as a means of interrogation,...   More >

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

GUH Lecture: Informal Urbanism, Creativity, and Ecology in Lagos, Nigeria

Lecture | October 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 170 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Lagos is notorious for its ever-expanding population, massive infrastructural challenges, and controversial practices of state-sanctioned land capture. This talk will discuss will discuss how we can utilize urban planning and visual culture studies to inv

Letters of recommendation in Berkeley undergraduate admissions: Program evaluation and natural language processing: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | October 9 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Jesse Rothstein, Professor, Public Policy and Economics, UC Berkeley

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

In Fall 2015 and 2016, UC Berkeley asked many freshman applicants to submit letters of recommendation as part of their applications. This was highly controversial. Proponents argued that letters would aid in the identification of disadvantaged students who had overcome obstacles that were not otherwise apparent from their applications, while opponents argued that disadvantaged students were...   More >

Performing Germanness: Laughter and Violence in Nazi Germany

Lecture | October 9 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Martina Kessel, Bielefeld University

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Center for German and European Studies, Gerda Henkel Stiftung

Martina Kessel looks at the meaning and role of humor as an identity practice in Germany during the time of National Socialism in Germany. One theory that she will explore in her lecture is that non-Jewish Germans disguised violence as 'art' to justify their failure to comply with international or humanitarian beliefs.

Martina Kessel is a Historian of Modern Germany at Bielefeld University,...   More >

  RSVP online

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Fascism Then and Now: Some Theoretical and Practical Reflections

Lecture | October 10 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Timothy Scott Brown, Northeastern University

 Institute of European Studies

The better part of a century after being relegated to the political fringes by its central responsibility for war and genocide, fascism is unmistakably making a comeback on both sides of the Atlantic. Of course, fascism never completely went away; but what has propelled it from the margins back to the center? Attempts to understand this phenomenon lead inevitably back to a question that has...   More >

Language Politics and Attitudes of the Genovese Variety

Lecture | October 10 | 12:10-1 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Gabriella Licata, PhD Candidate, Romance Languages and Literatures, Berkeley

 Berkeley Language Center

The current ideologies and politics of Genoese, a dialect of Ligurian in the Northwestern Italian region of Liguria, reflect the status of many of Italy’s “dialects”—lingering in unofficial status with little institutional support but vibrant ties to and representation in regional identity.

The Lost Ethical Language of New Deal Public Works

Lecture | October 10 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison St, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

The Living New Deal has been identifying, mapping, and interpreting the vast physical matrix of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal for over a decade. Like those of a lost civilization, these artifacts speak to us in a language we have been made to forget of a time when government was designed to serve all of its citizens rather than those who could afford to buy it.

A Conversation with Supreme Court Litigator Deepak Gupta

Lecture | October 10 | 12:50-2 p.m. | 110 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Deepak Gupta, Gupta Wessler

 American Constitution Society

Please join the Civil Justice Research Initiative, the Consumer Advocacy & Protection Society (CAPS), American Constitution Society (ACS), and the Center for Consumer Law & Economic Justice, for a lunch event featuring prominent Supreme Court Litigator Deepak Gupta. Mr. Gupta is an accomplished appellate advocate who has argued before the Supreme Court on numerous occasions. Mr. Gupta’s current &...   More >

The Distributional Effects of Minimum Wages: Evidence from Linked Survey and Administrative Data: IRLE Speaker Series

Lecture | October 10 | 4-6 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), Director's Room

 John Voorheis, Howard University

 IRLE

Join us for a discussion with John Voorheis, economist from the U.S. Census Bureau, on the effects of minimum wage on earnings and the implications for law-wage workers.

  RSVP online by September 4.

From the Killing Fields of Cambodia to California and Back

Lecture | October 10 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Katya Cengel, journalist

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Department of Ethnic Studies, Asian American Studies

Journalist Katya Cengel will discuss her new book, Exiled: From the Killing Fields of Cambodia to California and Back (Potomac Books, 2018) which follows the stories of four Cambodian families, as they confront criminal deportation 40 years after their resettlement in the U.S. Copies of the book will be available for sale at the event, courtesy of Eastwind Books.

