<< March 2018 >>

Thursday, March 8, 2018

Econ 235, Financial Economics: Topic Forthcoming

Seminar | March 8 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | C330 Haas School of Business

 Gordon Phillips, Dartmonth

 Department of Economics

Joint with the Haas Finance Seminar

2018 ESPM Seminar Series - Nicia Giva

Seminar | March 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 132 Mulford Hall

 Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM)

Nicia Giva of Eduardo Mondlane University - Maputo, Mozambique shares lecture "Action Research toward co-management of Transboundary Protected Areas: The case of Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park in Mozambique"

Coffee will be served in 139 Mulford Hall
**In an effort to reduce waste, please bring your own reusable mug**

This event is open to the public.

Oliver E. Williamson Seminar

Seminar | March 8 | 12-1:30 p.m. | C325 Haas School of Business

 Ben Enke, Harvard University

 Department of Economics

The Oliver E. Williamson Seminar on Institutional Analysis, named after our esteemed colleague who founded the seminar, features current research by faculty, from UCB and elsewhere, and by advanced doctoral students. The research investigates governance, and its links with economic and political forces. Markets, hierarchies, hybrids, and the supporting institutions of law and politics all come...   More >

Peripheral Representations for computational models of Human and Machine Perception

Seminar | March 8 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Arturo Deva, UC Santa Barbara

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Are there any benefits in incorporating the foveated nature of human vision into image-based metrics of perception and computer vision systems? In this talk I hope to advance our understanding of this question through my work via psychophysical experiments (eye-tracking), computational modelling, and computer vision.

The first part of the talk will revolve around peripheral representations...   More >

Seminar 217, Risk Management: Factor Strategies: Crowding, Capacity and Sources of Active Returns

Seminar | March 8 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Speaker: Ananth Madhavan, Blackrock

 Center for Risk Management Research

We develop a methodology to estimate dynamic factor loadings using cross-sectional risk characteristics, which is especially useful when factor loadings significantly vary over time. In comparison, standard regression approaches assume the factor loadings are constant over a particular window. Applying the methodology to a dataset of U.S.-domiciled mutual funds we distinguish the components of...   More >

EHS 201 Biosafety in Laboratories

Course | March 8 | 1:30-3:30 p.m. | 115 Energy Biosciences Building

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This training is required for anyone who is listed on a Biological Use Authorization (BUA) application form that is reviewed by the Committee for Laboratory and Environmental Biosafety (CLEB). A BUA is required for anyone working with recombinant DNA molecules, human clinical specimens or agents that may infect humans, plants or animals. This safety training will discuss the biosafety risk...   More >

Seminar 251, Labor Seminar: “Vacancy Chains”

Seminar | March 8 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Mike Elsby, University of Edinburgh

 Center for Labor Economics

joint with Macro

Seminar 237/281, Macro/International Seminar: Vacancy Chains

Seminar | March 8 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Mike Elsby, University of Edinburgh

 Department of Economics

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Senate Forum on the Campus Strategic Planning Process

Panel Discussion | March 8 | 3-5 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Lisa Alvarez-Cohen, Chair, Berkeley Division, Academic Senate

 Richard Lyons, Dean, Haas School of Business

 Academic Senate

On January 25, 2018, Chancellor Carol Christ announced details of a semester-long strategic planning process, that she expects to establish a framework for charting Berkeley’s path forward over the coming years. This is an opportunity for Senate members to learn about the strategic planning process directly from the faculty co-chairs of the four planning process working groups.

Dr. Tal Korem, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Weizmann Institute of Science: Microbiome Analysis in Clinical Research: Can our microbes tell us what to eat?

Seminar | March 8 | 3-4 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Center for Computational Biology, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

The gut microbiome is an immense microbial ecosystem with unique and diverse metabolic capabilities. In the past decade, it has been associated with multiple chronic and complex diseases, raising great hopes for novel medical advances. But are contemporary microbiome analysis methods useful in a clinical setting? I will present new tools that we developed for the analysis of the gut microbiome...   More >

Mathematics Department Colloquium: From Algebraic Combinatorics to Geometric Complexity Theory

Colloquium | March 8 | 4-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Greta Panova, University of Pennsylvania

 Department of Mathematics

A major 80-year old problem in Algebraic Combinatorics concerns the Kronecker coefficients of the symmetric group – the multiplicities of irreducible representations in the decomposition of the tensor product of irreducible representations, or more formally – showing that computing these coefficients is in #P. The flagship problem in Algebraic Complexity Theory is the "VP vs VNP" problem,...   More >

Bodies in Process: Trans Politics and Possibilities

Colloquium | March 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, 691, CRG Conference Room

 Center for Race and Gender

BODIES IN PROCESS: TRANS POLITICS & POSSIBILITIES
Thursday, Mar 08, 2018 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
691 Barrows Hall, UC Berkeley
Location is ADA accessible
Giancarlo Cornejo, Department of Rhetoric
Omi Salas-SantaCruz, School of Education

“Thank You For Your Service”: Gratitude, Silence, and the Production of Militarized Common Sense on College Campuses

Colloquium | March 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. |  2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues)

 Ellen Moore, Visiting Scholar, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues

 Center for Ethnographic Research, Graduate School of Education, Center for Studies in Higher Education

In this contemporary period of prolonged undeclared wars, where lethal-force conflicts are waged not against designated nation-states but against rhetorical abstractions (Terror) in the name of other rhetorical abstractions (Freedom), speech and language are important loci of power. On contemporary college campuses, the needs of student veterans, veteran support programs and veteran identities...   More >

Workshop with Dr. Stacey Sloboda

Workshop | March 8 | 4-6 p.m. | 308A Doe Library

 Shivani Sud

 Asian Art and Visual Cultures Working Group

Please join the Asian Art and Visual Cultures Working Group for an upcoming workshop with Stacey Sloboda, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. We will be discussing her recent co-edited volume Eighteenth-Century Art Worlds: Global and Local Geographies of Art.

  RSVP by emailing Shivani Sud at shivanisud@berkeley.edu by March 5.

Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah -- Reading and Conversation

Reading - Nonfiction | March 8 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife

 RACHEL KAADZI GHANSAH

 Department of English

Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah is a journalist, essayist and critic whose work on such figures as Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, and Kendrick Lamar has been widely acclaimed and featured in The New York Times, The Believer, The Paris Review, VQR, and Transition, amongst several other outlets and publications. Her essay on the comedian Dave Chappelle, “If He Hollers Let Him Go,” received enthusiastic notice...   More >

Environmental Career Options: A Career Panel with AEP

Panel Discussion | March 8 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | 170 Barrows Hall

 Student Environmental Resource Center

Join the Association for Environmental Professional's for their biggest event of the year: a career panel featuring environmental professionals from a broad scope of industries -- from consultants to research scientists.

Big Data in Transportation: Alumni Career Panel

Panel Discussion | March 8 | 7:30-8:30 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 ASUC (Associated Students of the University of California)

TRANSOC is proud to host the upcoming career panel on March 8, featuring alums working in the tech sector and making use of cutting-edge data analytics to solve urban transportation problems.

Five data scientists from leading tech and urban analytics companies will share their work experience and insights for current students who are interested in a career in transportation-related data...   More >

Friday, March 9, 2018

Theology and Its Publics

Workshop | March 9 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

In order to reorient theological study, the Berkeley Public Theology Program supports a broad and comparative investigation of the ways this study happens, past and present, in the U.S. and abroad. This investigation includes two annual workshops on comparative approaches to theology, with participants drawn from a diverse group of institutions.

42nd Annual Stanford-Berkeley Conference - Empires: Past and Present

Conference/Symposium | March 9 | 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. |  Stanford Humanities Center

 424 Saint Teresa Street, Stanford, CA 94305

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, Stanford Humanities Center

42nd Annual Stanford-Berkeley Conference
Empires: Past and Present
Friday, March 9, 2018
Stanford Humanities Center
424 Santa Teresa Street

A century after the collapse of Europe's continental empires, we are living in an age that many contemporary scholars have characterized as still dominated by these imperial legacies as well as new forms of imperial rule. This conference will explore...   More >

  RSVP online

Amateurism Across the Arts

Conference/Symposium | March 9 | 10 a.m.-6 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Arts Research Center

Amateurism Across the Arts is an exploration of vernacular, popular, fannish, kitsch, informal, self-taught, user-generated, and DIY production in music, architecture, literature, the visual arts, dance, and new media.

Cartenera Books

Civil and Environmental Engineering Department Seminar: Sufficiency and Efficiency and Proficiency, Oh My! A Unified Metric for Seismic Intensity Measure Selection

Seminar | March 9 | 10-11 a.m. | 542 Davis Hall

 Madeleine Flint

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

Probabilistic Seismic Demand Analysis (PSDA) characterizes the response of buildings and other structures to the full range of future ground motions expected at a structure's site, and is widely used in research and practice.

Elemental Media: 26th Annual Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference

Conference/Symposium | March 9 – 10, 2018 every day | 10 a.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

The Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference brings media theory in conversation with ecological thought. Contributions from the fields of German, Comparative Literature, Rhetoric, Visual and Environmental Studies, Film and Media, and History.

“Leveraging Deep Neural Networks To Study Human Cognition”

Colloquium | March 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Joshua Peterson, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Exit Talk

Activism and Pragmatism: Building a Career as a Global Change Maker: A Brown Bag Discussion with Bennett Freeman

Seminar | March 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall

 Bennett Freeman

 Social Science Matrix

Opportunities for progressive change in the 21st century increasingly come from multiple actors and sectors: governments and international institutions; multinational corporations and innovative entrepreneurs; responsible and impact investors; activist campaigners and social movements. Often those opportunities come at the intersection of those actors and sectors: sometimes forged in conflict;...   More >

  RSVP online

Bennett Freeman

Dr. Eric Hoek Seminar: Environmental Engineering Seminar

Seminar | March 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 534 Davis Hall

 Dr. Eric Hoek, Professor, UCLA

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

Yoga for Tension and Stress Relief (BEUHS664)

Workshop | March 9 | 12:10-1 p.m. | 251 Hearst Gymnasium

 Laurie Ferris, Yoga Instructor, Be Well at Work - Wellness Program

 Be Well at Work - Wellness

Practicing yoga can release tension in your joints, give you greater range of movement, soothe your back, and grant you increased comfort in all aspects of your life. Learn how pranayama breathing can enhance your practice, and help liberate your mind in surprising ways. Yoga mats are provided, or you can bring your own. Comfortable clothing and bare feet recommended.

  Register online

Talking About Combinatorial Objects Student Seminar: Generalized Permutahedra

Seminar | March 9 | 1-2 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Mariel Supina, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

The standard permutahedron is a polytope obtained by taking the convex hull of the orbit of the point $(0, 1, ..., n)$ under the action of the symmetric group. Due to how it is constructed, the permutahedron contains a great deal of information about the symmetric group in its structure. I will present some interesting results about the permutahedron which will illustrate the link between this...   More >

Solid State Technology and Devices Seminar: Taking electrons out of bioelectronics: transistors, ion channels, and shark’s electrosensors

Seminar | March 9 | 1-2 p.m. | Cory Hall, 521 Hogan Room

 Marco Rolandi, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

The quest for smaller and faster computing has mostly focused on controlling the flow of electrons and holes in nanoscale structures. In living systems, ionic and protonic currents affect physiological function. As such, ionic and protonic devices offer exciting opportunities for bioelectronics. Proton transport in nature is important for ATP oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, light...   More >

Atomic Layer Etching in Semiconductor Device Manufacturing

Seminar | March 9 | 1:30-2:30 p.m. | Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Bldg. 62, room 230

 Dr. Aaron Eppler, Lam Research, Fremont

 College of Chemistry

Stewardship of the Cultural Record: How do we approximate cultural “production”?

Seminar | March 9 | 1:30-3 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Clifford Lynch

 Information, School of

The challenge of cultural stewardship when everyone is a content producer.

