<< February 2018 >>

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Book Talk: Design-Based School Improvement

Lecture | February 1 | 12-1:15 p.m. | 2515 Tolman Hall

 Rick Mintrop, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Education, UC Berkeley

 Graduate School of Education

Professor Mintrop will discuss his new book, Design-Based School Improvement: A Practical
 Guide for Education Leaders, which explores how the need for more robust links between
 research and practice is at the heart of the effort to enact and scale up successful school
 reforms. One promising approach is "design development," a methodology widely used in other...   More >

Sorbian/Wendish Cultural Revival in the Age of Globalization

Lecture | February 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Hélène Yèche, University of Poitiers

 Institute of European Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, GHI West, The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

Hélène Yèche will introduce the audience to the case study of the Sorbs, a Slavic minority living in today’s Germany. The Sorbian community of Lusatia recently developed a few important ways of preserving identity and culture in the context of globalization through language revitalization. Sorbian identity challenge is part of a global minority revival trend, which is not only taking place in...   More >

Accountability for Syria

Lecture | February 1 | 12:45-2 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Room 110

 Jeff Deutch, Syrian Archive; Niko Para, Syrian Archive

 Human Rights Center, Boalt Hall Committee for Human Rights, Middle Eastern Law Students Assc.

Jeff Deutch and Niko Para of the Syrian Archive based in Berlin will discuss the vital work of documenting war crimes and human rights abuses in the age of open source evidence and social media and the critical role of individuals and NGOs. Lunch will be served; pls RSVP at link below.

  RSVP online

The Future Of Cybersecurity And Trends In Technological Risk: Implications For US Foreign Policy And Politics

Lecture | February 1 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Jonathan Reiber, Senior Fellow, Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity, UC Berkeley

 Institute of International Studies

Jonathan Reiber is Senior Advisor at Technology for Global Security, a think-do tank based in Palo Alto, California, and a Visiting Scholar at UC Berkeley's Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity, where he previously held a two-year writing and research senior fellowship from 2015-2017. Jonathan is currently at work on a Smith Richardson Foundation funded study exploring the nature of public-private...   More >

Maya Tudor | India's Changing Nationalism: Does It Matter?

Lecture | February 1 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room) | Note change in date

 Maya Tudor, Associate Professor of Government and Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government Fellow, St. Hilda's College, Oxford University

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of Political Science

Dr. Maya Tudor, Associate Professor of Government and Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government Fellow, St. Hilda's College, Oxford University

Where Wild Beauty and Science Meet

Lecture | February 1 | 5:30-8:30 p.m. |  David Brower Center

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 College of Natural Resources, Braided River

Wildlife photojournalist and National Geographic fellow Joe Riis, who has documented the migrations of pronghorn, mule deer, and elk in Wyoming for more than a decade, will give a multimedia presentation and book signing of his new book, Yellowstone Migrations. A reception begins at 5:30 pm with the program at 6:30 pm.

Riis will be joined by ecologist & UC Berkeley Professor Arthur Middleton,...   More >

  RSVP online

The Science of Cannabis: The Environmental Impact of Large Scale Cannabis Cultivation

Lecture | February 1 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

The current system for growing cannabis has caused significant environmental degradation due to pollutants, heavy water use, clear cutting natural areas, and other man-made impacts. What are the current environmental issues, and how can they be addressed as cannabis production scales.

$30 / $25 UCBG Members / $15 Current students

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Friday, February 2, 2018

A Conversation with Author, Amish Tripathi: On turning centuries-old mythological tales into bestselling works of fiction

Lecture | February 2 | 12-2 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Amish Tripathi, Author

 Harsha Ram, Associate Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Art Forum

Amish Tripathi is the author of the spellbinding series - the Shiva Trilogy - The Immortals of Meluha, The Secret of the Nagas, The Oath of the Vayuputras; The Ram Chandra Series - Scion of Ikshvaku and Sita: Warrior of Mithila. And the newly released, Immortal India.

Car-sharing Network Optimization Driven by High-resolution Data, Simulation and Discrete Optimization

Lecture | February 2 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Carolina Osorio, MIT

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: With the increase in connectivity and in real-time responsiveness, travelers and vehicles are becoming "real-time optimizers" of their trips. The urban mobility challenges and breakthroughs of the next decades will be marked by our ability to optimize the aggregate performance of large-scale transportation systems while accounting for how the hundreds of thousands of "real-time...   More >

Sumgayit: 30 Years After: History and Future of the Nagorno-Karabakh (Artsakh) Conflict

Lecture | February 2 | 7:30-9:30 p.m. |  St. John Armenian Church

 275 Olympia Way, San Francisco, CA 94131

 Anna Turcotte, Author

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program, St. John Armenian Church

Anti- Armenian atrocities of my childhood, the history
that fueled the hatred, and the current state of affairs on
the ground in Artsakh.

Anna Astvatsaturian Turcotte is an Armenian-American writer, lecturer, and activist. She authored <u>Nowhere, a Story of Exile </u>and has lectured extensively about the plight of Armenians in Azerbaijan in the context of human rights and international...   More >

Monday, February 5, 2018

What's in a grape? Science, politics, and the race for authenticity in the West Bank wineries

Lecture | February 5 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ariel Handel, Tel Aviv University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Lecture by Ariel Handel on the wine industry in Israel-Palestine.

John E. Cort | No One Gives like the Guru

Lecture | February 5 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 John E. Cort, Professor of Asian and Comparative Religions and the Judy Gentili Chair in International Studies at Denison University

 Alexander von Rospatt, Professor, Buddhist and South Asian Studies; Acting Chair, South and Southeast Asian Studies; and Director, Himalayan Studies Initiative

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

A talk by John E. Cort, Professor of Asian and Comparative Religions and the Judy Gentili Chair in International Studies at Denison University.