The Distributional Effects of Minimum Wages: Evidence from Linked Survey and Administrative Data, Jon Voorheis, US Census

Lecture | October 10 | 4-6 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), IRLE Directors Room

 John Voorheis, U.S. Census Bureau’s Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications

 Institute for Research on Labor and Employment

Voorheis will discuss the implications of his research finding that minimum wage policies increase long-term earnings of low-wage workers, and possibly reasons for the persistence of those effects. Rising income inequality and stagnating economic mobility have prompted state and local governments to focus on higher minimum wages. As these policies expand, an understanding of how minimum wage...   More >

Learning To Interact: Cybernetics and Play

Lecture | October 10 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Moffitt Undergraduate Library, BCNM Commons, 340 Moffitt

 Timothy Stott, Dublin School of Creative Arts, Dublin Institute of Technology

 Berkeley Center for New Media

Play was, and remains, a social technology for the cybernetic age. Advocated by many as a humanist corrective to a technocratic and automated post-war society, play also expanded cybernetic ideas of interaction, feedback, and systems modelling into the social domain. From the late nineteen-fifties on, especially, cybernetics and play converged through games, toys, and interactive...   More >

Foreshadow: Breaking the Virtual Memory Abstraction with Transient Out-of-Order Execution

Lecture | October 10 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Ofir Weisse

 Information, School of

Ofir Weisse explains how the Foreshadow attack dismantles Intel's SGX security â previously considered the most secure feature of Intel chips â and also bypasses virtual machine isolation between users in the cloud.

Gallery Talk: Olivia Young on Christina Quarles

Lecture | October 10 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 BAMPFA

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Join Olivia Young, PhD candidate in UC Berkeley’s Department of African Diaspora Studies, for insights into the work of Christina Quarles, including the dynamics of excess, visibility, and form as instruments of black queer longing.

Young’s writing has appeared in publications by the New Museum (New York), Antenna Gallery (New Orleans), and BAMPFA. Her dissertation asks how contemporary,...   More >

The Demise of the Islamist Utopia: What's Next?

Lecture | October 10 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Hicham Alaoui, University of Oxford

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Islamist movements have dominated popular discussions of opposition and change within Arab politics for the past three decades. Uniquely positioned during the Arab Spring, some have since directly governed, while others have been co-opted or absorbed into existing political structures. Yet outside Tunisia, no Islamist group has been able to deliver upon its promise of political transformation....   More >

A Fantastic Woman

Lecture | October 10 | 7-9 p.m. | 160 Kroeber Hall

 Center for Latin American Studies

Marina, a young transgender actress and singer in Chile, and Orlando, an older man who owns a printing company, are in love and planning for the future. After Orlando suddenly falls ill and dies, Marina is forced to confront his family and society, and to fight to show them who she is: a complex, strong, forthright, and fantastic woman.

Daniela Vega in "A Fantastic Woman." (Image courtesy of Sony Pictures Classic.)

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Rita Moreno: From Puerto Rico to Stardom with Fernanda Fisher

Lecture | October 11 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Fernanda Fisher

 Arts + Design

Fernanda Fisher has been involved in the arts throughout her life. She grew up in NYC with both her father, Leonard Gordon, a cardiologist and her mother, Rita Moreno, an actress. Fisher will talk about Puerto Rico, her mother’s rise to stardom, and her own creative career. She attended Brearley School and danced under George Balanchine at the School of American Ballet. After moving to Los...   More >

Hardy Californians: The Life of Lester Rowntree

Lecture | October 11 | 10-11:30 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Lester Gertrude Rowntree (1878-1978) was a pioneering California native plant botanist and horticulturalist who popularized the study, use, and protection of native flora through voluminous writings, lectures, and photographs. As testimonial to Lester's important role she was named life-long honorary president of the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) upon its creation in 1965. However, the...   More >

Free with Garden admission ($12); Free for UCBG members, UC Berkeley students, staff, and faculty

  Register online

From One War to Another. The Armenian Experience and Its Impact on Germany

Lecture | October 11 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Raymond Kévorkian, Emeritus director of research, Institut Français de Géopolitique, Université Paris VIII, Saint-Denis

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

Our knowledge of the impact of the 1915 genocide on German society has long been characterized by Germany’s commitment to the Eastern Front and by the experience of mass violence experienced by several thousand soldiers and officers who witnessed the extermination of the Armenians. But the most recent works, in particular Stefan Ihrig’s two books, have opened new avenues for studying the...   More >

Rita Moreno: From Puerto Rico to Stardom with Fernanda Fisher

Lecture | October 11 | 12-1 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Rita Rita Moreno

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

The daughter of celebrated actress Rita Moreno, Fernanda Fisher has been involved in the arts throughout her life. In this event hosted by Kathryn Roszak, Fisher will talk about Puerto Rico, her mother’s rise to stardom, and her own creative career.