BLISS Seminar: Nonconvex Sparse Deconvolution: Geometry and Efficient Methods

Seminar | March 9 | 2-3 p.m. | 540 Cory Hall

 John Wright, Associate Professor, Columbia University

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

The problem of decomposing a given dataset as a superposition of basic motifs arises in a wide range of application areas, including neural spike sorting and the analysis of astrophysical and microscopy data. Motivated by these problems, we study a ``short-and-sparse’’ deconvolution problem, in which the goal is to recover a short motif a from its convolution with a random spike train x. We...   More >

Hybridized Metasurfaces: A New Twist in Flat Optics: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | March 9 | 2-3 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall | Note change in time and location

 Prof. Cheng-Wei Qiu, Nat'l University of Singapore, ECE

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

I will report some of the most recent developments in my group as well as in the field of the interfacial engineering of manipulation of light-matter interactions, via the artificially constructed structures of ultrathin thickness compared to the wavelength. In particular, the low-dimension and high-frequency scaling may promise a lot more interesting applications, while the challenges in design...   More >

Student Probability/PDE Seminar: Equivalence of Ensembles for Gibbs Measures and Large Deviation Principle

Seminar | March 9 | 2:10-3:30 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Fraydoun Rezakhanlou, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

“Immune system regulation by microbiota in intestinal barrier homeostasis”

Seminar | March 9 | 3-4 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Dan Littman, Skirball Institute and New York University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Pathways to the Environmental and Sustainability Public Sector: Networking Event

Career Fair | March 9 | 3-5 p.m. | Career Center, Gold Room

 2440 2440 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94720

 Career Center

The Career Center is hosting a networking event where we will invite organizations to have a table, explain what their organization does, and then the rest of the event will be networking.

Dopamine Diversity: Tasks, Projections and Channels

Seminar | March 9 | 3-4 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Dr. Jochen Roeper, Director, Institute of Neurophysiology, Goethe University Frankfurt

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Abstract:
Dopamine (DA) midbrain neurons that in reside in the two neighboring nuclei substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) have segregated according to their axonal projections into several mostly parallel systems with different functions in the control of action, reward-based learning and cognition. In vivo electrophysiology in awake freely moving mice demonstrates...   More >

The Means Don’t Quantify the Ends: Criteria and Metrics for Evaluating Digital Preservation Success

Seminar | March 9 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Stephen Abrams, California Digital Library

 Information, School of

Cultural preservation is a form of communication with the future. So how can we measure its success?

An Intellectual History of Literati Localism, 1100-1500

Colloquium | March 9 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Peter Bol, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

 Nicolas Tackett, History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Literati communities took form at the local level in the twelfth century and developed various forms of voluntary activism in areas that had once been the province of the state and religious institutions. Some Neo-Confucians encouraged this voluntarism, but generally literati continued to see themselves as members of a national elite even if they lived their lives locally. This case study of...   More >

Gaze and Locomotion in Natural Terrains

Seminar | March 9 | 4-5 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Mary Hayhoe, Professor, Center for Perceptual Systems, University of Texas Austin

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Abstract: Eye movements in the natural world reflect the information needs of the momentary behavioral goals, the rewards and costs associated with those goals, and uncertainty about the state of the world. We examine how these factors trade off in the context of walking outdoors in terrains of varying difficulty, a situation where little is known about how visual and locomotor systems work...   More >

Music Studies Colloquium Melina Esse (Eastman School of Music): Divinely Inspired: Incantation and the Making of Melody in Bellini's Norma

Colloquium | March 9 | 4:30 p.m. | 128 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

In her writing, teaching, and personal practice, Melina Esse enacts her longstanding fascination with the connections between gender, materiality, and performance. A scholar of opera in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, she has published widely—on voice and technological mediation, on opera and film, and on gender and the emotive body. Her latest work probes the intertwining histories of...   More >

Saturday, March 10, 2018

Theology and Its Publics

Workshop | March 10 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

In order to reorient theological study, the Berkeley Public Theology Program supports a broad and comparative investigation of the ways this study happens, past and present, in the U.S. and abroad. This investigation includes two annual workshops on comparative approaches to theology, with participants drawn from a diverse group of institutions.

Elemental Media: 26th Annual Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference

Conference/Symposium | March 9 – 10, 2018 every day | 10 a.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

The Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference brings media theory in conversation with ecological thought. Contributions from the fields of German, Comparative Literature, Rhetoric, Visual and Environmental Studies, Film and Media, and History.

SOLD OUT - Local Color: A Watercolor Workshop with Mimi Robinson

Workshop | March 10 | 10 a.m.-3 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Have you ever noticed that each place has its own distinct set of colors? This watercolor workshop explores the colors that make up The UC Botanical Garden. Through classroom and garden we will develop color palettes that reflect this remarkable place.

$100, $90 members

 SOLD OUT.

Sunday, March 11, 2018

SLAM: How to lead effectively: Skills for managing scientists

Seminar | March 11 | 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | 775 Tan Hall

 Dr. Anna Goldstein, Harvard University; Dr. Ben Thuronyi, Harvard University

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

This full-day workshop will focus on the critical interpersonal aspects of leading a group of scientists, integrating techniques for communication, feedback, conflict resolution, and negotiation. It’s designed to complement the SLAM seminar series by providing highly interactive, participatory experiences. You’ll get hands-on practice with the relationship skills that are key to being a great...   More >

Monday, March 12, 2018

Lessons from the Black Panther Party's Oakland Community School

Workshop | March 12 | 2407 Dwinelle Hall

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

Join UCBHSSP for a day of content learning and planning! Angela LeBlanc-Ernest, a scholar of the Black Panther Party, will share her research, which is part of a documentary she is developing on the Party's Oakland Community School. She will also introduce teachers to the Intersectional Black Panther Party History Project, which highlights the experience of women in the Black Panther Party.