Connectivity as Human Right

Lecture | February 5 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Nicholas Negroponte, Architect at MIT

 Berkeley Center for New Media, Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Nicholas Negroponte is the co-founder (with Jerome B. Wiesner) of the MIT Media Lab (1985), which he directed for its first 20 years. A graduate of MIT, Negroponte was a pioneer in the field of computer-aided design and has been a member of the MIT faculty since 1966. He gave the first TED talk in 1984, as well as 13 since. He is author of the 1995 best seller, Being Digital, which has been...   More >

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Cognitive Adaptations to Harsh Environments

Lecture | February 6 | 10-11:30 a.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Willem Frankenhuis, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University

 Department of Psychology

Growing up in a harsh environment has a major impact on cognition. People from such environments tend to score lower on a variety of cognitive tests. The predominant view in psychology is, therefore, that chronic exposure to harsh conditions impairs cognition. I have recently challenged this consensus by proposing that harsh environments do not exclusively impair cognition. Rather, people also...   More >

An Epidemiologic Characterization of the TMPRSS2: ERG Subtype of Prostate Cancer

Lecture | February 6 | 2:30-3:30 p.m. | 150 University Hall

 Rebecca Graff

 Public Health, School of

Nearly half of prostate tumors harbor the somatic TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion, annually yielding diagnoses of more than 100,000 fusion-positive prostate cancers in the United States. Such cancers represent a unique paradigm of malignancy – one in which an oncogene (ERG) becomes regulated by androgens because it is fused to a gene that is androgen-regulated (TMPRSS2). The etiology and disease courses...   More >

GFI Talk: The Future of Protein: How Your Business Will Save the World

Lecture | February 6 | 8-9 p.m. | 20 Wheeler Hall

 Aylon Steinhart, The Good Food Institute

 Food Science and Tech at Cal

Aylon Steinhart, coming from the Good Food Institute, a graduate from our very own Haas and co-founder of two start-ups, will be coming to give us insight about the issues that come with the meat industry and how plant-based meat industries are successfully finding ways around those problems. He has spoken at top campuses such as Harvard, MIT, Stanford, and Yale about the entrepreneurial and...   More >

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: David Marno: Death Be Not Proud: The Art of Holy Attention

Lecture | February 7 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

In his book Death Be Not Proud (Chicago, 2016), David Marno explores the precedents of Malebranche’s advice by reading John Donne’s poetic prayers in the context of what Marno calls the “art of holy attention.”

A Talk with Ken Ueno

Lecture | February 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Ken Ueno, Jerry and Evelyn Hemmings Chambers Distinguished Professor in Music Associate Professor, UC Berkeley

 Arts + Design

Experimental composer/vocalist/sound artist who collaborates with visual artists, architects, and video artists to create unique cross-disciplinary art works. Ueno, is the Jerry and Evelyn Hemmings Chambers Distinguished Professor Chair in Music at UC Berkeley

Ken Ueno, Jerry and Evelyn Hemmings Chambers Distinguished Professor in Music, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley

Rome Prize and...   More >

From Saliva to Saints: (m)oral Hygiene in the Middle Ages and the Case of Late Medieval Villamagna

Lecture | February 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Trent Trombley, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Human dentition and the accompanying oral cavity is a dense source of biocultural information and has enjoyed a long history of anthropological fascination. Analyses have ranged from establishing biological affinity in archaeological communities via dental metric and non-metric traits, to larger evolutionary questions of morphology. However, dental tissues have seldom been analyzed for their...   More >

Bowen Lectures: Lecture 1: Mathematics and Computation (through the lens of one problem and one algorithm). The problem, the algorithm and the connections.

Lecture | February 7 | 4:10-5 p.m. | Calvin Laboratory (Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing), Auditorium

 Avi Wigderson, Institute for Advanced Study

 Department of Mathematics

In this lecture, we introduce and motivate the main characters in this plot:

- Singularity of symbolic matrices: a basic problem in both computational complexity.

- Alternating Minimization: a basic heuristic in non-convex optimization.

I will explain how variants of this algorithm are applied to variants of this problem, how they are analyzed, and how the analysis gives rise to problems...   More >

Book Lecture | David Biale on Hasidism: A New History

Lecture | February 7 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Free and open to the public

Far from a throwback to the Middle Ages, Hasidism is a product of modernity that forged its identity as a radical alternative to the secular world. So argue the eight distinguished authors, led by David Biale, of Hasidism: A New History, the first comprehensive account of the movement’s place in modern Jewish history. The book represents an innovative collaboration...   More >

ARCH Lecture: 2017 Branner & Stump Fellows

Lecture | February 7 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, FEB 7, 6:30pm. Recent fellowship recipients will present their research from their international travels. Followed by a reception in the Wurster Gallery, alongside the 2017 Branner &amp; Stump Fellows Exhibition. Open to the CED community!

