<< March 2018 >>

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Econ 235, Financial Economics: Topic Forthcoming

Seminar | March 1 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | C330 Haas School of Business

 Ariel Zetlin-Jones, Carnegie Mellon University

 Department of Economics

Joint with the Haas Finance Seminar

Oliver E. Williamson Seminar

Seminar | March 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | C325 Haas School of Business

 Davide Cantoni, Munich

 Department of Economics

The Oliver E. Williamson Seminar on Institutional Analysis, named after our esteemed colleague who founded the seminar, features current research by faculty, from UCB and elsewhere, and by advanced doctoral students. The research investigates governance, and its links with economic and political forces. Markets, hierarchies, hybrids, and the supporting institutions of law and politics all come...   More >

ESPM Seminar Series - Joe McBride

Seminar | March 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 132 Mulford Hall

 Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM)

ESPM Professor Emeritus Joe McBride shares his talk, "Here today and gone tomorrow: California street trees and climate change"

Coffee will be served at 11:30 in 139 Mulford Hall

This event is open to the public.

IB Seminar: Non-B DNA affects polymerization speed and error rate in sequencers and living cells

Seminar | March 1 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Kateryna Makova, The Pennsylvania State University

 Department of Integrative Biology

Seminar 217, Risk Management: The role of dynamic and static volatility interruptions: Evidence from the Korean stock markets

Seminar | March 1 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Speaker: Kyong Shik Eom, UC Berkeley

 Center for Risk Management Research

We conduct a comprehensive analysis on the sequential introductions of dynamic and static volatility interruption (VI) in the Korean stock markets. The Korea Exchange introduced VIs to improve price formation, and to limit damage to investors from brief periods of abnormal volatility, for individual stocks. We find that dynamic VI is effective in stabilizing markets and price discovery, while the...   More >

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Computational Design for the Next Manufacturing Revolution

Seminar | March 1 | 3-4 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 - Banatao Auditorium

 Adriana Schulz, Ph.D. Candidate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In my talk, I argue that the field of computational design is essential for the next revolution in manufacturing. To build increasingly functional, complex and integrated products, we need to create design tools that allow their users to efficiently explore high-dimensional design spaces by optimizing over a set of performance objectives that can be measured only by expensive computations.

Dr. Julia Fukuyama, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Institute: Using Phylogenetic Information to Understand the Microbiome

Seminar | March 1 | 3-4 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Center for Computational Biology, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Transcription, the fundamental cellular process by which DNA is copied to RNA, is tightly regulated in healthy human development but frequently dysregulated in disease. During or shortly after transcription, regions known as “introns” are spliced out of the RNA to produce mature “messenger” RNA. Massively parallel sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) has become a ubiquitous technology in...   More >

Seminar 291, Department: What You Lose When You Lose Your Job: The Lasting Impacts of Unemployment

Panel Discussion | March 1 | 4-6 p.m. |  2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment)

 Jennie Brand, UCLA

 Department of Economics

The discussion will be moderated by Danny Yagan of the UC Berkeley Economics Department and Sandra Smith of IRLE. You must register to attend. Click on title above to register.

WEBINAR: F-1 Optional Practical Training (OPT) Question and Answer Session

Workshop | March 1 | 4-5 p.m. |  Online Webinar

 Berkeley International Office(BIO))

If you are graduating soon and have questions about applying for F-1 employment eligibility after you graduate, then sign up for this ONLINE Webinar. We'll do a brief overview of the OPT application process and timelines, followed by a Question and Answer session.

Prior to attending this webinar, you need to review the OPT Tutorial...   More >

Mathematics Department Colloquium: Combinatorics, Categorification, and Crystals

Colloquium | March 1 | 4-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Monica Vazirani, UC Davis

 Department of Mathematics

Categorification attempts to replace sets or algebraic and geometric structures with more general categories. It has enjoyed amazing successes, such as Khovanov homology categorifying the Jones polynomial knot invariant, KLR algebras categorifying quantum groups, or Soergel bimodules categorifying Hecke algebras. Many of the algebras we see in categorification can be described diagrammatically,...   More >

Fireside Chat with Tom Siebel: AI and IoT at Industrial Scale

Panel Discussion | March 1 | 4-6 p.m. |  UCSC Silicon Valley Campus

 3175 Bowers Avenue, Santa Clara, CA 95054

 Tom Siebel, C3 IoT

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Please join us for our launch of the CITRIS Silicon Valley Forum 2018 while we share our innovative, cross-disciplinary research. Forums will be held the first Thursday of each month, starting March 1, to discuss emerging trends in high-impact technology from the source. Our Spring 2018 series begins with a "Fireside Chat" about AI and IoT at Industrial Scale, featuring visionary entrepreneur...   More >

$0 $0

  Register online by March 3.