Beyond New Neurons: The Secretory Role of Adult Hippocampal Stem and Progenitor Cells

Seminar | March 12 | 9-10:30 a.m. | 445 Li Ka Shing Center

 Dr. Liz Kirby, Assistant Professor at OSU

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

In the adult mammalian hippocampus, resident neural stem and progenitor cells give rise to new, highly plastic neurons. A great deal of research has focused on the role of these new neurons in supporting hippocampal memory function and injury response. However, our recent work shows that undifferentiated neural stem and progenitor cells also have functional relevance by secreting soluble...   More >

The Political Economy and Legal Aspects of Trade Policy in the Trump Era

Conference/Symposium | March 12 | 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Warren Room 295

 UC Berkeley School of Law, The Berkeley APEC Study Center, The Institute of East Asian Studies, Miller Center for Global Challenges and the Law, The Clausen Center for International Business and Policy

With the Brexit referendum, election of Donald Trump, and the continued stasis at the World Trade Organization (WTO), the liberal, rules-based trading order is facing considerable pressure for business and policymakers. These pressures come from structural economic forces, systemic changes in geopolitics, domestic political conflicts in the US and elsewhere, and a rethinking of the ideological...   More >

​Graduate Students Talk

Seminar | March 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Nevin El Nimri; Patrick Carney

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Combinatorics Seminar: A crystal-like structure on shifted tableaux

Seminar | March 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Maria Monks Gillespie, UC Davis

 Department of Mathematics

We establish a crystal-like structure on shifted tableaux, whose characters are the Schur $Q$-functions. In particular, we will define two sets of coplactic raising and lowering operators $E$, $F$, $E'$, and $F'$ on shifted tableaux that each independently give a type A Kashiwara crystal. Taken together, these operators detect highest weight skew shifted tableaux, giving a new shifted...   More >

Comparative Neurobiology of Social Bonds - from Rodents to Primates to Humans

Colloquium | March 12 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Karen Bales, Department of Psychology, UC Davis

 Department of Psychology

Social bonds are critical to human health and well-being. However, most of what we know regarding the neurobiology of strong, selective social bonds ("pair-bonds") comes from a socially monogamous rodent, the prairie vole. In my laboratory, we also study a socially monogamous primate, the titi monkey, as a model for the neurobiology of pair bond formation and maintenance. We have characterized...   More >

PMB Student/Postdoc Seminar: Leveraging Social Media for Science Communication and Professional Development

Seminar | March 12 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 338 Koshland Hall

 Sara ElShafie, Grad student, IB; Aaron Pomerantz, Grad student, IB

 Plant and Microbial Biology Student Group

What is the most effective way to use social media to share your scientific work with the public? How can you use social media to network and find professional opportunities? This workshop will explore how you can use social media to advance your career and heighten the impact of your work.

The Plant and Microbial Biology Student Group (PMBG) hosts a special Student Postdoc Seminar on social...   More >

The fabric of the neocortex: a less-artificial intelligence

Seminar | March 12 | 1-2 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 **Andreas Tolias**, Baylor College of Medicine

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Probabilistic Operator Algebra Seminar: Standard invariants for discrete subfactors

Seminar | March 12 | 2-3:50 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Dave Penneys, Ohio State University

 Department of Mathematics

The standard invariant of a finite index $II_1$ subfactor is a λ-lattice and forms a planar algebra. In turn, the planar algebra formalism has been helpful in constructing and classifying subfactors, as well as studying analytic properties. In joint work with Corey Jones, we give a well-behaved notion of the standard invariant of an extremal irreducible discrete subfactor $N\subset M$, where $N$...   More >

Seminar 231, Public Finance: Special Seminar: How Did Tax Reform Happen?

Seminar | March 12 | 2-4 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Robert D. Burch Center for Tax Policy and Public Finance

David Kamin / Ed Kleinbard / Alan Auerbach

Differential Geometry Seminar: New examples of complete Calabi-Yau metrics on \(ℂ^n\) for \(n \geq 3\)

Seminar | March 12 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Ronan Conlon, Florida International University

 Department of Mathematics

I will present new examples of non-flat complete Calabi-Yau metrics on \(ℂ^n\) for \(n \geq 3\) having Euclidean volume growth and a tangent cone at infinity with a singular cross section. This is joint work with Frédéric Rochon (UQAM).

BLISS Seminar: Robust Storage of Information in DNA Molecules

Seminar | March 12 | 3-4 p.m. | 540 Cory Hall

 Reinhard Heckel, Rice University

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Due to its longevity and enormous information density, DNA is an attractive medium for archival storage of digital information. In this talk, we discuss algorithmic and design aspects of DNA data storage systems. A key distinctive aspect of DNA data storage systems is that due to technological constraints, (1) data is written onto many short DNA molecules that are stored in an unordered way and...   More >

Core Cognitive Mechanisms in Learning and Development

Colloquium | March 12 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Celeste Kidd, Assistant Professor, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

The talk will discuss approaches aimed at understanding the computational mechanisms that drive learning and development in young children. Although infants are born knowing little about the world, they possess remarkable learning mechanisms that eventually create sophisticated systems of knowledge. We discuss recent empirical findings about learners’ cognitive mechanisms—including attention,...   More >

STROBE Seminar Series: Strategies for Effective Mentoring

Seminar | March 12 | 3-4 p.m. | 433 Latimer Hall

 College of Chemistry

The purpose of this workshop is to assist graduate students and other STROBE participants in working effectively within the context of mentoring relationships with faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates. Participants will learn about the importance of mentoring both to mentors and mentees, how to initiate mentoring relationships and keep them on track, and how to address
problems that...   More >

Arithmetic Geometry and Number Theory RTG Seminar: $2^k$-Selmer groups, $2^k$-class groups, and Goldfeld's conjecture

Seminar | March 12 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Alexander Smith, Harvard University

 Department of Mathematics

Take $E/\mathbb Q$ to be an elliptic curve with full rational 2-torsion (satisfying some extra technical assumptions). In this talk, we will show that $100\%$ of the quadratic twists of $E$ have rank less than two, thus proving that the BSD conjecture implies Goldfeld's conjecture in these families. To do this, we will extend Kane's distributional results on the 2-Selmer groups in these families...   More >

Political Economy Seminar

Seminar | March 12 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Evans Hall, Evans Hall 648

 Ben Olken, MIT

 Department of Economics

The Political Economy Seminar focuses on formal and quantitative work in the political economy field, including formal political theory.

The impact of biology on genome editing

Seminar | March 12 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Dana Carroll, The University of Utah

 College of Chemistry

Analysis and PDE Seminar: Honeycomb Structures, Edge States, and the Strong Binding Regime

Seminar | March 12 | 4-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Michael Weinstein, Columbia University and Stanford University

 Department of Mathematics

We review recent progress on the propagation of waves for the 2D Schrödinger and Maxwell equations for media with the symmetry of a hexagonal tiling of the plane.