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Improving prediction of intervention effects across populations

Lecture | February 8 | 2:30-3:30 p.m. | 150 University Hall

 Kara Rudolph, Ph.D., University of California, Davis

 Public Health, School of

In public health, there is frequently an implicit assumption that an intervention that works in one place will work in another. This is often not the case in practice, where expansion of interventions may yield disappointingly null results or even unexpected adverse effects. In this talk, I will discuss how some of my recent work in transportability and mediation can help better predict how an...   More >

The Berkeley Seminar on Global History: Karl Jacoby on The Strange Career of William Ellis

Lecture | February 8 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Karl Jacoby, Professor, Department of History, Columbia University

 Chip Williams, Descendent of William Ellis

 Department of History, Institute of International Studies

To his contemporaries in Gilded Age Manhattan, Guillermo Eliseo was a fantastically wealthy Mexican, the proud owner of a luxury apartment overlooking Central Park, a busy Wall Street office, and scores of mines and haciendas in Mexico. But for all his obvious riches and his elegant appearance, Eliseo was also the possessor of a devastating secret: he was not, in fact, from Mexico at all. Rather,...   More >

Working Together: How the Supreme Court Divided the Labor and Civil Rights Movements

Lecture | February 8 | 4 p.m. |  2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment)

 Catherine Fisk, Professor, Berkeley Law

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Center for the Study of Law and Society, Berkeley Journal of Employment and Labor Law

Once, activists dreamed of an all-inclusive movement for poor people. But then came the 1950s – labor began to decline as a social movement, and civil rights leaders turned away from their early focus on labor rights. What role did the courts play in pushing these movements apart?

Professor Fisk finds that the era’s labor laws, which were hostile to picketing by labor organizers, encouraged...   More >

  RSVP online

After the Airlifts: Battling over Vietnamese Children and the Place of Vietnamese Refugees

Lecture | February 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Allison Varzally, Professor of History, CSU Fullerton

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This talk is derived from Prof. Varzally's new book Children of Reunion: Vietnamese Adoptions and the Politics of Family Migrations (University of North Carolina Press, 2017).

Allison Varzally

The EU’s ad hoc Policy Towards the Middle East after the Refugee Crisis. A View From Central Europe

Lecture | February 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 (Townsend)

 Łukasz Fyderek, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Institute of Middle and Far East Studies, Jagiellonian University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Over the years the Southern Dimension of the European neighborhood policy has been characterized by efforts to promote stability and prosperity. The aim was to build “a ring of friends” from the Caucasus to the Sahara, using a plethora of foreign policy instruments and economic incentives. Within the EU, the matter was relatively uncontroversial, and since 2008 a division of labor became visible,...   More >

Bowen Lectures: Lecture 2: Mathematics and Computation (through the lens of one problem and one algorithm). Proving Algebraic Identities.

Lecture | February 8 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Avi Wigderson, Institute for Advanced Study

 Department of Mathematics

In numerous mathematical settings, an object typically has several representations. This leads to the “isomorphism problem” or “word problem”: when are two given representations equivalent. Such problems have driven much structural and algorithmic research across mathematics.

We will focus on the algebraic setting, where our objects will be polynomials and rational functions in many...   More >

Buddhism and Divination in Tibet

Lecture | February 8 | 5-7 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room

 Brandon Dotson, Georgetown University

 Center for Buddhist Studies

As a poor cousin of both science and religion, a begrudged relative of ritual, and a strange bedfellow of play, divination persists at the margins of established traditions. Buddhism shows some ambivalence toward divination, sometimes barely tolerating it, and other times making full use of divination as a medium for Buddhist messages. Buddhists, for their part, have employed divination in much...   More >

A Long Civil War or a Long Reconstruction?: A Case for 1865

Lecture | February 8 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Brook Thomas, UC Irvine

 Department of English, Americanist Colloquium

An evening lecture and discussion with UC Irvine professor Brook Thomas; Sponsored by the Americanist Colloquium

We Crossed a Bridge and It Trembled: Voices from Syria

Lecture | February 8 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Wendy Pearlman, Northwestern University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Author Wendy Pearlman presents her book, We Crossed a Bridge and it Trembled: Voices from Syria, which is an astonishing collection of intimate wartime testimonies and poetic fragments from a cross-section of Syrians whose lives have been transformed by revolution, war, and flight.

Wendy Pearlman is a professor at Northwestern University, specializing in Middle East politics.

SOLD OUT - The Science of Cannabis: The Genetics of Cannabis Breeds

Lecture | February 8 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

There is a rich informal taxonomy of Cannabis strains with exotic and evocative names. How do these breeds reflect the genetic relationships among different strains, and how do those genetic relationships reflect the chemical properties of the specific plants?

$30 / $25 UCBG Members / $15 Current students

 SOLD OUT.

Celebrate Michael Krasny’s 25 Years as host of KQED’s Forum

Lecture | February 8 | 6:30-7:30 p.m. | North Gate Hall, North Gate Hall Library

 Michael Krasny, KQED

 Graduate School of Journalism

You are invited to a very special evening celebrating the career of legendary Bay Area radio host and author Michael Krasny.

RSVP: https://goo.gl/8B6wvu
Seating is first come, first served. Advance registration does not guarantee seating.

  RSVP online

Hilton Als in Conservation with Stephen Best

Lecture | February 8 | 7:30 p.m. |  Nourse Theater

 275 Hayes Street, San Francisco, CA

 Hilton Als, The New Yorker

 Stephen Best, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley English

 Department of English

Hilton Als began contributing to The New Yorker in 1989, writing pieces for ‘The Talk of the Town,’ he became a staff writer in 1994, theatre critic in 2002, and lead theater critic in 2012. Week after week, he brings to the magazine a rigorous, sharp, and lyrical perspective on acting, playwriting, and directing. With his deep knowledge of the history of performance—not only in theatre but in...   More >

Memory and the Ear: Sather Lecture #1

Lecture | February 8 | 8 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maud Fife Room | Note change in time and location