Fernanda Fisher grew up in New York City, where she attended Brearley School and danced under George Balanchine at the School of American Ballet....   More >

Guardians, Aliens, Or Robot Overlords? Security In The Age Of Artificial Intelligence

Lecture | October 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium | Note change in location

 Edward W. Felten, Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs at Princeton University

 Institute of International Studies

Edward W. Felten is Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs at Princeton University. His research interests include computer security and privacy, and public policy issues relating to information technology.

He is the Director of Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP), a cross-disciplinary effort studying digital technologies in public life. CITP...   More >

What’s New about New Materialism?: Black and Indigenous Scholars on Science, Technology and Materiality

Lecture | October 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

As the “New Materialisms” discourse continues to gain traction across multiple fields of inquiry, we come together as scholars of Xicanx/Latinx Studies, Native American/Indigenous Studies and postcolonial African Studies to open up a space of dialogue on the subject.

Identity and Social Bonds: Howison Lectures in Philosophy by Joseph Raz

Lecture | October 11 | 4:10 p.m. | Bancroft Hotel, Great Hall

 2680 Bancroft Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Joseph Raz, Professor, Columbia Law School

 Graduate Division

Joseph Raz will present the Howison lecture on October 11, 2018. His lecture is titled "Identity and Social Bonds" is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Joseph Raz

Intimate Violence: Anti-Jewish Pogroms on the Eve of the Holocaust

Lecture | October 11 | 5:15-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Jason Wittenberg, Associate Professor, Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Center for Jewish Studies

Jason Wittenberg is associate professor of political science at UC Berkeley and a former Academy Scholar at Harvard University. He is the co-author of Intimate Violence: Anti-Jewish Pogroms on the Eve of the Holocaust (Cornell, 2018). His first book, Crucibles of Political Loyalty: Church Institutions and Electoral Continuity in Hungary (Cambridge, 2006), won the 2009 Hubert...   More >

  RSVP online

Escritura, Trama Y Deseo (Writing, Plot And Desire) with Diamela Eltit

Lecture | October 11 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, Townsend Center

 Diamela Eltit

 Arts Research Center

Escritura, Trama Y Deseo (Writing, Plot And Desire) with Diamela Eltit
Thursday, October 11, 2018
5:30-7:30pm
Geballe Room, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Diamela Eltit

The Challenge for Progressives in Latin America

Lecture | October 11 | 6-8 p.m. | 250 Goldman School of Public Policy

 Giorgio Jackson

 Center for Latin American Studies

Giorgio Jackson is a transformative political figure in Chile. As a student at the Catholic University in Santiago, Jackson was a key leader of the Chilean student protests in 2011. As a 25 year old, Jackson founded the Democratic Revolution political party in 2012, and was elected to Congress representing Santiago in 2013. He was re-elected in 2017 with the highest plurality of any member...   More >

Friday, October 12, 2018

Why the Common Good Disappeared and How We Get It Back

Lecture | October 12 | 1-2 p.m. |  Hertz Concert Hall

 Goldman School of Public Policy

The Class of '68 50th Reunion Lecture
HOMECOMING WEEKEND, OCTOBER 12-14, 2018

PROFESSOR ROBERT B. REICH ignites a discussion of the good we have had in common, what happened to it, and what we might do to restore it. His goal is not that we all agree on the common good. It is that we get into the habit of thinking and talking about it, listening to each other’s views and providing a means for...   More >

Discovery of New Two-Dimensional Materials with Electro-Active Functionality: Nano Seminar Series

Lecture | October 12 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Prof. SungWng Kim, Sungkyunkwan University, Energy Science

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

In this talk, two different strategies for the discovery of new two-dimensional (2D) materials with electro-active functionality will be introduced. Our new 2D materials are created based on the engineering of crystal structure dealing with electrons, showing unprecedented physical properties.