California Through Native Eyes: Reclaiming History

Colloquium | March 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, 220 Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union

 William J. Bauer, Jr., Professor, Department of History,, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 Center for Native American Issues Research on, American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, Department of Ethnic Studies

In 1935, Concow Austin McLaine, of northern California’s Round Valley Reservation, told an oral tradition about Lizard, who saw smoke wafting up from West Mountain, now known as Lassen Peak. The people in Lizard’s town planned to steal fire from Eagle, who selfishly kept the fire under his wings. The people teamed up, stole the fire, and raced with it back to town. Before they reached their...   More >

Amita Shastri | Political Parties in Sri Lanka: Change and Continuity

Reading - Nonfiction | March 1 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Amita Shastri, Professor of the Department of Political Science, San Francisco State University

 Sanchita B. Saxena, Executive Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Director, Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A lecture by Dr. Amita Shastri on her latest publication, Political Parties in Sri Lanka: Change and Continuity (Oxford University Press-India, 2018).

Buddhism and Social Discrimination in Japan

Colloquium | March 1 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Hank Glassman, Associate Professor, Haverford College; Jessica Main, Associate Professor, University of British Columbia; Jessica Starling, Assistant Professor, Lewis & Clark College

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Buddhist Studies

"Kegawarashii: Discrimination against Funeral Workers in Japan, Medieval and Modern". Hank Glassman, Associate Professor, Haverford College
"Public Health and Propaganda: Shin Buddhism and the Campaign to Eradicate Leprosy in the 1930s". Jessica Main, Associate Professor, University of British Columbia
"Practicing Ethics in Contemporary Shin Buddhism: Deconstructing Stigma at a Former...   More >

Camp and Campus

Conference/Symposium | March 1 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall

 Joyce Nao Takahashi

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Asian American & Asian Diaspora Studies 122, UC Berkeley Japanese American Studies Advisory Committee, Japanese American Women Alumnae of UC Berkeley

Cal alumna, Joyce Nao Takahashi (’55) was born in Berkeley, California, the second daughter of alumni, Henry (’26) and Barbara (’30) Takahashi. She grew up in Berkeley, with the exception of the “war years”, which she spent in Tanforan, California, Topaz, Utah and Chicago, Illinois. She graduated from Berkeley High School, and the University of California, Berkeley and received a Ph. D....   More >

Can Silicon Valley Be Tamed?: Pioneer Tech Reporter Kara Swisher on Tech Industry and Social Responsibility

Presentation | March 1 | 6:15-7:45 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Kara Swisher, Recode

 Graduate School of Journalism

The first Annual Esther Wojcicki '61 Lectureship in Journalism will feature Kara Swisher, one of the country's most influential journalists covering Silicon Valley for over two decades.

  RSVP by emailing Maura Smith at maurasmith@berkeley.edu by February 28.

Kara Swisher, Pionerring Tech Reporter

Friday, March 2, 2018

Workshop on Tannishō Commentarial Materials

Conference/Symposium | March 2 – 4, 2018 every day |  Jodo Shinshu Center

 2140 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Buddhist Studies, Otani University, Ryukoku University, BCA Center for Buddhist Education, Institute of Buddhist Studies

The Centers for Japanese Studies and Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, together with Ōtani University and Ryūkoku University in Kyoto announce a workshop under the supervision of Mark Blum that will focus on critically examining premodern and modern hermeneutics of the Tannishō, a core text of the Shin sect of Buddhism, and arguably the most well-read...   More >

Qigong with Director Eric Siegel

Workshop | March 2 | 10-11 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Join UCBG Director, Eric Siegel, for a morning practice in Qigong (pronounced cheegong), a form of meditative exercise with repeated movements, gently stretching the core and limbs and building body awareness.

Free with Garden Admission

  Register online

Determinants and Consequences of the Need for Explanation

Colloquium | March 2 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Emily Liquin, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

30 minute research talk by graduate student

WEBINAR: Planning Ahead: F-1 Employment Authorization for Off-Campus Internships

Workshop | March 2 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Online Webinar

 Berkeley International Office(BIO))

Understand how F-1 students can apply for off-campus work authorization for internships and employment related to their major field of study.

Attendees are expected to have watched the F-1 Guide to CPT Video here before attending the webinar: http://internationaloffice.berkeley.edu/students/current/f-1/curricular_practical_training

Please come prepared with your questions.

Symplectic Geometry and Mirror Symmetry Seminar: Wall-crossing formulae for LG potentials

Seminar | March 2 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Dmitry Tonkonog, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

I will discuss an "umbrella" wall-crossing theorem for Landau-Ginzburg potentials of monotone Lagrangian submanifolds. I will try to cover two proof methods (using the relative Fukaya category and the Borman-Sheridan class) and/or some applications. Most of the material is joint work with James Pascaleff.