 Maurizio Bettini, Università degli Studi di Siena

 Department of Classics

Friday, February 9, 2018

Austria in a Changing Europe. Diplomatic Perspectives

Lecture | February 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Andreas Launer, Consul General of the Republic of Austria in Los Angeles; Martin Rauchbauer, Co-Director of the Open Austria Silicon Valley Office

 Institute of European Studies

Austria is in the heart of a Europe that continues to go through fundamental political, economic, and social changes. As the country takes over the Presidency of the European Union in the second half of this year, two Austrian diplomats based in Los Angeles and San Francisco, respectively, share their perspectives on developments and challenges in Austria, Europe, and on relations with the United...   More >

Leveraging Big Data to Improve Operational Performance, Reliability, and Efficiency

Lecture | February 9 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Jonny Simkin, Swiftly

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: The existing public transit infrastructure in the United States already generates a tremendous amount of data, however, this information is often not used as effectively as it could be. In this session, we will discuss some of the ways that Swiftly is leveraging billions of data points to help transit agencies improve operational performance, reliability, and efficiency.

Bio: Jonny...   More >

Bowen Lectures: Lecture 3: Mathematics and Computation (through the lens of one problem and one algorithm). Proving Analytic Inequalities.

Lecture | February 9 | 4:10-5 p.m. | Calvin Laboratory (Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing), Auditorium

 Avi Wigderson, Institute for Advanced Study

 Department of Mathematics

The celebrated Brascamp-Lieb (BL) inequalities, and their reverse form of Barthe, is a powerful framework which unifies and generalizes many important inequalities in analysis, convex geometry and information theory.

I will exemplify BL inequalities, building to the general set-up. I will describe the structural theory that characterizes existence and optimality of these inequalities in terms...   More >

Hesiod, the Presocratics and Hellenistic Poetry

Lecture | February 9 | 5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, Nestrick Room (142)

 Richard Hunter

 Department of Classics

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Career Clinic: Making A Successful Career Transition: Roadmap for Change

Lecture | February 10 | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. | UC Berkeley Extension (Golden Bear Center), Room 204

 Rebecca Andersen, Career Services at the UC Berkeley Information School; RuthAnn Haffke, UC Berkeley School of Public Health

 UC Berkeley Extension

Making a career transition can be bewildering: how do you find jobs? How can you stand out as a candidate? And, if you finally get an interview, how do you showcase yourself as the best candidate? This workshop will walk participants through each step of making a career transition. Through interactive exercises, we will cover strategies in personal branding, networking, résumé and LinkedIn...   More >

$50

  Register online

Sunday, February 11, 2018

AIA Joukowsky Lecture - The Late Bronze Age Eruption of Thera (Santorini)

Lecture | February 11 | 2 p.m. | 142 Dwinelle Hall

 Floyd McCoy, University of Hawaii

 AIA, San Francisco Society

The largest volcanic eruption of the past 10,000 years occurred in the southern Aegean Sea on an island known in antiquity as Thera (Santorini). A landscape was forever altered – as was a culture that thrived on that island, the Cycladic culture. Here was the core of a thriving maritime trade network, in close communication with the Minoan culture on Crete, vaporized in a four/five-day volcanic...   More >

Monday, February 12, 2018

EU Climate Leadership Post Paris

Lecture | February 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Max Gruenig, Ecologic Institute US

 Institute of European Studies

What can be expected from the EU and its member states in a time of internal turmoil and external challenges? How far along is the project of a European energy transition and what priority does energy efficiency and renewable energy take in the outgoing Juncker commission? What hope can be placed on the still new French president and what is emerging in Germany?

Max Gruenig is the President of...   More >

In Search of Modern Iran: A Lecture by Abbas Amanat

Lecture | February 12 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Abbas Amanat, Yale University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Abbas Amanat will talk about the challenges and rewards of writing a longue dureé covering early modern and modern history of Iran. His new book: Iran: A Modern History (Yale University Press, 2017) looks at five centuries of national and transnational history and explores overarching themes that connect the history of the Safavids Empire and emergence of the religion-state symbiosis with modes...   More >

Matthew Hull | Satisfied Callers: Police and Corporate Customer Service in India

Lecture | February 12 | 2-4 p.m. | Kroeber Hall, 221 (Gifford Room)

 Matthew Hull, Associate Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of Anthropology, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Cyborg Linguistics (Townsend Center Working Group), Form and Formalism (Townsend Center Working Group)

A talk by anthropologist Dr. Matthew Hull.

New directions in obesity epidemiology: Sleep, dietary patterns, and body composition

Lecture | February 12 | 3-4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Elizabeth Feliciano, ScD, MSc

 Public Health, School of

More than one-third of U.S. adults have obesity. Obesity epidemiology identifies the causes and consequences of obesity to inform intervention strategies. This presentation will: 1) define obesity as a metabolic phenotype; 2) present two examples of novel obesity risk factors: sleep and dietary patterns; and 3) discuss the importance of body composition to understanding obesity’s role in chronic...   More >

History Graduate Association Distinguished Alumni Lecture: Priya Satia on Empire of Guns

Lecture | February 12 | 4-6 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Priya Satia, Professor of Modern British History, Stanford University

 Department of History, History Graduate Association (HGA)

The 2018 History Graduate Association Distinguished Alumni Lecture featuring Priya Satia of Stanford University: Empire of Guns: The Violent Making of the Industrial Revolution

Priya Satia was raised in Los Gatos, California, and educated at Stanford University, the London School of Economics, and here at UC Berkeley where she earned her Ph.D. in 2004. She is currently a Professor of...   More >

The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale And The American Tragedy In Vietnam

Lecture | February 12 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room | Note change in location

 Max Boot, Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow for National Security Studies, Council on Foreign Relations

 Institute of International Studies

Max Boot is a historian, best-selling author, and foreign-policy analyst who has been called one of the “world’s leading authorities on armed conflict” by the International Institute for Strategic Studies. He is the Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow in National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.

