<< February 2018 >>

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Sorbian/Wendish Cultural Revival in the Age of Globalization

Lecture | February 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Hélène Yèche, University of Poitiers

 Institute of European Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Hélène Yèche will introduce the audience to the case study of the Sorbs, a Slavic minority living in today’s Germany. The Sorbian community of Lusatia recently developed a few important ways of preserving identity and culture in the context of globalization through language revitalization. Sorbian identity challenge is part of a global minority revival trend, which is not only taking place in...   More >

Maya Tudor | Nationalism as a Democratic Resource: Comparing India and Pakistan at 70

Lecture | February 1 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room) | Note change in date

 Maya Tudor, Associate Professor of Government and Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government Fellow, St. Hilda's College, Oxford University

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, Department of Political Science

Dr. Maya Tudor, Associate Professor of Government and Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government Fellow, St. Hilda's College, Oxford University

Where Wild Beauty and Science Meet

Lecture | February 1 | 5:30-8:30 p.m. |  David Brower Center

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 College of Natural Resources, Braided River

Wildlife photojournalist and National Geographic fellow Joe Riis, who has documented the migrations of pronghorn, mule deer, and elk in Wyoming for more than a decade, will give a multimedia presentation and book signing of his new book, Yellowstone Migrations. A reception begins at 5:30 pm with the program at 6:30 pm.

Riis will be joined by ecologist & UC Berkeley Professor Arthur Middleton,...   More >

  RSVP online

The Science of Cannabis: The Environmental Impact of Large Scale Cannabis Cultivation

Lecture | February 1 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

The current system for growing cannabis has caused significant environmental degradation due to pollutants, heavy water use, clear cutting natural areas, and other man-made impacts. What are the current environmental issues, and how can they be addressed as cannabis production scales.

$30 / $25 UCBG Members / $15 Current students

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Friday, February 2, 2018

Car-sharing Network Optimization Driven by High-resolution Data, Simulation and Discrete Optimization

Lecture | February 2 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Carolina Osorio, MIT

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: With the increase in connectivity and in real-time responsiveness, travelers and vehicles are becoming "real-time optimizers" of their trips. The urban mobility challenges and breakthroughs of the next decades will be marked by our ability to optimize the aggregate performance of large-scale transportation systems while accounting for how the hundreds of thousands of "real-time...   More >

Sumgayit: 30 Years After: History and Future of the Nagorno-Karabakh (Artsakh) Conflict

Lecture | February 2 | 7:30-9:30 p.m. |  St. John Armenian Church

 275 Olympia Way, San Francisco, CA 94131

 Anna Turcotte, Author

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program, St. John Armenian Church

Anti- Armenian atrocities of my childhood, the history
that fueled the hatred, and the current state of affairs on
the ground in Artsakh.

Anna Astvatsaturian Turcotte is an Armenian-American writer, lecturer, and activist. She authored <u>Nowhere, a Story of Exile </u>and has lectured extensively about the plight of Armenians in Azerbaijan in the context of human rights and international...   More >

Monday, February 5, 2018

What's in a grape? Science, politics, and the race for authenticity in the West Bank wineries

Lecture | February 5 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ariel Handel, Tel Aviv University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

"Israel aims to recreate wine that Jesus and King David drank," reads a New York Times title in 2015, telling the story of a new wine, Marawi. The Marawi (also known as Hamdani" grape species is, needless to say, not new. Nevertheless, along with several other grape varieties it recently goes through an identity metamorphosis as part of an economic, cultural, and political race for authenticity....   More >

John E. Cort | No One Gives like the Guru

Lecture | February 5 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 John E. Cort, Professor of Asian and Comparative Religions and the Judy Gentili Chair in International Studies at Denison University

 Alexander von Rospatt, Professor, Buddhist and South Asian Studies; Acting Chair, South and Southeast Asian Studies; and Director, Himalayan Studies Initiative

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by John E. Cort, Professor of Asian and Comparative Religions and the Judy Gentili Chair in International Studies at Denison University.