“Engineering Biology to Make Novel Medicines”

Seminar | March 2 | 12-1 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 César de la Fuente-Nunez, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Proteins perform the cellular tasks required for life. The great variety of their biological activity is due in part to their vast combinatorial space: 20n, n being the number of amino acids present in any given peptide chain and 20 being the number of natural amino acid monomer building blocks. Yet we do not have the tools to properly engineer these diverse molecules. One approach is to start...   More >

Labor Lunch Seminar: Measuring the Impacts of Teacher and School Quality on Crime

Seminar | March 2 | 12-1 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Jon Schellenberg, UCB

 Center for Labor Economics

Consequences of Groundwater Sustainability in California: Environmental Engineering Seminar

Seminar | March 2 | 12-1 p.m. | 534 Davis Hall

 Jeff Mount, Senior Fellow, Public Policy Institute of California

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

Solid State Technology and Devices Seminar: Emerging Cell Architectures in Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics

Seminar | March 2 | 1-2 p.m. | Cory Hall, 521 Hogan Room

 James Bullock, University of California, Berkeley

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In the last 5 years the crystalline silicon photovoltaic research community has produced a number of significant breakthroughs, including a string of new efficiency records and a broadening in device architectural diversity. This talk focuses on recent innovations from the Javey group which have contributed towards this trend, including the development of Dopant-free Asymmetric Heterocontact...   More >

Talking About Combinatorial Objects Student Seminar: The geometry of Coxeter groups

Seminar | March 2 | 1-2 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Nic Brody, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

There are many exciting areas of research in the combinatorial properties of Coxeter groups, but that's not what this talk is about. I will review some fundamental concepts of geometric group theory, and sketch the proofs that Coxeter groups are CAT(0) and cubulated. I will describe "alternative" that the class of Coxeter groups satisfy: a Coxeter group either contains a surface subgroup or has a...   More >

Archaeology Agencies Panel Workshop: Archaeological careers with government agencies and utilities

Workshop | March 2 | 1:30-4 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Archaeological Research Facility

A public round table discussion of how governmental and agency
businesses engage with archaeology and archaeologists.

Publishing chemistry and materials research in Nature: an editor’s perspective

Seminar | March 2 | 2-3 p.m. | Hildebrand Hall, Library room 100D

 Claire Hansell, Nature

 College of Chemistry

The time between manuscript submission and the binary outcomes of acceptance or rejection can often seem like a black box of intrigue, witchcraft, denial, confusion and much more. However, that is not the intended external face of peer review, and editors make judgements on what is best for any given manuscript every day based on just a few rational principles. Claire Hansell is a senior editor...   More >

Currents and Phases in Quantum Rings: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | March 2 | 2-3 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Prof. Kathryn Moler, Stanford University, Physics & Applied Physics

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

Emergent phenomena in quantum systems often exhibit magnetic signatures. In this talk, I will describe how to use the current in a ring to access fundamental and topological properties of quantum states of charge-carrying particles.

Applying a magnetic flux through a ring creates a phase gradient, in response to which a current flows, creating magnetic fields that we measure with a scanning...   More >

MENA Salon: Press "Freedom" as Diplomacy: Turkish-German Relations

Workshop | March 2 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

On February 16, a court in Istanbul ordered the release of German-Turkish journalist Deniz Yücel after 366 days of pre-trial detention. Yücel’s release, following months of lobbying by the German government, marks rare good news for jailed journalists in Turkey, which is now ranked the world’s worst jailer of journalists, with around 160 held in detention according to the Turkish Journalists’...   More >

Composition Colloquium: Du Yun

Colloquium | March 2 | 3 p.m. | 250 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

Du Yun (traditional Chinese: 杜韻, simplified Chinese: 杜韵, born June 18, 1977) is a Chinese born international composer, multi-instrumentalist, vocalist and performance artist. She won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Music for her opera Angel's Bone.

Du Yun was born in Shanghai, China. She began studying piano at the age of four, attending the primary school Shanghai...   More >

Three Progress Reports

Seminar | March 2 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Anushah Hossain, Ankeet Shankar, and Michael Buckland

 Information, School of

Progress reports on three projects, presented by Anushah Hossein, Ankeet Shankar, and Michael Buckland.

Who are the humans kept out by CAPTCHAs?
Anushah Hossain
Are web services provided by global companies equally accessible to internet users across the world? Anecdotal evidence suggests that there are significant barriers to viewing and using websites in developing regions....   More >

BASF Seminar in the Chemical Sciences: Carbon Based Nanosciences

Seminar | March 2 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Hongjie Dai, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University

 College of Chemistry

This talk will review our work on nanosciences based on carbon. I will first briefly review our earlier work of carbon nanomaterials including carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, and then focus on fluorescence imaging in the previously unexplored 1000-1700 nm NIR-II window to benefit from greatly suppressed photon scattering at long wavelengths. We show that NIR-II imaging is novel with up...   More >

Student / postdoc PDE seminar: Monotonicity formulas for elliptic and parabolic PDE 2

Seminar | March 2 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Tim Laux, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

QB3 Postdoc Seminar

Seminar | March 2 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Speaker: Shion An Lim (Susan Marqusee lab)

Investigating the evolution of protein biophysical properties by ancestral sequence reconstruction

How do properties of proteins evolve over time? The biophysical properties of proteins affect a protein's biological function and fitness and are encoded by their amino acid sequence. Therefore, we can imagine that these properties will...   More >

Saturday, March 3, 2018

Workshop on Tannishō Commentarial Materials

Conference/Symposium | March 2 – 4, 2018 every day |  Jodo Shinshu Center

 2140 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Buddhist Studies, Otani University, Ryukoku University, BCA Center for Buddhist Education, Institute of Buddhist Studies