Boot’s latest book—The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the...   More >

The Clock Tower at Jaffa Gate, Sheikh Suleiman Jacir, the Jerusalem Hebron Road, and other disappearances

Lecture | February 12 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Emily Jacir, Artist and Filmmaker

 Arts + Design

Renowned for work that is as poetic as it is political and biographical, Emily Jacir will discuss her powerful artistic practice and address some of the crucial questions which inform her approach. Jacir has built a complex and compelling oeuvre through a diverse range of media and methodologies that include unearthing historic material, performative gestures and in-depth research. Her projects...   More >

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

After Kathy Acker: A Conversation with Chris Kraus

Lecture | February 13 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 330 Wheeler Hall

 Chris Kraus

 Department of English

A graduate student led discussion with author Chris Kraus about her recent literary biography, "After Kathy Acker" [moderated by Alex Brostoff (Comparative Literature) & Katie Bondy (English)]

Sponsored by the English Department Americanist Colloquium, the English Department, the Townsend Center for the Humanities, the Florence Bixby Chair, the 20/21st Century Colloquium, & the Consortium for...   More >

Initial Coin Offerings: The Opportunities and Pitfalls of Funding Start-Ups With Cryptocurrencies

Lecture | February 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Lukas Repa, European Commission

 Institute of European Studies

Start-up funding is still a prerogative of venture capital firms in the Silicon Valley. Yet, this may change. The boom of Bitcoin has attracted investor interest to cryptocurrencies in general. As a consequence, both in Europe and the USA, entrepreneurs are increasingly issuing cryptocurrencies to fund their start ups rather than seeking venture capital. The so-called "Initial Coin Offerings"...   More >

Ancient Icons/Modern Russia

Lecture | February 13 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Judith Deutsch Kornblatt, Professor Emerita, Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Wisconsin - Madison

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

This lecture and slide show examines the history, theology, and presentation of Russian icons, from their beginnings through the twentieth century and into post-Soviet times. It will demonstrate how these sacred objects have permeated even secular Russian culture, including modernist art, poetry, advertising, and popular memes.

Latin American Hyperfetishism and the Materialist Turn

Lecture | February 13 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Center for Latin American Studies, CLAS Conference Room

 2334 Bowditch Street, Berkeley, CA 94720

 Héctor Hoyos, Associate Professor, Stanford University Latin American Literature

 Center for Latin American Studies

In this talk, Hoyos interrogates Marx’s notion of commodity fetishism from the vantage point of new materialisms. Complicating the notion that counternarrative may reveal the social relations behind the fascination toward commodities, Hoyos considers literary and artistic case studies from Colombia and Mexico (Fernando Vallejo, Margo Glantz, and Daniela Rosell) to characterize a mode of...   More >

The Politics of Faith and Fear: Robert Baer at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | February 13 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Robert Baer, Author and Former CIA Officer

 The Berkeley Forum

Global warming, overpopulation, and mass migration will put catastrophic stress on humanity. How we deal with it will be the question. Robert Baer believes that people governed by fear want to be governed by faith. The Taliban’s demolition of the Buddhas at Bamiyan and the Islamic State's destruction of Palmyra may have occurred halfway around the world, but Americans can apply lessons from these...   More >

Free

  Buy tickets online

Translation as Research: with Ahmad Diab, Anneka Lenssen, and Kathy Zarur

Lecture | February 13 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Annex, Room 126

 Arts Research Center

To celebrate the upcoming publication of the anthology Modern Art in the Arab World: Primary Documents (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 2018), co-editor Anneka Lenssen joins Ahmad Diab and Kathy Zarur in a conversation exploring the possibilities of translation as artistic research.

Modern Art in the Arab World: Primary Documents

Environmental Design Archives Gallery Talks: Margie O’Driscoll

Lecture | February 13 | 7-8 p.m. | 121 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Join the Environmental Design Archives the second Tuesday of each month for Gallery Talks, a series of informal lectures given by scholars and practitioners.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Food and Power: Regime Type, Agricultural Policy and Political Stability

Lecture | February 14 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Henry Thomson, chool of Politics & Global Studies at Arizona State University

 Institute of European Studies

One of the most salient cleavages to be managed in developing nations is between cities and the countryside, and it plays itself out in markets for agricultural produce and food. Agricultural policy is a trade-off between rural and urban interests and results from different types of governments attempting to remain in power by addressing the competing claims of these constituencies. Policies go...   More >

A Talk with Chip Lord

Lecture | February 14 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Chip Lord, Professor Emeritus, Film & Digital Media Department, University of California, Santa Cruz

 Arts + Design

Chip Lord is a pioneering video artist and founding member of the Bay Area media collective Ant Farm.

Chip Lord grew up in 1950’s America, a place that has been a continual source of inspiration in his work as an artist. Trained as an architect, he was a founding partner of Ant Farm, with whom he produced the video art classics Media Burn and The Eternal Frame as well as the public sculpture,...   More >

Connecting Cultures at the Phoebe Hearst Museum: Building a 21st-Century Anthropology Museum

Lecture | February 14 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Benjamin Porter, Director, Phoebe A. Hearst Museum, Phoebe A. Hearst Museum, University of California Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

The Phoebe Hearst Museum Director Benjamin Porter will discuss the Museum’s recent efforts to create a dynamic venue where people from around the world can connect in new and meaningful ways. The Museum is positioning itself to be a place where visitors encounter pressing questions and challenges that can be explored through the lenses of contemporary anthropology. Recent accomplishments will be...   More >

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: James Turner: Eros Visible: Art, Sexuality and Antiquity in Renaissance Italy

Lecture | February 14 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

In his study of High Renaissance art, Professor of English James Turner demonstrates the surprisingly close connection between explicitly pornographic art and the canonical works of masters such as Leonardo, Raphael, and Michelangelo.