Basic Needs Security Mental Health Workshop

Workshop | March 12 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Stiles Hall Conference Room (basement)

 Tova Feldmanstern, Counseling & Psychological Services

 UC Berkeley Basic Needs Security Committee

The student mental health workshop will be hosted by Tova Feldmanstern, a Staff Social Worker from Counseling & Psychological Services, who will be giving a brief presentation about mental health information and basic needs resources. Then a student panel will be sharing their personal experiences, with time at the end for questions. This will be followed by a community building space for...   More >

UROC DeCal – Demystifying the Research Process: Decolonizing Methods in Academic Research (Hosted by UROC: Undergraduate Researchers of Color)

Course | January 29 – April 30, 2018 every Monday with exceptions | 6-8 p.m. | 174 Barrows Hall

 Istifaa Ahmed, UROOC

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Ethnic Studies 98/198
Class Time: Mondays, 6pm-8pm, 1/22/18 - 4/30/18
Course Control Number (CCN): 24251

Units: 1-3 units

Student Instructor: Istifaa Ahmed

Welcome to our student-led organization and DeCal, Underrepresented Researchers of Color (UROC) – Demystifying the Research Process: Decolonizing Methods in Academic Research! We seek to build a community of researchers of color...   More >

The Honorable J. Clifford Wallace Lecture Series: the Ups and Downs of Religious Freedom

Panel Discussion | March 12 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Room 295, Warren Room

 Michael W. McConnell, Richard and Frances Mallery Professor of Law Director, Constitutional Law Center at Stanford Law School

 Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean and Jesse H. Choper Distinguished Professor of Law at University of California, Berkeley

 Jesse Choper, Earl Warren Professor of Public Law (Emeritus) at University of California, Berkeley

 Frederick Gedicks, Guy Anderson Chair and Professor of Law at Brigham Young University

 Stephen Sugarman, Roger J. Traynor Professor at University of California, Berkeley

 Law, Boalt School of, BYU Law

Monday, March 12, 2018
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Warren Room 295, Berkeley Law

THE HONORABLE J. CLIFFORD WALLACE LECTURE SERIES: THE UPS AND DOWNS OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Mentorship in Science: Interview with Jing Chen, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Seminar | March 13 | 9-9:30 a.m. | Barrows Hall, Radio broadcast, ON-AIR ONLY, 90.7 FM

 Jing Chen, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology; Andrew Saintsing, Department of Integrative Biology

 KALX 90.7 FM

Tune in for another exciting episode of The Graduates as we speak with Jing Chen. Jing is a PhD candidate in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology studying the regulation of proteins involved in cell division. She is specifically interested in how these proteins ensure that parents are able to pass on their genetic material to offspring during sexual reproduction. In the interview, Jing...   More >

Jing Chen

Robert G. Bergman Lecture: What is a transition state, and why should I care?

Seminar | March 13 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Barry Carpenter, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol

 College of Chemistry

Since the early days of the development of Transition State Theory, there have been two descriptions of what a transition state (TS) is. The one that most chemists use identifies the TS with a saddle point on the potential energy surface (PES). The other is that it is a dividing surface (DS) in phase space, which reactive trajectories cross only once on their transit from reactant to product....   More >

Food Systems Policy and Communications Workshop Series 2017–18: Session 4: Using Social Media for Influencer Engagment

Workshop | March 13 | 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. | 112 Hilgard Hall

 Haven Bourque, Founder, HavenBMedia

 Berkeley Food Institute

Session 4: Using Social Media for Influencer Engagement

Overview of the role of social media in the social and environmental justice movements and a training on how experts can amplify their work and engage with news cycle topics, reporters, and outlets via social media.

Featuring: Haven Bourque, HavenBMedia

 Free. RSVP online

Development Lunch: "Behavioral and market determinants of household energy efficiency in a development context"

Seminar | March 13 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Susanna Berkouwer

 Department of Economics

A Theory of Land and Electoral Violence: Evidence from Kenya

Colloquium | March 13 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Kathleen Klaus, Visiting Assistant Professor, Welsleyan University, Department of Government

 Center for African Studies

This talk presents the main theoretical chapter from my book manuscript, Claiming Land: Institutions, Narratives, and Political Violence in Kenya. The book examines an enduring puzzle in the study of electoral violence: How do elites organize violence and more so, why do ordinary citizens participate? Existing theories emphasize weak state institutions, ethnic cleavages, and the calculations of...   More >

Kathleen Klaus

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR - Rayna Bell: Bridges, rafts, and phenotypic diversification in the Gulf of Guinea archipelago

Seminar | March 13 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Rayna Bell (MVZ/IB Faculty Candidate)

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ/IB Faculty Search. 12:30 - 1:30 pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist know you are there for the seminar. The library is located in the rear of the Museum on the north side - follow the orange directional signs.

Impacts of Public Preschool on Income, Health and Inequality: A Life Course Model

Colloquium | March 13 | 12:40-2 p.m. | 104 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Richard Cookson, PhD, Professor, University of York

 Public Health, School of

We develop a novel general population microsimulation model of the causal pathways linking early life circumstances and skills formation to diverse later life outcomes, based on quasi-experimental evidence and recent longitudinal UK survey data (Millennium Cohort Study 2000-14, Understanding Society 2011 and 2016). We illustrate how it can evaluate the long-run costs, benefits and inequality...   More >

3-Manifold Seminar: Tait colorings and instanton homology (continued)

Seminar | March 13 | 12:40-2 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Ian Agol, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

We'll continue to discuss the construction of the J# invariants of 3-dimensional webs and 4-dimensional foam cobordisms by Kronheimer-Mrowka.

How to Prepare Human Subjects Protocols for Your Research Projects

Workshop | March 13 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 14 Durant Hall

 Jeffrey Vance Martin, SURF Social Science and Humanities Advisor, OURS

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to learn how to prepare human subjects protocols for a research project, you may want to attend one of these workshops given by the Office of Undergraduate Research & Scholarships (OURS). Note that they are timed to be very shortly after SURF and Haas Scholars human subjects selection, respectively.