The Centers for Japanese Studies and Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, together with Ōtani University and Ryūkoku University in Kyoto announce a workshop under the supervision of Mark Blum that will focus on critically examining premodern and modern hermeneutics of the Tannishō, a core text of the Shin sect of Buddhism, and arguably the most well-read...   More >

Lichen BioBlitz-FULL

Workshop | March 3 | 9 a.m.-12 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden | Note change in date

 Botanical Garden

We invite you to join lichen experts, UCBG faculty, Garden staff and citizen scientists for a lichen “treasure hunt”. During this one day event, participants will work in teams to document the lichen diversity at the Garden. Even if you have no specific lichen expertise, your participation is welcome. A keen eye and willingness to work collaboratively will help insure a thorough survey.

Free with advance registration

  Register online


Santa Clara County: H-SS Framework Workshops

Workshop | March 3 | 9 a.m. |  Santa Clara County Office of Education

 1290 Ridder Park Drive, San Jose, CA 95131

 Professional Development for Educators

Join other Bay Area teachers in a series of three workshops sponsored by the Santa Clara COE in partnership with UCBHSSP. The sessions will help teachers explore and start implementing the new California History-Social Science Framework with an emphasis on the Framework's encouragement of student civic engagement.

Attendance in the entire series is highly recommended but not required.

Panel Discussion: Kronos Quartet, My Lai

Panel Discussion | March 3 | 4 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Kronos Quartet’s collaboration with composer Jonathan Berger and novelist Harriet Scott Chessman, My Lai revisits the horrors of the massacre and its aftermath. The work’s creators and performers visit BAMPFA for this conversation.

Sunday, March 4, 2018

Workshop on Tannishō Commentarial Materials

Conference/Symposium | March 2 – 4, 2018 every day |  Jodo Shinshu Center

 2140 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Buddhist Studies, Otani University, Ryukoku University, BCA Center for Buddhist Education, Institute of Buddhist Studies

The Centers for Japanese Studies and Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, together with Ōtani University and Ryūkoku University in Kyoto announce a workshop under the supervision of Mark Blum that will focus on critically examining premodern and modern hermeneutics of the Tannishō, a core text of the Shin sect of Buddhism, and arguably the most well-read...   More >

Monday, March 5, 2018

WiDS Berkeley: The Global Women in Data Science Conference

Conference/Symposium | March 5 | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. |  South Hall

 Information, School of

The UC Berkeley School of Information is excited to partner with Stanford University to bring the Women in Data Science (WiDS) conference to Berkeley, California.

The Global Women in Data Science (WiDS) Conference is an annual one-day technical conference based at Stanford, which brings together data scientists and professionals in adjacent fields from around the globe to discuss the latest...   More >

  Register online

A History of Building Code Development in CA: Semm Seminar

Seminar | March 5 | 12-1 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 Ronald Hamburger, SE, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

Cities and states adopt building codes to protect the public safety. In California this process initiated following the great earthquake of 1906. The primary purpose of early codes was to avoid mass loss of life, whether caused by building collapse or urban conflagration. Most building code requirements have been based on observation of poor performance, and development of rules intended to...   More >

Combinatorics Seminar: Unified theory for finite Markov chains

Seminar | March 5 | 12-1 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Anne Schilling, UC Davis

 Department of Mathematics

We provide a unified framework to compute the stationary distribution of any finite irreducible Markov chain or equivalently of any irreducible random walk on a finite semigroup S. Our methods use geometric finite semigroup theory via the Karnofsky-Rhodes and the McCammond expansions of finite semigroups with specified generators; this does not involve any linear algebra. The original Tsetlin...   More >

​Graduate Students Seminar

Seminar | March 5 | 12-1 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Vasha Dutell, Bruno Olshausen Lab; Emilia Zin, John Flannery Lab

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Vasha Dutell’s Talk Title: Natural Visual Signals and Heterogeneous Networks Optimized to Process Them

Abstract: One of the many mysteries of the retina is its great diversity of neuron types and subtypes. An example of this is the many retinal ganglion cells subtypes that independently tile visual space, creating multiple pathways that transmit different aspects of visual information to the...   More >

Knowledge from Language via Deep Understanding

Seminar | March 5 | 1-2 p.m. | Soda Hall, 430-438 Wozniak Lounge

 Danqi Chen, Ph.D. Candidate, Stanford University

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In this talk, I explore novel neural network approaches that open up opportunities for getting a deep understanding of natural language text.

Probabilistic Operator Algebra Seminar: Non-amenable, hyperfinite subfactors

Seminar | March 5 | 2-4 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Dietmar Bisch, Vanderbilt University

 Department of Mathematics

I will present constructions of hyperfinite subfactors with infinite representation theory that cannot be recovered from their standard invariant. While it is open how to distinguish such non-amenable subfactors in general, some invariants are known and will be discussed. I hope to convince you that the world of non-amenable, hyperfinite subfactors is extremely interesting.