Beyond Crisis Liberalism: How We Can Tackle Extreme Inequality

Lecture | February 14 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Mark Gomez

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

California is remarkably prosperous. Yet most of us are stuck. How can we inspire the change we need to ensure renewed economic progress? How can we finally end racial economic exclusion? Who will lead us forward?

Dealing with Secrecy, Trust and Access in Nuclear Weapons Verification

Lecture | February 14 | 1-2 p.m. |  Nuclear Science and Security Consortium

 2150 Shattuck Ave, Suite 230 , Berkeley, CA 94704

 Sébastien Philippe

 Nuclear Science and Security Consortium

Presented by Sébastien Philippe.

Future nuclear arms-control agreements could place numerical limits on the total number of warheads in the arsenals of the weapon states. Verifying these agreements would face at least two fundamentally new challenges. First, inspectors would have to confirm that the number of declared items does not exceed the agreed limit; and, second, inspectors would also...   More >

A Conversation About US Foreign Policy

Lecture | February 14 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Michèle Flournoy, Co-Founder and Managing Director of WestExec Advisors

 Institute of International Studies

Michèle Flournoy is the Co-Founder and Managing Director of WestExec Advisors and is the former CEO of CNAS. She serves on the CNAS Board of Directors.

She served as the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy from February 2009 to February 2012. She was the principal adviser to the Secretary of Defense in the formulation of national security and defense policy, oversight of military plans and...   More >

Artist's Talk: Jay Heikes

Lecture | February 14 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Artist Jay Heikes talks about art and alchemy and offers an overview of his wide-ranging practice, with an emphasis on the works featured in Jay Heikes / MATRIX 269.

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Solving Mysteries at The Bancroft Library: The Fifth (Floor) Dimension

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Kenna Fisher, MLIS, Manuscripts Cataloger, The Bancroft Library

 Bancroft Library

Ever wonder how Bancroft's wonderful collections are made ready for the public? Go behind the scenes with Bancroft manuscripts cataloger Kenna Fisher as she takes you on a journey through special collections processing. Fisher will discuss how she solved mysteries contained in two new acquisitions: a Gold Rush-era journal and a World War I collection.

A Medieval Gospel Book from Genocide to Restitution: Toros Roslin’s Zeytun Gospels, 1915-2015

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Heghnar Zeitlian Watenpaugh, Associate Professor of Art History, UC Davis

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

The destruction of art, especially religious art, is one of the components of the genocidal phenomenon. Claims for the restitution of surviving religious and artistic objects form part post-conflict processes of survival or reconciliation. The widespread destruction of religious art is a well known dimension of the Armenian Genocide, yet its has rarely attracted critical attention. A rare example...   More >

Is There A Future for International Criminal Justice?

Lecture | February 15 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 140 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Stephen J. Rapp, former US Ambassador-at-Large, Office of Global Crimnial Justice, US State Dept

 Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law

Stephen Rapp was Ambassador-at-Large (2009-2015) heading the Office of Global Criminal Justice in the US State Department, where he coordinated US Government support to international criminal tribunals, and to hybrid and national courts responsible for prosecuting persons charged with genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.

Barbarians at the Gate: Socialist University, Upward Mobility, and New Intelligentsia in Postwar Poland

Lecture | February 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Agata Zysiak, Visiting Scholar, Institute for Advanced Study

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

After the social revolution brought on by WWII and a new political order, Polish society started on a path of intense reconstruction. A freshly established university in the "Polish Manchester" - Łódź - serves as a case study to examine postwar visions of academia, reforms of higher education, and upward mobility. The socialist university project was designed for the people and was a...   More >

Measuring Subgenres: Quantitative Approaches to Paratextual Labeling and Readers’ Expectations

Lecture | February 15 | 4-6 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 4125A (level D)

 Nicholas Paige, UC Berkeley French

 Department of French

This event will feature two presentations of ongoing quantitative research into the adoption of labels for novelistic subgenres — phrases such as “a novel of manners” and “a historical novel.” Is the appearance of generic subtitles on title pages a reliable indicator of a novel’s content? Do such subtitles spread in a predictable fashion, and to what extent does their use traverse national and...   More >

The Merit of Words and Letters: Sutra Recitation in Japanese Zen

Lecture | February 15 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Erez Joskovich, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

Classical Chan/Zen literature is famous for its disparagement of scriptural authority, ranging from the well-known slogan “separate transmission outside the scriptures...,” attributed to Bodhidharma, to stories of renowned Zen masters abusing Buddhist scriptures. Nevertheless, similar to other Buddhist schools, incantations of sutras and invocation of dhāranī have been a significant...   More >

Fatum: Destiny in Greece and Rome: Sather Lecture #2

Lecture | February 15 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall | Note change in time and location

 Maurizio Bettini, Università degli Studi di Siena

 Department of Classics

SOLD OUT - The Science of Cannabis: The Neuroscience of Cannabis

Lecture | February 15 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

How does Cannabis affect our brain, mind, and behavior? The subjective experiences, therapeutic uses, and potential for abuse associated with Cannabis are related to the plant’s complex botanical chemistry and the impact of this chemistry on body and psyche.