We will go through, step by step, the things...   More >

Tripodi Workshop with Dr. Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro: Research Design to Empirically Operationalize Intersectionality

Workshop | March 13 | 1:30-3:30 p.m. | Haviland Hall, Haviland Commons

 Social Welfare, School of

Empirical approaches to intersectionality traditionally attempt to shoehorn intersectionality as a “testable explanation” into standard positivistic methodologies. But is this the most appropriate way to incorporate intersectionality? Using fs(QCA), Dr. Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro illustrates an alternative approach to empirically operationalizing intersectionality as a research paradigm instead of...   More >

Seminar 218, Psychology and Economics: "Knowing When to Ask: The Cost of Leaning In"

Seminar | March 13 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Christine Exley, Harvard Business School

 Department of Economics

Seminar 237/281, Macro/International Seminar: Topic Forthcoming

Seminar | March 13 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 597 Evans Hall

 Arnaud Costinot, MIT

 Department of Economics

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Bay Area Microlocal Analysis Seminar: Control and stabilization on hyperbolic surfaces

Seminar | March 13 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 732 Evans Hall

 Long Jin, Purdue University

 Department of Mathematics

In this talk, we discuss some recent results concerning the control and stabilization on a compact hyperbolic surface. In particular, we show that

the Laplace eigenfunctions have uniform lower bounds on any nonempty open set;

the linear Schrödinger equation is exactly controllable by any nonempty open set; and

the energy of solutions to the linear damped wave equation with regular...   More >

Social Impact Career Fair

Career Fair | March 13 | 3-7 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Pauley Ballroom

 Career Center

Sponsored by the Career Center, come join us for the 3rd Annual Social Impact Career Fair!

Recruiters will bring information about their entry-level career, fellowship and internship positions that provide you an opportunity to have a meaningful, positive impact on the world. Recruiting all majors and degree levels!

► We expect 50+ employers representing:
• Non-profit
• Public...   More >

 This fair is open only to current enrolled UC Berkeley students and alumni who are registered for the Career Center's Alumni Advantage program (https://career.berkeley.edu/Alumni/AlumniAdv). Be sure to bring your UC Berkeley Student ID.

i4Y Child Marriage and Youth Empowerment Group Speaker Series:Adolescent Development in the US and Implications for Child Marriage

Seminar | March 13 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 198 University Hall

 Julianna Deardorff, UC Berkeley School of Public Health

 Innovations for Youth (i4Y)

Title: Adolescent Development in the US and Implications for Child Marriage


Abstract: Advocacy efforts around child marriage are commonly centered outside of the United States. However, findings from U.S.-based research may have important implications for more effectively tackling child marriage, both domestically and globally. This talk focuses on three areas of research that are largely...   More >

How to Prepare Human Subjects Protocols for Your Research Projects

Workshop | March 13 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 1229 Dwinelle Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, OURS

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to learn how to prepare human subjects protocols for a research project, you may want to attend one of these workshops given by the Office of Undergraduate Research & Scholarships (OURS). Note that they are timed to be very shortly after SURF and Haas Scholars human subjects selection, respectively.

We will go through, step by step, the things...   More >

Semiconducting Polymer Dots and Single-Molecule Studies of Synaptic Vesicles

Seminar | March 13 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Daniel Chiu, Department of Chemistry, University of Washington

 College of Chemistry

Synaptic vesicle plays a central role in neurotransmission. It is also perhaps the smallest organelle present in the cell, with a diameter of ~40nm, which makes it amendable to high-resolution single-particle and single-molecule studies. This talk will describe some of the surprising findings we made over the years about synaptic vesicles. Because single-molecule experiments depend critically on...   More >

Design Field Notes: Kal Spelletich

Seminar | March 13 | 4-5 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Kal Spelleitch, an artist who uses technology to put people back in touch with real-life experiences, will speak at Jacobs Hall.

Bay Area Microlocal Analysis Seminar: Deformation of constant curvature conical metrics

Seminar | March 13 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Xuwen Zhu, Stanford

 Department of Mathematics

In this joint work with Rafe Mazzeo, we aim to understand the deformation theory of constant curvature metrics with prescribed conical singularities on a compact Riemann surface. We construct a resolution of the configuration space, and prove a new regularity result that the family of such conical metrics has a nice compactification as the cone points coalesce. This is a key ingredient of...   More >

International Alumni Career Chats (Architecture, City Planning and Urban Design)

Career Fair | March 13 | 6-7 p.m. | 305 Wurster Hall

 Berkeley International Office(BIO)), Career Center

International students with majors in humanity and social science areas may face more challenging job market and hurdles with work authorization and visa requirements. Come and talk to the international alumni who graduated with the same majors as you and are working in the Bay Area.

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

SOLD OUT - Local Color: A Watercolor Workshop with Mimi Robinson

Workshop | March 14 | 10 a.m.-3 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Have you ever noticed that each place has its own distinct set of colors? This watercolor workshop explores the colors that make up The UC Botanical Garden. Through classroom and garden we will develop color palettes that reflect this remarkable place. Learn and refine your color mixing skills, and how “limited palettes” can create a wide range of subtle color.

$100, $90 members

 Sold out.

WEBINAR: Travel and Visa Renewal in 2018

Workshop | March 14 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Online Webinar

 Berkeley International Office(BIO))

Learn about what to expect when traveling abroad and re-entering the U.S. Topics include: Is it ok to travel internationally right now? What are the risks involved with travelling? When a visa stamp is needed (and when it is not), documents you need to apply for a visa, the visa application process and timelines, Security Clearances, and travel to Canada and Mexico.

Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

Workshop | March 14 | 11:10 a.m.-12:40 p.m. | Barrows Hall, D-Lab, 350 Barrows Hall

 Rachael Samberg, Scholarly Communication Officer, Library

 Library

This training will help you navigate the copyright, fair use, and usage rights of including third-party content in your digital project. We will also provide an overview of your intellectual property rights as a creator and ways to license your own work.

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR - Anne Yoder: From speciation, to sensory biology, to translational biomedicine: My journey with the mouse lemur as an emerging genetic model organism

Seminar | March 14 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Anne Yoder (MVZ Student Invited Speaker)

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

Bridging the Gap Between the Petri Dish and the Patient: Integrative Approaches to Put Disease in Context

Seminar | March 14 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Stephanie Fraley, University of California, San Diego

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Technological advances continue to accentuate the fact that biological knowledge is highly context and time dependent. It is now clear that in vitro model systems, which are necessary for studying the molecular mechanisms of disease, fail to represent many critical pathophysiological features of human disease. Thus, findings from in vitro studies rarely translate directly into impact for...   More >

The contribution of drug-related deaths to the US disadvantage in mortality: Magali Barbieri, UC Berkeley/INED

Colloquium | March 14 | 12-1 p.m. | 2232 Piedmont, Seminar Room

 Magali Barbieri, Professor, UC Berkeley/INED

 Population Science, Department of Demography

A lunch time talk and discussion session, featuring visiting and local scholars presenting their research on a wide range of topics of interest to demography.