Differential Geometry Seminar: Gluing constructions for constant mean curvature hypersurfaces

Seminar | March 5 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Christine Breiner, Fordham University

 Department of Mathematics

Constant mean curvature (CMC) surfaces are critical points for the area functional, subject to an enclosed volume constraint. Classical examples include spheres and cylinders. Until the late 1980's the only other known examples were the Wente torus and the rotationally symmetric surfaces of Delaunay. In 1990, Kapouleas developed a gluing construction that produced infinitely many new examples of...   More >

Northern California Symplectic Geometry Seminar: Different approaches to the virtual moduli cycle

Seminar | March 5 | 2:30-3:30 p.m. | Stanford University, Room 384H

 Dusa McDuff, Columbia

 Department of Mathematics

If one wants to count J-holomorphic curves in a general symplectic manifold, often one cannot get a good count simply by choosing a sufficiently generic J. Instead one needs a more elaborate perturbation scheme in order the define what is known as the virtual moduli cycle or virtual fundamental class, This talk will explain different ways of defining this, mentioning in particular new simpler...   More >

Northern California Symplectic Geometry Seminar: Mapping Tori and Stable Pairs

Seminar | March 5 | 4-5 p.m. | Stanford University, Room 383N

 Andrew Lee, UC Santa Cruz

 Department of Mathematics

In this talk we first recall a construction of a moduli space of objects over a Riemann surface, called stable pairs, which carries a symplectic structure. Symplectic geometry in this space allows us to produce a Floer-theoretic invariant of a particular class of 3-manifolds called mapping tori (surface bundles over the circle). Time permitting, we then outline a calculation of this invariant for...   More >

Seminar 237/281, Macro/International Seminar: Topic Forthcoming

Seminar | March 5 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 David Atkin, MIT

 Department of Economics

Unhappy in its Own Way: Revising the English Family Novel on Russian Soil

Colloquium | March 5 | 4-5:30 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Anna Berman, Assistant Professor, Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, McGill University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Department of Comparative Literature

This is the second lecture of the Spring 2018 Slavic Graduate Colloquium lecture series.

Analysis and PDE Seminar: Several questions on Laplace eigenfunctions

Seminar | March 5 | 4-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Alexander Logunov, Institute for Advanced Study

 Department of Mathematics

Let \((M,g)\) be a compact Riemannian manifold without boundary. We are interested in asymptotic properties of Laplace eigenfunctions on \(M\) as the eigenvalue \(\lambda \) tends to infinity. The advances of the last few years will be discussed and a survey of interesting open questions will be given.

IB Seminar: Evolutionary Biology of Acquired Chemical Defenses

Seminar | March 5 | 4-5 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Rebecca Tarvin, University of Texas at Austin

 Department of Integrative Biology

On the benefits of being lost: When supporting exploration leads to better learning

Colloquium | March 5 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2515 Tolman Hall

 Ido Roll, Institute for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, University of British Columbia

 Graduate School of Education

Most scaffolding literature advocates for providing novice learners with detailed explicit support. In this talk I will share examples that suggest otherwise, namely, that novice learners benefit more from implicit support for exploration. These examples span diverse STEM topics and student populations. Identifying commonalities across these, I will suggest forms of task and feedback that...   More >

Cultivating the Paddy to Cultivate the Future: Joy and Challenges of a Small Scale Farmer in Rural Japan

Seminar | March 5 | 4-5:15 p.m. | Morgan Hall, Lounge

 Nami Yamamoto, Kyoto University

 Center for Diversified Farming Systems

Nami Yamamoto is an urban migrant from Osaka, Japan, who decided to go into the rural area and live there as new dweller with her partner and two young children. She will share the living experiences full of joy and difficulties in search of an alternative lifestyle in a rural village in Japan.

  RSVP online

Nuclear quality control and the RNA exosome

Seminar | March 5 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Christopher Lima, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

 College of Chemistry

Statistics and Data Science: the Prediction and Modeling Cultures

Seminar | March 5 | 4-5 p.m. | 102 Moffitt Undergraduate Library

 Roderick Little, University of Michigan

 Department of Statistics

I recently taught a course entitled "Seminal Papers and Controversies in Statistics", and Leo Breiman's (2001) article "Statistical Modeling: The Two Cultures" was a very popular paper with students. The paper contrasts the machine learning culture, with it's focus on prediction, with more classical parametric modeling approach to statistics. I am more in the parametric modeling camp, but...   More >

UROC DeCal – Demystifying the Research Process: Decolonizing Methods in Academic Research (Hosted by UROC: Undergraduate Researchers of Color)

Course | January 29 – April 30, 2018 every Monday with exceptions | 6-8 p.m. | 174 Barrows Hall

 Istifaa Ahmed, UROOC

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Ethnic Studies 98/198
Class Time: Mondays, 6pm-8pm, 1/22/18 - 4/30/18
Course Control Number (CCN): 24251

Units: 1-3 units

Student Instructor: Istifaa Ahmed

Welcome to our student-led organization and DeCal, Underrepresented Researchers of Color (UROC) – Demystifying the Research Process: Decolonizing Methods in Academic Research! We seek to build a community of researchers of color...   More >