Connectivity as Human Right

Lecture | February 5 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Nicholas Negroponte, Architect at MIT

 Berkeley Center for New Media, Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Nicholas Negroponte is the co-founder (with Jerome B. Wiesner) of the MIT Media Lab (1985), which he directed for its first 20 years. A graduate of MIT, Negroponte was a pioneer in the field of computer-aided design and has been a member of the MIT faculty since 1966. He gave the first TED talk in 1984, as well as 13 since. He is author of the 1995 best seller, Being Digital, which has been...   More >

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

From Saints to Salves: (m)oral Hygiene in the Middle Ages and the Case of Late Medieval Villamagna

Lecture | February 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Trent Trombley, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Human dentition and the accompanying oral cavity is a dense source of biocultural information and has enjoyed a long history of anthropological fascination. Analyses have ranged from establishing biological affinity in archaeological communities via dental metric and non-metric traits, to larger evolutionary questions of morphology. However, dental tissues have seldom been analyzed for their...   More >

A Talk with Ken Ueno

Lecture | February 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Ken Ueno, Jerry and Evelyn Hemmings Chambers Distinguished Professor in Music Associate Professor, UC Berkeley

 Arts + Design

Experimental composer/vocalist/sound artist who collaborates with visual artists, architects, and video artists to create unique cross-disciplinary art works. Ueno, is the Jerry and Evelyn Hemmings Chambers Distinguished Professor Chair in Music at UC Berkeley

Ken Ueno, Jerry and Evelyn Hemmings Chambers Distinguished Professor in Music, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley

Rome Prize and...   More >

Bowen Lectures: Lecture 1: Mathematics and Computation (through the lens of one problem and one algorithm). The problem, the algorithm and the connections.

Lecture | February 7 | 4:10-5 p.m. | Calvin Laboratory (Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing), Auditorium

 Avi Wigderson, Institute for Advanced Study

 Department of Mathematics

In this lecture, we introduce and motivate the main characters in this plot:

- Singularity of symbolic matrices: a basic problem in both computational complexity.

- Alternating Minimization: a basic heuristic in non-convex optimization.

I will explain how variants of this algorithm are applied to variants of this problem, how they are analyzed, and how the analysis gives rise to problems...   More >

Book Lecture | David Biale on Hasidism: A New History

Lecture | February 7 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Free and open to the public

Far from a throwback to the Middle Ages, Hasidism is a product of modernity that forged its identity as a radical alternative to the secular world. So argue the eight distinguished authors, led by David Biale, of Hasidism: A New History, the first comprehensive account of the movement’s place in modern Jewish history. The book represents an innovative collaboration...   More >

ARCH Lecture: 2017 Branner & Stump Fellows

Lecture | February 7 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, FEB 7, 6:30pm. Recent fellowship recipients will present their research from their international travels. Followed by a reception in the Wurster Gallery, alongside the 2017 Branner &amp; Stump Fellows Exhibition. Open to the CED community!

Thursday, February 8, 2018

The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire

Lecture | February 8 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Karl Jacoby, Professor, Department of History, Columbia University

 Department of History

To his contemporaries in Gilded Age Manhattan, Guillermo Eliseo was a fantastically wealthy Mexican, the proud owner of a luxury apartment overlooking Central Park, a busy Wall Street office, and scores of mines and haciendas in Mexico. But for all his obvious riches and his elegant appearance, Eliseo was also the possessor of a devastating secret: he was not, in fact, from Mexico at all. Rather,...   More >

Bowen Lectures: Lecture 2: Mathematics and Computation (through the lens of one problem and one algorithm). Proving Algebraic Identities.

Lecture | February 8 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Avi Wigderson, Institute for Advanced Study

 Department of Mathematics

In numerous mathematical settings, an object typically has several representations. This leads to the “isomorphism problem” or “word problem”: when are two given representations equivalent. Such problems have driven much structural and algorithmic research across mathematics.

We will focus on the algebraic setting, where our objects will be polynomials and rational functions in many...   More >

Buddhism and Divination in Tibet

Lecture | February 8 | 5-7 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room

 Brandon Dotson, Georgetown University

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

As a poor cousin of both science and religion, a begrudged relative of ritual, and a strange bedfellow of play, divination persists at the margins of established traditions. Buddhism shows some ambivalence toward divination, sometimes barely tolerating it, and other times making full use of divination as a medium for Buddhist messages. Buddhists, for their part, have employed divination in much...   More >

A Long Civil War or a Long Reconstruction?: A Case for 1865

Lecture | February 8 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Brook Thomas, UC Irvine

 Department of English, Americanist Colloquium

An evening lecture and discussion with UC Irvine professor Brook Thomas; Sponsored by the Americanist Colloquium

We Crossed a Bridge and It Trembled: Voices from Syria

Lecture | February 8 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Wendy Pearlman, Northwestern University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Author Wendy Pearlman presents her book, We Crossed a Bridge and it Trembled: Voices from Syria, which is an astonishing collection of intimate wartime testimonies and poetic fragments from a cross-section of Syrians whose lives have been transformed by revolution, war, and flight.