$30 / $25 UCBG Members / $15 Current students

 SOLD OUT.

Friday, February 16, 2018

Sara Ahmed Talk and Conversation

Lecture | February 16 |  Location TBA

 Sara Ahmed

 Center for the Study of Sexual Culture

Join us for a talk with renowned scholar Sara Ahmed, whose work lives at the intersections of feminist, queer, postcolonial, and critical race theory. We will also be hosting a conversation with Professor Ahmed for graduate students only. Contact the CSSC for more details.

Sara Ahmed: Queer Use

Lecture | February 16 | 4-5 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

This lecture by scholar Sara Ahmed explores the queerness of use as well as uses of queer.

"Race Play: Racialized Gender and Sexuality in Settler Colonial North America”

Lecture | February 16 | 4-6 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Department of Ethnic Studies

"Race Play: Racialized Gender and Sexuality in Settler Colonial North America” brings together two scholars who work at the intersections of racialization and gender and sexual identities—C Winter Han and Scott Morgensen—to consider how these issues become co-constituted in contemporary settler colonial North America.

The conversation will be followed by an audience Q&A.
This event is free...   More >

Saturday, February 17, 2018

Science at Cal Lecture: Cosmic Gold: Neutron Star Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and the Origin of the Heavy Elements

Lecture | February 17 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 131 Campbell Hall

 Eliot Quataert, Department of Astronomy

 Science@Cal

Scientists have recently developed a new way to “see” the universe, using the gravitational waves predicted by Einstein nearly a century ago. These waves can teach us about some of the most exotic objects known, including star “corpses” known as black holes and neutron stars. Remarkably, they have also helped solve a longstanding puzzle about where in the Universe some of the elements we know and...   More >

Neutron Star Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and the Origin of the Heavy Elements - Image LIGO/NSF

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Climate Change, Climate Change Refugees, and Public Art

Lecture | February 20 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Christina Gerhardt, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West, the Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

In Let Them Drown, the 2016 London Edward W. Said lecture, Naomi Klein called attention, as Rob Nixon's Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor had done, to the nexus of climate change, (colonial) racism and poverty. But she shifted the spotlight onto the oft-overlooked low-lying island nations. And their current-day situation is dire.

In her talk, Professor Christina Gerhardt...   More >

From Turks to Mongols: David Ayalon’s Vision of the Eurasian Steppe in Islamic History

Lecture | February 20 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Reuven Amitai, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

This lecture seeks to survey and critically engage some of the ideas of David Ayalon (1914-98), and then to see where they might further be developed and applied. Although Ayalon is primarily known as a Mamlukist, and in fact can be called the father of Mamluk studies, he also turned his attention to other weighty matters in the study of Middle Eastern and Islamic history. Among these was the...   More >

ARCH Lecture: Kersten Geers

Lecture | February 20 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

TUES, FEB 20, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk with renowned architect Kersten Geers of OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen. Open to the public!

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Evidences (both Archaeological and Textual) for Long-Distance Trade Networks and Weighted Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Near Eastern Bronze Age (1950-1750 BCE)

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Adam Anderson, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Berkeley Digital Humanities

 Archaeological Research Facility

Archaeology in the Middle East or Near East has a long and illustrious history, with more than 150 years of scholarship. From the 1840s onward western archaeologists like Sir Austen Henry Layard made early discoveries of textual artifacts in the heart of Mesopotamia, and awoke a deep curiosity in deciphering the beginnings of human history. Unfortunately, these discoveries inadvertently...   More >

Decolonial and Deimperial Crossings: An Inter-Asian Feminist Genealogy

Lecture | February 21 | 12-2 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Laura Kang, Professor of Gender & Sexuality Studies, English and Comparative Literature, UC Irvine

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Race and Gender, Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

Part of the Feminist Studies and Decolonial Epistemologies Lecture Series

This talk recalls and retraces the inter-Asian network of feminist mobilizations against Japanese sex tourism and U.S. military prostitution in the early 1970s. The work of attending to the discrepant yet linked histories of imperialist sexual violence, military dictatorship, and neocolonial exploitation of Asian women’s...   More >

Small States and Secondary Actors in the Cold War: Entanglements Between Europe and Latin America

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Albert Manke, GHI West

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West. Pacific Regional Office of the Germany Historical Institute Washington DC, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

What kind of relations could small states and secondary actors establish with each other during the Cold War? To which extent were they able to overcome ideological boundaries and/or superpower dominance? Based on archival research in Cuba and the Czech Republic and extensive exchange with colleagues specialized on Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe, Albert Manke will provide an...   More >

A Talk with Jacob Gaboury

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Jacob Gaboury, Assistant Professor of Film & Media, University of California, Berkeley

 Arts + Design

Jacob Gaboury is a historian of digital media, studying the ways people have imagined, developed, and used digital images over the past seventy years. His forthcoming book is titled Image Objects (MIT Press, 2018), and offers a material history of early computer graphics and visual simulation. He is currently Assistant Professor of New Media History and Theory in the Department of Film & Media at...   More >

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: Peter Sahlins: 1668: The Year of the Animal in France

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Professor of History Peter Sahlins explores the “animal moment” in and around 1668, in which French authors, anatomists, painters, sculptors, and especially the young Louis XIV turned their attention to nonhuman beings.

Why Is the Information Revolution So Scary?

Lecture | February 21 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Jeffrey K. MacKie-Mason

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

A look at information and its discontents with University Librarian and Chief Digital Scholarship Officer Jeff MacKie-Mason.