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Genentech Seminar in Organic Chemistry: Fluorescent Sensing and Logic Systems

Seminar | March 6 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Amilra De Silva, School of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Queen's University Belfast

 College of Chemistry

One of the main principles underlying fluorescent sensors is based on PET (photoinduced electron transfer), according to which a switching ‘on’ of fluorescence in response to chemical1 and biochemical2 analytes can be designed. Since its generalization in Colombo, Sri Lanka, it has now grown to involve 350 laboratories around the world. Some of these sensor systems are serving in critical care...   More >

Necroptosis beyond death: new roles for a cell death pathway in infection and immunity

Seminar | March 6 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Andrew Oberst, University of Washington, Department of Immunology

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

2018-19 Graduate Fellows Program Application Workshop

Workshop | March 6 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Institute for the Study of Societal Issues

 2420 Bowditch Street, Berkeley, CA 94720

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues

In its forty years of existence, the Graduate Fellows Program (GFP) has provided an interdisciplinary research and training environment as a complement to, and resource for, UC Berkeley graduate programs in the social sciences and professional schools. Over 150 UC Berkeley graduate students have completed their doctoral studies and gone on to distinguished academic careers that have significantly...   More >

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR - Rebecca Tarvin: A glimpse into the evolution of aposematism through Epipedobates poison frogs

Seminar | March 6 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Rebecca Tarvin (MVZ/IB Faculty Candidate)

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ/IB Faculty Search. 12:30 - 1:30 pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist know you are there for the seminar. The library is located in the rear of the Museum on the north side - follow the orange directional signs.

3-Manifold Seminar: Tait colorings and instanton homology (continued)

Seminar | March 6 | 12:40-2 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Ian Agol, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

We'll continue discussing Kronheimer-Mrowka's J# invariant of spatial webs and foams.

Seminar 218, Psychology and Economics: "Moral Values and Voting"

Seminar | March 6 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Ben Enke, Harvard University

 Department of Economics

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: 3rd year talks

Colloquium | March 6 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Joe Winer, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley; Christina Merrick, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

EECS/CS Resume Lab for Freshmen/Sophomores

Workshop | March 6 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, Wozniak Lounge (#430)

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Join Katie Crawford, Engineering Career Counselor at the Cal Career Center for an interactive resume workshop for first and second year computer science/EECS students. Learn do's and don'ts, what to include when you have little or no experience, and tips for finding opportunities. Feel free to bring your laptop/surface to work on your materials in real time!

All students welcome!

Student Harmonic Analysis and PDE Seminar (HADES): Zeroes of harmonic functions and propagation of smallness

Seminar | March 6 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Aleksandr Logunov, Institute for Advanced Study

 Department of Mathematics

The classical Liouville theorem claims that any positive harmonic function in $R^n$ is a constant function. Nadirashvili conjectured that any non-constant harmonic function in $R^3$ has a zero set of infinite area. The conjecture is true and the following principle holds for harmonic functions: "the faster the function grows the bigger the area of its zero set is" and vice versa. Propagation of...   More >

Commutative Algebra and Algebraic Geometry: The Fellowship of the Ring: A new residual intersection phenomenon

Seminar | March 6 | 3:45-5 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 David Eisenbud, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Residual intersection theory works well for ideals like the ideal of $p\times p$ minors of a generic $p \times (p+1)$ matrix, but fails for some very nice ideals, such as the ideal of $2 \times 2$ minors of a $2\times n$ matrix for n greater than $3$. Poking around for what might be true, Bernd Ulrich and I stumbled on a new phenomenon that seems to be rather general. We are far from proving all...   More >

Learning vs? Education

Colloquium | March 6 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2515 Tolman Hall

 Leah Buechley, Rural/Digital

 Graduate School of Education

In my career as a researcher and designer I’ve worked to nurture young people’s interests by engaging them in creative activities that blend technology and art. I’ve focused primarily on what young people do outside of school, guided by the belief that the things kids are most interested in and excited about shape their lives as much as the classes that they take. I’ve mostly evaded the political...   More >

Breaking Lorentz Reciprocity: From New Physical Concepts to Applications

Seminar | March 6 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, HP Auditorium, 306 Soda Hall

 Negar Reiskarimian, Ph.D. Candidate, Columbia University

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Lorentz reciprocity is a fundamental characteristic of the vast majority of electronic and photonic structures. In this talk, I will present a novel approach to break Lorentz reciprocity based on linear periodically-time- varying (LPTV) circuits.