Wendy Pearlman is a professor at Northwestern University, specializing in Middle East politics.

The Science of Cannabis: The Genetics of Cannabis Breeds

Lecture | February 8 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

There is a rich informal taxonomy of Cannabis strains with exotic and evocative names. How do these breeds reflect the genetic relationships among different strains, and how do those genetic relationships reflect the chemical properties of the specific plants?

$30 / $25 UCBG Members / $15 Current students

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Hilton Als in Conservation with Stephen Best

Lecture | February 8 | 7:30 p.m. |  Nourse Theater

 275 Hayes Street, San Francisco, CA

 Hilton Als, The New Yorker

 Stephen Best, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley English

 Department of English

Hilton Als began contributing to The New Yorker in 1989, writing pieces for ‘The Talk of the Town,’ he became a staff writer in 1994, theatre critic in 2002, and lead theater critic in 2012. Week after week, he brings to the magazine a rigorous, sharp, and lyrical perspective on acting, playwriting, and directing. With his deep knowledge of the history of performance—not only in theatre but in...   More >

Memory and the Ear

Lecture | February 8 | 8 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maud Fife Room | Note change in time and location

 Maurizio Bettini, Università degli Studi di Siena

 Department of Classics

Friday, February 9, 2018

Leveraging Big Data to Improve Operational Performance, Reliability, and Efficiency

Lecture | February 9 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Jonny Simkin, Swiftly

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: The existing public transit infrastructure in the United States already generates a tremendous amount of data, however, this information is often not used as effectively as it could be. In this session, we will discuss some of the ways that Swiftly is leveraging billions of data points to help transit agencies improve operational performance, reliability, and efficiency.

Bio: Jonny...   More >

Bowen Lectures: Lecture 3: Mathematics and Computation (through the lens of one problem and one algorithm). Proving Analytic Inequalities.

Lecture | February 9 | 4:10-5 p.m. | Calvin Laboratory (Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing), Auditorium

 Avi Wigderson, Institute for Advanced Study

 Department of Mathematics

The celebrated Brascamp-Lieb (BL) inequalities, and their reverse form of Barthe, is a powerful framework which unifies and generalizes many important inequalities in analysis, convex geometry and information theory.

I will exemplify BL inequalities, building to the general set-up. I will describe the structural theory that characterizes existence and optimality of these inequalities in terms...   More >

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Career Clinic: Making A Successful Career Transition: Roadmap for Change

Lecture | February 10 | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. | UC Berkeley Extension (Golden Bear Center), Room 204

 Rebecca Andersen, Career Services at the UC Berkeley Information School; RuthAnn Haffke, UC Berkeley School of Public Health

 UC Berkeley Extension

Making a career transition can be bewildering: how do you find jobs? How can you stand out as a candidate? And, if you finally get an interview, how do you showcase yourself as the best candidate? This workshop will walk participants through each step of making a career transition. Through interactive exercises, we will cover strategies in personal branding, networking, résumé and LinkedIn...   More >

$50

  Register online

Sunday, February 11, 2018

AIA Joukowsky Lecture - The Late Bronze Age Eruption of Thera (Santorini)

Lecture | February 11 | 2 p.m. | 142 Dwinelle Hall

 Floyd McCoy, University of Hawaii

 AIA, San Francisco Society

The largest volcanic eruption of the past 10,000 years occurred in the southern Aegean Sea on an island known in antiquity as Thera (Santorini). A landscape was forever altered – as was a culture that thrived on that island, the Cycladic culture. Here was the core of a thriving maritime trade network, in close communication with the Minoan culture on Crete, vaporized in a four/five-day volcanic...   More >

Monday, February 12, 2018

In Search of Modern Iran

Lecture | February 12 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Abbas Amanat, Yale University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Abbas Amanat will talk about the challenges and rewards of writing a longue dureé covering early modern and modern history of Iran. His new book: Iran: A Modern History (Yale University Press, 2017) looks at five centuries of national and transnational history and explores overarching themes that connect the history of the Safavids Empire and emergence of the religion-state symbiosis with modes...   More >

Matthew Hull | Satisfied Callers: Police and Corporate Customer Service in India

Lecture | February 12 | 2-4 p.m. | Kroeber Hall, 221 (Gifford Room)

 Matthew Hull, Associate Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of Anthropology, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Cyborg Linguistics (Townsend Center Working Group), Form and Formalism (Townsend Center Working Group)

A talk by anthropologist Dr. Matthew Hull.