The first material, “electride”, which is regarded as a new electronic material, is ionic crystal in...   More >

Teaching a Spanish Literature Course Online: A skeptic’s experience

Lecture | October 12 | 3-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 (Classroom side)

 Mary Quinn, University of New Mexico

 Berkeley Language Center

According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, one in every four undergraduate students takes at least one class online and studies show that access to online learning can boost graduation rates. But certain subjects, like language learning, seem in their very nature to be antithetical to an online format. In this talk I will share my experience of adapting a beginning literature class in...   More >

Unlikely Alliances and Transpartisanship: Finding Common Ground Across Difference on Transportation and Infrastructure

Lecture | October 12 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Karen Trapenberg Frick

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract:
Against a backdrop of hyper-political polarization worldwide, this presentation reviews recent transpartisan coalitions of conservative and progressive allies who advocate for policy change about transportation and infrastructure in the United States. Some might view these as unholy alliances where participants make deals with the devil or lend one’s enemies undue legitimacy. However,...   More >

Fall 2018 Bioengineering Alumni Lecture: Pushing the Boundaries of Your Engineering Degree: Imagination Will Take You Everywhere

Lecture | October 12 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Dr. Karin Hollerbach

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Karin Hollerbach serves as Managing Director of Taku International, a technology consulting firm based in the San Francisco Bay Area and in Germany, and conducts R&D for a medical device / wearables company in Silicon Valley. Applications of her technical interests in cyber-physical systems, both real and sci-fi, cut across multiple industries, including energy, medical, ag tech, and search and...   More >

  RSVP online by October 5.

Saturday, October 13, 2018

Are You Scared Yet? Cybersecurity for You and Me

Lecture | October 13 | 9-10 a.m. | 145 Dwinelle Hall

 Jeffrey Mackie-Mason, Library

 Library

Every day there’s a new scary story: Russians hacking elections; thieves remotely locking computers and demanding ransom; millions of credit card numbers and other personal records stolen from corporate data systems. What is vulnerable — and why? What should we, as ordinary citizens, understand about cybersecurity and about how to protect ourselves?

 This event is part of Homecoming Weekend — if you have not registered (online registration is now closed), we urge you to arrive early and register onsite at Homecoming Headquarters for a Class Pass for access to all lectures. Class Passes are free f

Career Clinic: Making A Successful Career Transition: Roadmap for Change

Lecture | October 13 | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. | UC Berkeley Extension (SF Campus at 160 Spear St.), Room 507

 Rebecca Andersen, Career Services at the UC Berkeley Information School; RuthAnn Haffke, UC Berkeley School of Public Health

 UC Berkeley Extension

Making a career transition can be bewildering: how do you find jobs? How can you stand out as a candidate? And, if you finally get an interview, how do you showcase yourself as the best candidate? This workshop will walk participants through each step of making a career transition. Through interactive exercises, we will cover strategies in personal branding, networking, résumé and LinkedIn...   More >

$50

  Register online

An American History of Race, Gender, and Hair

Lecture | October 13 | 12-1 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, Third Floor

 Sarah Gold McBride, Visiting Lecturer, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Department of History, Cal Alumni Association

How did something as ordinary as hair affect major U.S. institutions like slavery and the women’s rights movement? In the 19th century, American people from different regions, class backgrounds, racial groups, and religious traditions shared the belief that hair exposed the truth about the person from whose body it grew.

Matti Braun | Vikram Sarabhai: A Modern Indian Icon

Lecture | October 13 | 1:30-3 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Matti Braun, Artist

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Society for the Art & Cultural Heritage of India (SACHI), South Asia Art Initiative at UC Berkeley

A talk by Artist, Matti Braun on the remarkable life and biography of Vikram Sarabhai (1919-1971), best remembered as the father of Indian Space Program

Sunday, October 14, 2018

Garden Goddesses: Four California Women and Their Legendary Gardens

Lecture | October 14 | 10-11:30 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Celebrate the achievements of great women gardeners! In his new talk, “Garden Goddesses: Four California Women and Their Legendary Gardens,” popular garden writer Donald Olson takes you on an informative and entertaining tour of some spectacular California gardens and introduces you to the remarkable women who created them.