Harold S. Johnston Seminar in Physical Chemistry: Exploring uncharted regions of atmospheric reaction pathways

Seminar | March 6 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Marsha Lester, Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania

 College of Chemistry

Alkene ozonolysis is a primary oxidation pathway for alkenes emitted into the troposphere and also an important source of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals. Alkene ozonolysis takes place on a reaction path with multiple minima and barriers along the way to OH products. In particular, a key reaction intermediate, known as the Criegee intermediate, R1R2COO, had eluded detection until very recently. In...   More >

Commutative Algebra and Algebraic Geometry: The Fellowship of the Ring: Applications of the Excess intersection formula

Seminar | March 6 | 5-6 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Irit Huq-Kuruvilla, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

In this talk, we introduce the excess intersection formula and use it to compute the number of cubics tangent to $5$ given ones. If there is more time, we will discuss intersections of surfaces in a curve and discrete points

What's Up With That - Changing Self

Workshop | March 6 | 5:30-7 p.m. | International House, Robert Sproul Room

 Berkeley International Office(BIO))

As you spend more time in the US and UC Berkeley as an international student, you will start to see a shift in the way you speak, think, and present yourself. Welcome to your version 2.0!

In this session of What's Up with That?, we will discuss how to manage and deal with these changes.

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Collaborating Effectively in the Workplace

Workshop | March 7 | 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | University Hall, Room 24

 Sara Thacker, Staff Ombuds Office

 Staff Ombuds Office

To be successful in the rapidly changing workplace, where jobs and people change fast – staff must be able to collaborate with a variety of people within and outside the organization who have the skills, resources, and influence to tackle increasing complex challenges. Collaboration is a skill and a set of practices that are rarely taught in the workplace. In this course staff will learn about...   More >

Civil and Environmental Engineering Department Seminar: Advanced Simulation Methodologies for Seismic Hazard and Risk Assessment

Seminar | March 7 | 10-11 a.m. | 542 Davis Hall

 Floriana Petrone

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

Moderate-to-large magnitude earthquakes still represent a major issue for the safety of ordinary and critical infrastructure. Despite significant advances in the seismic engineering field, much research is still needed to gain better understanding of the science and engineering behind earthquake phenomenon and develop effective risk assessment methodologies.

UCB Startup Fair

Career Fair | March 7 | 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Pauley Ballroom

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

The UCB Startup Fair is back!

Student-run by IEEE, HKN, and CSUA, students are introduced to small tech companies that typically rely on personal connections for hiring. It's a great way for students to find full-time and internship positions! Attendance is free for all UCB students!

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Ferredoxin - protein interactions and energy transduction in Photosynthesis"

Seminar | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Toshiharu Hase, Osaka University

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Dr. Hase is Professor Emeritus of Osaka University and formerly affiliated to the Institute of Protein Research at Osaka University. His research interests include photosynthetic electron transfer, ferredoxin-dependent redox metabolisms and the structure/function of redox enzymes.

On a Lesser Known Montreality: French Among the City's Haitian Youth

Colloquium | March 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Luc Baronian, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi

 Canadian Studies Program (CAN))

Haitian Creole possesses certain features in common with French as spoken in Montréal. For example, both spoken languages affricate /t, d/ before high front vowels, both contain traces of a former palatalization, both have a progressive marker based on the word for 'after' and both share certain Amerindian borrowings such as "boucane / boukan". For nearly half a century now, a modern Haitian...   More >

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR - Bret Payseur: Genetics of rapid and extreme size evolution in island mice

Seminar | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Bret Payseur

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

How the power of diversity creates better groups, firms, schools, and societies: CITRIS Spring 2018 Research Exchange Series

Seminar | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Vinton G. Cerf, Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist, Google

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Vinton G. Cerf has served as vice president and chief Internet evangelist for Google since October 2005. In this role, he is responsible for identifying new enabling technologies to support the development of advanced, Internet-based products and services from Google. He is also an active public face for Google in the Internet world.

Excess Baggage: How Physicians' and Patients’ Race-Related Beliefs and Attitudes Affect Racially Discordant Clinical Interactions

Colloquium | March 7 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Louis A. Penner, Professor, Wayne State University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

There are pervasive and persistent disparities in the health of Nonhispanic White Americans and most racial ethnic/minorities; the greatest of these are between Black and White Americans. There are multiple, complex reasons for this but disparities in the quality of healthcare received by Black and by White patients is one well-documented cause. One important aspect of healthcare disparities...   More >

Reducing Stress with Breema (BEUHS177)

Workshop | March 7 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Section Club

 Arlie Mischeaux, The Breema Center; Angela Porter, The Breema Center

 Be Well at Work - Elder Care

This interactive workshop will introduce you to Breema, a body centered meditation/mindfulness practice that creates an experience of relaxation, balance, and harmony. Breema practice supports physical and mental flexibility, as well as mental clarity, vitality, and emotional balance. Participants will engage in various movements, including gentle stretches, rhythmic movements, and...   More >

  Enroll online

Holistic Optimization of Data-Intensive Applications

Seminar | March 7 | 1-2 p.m. | Soda Hall, 430-438 Wozniak Lounge

 Alvin Cheung, Assistant Professor, University of Washington

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In this talk, I will show how examining the programming system and the database management system in tandem allows developers to build data-intensive applications and systems that are both performant and correct.

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Background for research talk

Seminar | March 7 | 2-3 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Laura Starkston, Stanford

 Department of Mathematics

We will go over some background related to J-holomorphic curves and complex algebraic singularities in relation to questions discussed in the research talk.