The Clock Tower at Jaffa Gate, Sheikh Suleiman Jacir, the Jerusalem Hebron Road, and other disappearances

Lecture | February 12 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Emily Jacir, Artist and Filmmaker

 Arts + Design

Renowned for work that is as poetic as it is political and biographical, Emily Jacir will discuss her powerful artistic practice and address some of the crucial questions which inform her approach. Jacir has built a complex and compelling oeuvre through a diverse range of media and methodologies that include unearthing historic material, performative gestures and in-depth research. Her projects...   More >

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Ancient Icons/Modern Russia

Lecture | February 13 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Judith Deutsch Kornblatt, Professor Emerita, Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Wisconsin - Madison

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

This lecture and slide show examines the history, theology, and presentation of Russian icons, from their beginnings through the twentieth century and into post-Soviet times. It will demonstrate how these sacred objects have permeated even secular Russian culture, including modernist art, poetry, advertising, and popular memes.

Translation as Research: Ahmad Diab and Anneka Lenssen in conversation with Saleh al-Jumaie

Lecture | February 13 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Annex, Room 126

 Arts Research Center

Anneka Lenssen (Assistant Professor, Global Modern Art, UC Berkeley) and Ahmad Diab (Assistant Professor of Arabic Literature, UC Berkeley) will speak with Iraqi artist Saleh al-Jumaie (b. al-Suwaira, 1939).

Saleh al-Jumaie Image

Environmental Design Archives Gallery Talks: Margie O’Driscoll

Lecture | February 13 | 7-8 p.m. | 121 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Join the Environmental Design Archives the second Tuesday of each month for Gallery Talks, a series of informal lectures given by scholars and practitioners.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Artist's Talk: Jay Heikes

Lecture | February 14 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Artist Jay Heikes talks about art and alchemy and offers an overview of his wide-ranging practice, with an emphasis on the works featured in Jay Heikes / MATRIX 269.

A Talk with Chip Lord

Lecture | February 14 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Chip Lord, Professor Emeritus, Film & Digital Media Department, University of California, Santa Cruz

 Arts + Design

Chip Lord is a pioneering video artist and founding member of the Bay Area media collective Ant Farm.

Chip Lord grew up in 1950’s America, a place that has been a continual source of inspiration in his work as an artist. Trained as an architect, he was a founding partner of Ant Farm, with whom he produced the video art classics Media Burn and The Eternal Frame as well as the public sculpture,...   More >

Beyond Crisis Liberalism: How We Can Tackle Extreme Inequality

Lecture | February 14 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Mark Gomez

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

California is remarkably prosperous. Yet most of us are stuck. How can we inspire the change we need to ensure renewed economic progress? How can we finally end racial economic exclusion? Who will lead us forward?

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Is There A Future for International Criminal Justice?

Lecture | February 15 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 140 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Stephen J. Rapp, former US Ambassador-at-Large, Office of Global Crimnial Justice, US State Dept

 Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law

Stephen Rapp was Ambassador-at-Large (2009-2015) heading the Office of Global Criminal Justice in the US State Department, where he coordinated US Government support to international criminal tribunals, and to hybrid and national courts responsible for prosecuting persons charged with genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.