$20 / $15 UCBG Member

  Register online

Monday, October 15, 2018

Sholem Aleichem on the South Side of Chicago: The Story and Songs of the Rediscovered 1905 Musical Stempenyu

Lecture | October 15 | 12-1 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

In June of 1905, Sholem Aleichem—author of the Tevye Stories—met in Warsaw with theater producers Spivakovsky and Adler, and agreed to pen adaptations of his fiction works for theatrical production on stages throughout the Russian Empire. Only a few months later, caught in the anti-Jewish violence that accompanied the outbreak of the 1905 Revolution, Aleichem quickly made plans to flee Russia...   More >

Architecture Lecture: Takaharu Tezuka: Nostalgic Future

Lecture | October 15 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 Takaharu Tezuka

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), College of Environmental Design, Consulate General of Japan in San Francisco

NOSTALGIC FUTURE
Real human life is supported by latest technologies. Our good future is depending on the respect for the wisdom from our past. We are still a part of the whole environment, yet still in the most advanced society.

ABOUT TAKAHARU TEZUKA
Architect / President of Tezuka Architects / Professor of Tokyo City University

1964 Born in Tokyo, Japan
1987 B. Arch.,...   More >

Image and Amnesia

Lecture | October 15 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Kerry Tribe

 Arts + Design, Berkeley Center for New Media

Kerry Tribe’s work in film, video, installation and other media raises questions about the elusive and ephemeral aspects of human experience including memory, empathy and linguistic communication. Often working with multiple projections and timed loops, her projects are designed to structurally underscore their content. Tribe’s fascination with the literal mechanics of moving images suggests that...   More >

Image and Amnesia

Lecture | October 15 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Osher Theater, BAMPFA

 Kerry Tribe

 Berkeley Center for New Media, Wiesenfeld Visiting Artist Lecture Series

Kerry Tribe’s work in film, video, installation and other media raises questions about the elusive and ephemeral aspects of human experience including memory, empathy and linguistic communication. Often working with multiple projections and timed loops, her projects are designed to structurally underscore their content. Tribe’s fascination with the literal mechanics of moving images suggests that...   More >

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Indigenous Peoples in India: Social Consequences of Land Rights Legislation: Gender and Resilience

Lecture | October 16 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall

 Indrani Sigamany

 Native American Studies & Ethnic Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

In the Aravalli Hill forests of Rajasthan, where access to justice remains uneven and elusive for indigenous peoples, a group of Adivasi women are claiming land rights through activistism. In the context of gender inequality in predominantly patriarchal societies, the threat to loss of lands, forest based livelihoods and traditional conservation, is experienced more acutely by women.

Indigenous Peoples in India: Social Consequences of Land Rights Legislation: Gender and Resilience

Lecture | October 16 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall

 Indrani Sigamany

 Native American Studies & Ethnic Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

In the Aravalli Hill forests of Rajasthan, where access to justice remains uneven and elusive for indigenous peoples, a group of Adivasi women are claiming land rights through activistism. In the context of gender inequality in predominantly patriarchal societies, the threat to loss of lands, forest based livelihoods and traditional conservation, is experienced more acutely by women.

Addressing Us: On the Transformations of Public Space as Art —Hegel, Arendt, and Jacobi Revisited

Lecture | October 16 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Marita Tatari, Feodor-Lynen-Fellow (Humboldt Foundation), German Department, UC Berkeley

 The Program in Critical Theory

Hegel on art as action and Arendt on action as public space converge. This convergence is not about what action, art and public space should be. It is about the historical transformations of the common condition—the symbolic order—as it relates to heterogeneity. Surprisingly, both Hegel and Arendt reveal a view of these transformations that is not that of the subject and its purposiveness....   More >

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

What is in a Category? Telling Political Refugees and Economic Migrants Apart

Lecture | October 17 | 11 a.m.-2 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Jutta Allmendinger, WZB Berlin Social Science Center

 David Miliband, International Rescue Committee

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, ZEIT-Stiftung Ebelin und Gerd Bucerius, International Rescue Committee, Thomas Mann House Los Angeles

Please join us for our Annual Bucerius Lecture with David Miliband, President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee, followed by a conversation with Jutta Allmendinger, President of the WZB Berlin Social Science Center.