Non-Invasive Bladder Volume Sensing for Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction Management: CITRIS Spring 2018 Research Exchange Series

Seminar | March 14 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Eric A. Kurzrock, Professor of Urology, UC Davis

 Soheil Ghiasi, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UC Davis

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

We will develop machine learning algorithms to identify patterns in light absorption maps generated by the sensor array, and to personalize the alert to better match individual patient’s body characteristics and preferences. Extensive empirical studies with bladder replicas, swine bladder and healthy human volunteers will be carried out.

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Chemical Intelligence of Fungi"

Seminar | March 14 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Nancy Keller, University of Wisconsin - Madison

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

My research focus lies in genetically dissecting those aspects of Aspergillus spp. that render them potent pathogens and superb natural product machines. We are interested in elucidating the mechanism of fungal sporulation and host/pathogen interactions; processes intimately linked to secondary metabolite (e.g. mycotoxin) production.

The Persistence of Gender Inequality from Interpersonal and Intergroup Perspectives

Colloquium | March 14 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Laura Kray, Professor, Haas School of Business

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Laura Kray will weigh evidence in support of a popular explanation for women’s lesser outcomes in pay and career advancement—the belief that women are poor advocates for themselves.

Sound meditation for Sleep (BEUHS057)

Workshop | March 14 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Section Club

 Melissa Felsenstein, Inner Sounds Yoga

 Be Well at Work - Employee Assistance

Experience the powerful effects of live sound during this special, free sound meditation. Learn how sound can be used as therapy to help reduce stress, release tension, balance the nervous system, and encourage healthier sleep. Feel a deeper sense of relaxation and renewal as you are immersed in tone and vibration of quartz crystal bowls and other instruments.

Participants have reported...   More >

  Register online

Employment Issues in Agriculture

Workshop | March 14 | 1-5 p.m. |  2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment)

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment

The aim of this workshop is to explore employment issues in Californian agriculture. This workshop aims at approaching the broad theme of employment issues in Californian agriculture from different perspectives, by focusing on the following: i) low wage jobs in agriculture; ii) discrimination at work; ii) immigration reform; and iii) attempts to make agriculture more sustainable. These approaches...   More >

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Rigidity and flexibility for discrete subgroups of semisimple Lie groups

Seminar | March 14 | 2-3 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Beatrice Pozzetti, University of Heidelberg

 Department of Mathematics

After introducing semisimple Lie groups as groups of isometries of symmetric spaces, I will give a panorama on some classical results about their discrete subgroups. On the one hand, I will discuss Mostow rigidity and Margulis superrigidity, on the other I will discuss how the Teichmuller space gives examples of flexible subgroups of Lie groups, as well as bending constructions.

Probabilistic Operator Algebra Seminar: The relative Drinfeld commutant of a fusion category and alpha-induction

Seminar | March 14 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Yasuyuki Kawahigashi, University of Tokyo

 Department of Mathematics

We establish a correspondence among simple objects of the relative commutant of a full fusion subcategory in a larger fusion category in the sense of Drinfeld, irreducible half-braidings of objects in the larger fusion category with respect to the fusion subcategory, and minimal central projections in the relative tube algebra. Based on this, we explicitly compute certain relative Drinfeld...   More >

Feminism and Politics in 1980s Britain

Workshop | March 14 | 2-5:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Stephen Brooke, York University; Judith Walkowitz, Johns Hopkins University; Sarah Stoller, UC Berkeley; Christopher Lawson, UC Berkeley

 James Vernon, UC Berkeley; Tehila Sasson, Emory University

 Department of History, Center for British Studies

This afternoon workshop will be structured around discussions of work-in-progress that are helping us to rethink the nature of feminism and the political culture of 1980s Britain. Papers will be pre-circulated electronically and each presenter will have 10-15 minutes to talk about them before opening up to discussion.

  RSVP by emailing ctrbs@berkeley.edu

Genre Awareness and Analysis: A Strategic Tool for Language Learning

Workshop | March 14 | 3-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 (Classroom side)

 Greta Vollmer, Professor Emerita, English & Applied Linguistics, Sonoma State University

 Berkeley Language Center

Students studying foreign languages often struggle to produce texts whose forms, purposes and linguistic features are unfamiliar or unclear to them. How can we - as instructors - help them understand the key genres of a foreign language, as well as the linguistic choices and cultural expectations that shape them? This session will offer an activity-based introduction to "genre-based pedagogy,”...   More >

Random walk on the Heisenberg group

Seminar | March 14 | 3:10-4 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Persi Diaconis, Stanford University

 Department of Statistics

The Heisenberg group ( 3 by 3 upper-triangular matrices with entries in a ring) is a venerable mathematical object. Simple random walk picks one of the bottom two rows at random and adds or substracts it from the row above.
I will use Fourier analysis to get sharp results about the long term behavior. For entries in integers mod n, the walk converges to uniform after order n squared steps

Bankers and Empire: How Wall Street Colonized the Caribbean

Colloquium | March 14 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 575 McCone Hall

 Peter James Hudson, University of California Los Angeles

 Department of Geography

From the end of the nineteenth century until the onset of the Great Depression, Wall Street embarked on a stunning, unprecedented, and often bloody period of international expansion in the Caribbean. The precursors to institutions like Citibank and JPMorgan Chase, as well as a host of long-gone and lesser-known financial entities, sought to control banking, trade, and finance in the region. In...   More >

Protecting the genome of mitotic and meiotic cells by homologous recombination

Seminar | March 14 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Maria Jasin, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Ethnographic films by Director-cinematographer Xiangchen Liu

Colloquium | March 14 | 4-6 p.m. |  1995 University Avenue, fifth floor

 Map

 Xiangchen Liu, independent filmmaker

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Mongolian Initiative

Zul (documentary, 57 minutes)
The Mongolians in Bayanbulug Area, believers of Tibetan Buddhism, make a lengthy journey through ridges and passes to reach their winter pasture deep inside Mount Tianshan. There, while being isolated for 5 months by storm and snow, people celebrate Zul, the Lamp Lighting Festival on the 25th of October on the lunar calendar each year. On this Day of Death of...   More >

How to Prepare Human Subjects Protocols for Your Research Projects

Workshop | March 14 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Manager and Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to learn how to prepare human subjects protocols for a research project, you may want to attend one of these workshops given by the Office of Undergraduate Research & Scholarships (OURS). Note that they are timed to be very shortly after SURF and Haas Scholars human subjects selection, respectively.