Barbarians at the Gate: Socialist University, Upward Mobility, and New Intelligentsia in Postwar Poland

Lecture | February 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Agata Zysiak, Visiting Scholar, Institute for Advanced Study

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

After the social revolution brought on by WWII and a new political order, Polish society started on a path of intense reconstruction. A freshly established university in the "Polish Manchester" - Łódź - serves as a case study to examine postwar visions of academia, reforms of higher education, and upward mobility. The socialist university project was designed for the people and was a...   More >

The Merit of Words and Letters: Sutra Recitation in Japanese Zen

Lecture | February 15 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Erez Joskovich, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Classical Chan/Zen literature is famous for its disparagement of scriptural authority, ranging from the well-known slogan “separate transmission outside the scriptures...,” attributed to Bodhidharma, to stories of renowned Zen masters abusing Buddhist scriptures. Nevertheless, similar to other Buddhist schools, incantations of sutras and invocation of dhāranī have been a significant...   More >

Lecture by Dr. Gregory Maxwell Bruce: Title TBD

Lecture | February 15 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Dr. Gregory Maxwell Bruce, Lecturer in Urdu, Dept. of South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by UC Berkeley's Urdu language lecturer, Dr. Gregory Maxwell Bruce. Dr. Bruce is a scholar of Islam in South Asia and Urdu Literature.

Fatum: Destiny in Greece and Rome

Lecture | February 15 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall | Note change in time and location

 Maurizio Bettini, Università degli Studi di Siena

 Department of Classics

The Science of Cannabis: The Neuroscience of Cannabis

Lecture | February 15 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

How does Cannabis affect our brain, mind, and behavior? The subjective experiences, therapeutic uses, and potential for abuse associated with Cannabis are related to the plant’s complex botanical chemistry and the impact of this chemistry on body and psyche.

$30 / $25 UCBG Members / $15 Current students

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Friday, February 16, 2018

Sara Ahmed Talk and Conversation

Lecture | February 16 |  Location TBA

 Sara Ahmed

 Center for the Study of Sexual Culture

Join us for a talk with renowned scholar Sara Ahmed, whose work lives at the intersections of feminist, queer, postcolonial, and critical race theory. We will also be hosting a conversation with Professor Ahmed for graduate students only. Contact the CSSC for more details.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

From Turks to Mongols: David Ayalon’s Vision of the Eurasian Steppe in Islamic History

Lecture | February 20 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Reuven Amitai, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

This lecture seeks to survey and critically engage some of the ideas of David Ayalon (1914-98), and then to see where they might further be developed and applied. Although Ayalon is primarily known as a Mamlukist, and in fact can be called the father of Mamluk studies, he also turned his attention to other weighty matters in the study of Middle Eastern and Islamic history. Among these was the...   More >

ARCH Lecture: Kersten Geers

Lecture | February 20 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

TUES, FEB 20, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk with renowned architect Kersten Geers of OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen. Open to the public!

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Decolonial and Deimperial Crossings: An Inter-Asian Feminist Genealogy

Lecture | February 21 | 12-2 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Laura Kang, Professor of Gender & Sexuality Studies, English and Comparative Literature, UC Irvine

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Race and Gender, Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

Part of the Feminist Studies and Decolonial Epistemologies Lecture Series

This talk recalls and retraces the inter-Asian network of feminist mobilizations against Japanese sex tourism and U.S. military prostitution in the early 1970s. The work of attending to the discrepant yet linked histories of imperialist sexual violence, military dictatorship, and neocolonial exploitation of Asian women’s...   More >

A Talk with Jacob Gaboury

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Jacob Gaboury, Assistant Professor of Film & Media, University of California, Berkeley

 Arts + Design

Jacob Gaboury is a historian of digital media, studying the ways people have imagined, developed, and used digital images over the past seventy years. His forthcoming book is titled Image Objects (MIT Press, 2018), and offers a material history of early computer graphics and visual simulation. He is currently Assistant Professor of New Media History and Theory in the Department of Film & Media at...   More >

Why Is the Information Revolution So Scary?

Lecture | February 21 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Jeffrey K. MacKie-Mason

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

A look at information and its discontents with University Librarian and Chief Digital Scholarship Officer Jeff MacKie-Mason.