An almost-linear time algorithm for uniform random spanning tree generation

Seminar | March 7 | 3:10-4 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Aaron Schild, U C Berkeley

 Department of Statistics

We give an m^{1+o(1)} beta^{o(1)}-time algorithm for generating uniformly random spanning trees in weighted graphs with max-to-min weight ratio beta. In the process, we illustrate how fundamental tradeoffs in graph partitioning can be overcome by eliminating vertices from a graph using Schur complements of the associated Laplacian matrix.

Our starting point is the Aldous-Broder algorithm,...   More >

Geographies of Activism: Cartographic Memory and Community Practices of Care

Colloquium | March 7 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 575 McCone Hall

 Juan Herrera, University of California Los Angeles

 Department of Geography

Social movements mobilize to make changes in actually existing geographies. But far more than space being just a surface upon which social movements evolve, this presentation posits that social movements take part in the production of space. Drawing from oral histories of 1960s activists from Oakland’s Fruitvale district, I argue that the work of remembering activism is a cartographic process...   More >

Number Theory Seminar: Computation of paramodular forms via lattice methods

Seminar | March 7 | 3:40-5 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Watson Ladd, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

We know how to calculate spaces of classical modular forms and make large tables, but Siegel modular forms have been much harder to compute. Conditional on Ibukiyama's conjecture, we compute efficiently Euler factors of some (many) paramodular forms via computations with the genus of particular quadratic forms. This is joint work with Gonzalo Tornaria and Jeffrey Hein.

Applied Math Seminar: Modeling electronic transport properties in incommensurate 2D multilayer materials

Seminar | March 7 | 4-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Paul Cazeaux, University of Kansas

 Department of Mathematics

The recent discovery of a whole family of two-dimensional crystalline materials such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and many others leads to study the properties of their combinations, particularly by stacking a number of layers vertically. Such structures are generally non-periodic, with interesting geometric properties such as moiré effects. We first recall the usual description...   More >

ERG Colloquium: Cynthia Moe-Lobeda: Climate Change as Climate Debt: Forging a Just Future

Colloquium | March 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 126 Barrows Hall

 Cynthia Moe-Lobeda, Recent ERG PhD Graduate, Professor of Theological and Social Ethics

 Energy and Resources Group

Climate change may be the most far reaching manifestation of white privilege and class privilege yet to face humankind. Caused overwhelmingly by high-consuming people, climate change is wreaking death and destruction foremost on impoverished people who also are disproportionately people of color...   More >

Expanding the Chemical Palette for Reliable Adsorption-Based Separations

Colloquium | March 7 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 David Sholl, Georgia Institute of Technology

 Department of Chemical Engineering

The majority of research literature on chemical separations focuses on a relatively small collection of chemicals. In many ways this is appropriate because of the dramatic economic and environmental impacts of these species. The space of possible chemicals, however is vast; Carl Sagan's famous "billions and billions" is many orders of magnitude too small for chemical space. I will discuss early...   More >

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): Smooth and singular symplectic surfaces

Seminar | March 7 | 4-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Laura Starkston, Stanford

 Department of Mathematics

We will discuss some problems and results about symplectic surfaces in 4-manifolds, particularly in the complex projective plane. The main question is to classify symplectic surfaces up to symplectic isotopy. If the surface has singularities, we restrict the isotopies to the class of surfaces with the same model singularities.

What explains the dramatic rise in autism prevalence (from one in 10,000 to 1 in 68)?: The hunt for environmental factors

Colloquium | March 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. |  2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues)

 Troy Duster

 Emily Diamond, Professor, The Wright Institute

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues

Autism prevalence and other neurodevelopmental disabilities have markedly risen in the last 2 decades. Researchers around the world are looking for environmental factors. My project - the International Autism Mapping Project - tries to answer this question through geospatial mapping. Specifically, we examine the place of conception, and its nearness to various kinds of toxins. Since autism...   More >

Genetically Encoded Tools for Manipulation of Bioenergetics

Seminar | March 7 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 114 Morgan Hall

 Denis Titov, University of California, Berkeley

 Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology

Center for Computational Biology Seminar: Dr. Christina Curtis, Assistant Professor, School of Medicine, Stanford University

Seminar | March 7 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Center for Computational Biology

Title: Quantifying the evolutionary dynamics of tumor progression and metastasis

Abstract: Cancer results from the acquisition of somatic alterations in an evolutionary process that typically occurs over many years, much of which is occult. Understanding the evolutionary dynamics that are operative at different stages of progression in individual tumors might inform the earlier detection,...   More >

Science Cafe - Science and Art of Active Transportation Planning

Presentation | March 7 | 7-8:30 p.m. |  Restaurant Valparaiso

 1403 Solano Ave., Albany, CA 94706

 Eric Anderson, College of Environmental Design


This science cafe is an informal forum for discussing interesting and relevant scientific issues. We encourage public engagement with science by inviting members of the scientific community to present topics for a casual evening of conversation.

Berkeley is a leading city in promoting walking and biking for transportation. The City recently adopted a new Berkeley Bicycle Plan (2017), laying...   More >

The Art & science of designing safe bike and walkways in Berkeley