We will go through, step by step, the things...   More >

ERG Colloquium: Andy Jones: Rational Numbers: Improving the Usability of Science for a Climate Resilient Society

Colloquium | March 14 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 126 Barrows Hall

 Andy Jones, Research Scientist, Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 Energy and Resources Group

Many of the scientific data products available to decision-makers were not produced with their needs in mind and lack credibility information that could be used to guide the use of certain data products for specific applications. Dr. Jones will describe two lines of research aimed at addressing this gap

Mediation analysis for count and zero-inflated count data

Seminar | March 14 | 4-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Jing Cheng, UCSF

 Department of Statistics

In health studies, the outcome is often a count or zero-inflated (ZI) count such as the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (dmft) or surfaces (dmfs); many subjects have zeros because they have not had any cavities. To aid in understanding the underlying mechanisms of diseases and treatments, we developed a series of statistical methods for mediation analyses specifically for count or ZI...   More >

Individualizing Healthcare with Machine Learning

Seminar | March 14 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, 306 Soda Hall - HP Auditorium

 Suchi Saria, Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In this talk, I will begin by introducing the types of health data currently being collected and the challenges associated with learning models from these data.

Microhydrodynamics of Ellipsoidal Particles

Colloquium | March 14 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 Sangtae Kim, Purdue University

 Department of Chemical Engineering

The ellipsoid (along with its degenerate forms) is the workhorse in classical models that capture the role of nonspherical particle shapes in multiphase suspensions and composite materials. The utility of these models in many branches of science have forced generations of students to master the mathematics of elliptic integrals and related functions. And yet for over a half-century we have known...   More >

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): Maximal Representations

Seminar | March 14 | 4-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Beatrice Pozzetti, University of Heidelberg

 Department of Mathematics

An important application of bounded cohomology is the theory of maximal representations: a class of exceptionally well behaved homomorphisms of fundamental groups of Kaehler manifolds (most notably fundamental groups of surfaces and finite volume ball quotients) in Hermitian Lie groups (as Sp(2n,R) or SU(p,q)). I will discuss recent rigidity results for maximal representations of fundamental...   More >

Seminar 211, Economic History: Pricing Uncertainty Induced by Climate Change

Seminar | March 14 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Lars Peter Hansen, University of Chicago

 Department of Economics

Note change in time. Joint with Departmental Seminar.

City of Inmates: Conquest, Rebellion, and the Rise of Human Caging in Los Angeles, 1771–1965

Colloquium | March 14 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Hearst Memorial Mining Building, Room 290

 Kelly Lytle Hernandez, Associate Professor, History and African American Studies and Interim Director of the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies, UCLA

 Eric Henderson, Policy Associate, Ella Baker Center for Human Rights

 Center for Research on Social Change, Department of History, Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Equity and Inclusion, Vice Chancellor

Los Angeles incarcerates more people than any other city in the United States, which imprisons more people than any other nation on Earth. In this talk based on her new book, historian Kelly Lytle Hernández explains how the City of Angels became the capital city of the world’s leading incarcerator.

Los Angeles incarcerates more people than any other city in the United States, which imprisons more people than any other nation on Earth. This book explains how the City of Angels became the capital city of the world’s leading incarcerator. Marshali

Applied Math Seminar: Modeling and simulation of plasmons in 2D materials

Seminar | March 14 | 4-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Mitchell Luskin, University of Minnesota

 Department of Mathematics

The manipulation of the electronic structure of low-dimensional materials has recently been the subject of active research with applications in spintronics, quantum information processing, energy storage, and novel composites. In particular, the electric conductivity of atomically thick materials such as graphene and black phosphorous yields an effective complex permittivity with a negative real...   More >

Seminar 291, Departmental Seminar: "Pricing Uncertainty Induced by Climate Change"

Seminar | March 14 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Lars Peter Hansen, University of Chicago

 Department of Economics

Climate science documents uncertainty induced by different emission scenarios, alternative models, and ambiguous physical interactions. Moreover, for some purposes, it constructs tractable approximations to initially complex models. To engage in credible policy analysis requires that we acknowledge and confront the limits to our understanding of dynamic mechanisms by which human inputs impact the...   More >

Basic Needs Security Fitness Workshop: Nutrition Week

Workshop | March 14 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Stiles Hall Conference Room (basement)

 Alvin Yu, UC Berkeley Basic Needs Security Committee

 UC Berkeley Basic Needs Security Committee

The Fitness Workshop will be hosted by BNS member, Alvin Yu. The purpose of our workshop is to provide motivation and inspiration to those tentative about working out or who could use some direction in beginning exercise. We plan to have a fun, interactive environment in which participants listen to Berkeley students with different interests in fitness (running, pilates, taekwondo, IM sports),...   More >

Women in Intellectual Life Conversation: Woman and Power

Panel Discussion | March 14 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 330 Wheeler Hall

 Department of English

This conversation and the next one (on April 13) will focus on "Women and Knowledge"--the creating of knowledge (aesthetic and scholarly), the learning of knowledge (how do we women learn and why do we do so), the conveying of knowledge (pedagogical practices).

Poulomi Saha, Kathleen Donegan, Katie Bondy, and Jane Hu will provide a few opening remarks, and the conversation will develop from...   More >

It’s not personal: Why being happy should be one of your explicit professional goals

Seminar | March 14 | 6-7 p.m. | 105 Stanley Hall

 Dr. Troy Lionberger, Senior Manager of Technology Development at Berkeley Lights

 Thriving in Science

As scientists, we are trained to think of our science as a deterministic process. We organize our research following the scientific method, execute experiments to the best of our abilities, and the honest truth is that most of our professional lives will be spent encountering failure. How we deal with failure (an unavoidable part of the scientific process) is what will ultimately determine...   More >