The North Korean Quagmire and the Moon Jae-in Government: Nukes, Humanitarian Assistance, and Prospects for Inter-Korean Relations

Lecture | February 21 | 3 p.m. | Barrows Hall, 8th Floor Social Science Matrix

 Chung-in Moon, Distinguished University Professor at Yonsei University John Linton, Director, International Health Care Center, Severance Hospital of Yonsei Medical School; John Linton, Director, International Health Care Center, Yonsei University Severance Hospital

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Berkeley APEC Study Center, Social Science Matrix, Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

With the ongoing crisis over North Korean nuclear weapons, questions of humanitarian assistance to North Korea have fallen by the wayside. Prof. Chung-in Moon will talk about the Moon Jae-in government’s policy towards North Korea. Prof. John Linton will talk about about overall humanitarian conditions in...   More >

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Philippe Pirotte and Niklaus Largier in Conversation

Lecture | February 22 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Senior Adjunct Curator Philippe Pirotte, who organized Agony in Effigy: Art, Truth, Pain, and the Body, is joined in conversation by UC Berkeley professor of German and comparative literature Niklaus Largier, whose recent work explores the relation between bodily ascetic practices and the literary imagination. The discussion will expand and deepen the literary and cultural context for the...   More >

Defending Liberty in the Age of Trump: Lessons from the Front: Jefferson Memorial Lecture featuring David Cole

Lecture | February 22 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 David Cole, National Legal Director, American Civil Liberties Union

 Graduate Division

David Cole will present the Jefferson lecture on Thursday, February 22, 2018, entitled "Defending Liberty in the Age of Trump: Lessons from the Front." The lecture will be held in the Chevron Auditorium of International House and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

David Cole

"Doing" Political Theology Today: Promises and Pitfalls

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Ruth Marshall, Associate Professor of the Study of Religion and Political Science, University of Toronto

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Lecture details forthcoming.

Ruth Marshall received her DPhil in Politics from Oxford University, and joined both the Department for the Study of Religion and Political Science in 2008, after having spent 8 years living and researching in West Africa.

From chan to Chan: Meditation and the semiotics of visionary experience in medieval Chinese Buddhism

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Eric Greene, Yale University

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

In this talk Eric Greene argues that a distinguishing feature of “early Chan” discourse relative to mainstream Chinese approaches to “Buddhist meditation” (chan)was the rejection of the semiotic potential of visionary meditative experiences. Drawing from early Chan texts, contemporaneous non-Chan meditation manuals, and recently discovered stone inscriptions from Sichuan, he suggests that one way...   More >

“Doing” Political Theology Today: Promises and Pitfalls

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Ruth Marshall, Associate Professor of the Study of Religion and Political Science, University of Toronto

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Lecture details forthcoming.

Ruth Marshall received her DPhil in Politics from Oxford University, and joined both the Department for the Study of Religion and Political Science in 2008, after having spent 8 years living and researching in West Africa. She is the author of Political Spiritualities: The Pentecostal Revolution in Nigeria (U. Chicago Press, 2009) and numerous scholarly...   More >

Fas: A Law with No Gods

Lecture | February 22 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall | Note change in time and location

 Maurizio Bettini, Università degli Studi di Siena

 Department of Classics

The Gallery and the Archive: Contemporary Artists Work with The Magnes Collection

Lecture | February 22 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Join David Wilson, Greg Niemeyer and Nicki Green, three contemporary artists who, in recent years, have interacted with The Magnes Collection and contributed to exhibitions that intersect new works with art and artifacts from the collection itself, in a conversation about art, creativity, archives, and memory, moderated by Francesco Spagnolo.

David Wilson, an artist based in Oakland, worked...   More >

The Science of Cannabis: The Ethnobotany of Cannabis

Lecture | February 22 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Cannabis has been in cultivation for millennia and used as a medicine, food, and for hemp fiber. This program will look at the historical uses of cannabis and how we might explore those uses in future research.

$30 / $25 UCBG Members / $15 Current students

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Friday, February 23, 2018

Jacobs Design Conversations: Saul Griffith

Lecture | February 23 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Saul Griffith, an inventor and founder of Otherlab, Instructables, and many others, will speak as part of the Jacobs Design Conversations series.

An African American and Latinx History of the United States: An intersectional history of the shared struggle for African American and Latinx civil rights

Lecture | February 23 | 2-4 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Multicultural Community Center

 Paul Ortiz, Associate Professor of History and the Director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, University of Florida

 Office of Undergraduate Research, American Cultures, Center for Race and Gender, Center for Research on Social Change, Department of Ethnic Studies, Department of African American Studies, Multicultural Community Center

Professor Paul Ortiz will speak about his newly published book, An African American and Latinx History of the United States (Beacon Press, 2018). Spanning more than two hundred years, this much anticipated book is a revolutionary, politically charged narrative history, arguing that the “Global South” was crucial to the development of America as we know it. Scholar and activist Paul Ortiz...   More >