Unlike Europe, where there are two separate migration issues that are coming together in a complicated way, the US conversation on migration has until recently been...   More >

  RSVP online by October 14.

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Bryan Wagner: The Tar Baby: A Global History

Lecture | October 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Wagner offers a fresh analysis of this deceptively simple story of a fox, a rabbit, and a doll made of tar and turpentine, tracing its history and connections to slavery, colonialism, and global trade.

Overcoming Specialist Silos: Lessons from Zooarchaeology on Data Creation, Access, and Reuse

Lecture | October 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Sarah Kansa, Archaeological Research Facility & Open Context

 Archaeological Research Facility

Drawing on zooarchaeological case studies from Etruscan Italy and Neolithic Anatolia, this talk highlights the challenges specialists face in ensuring that their work contributes to the bigger picture of archaeological interpretation.

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Bryan Wagner: The Tar Baby: A Global History

Lecture | October 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Wagner offers a fresh analysis of this deceptively simple story of a fox, a rabbit, and a doll made of tar and turpentine, tracing its history and connections to slavery, colonialism, and global trade.

Space-In-Between: Dialogical Urban Space in Contemporary Iran

Lecture | October 17 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 M. Reza Shirazi, Institute for Urban and Regional Development

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Contemporary architecture and urban space in Iran registers itself between two extremes of modernity and tradition. In this lecture, I first narrate the conflict between these two extremes and its manifestation in the architecture and urban planning of Tehran starting from mid-19th century. I then present a critical analysis of the writings and works of three leading architects, Kamran Diba,...   More >

Litquake

Lecture | October 17 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison St, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

With Anita Amirrezvani, Tamim Ansary, Louise Nayer, Aimee Phan, and Jake Warner

Democratizing Data Science

Lecture | October 17 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Aditya Parameswaran

 Information, School of

Making it easy for individuals and teams to manage, analyze, and draw insights from large datasets.

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Dance, Heritage, and the Island: A Cuban in Oakland with Royland Lobato

Lecture | October 18 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Royland Lobato

 Arts + Design

In 2005, Royland Lobato arrived in the Bay Area from his native Cuba. Born in Guantanamo, his fascination with the folklore of the island drove him to become a teacher of Cuba’s musical and dance traditions, especially its Afro-Cuban elements, but also its contemporary popular expression, such as rueda de casino, rumba, son, and other forms. In this lecture, Lobato will discuss his experience as...   More >

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Education as the Project of Freedom: A Study of the Berkeley Experimental Schools Project, 1968-76

Lecture | October 18 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, O'Neill Room

 Joanne Tien, UC Berkeley

 Bancroft Library

Joanne Tien will discuss how teachers and students in the Berkeley Experimental Schools Project navigated the ideological tension between constructivist pedagogical approaches and the cultivation of explicit political values that challenge systems of oppression.

 The O'Neill Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

The Screen in Sound: Toward a Theory of Listening

Lecture | October 18 | 4-6 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Rey Chow, Anne Firor Scott Professor of Literature in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, Duke University

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies

This lecture is drawn from Rey Chow’s chapter in the anthology Sound Objects (Duke UP, forthcoming), ed. James A. Steintrager and Rey Chow. By foregrounding crucial connections among sound studies, poststructuralist theory, and contemporary acousmatic experiences, the lecture presents listening as a trans-disciplinary problematic through which different fields of study resonate in fascinating ways.

Why the Constitution? The Problem of Taxes and Slavery

Lecture | October 18 | 4-6 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, This is a webinar event.

 Robin Einhorn, Professor, Department of History

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

UCBHSSP is pleased to co-sponsor with the National Humanities Center, this virtual scholar talk with the Professor Robin Einhorn of the UC Berkeley Department of History.

This webinar will examine the relevant clauses of the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, along with extracts from and letters about the key debates in the Continental Congress, Philadelphia convention, and some...   More >

 This is a virtual event.