Paul Ortiz's newly published book from Beacon Press

Measurable Commute Reduction and the War on SOV

Lecture | February 23 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Steve Raney, Joint Venture Silicon Valley

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: The Big Picture covers: state SB375 15% per capita driving reduction goal, auto-centered Silicon Valley versus transit-centered Helsinki, Proposition 26 (Chevron spent $3.4 backing it) as barrier to protecting the climate, public policy political viability comparison, trip caps, carrot/stick, state bills, city ordinances, next generation employer commute programs. The Fair Value...   More >

Monday, February 26, 2018

Social Change in Post-Khomeini Iran: What to Expect in the Coming Years?

Lecture | February 26 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Mahmood Monshipouri, San Francisco State University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The post-Khomeini era has profoundly changed the socio-political landscape of Iran. Since 1989, the internal dynamics of change in Iran, rooted in a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic, and behavioral factors, have led to a noticeable transition in both societal and governmental structures of power, as well as the way in which many Iranians have come to deal with the...   More >

Transcending Institutions: A Medieval Way to Individual Freedom

Lecture | February 26 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Gert Melville, Senior Professor of Medieval History and Director of the Research Centre for the Comparative History of Religious Orders, Technische Universität Dresden

 Department of History, Medieval Studies Program, San Francisco Theological Seminary / Graduate Theological Union

The Natural History Museum and the Future of Nature

Lecture | February 26 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Beka Economopoulos, Co-founder and Director, The Natural History Museum; Dan Kamman, Professor, Energy & Chair Energy and Resources Group

 Arts + Design

In a post-truth era, the role of trusted institutions of science is more important than ever. Drawing on recent initiatives organized by The Natural History Museum, a mobile and pop-up museum founded by the activist art collective Not An Alternative, this talk will explore how The Natural History Museum leverages the symbolic and infrastructural power of science museums to transform them into...   More >

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Measure for the Anthropocene: Planetary Imagination and Design

Lecture | February 27 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Neyran Turan, College of Environmental Design

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

In light of our current political crisis around climate change, what can architecture and design contribute toward a new planetary imaginary of our contemporary environment? If climate change is a crisis of imagination, as literary historian Amitav Ghosh states, or a profound mutation in our relation to the world, as put by Bruno Latour, can design imagination provide any insights in this dilemma...   More >

Fanon in the Algerian War: A Painful Gender Issue

Lecture | February 27 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Seloua Luste-Boulbina

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Department of French

The colony operates with a double standard. Women are both largely excluded from schooling and supposed to be protected by their male fellow citizens. Everything then happens as if, according to the old despotic saying, colonial politics were benevolent toward them: they must be protected from their own. But how? And in what sense? To answer this, Seloua Luste-Boulbina examines the conditions...   More >

Magic Spells: A Research Workshop on Hebrew Amulets: With Magnes curators Shir Gal Kochavi, Zoe Lewin, and Francesco Spagnolo

Lecture | February 27 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Join Magnes curators in discovering the elaborate texts and imagery, magic formulas, and kabbalistic sources in Hebrew amulets.

Worn on one’s person or placed in homes, Jewish amulets are used at moments of vulnerability and transition, like childbirth, marriage, or illness. They feature texts including biblical verses, Psalms, divine names, and invocations of powerful figures like angels, and...   More >

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

A Talk with Jeanne C. Finley and John Muse

Lecture | February 28 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Jeanne C. Finley, Professor of Film and Graduate Fine Arts, California College of Arts; John Muse, Visual Media Scholar, Haverford College, Haverford PA

 Arts + Design

Since 1988 Jeanne C. Finley and John Muse have worked collaboratively on numerous experimental documentaries and installations. These works have been exhibited nationally and internationally, at festivals and museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Guggenheim Museum, The Whitney Biennial, San Francisco International Film Festival,...   More >

Who Names the Public Space?

Lecture | February 28 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

From Confederate memorials to Berkeley's Boalt Hall, culture wars are being fought. We need to take a stand, but what stand?

ARCH Lecture: Daniel M. Abramson

Lecture | February 28 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, FEB 28, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk with Professor Abramson about why the idea of architectural obsolescence was invented in early-twentieth-century America and how it has influenced design and urbanism up to the present age of sustainability.