Transformation Of Backward Politics In India: The Case Of Uttar Pradesh

Lecture | October 18 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Gilles Verniers, Assistant Professor of Political Science and Director of the Trivedi Centre for Political Data, Ashoka University

 Institute of International Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

Electoral politics in the state of Uttar Pradesh is undergoing profound changes. A long phase of explicit caste and religion-based electoral politics has given way to inclusive political discourses and electoral strategies that have produced more diverse assemblies, in terms of caste and communities composition. At the same time, a new political class has emerged, grounded in local business...   More >

Race in Brazil: A Historical Overview

Lecture | October 18 | 6-8 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Brazil was the site of the largest slave-based economy in the Americas and the last country in the hemisphere to abolish the institution. For most of the twentieth century, Brazil was described as a “racial democracy” – a place where clear racial categories and race-based discrimination do not exist. This presentation discusses the history of slavery, emancipation, and post-emancipation in Brazil...   More >

The Unconscious Is Structured Like a Workplace: Brainwork, Artwork and the Divided Labor of Thought in Late-Victorian Fiction

Lecture | October 18 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 330, English Department Lounge

 Emily Steinlight, Stephen M. Gorn Family Assistant Professor of English, Penn Arts & Sciences

 Department of English

This talk will find a prehistory of the contemporary problematic of the “creative economy” in two late-Victorian novels of the art world, Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray and George Du Maurier’s Trilby. Examining the relation they plot out between psychic processes and aesthetic production, it will assess how these narratives track art to unconscious sources that strangely resemble the...   More >

Friday, October 19, 2018

Why Read Montaigne’s Essays?: “Why Read…? Series”

Lecture | October 19 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Antónia Szabari, University of Southern California; Carla Freccero, UC Santa Cruz; Diego Pirillo, UC Berkeley; Jane O. Newman, U.C. Irvine

 Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, D.E.

Round-table and discussion

Jacobs Design Conversations: Camille Utterback

Lecture | October 19 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Camille Utterback, Stanford professor and internationally acclaimed artist, will speak at Jacobs Hall about her pioneering work in the field of digital and interactive art.

Integrating Shared Autonomous Fleet Services in Urban Mobility: Dynamic

Lecture | October 19 | 4 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 Hani S. Mahmassani, Northwestern University

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Northwestern University's Hani S. Mahmassani will present Integrating Shared Autonomous Fleet Services in Urban Mobility: Dynamic on October 19, 2018 at 4 p.m. in SPECIAL LOCATION 502 Davis Hall. Join us for cookies and beverages at 3:30 p.m.

Ancient Philosophy Workshop: Why was Socrates charged with "introducing religious innovations”?

Lecture | October 19 | 5-7 p.m. | 1229 Dwinelle Hall | Note change in location

 Kirk R. Sanders, University of Illinois

 Joint Graduate Program in Ancient Philosophy

Xenophon’s Apology and Memorabilia frequently merit little more than footnotes in the vast scholarly literature on Socrates generally, and on Socrates’ trial in particular. The present paper belongs to a larger project in which I try to build a systematic case for Xenophon – and, to a lesser extent, against Plato’s Apology – as a source for understanding the nature and motivation of the charges...   More >

Saturday, October 20, 2018

Science at Cal Lecture -A shaky anniversary: Lessons learned since the October 21, 1868 Hayward earthquake

Lecture | October 20 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Roland Bürgman, Department of Earth and Planetary Science

 Science@Cal

This lecture presented in partnership with the UC Berkeley Seismology Laboratory.

In 1868, a destructive earthquake ruptured along the Hayward fault in the Eastern Bay Area, which was then referred to as the “Great San Francisco earthquake”. It lost that name to the much larger 1906 earthquake on the San Andreas fault across the Bay.

Alamada County Courthouse in San Leandro (photo courtesy of Bancroft Library)

Members' Walk: Crops of the World

Lecture | October 20 | 1-2:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Join Horticulturist Jason Bonham on an in-depth exploration of the Crops of the World Garden. Food and other economically important plants in the Crops of the World Garden are arranged geographically by place of wild origin. Most of the plants featured are edibles—fruits, grains, vegetables, and herbs. A few are valuable for other purposes, such as mulberry trees as silkworm food and cork oaks as...   More >

  Register online