Imperfect immunity: estimation and epidemiological implications

Lecture | February 21 | 3-4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Joseph A. Lewnard, PhD

 Public Health, School of

The persisting burden of vaccine-preventable infections underscores challenges associated with the imperfect immune response elicited by many vaccines. I introduce statistical problems undermining causal inference of imperfect vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, motivating the use of models to account for the natural history of infectious agents. I next describe ongoing work applying such models...   More >

The North Korean Quagmire and the Moon Jae-in Government: Nukes, Humanitarian Assistance, and Prospects for Inter-Korean Relations

Lecture | February 21 | 3 p.m. | Barrows Hall, 8th Floor Social Science Matrix

 Chung-in Moon, Distinguished University Professor at Yonsei University John Linton, Director, International Health Care Center, Severance Hospital of Yonsei Medical School; John Linton, Director, International Health Care Center, Yonsei University Severance Hospital

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Berkeley APEC Study Center, Social Science Matrix, Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

With the ongoing crisis over North Korean nuclear weapons, questions of humanitarian assistance to North Korea have fallen by the wayside. Prof. Chung-in Moon will talk about the Moon Jae-in government’s policy towards North Korea. Prof. John Linton will talk about about overall humanitarian conditions in...   More >

Looking Around, Rather Than Ahead: Design at the Periphery of Contemporary High Tech Development

Lecture | February 21 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Sarah Fox

 Information, School of

How technology design can help us understand different social phenomena.

Reconfiguration of Ceramic Production and Trade in China at the Threshold of Global Trade: An Archaeological Perspective

Lecture | February 21 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Li Min, UCLA

 Tang Center for Silk Road Studies

Taking archaeological ceramics from production, transportation, and consumption sites during the 13th to 17th century, this paper examines the changing configuration of ceramic production and trade on Chinese coast during the critical transition from the Asiatic Trade Network to the beginning of early global trade. I will explore how potter communities in China linked to emerging maritime...   More >

The Gallery and the Archive: Contemporary Artists Work with The Magnes Collection

Lecture | February 21 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Join David Wilson, Greg Niemeyer and Nicki Green, three contemporary artists who, in recent years, have interacted with The Magnes Collection and contributed to exhibitions that intersect new works with art and artifacts from the collection itself, in a conversation about art, creativity, archives, and memory, moderated by Francesco Spagnolo.

David Wilson, an artist based in Oakland, worked...   More >

Philippe Pirotte and Niklaus Largier in Conversation

Lecture | February 21 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Senior Adjunct Curator Philippe Pirotte, who organized Agony in Effigy: Art, Truth, Pain, and the Body, is joined in conversation by UC Berkeley professor of German and comparative literature Niklaus Largier, whose recent work explores the relation between bodily ascetic practices and the literary imagination. The discussion will expand and deepen the literary and cultural context for the...   More >

The City Will Never Be the Same: Lost Radical Cultures in San Francisco's Montgomery Block: A talk with journalist Hiya Swanhuyser

Lecture | February 21 | 7-9 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), IRLE Director's Room

 Hiya Swanhuyser, https://hiyaswanhuyser.wordpress.com/

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, California Studies Association, Townsend Center for the Humanities

When it was built in 1853, the “Monkey Block”was probably the largest and most important office building in the Far West. But as the commercial center of the city moved south, the building became occupied by bohemian artists, writers, and cultural radicals. Bay Area journalist Hiya Swanhuyser will discuss her new book, The City Will Never Be the Same: Lost Radical Cultures in San Francisco's...   More >

Thursday, February 22, 2018

A talk by Jasmin Miller: Teaching Teaching Discretio in Advice for the Contemplative Life

Lecture | February 22 | 4-5 p.m. | 330 Wheeler Hall

 Jasmin Miller

 Department of English, Medieval and Early Modern Coloquium

For pre-circulated materials contact marianhomansturnbull@berkeley.edu.

A Book is Born: Greil Marcus and Steve Wasserman

Lecture | February 22 | 4 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Cultural critic Greil Marcus and publisher Steve Wasserman discuss their nearly half-century of collaboration.

Defending Liberty in the Age of Trump: Lessons from the Front: Jefferson Memorial Lecture featuring David Cole

Lecture | February 22 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 David Cole, National Legal Director, American Civil Liberties Union

 Graduate Division

David Cole will present the Jefferson lecture on Thursday, February 22, 2018, entitled "Defending Liberty in the Age of Trump: Lessons from the Front." The lecture will be held in the Chevron Auditorium of International House and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

David Cole

The U.S. - Israel Relationship Under President Donald Trump

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | 105 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Dennis Ross, The Washington Institute

 Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israel Studies

In the first year of his administration, President Trump has met with key Middle East
leaders, imposed additional sanctions on Iranian officials, set a new tone for the U.S.
role at the UN, and, most recently, made the unprecedented decision to move the
American embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. How do these tactical moves affect the
U.S. – Israel relationship and what else may be in store...   More >

  RSVP online

“Doing” Political Theology Today: Promises and Pitfalls

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Ruth Marshall, Associate Professor of the Study of Religion and Political Science, University of Toronto

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Lecture details forthcoming.

Ruth Marshall received her DPhil in Politics from Oxford University, and joined both the Department for the Study of Religion and Political Science in 2008, after having spent 8 years living and researching in West Africa. She is the author of Political Spiritualities: The Pentecostal Revolution in Nigeria (U. Chicago Press, 2009) and numerous scholarly...   More >

"Doing" Political Theology Today: Promises and Pitfalls

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Ruth Marshall, Associate Professor of the Study of Religion and Political Science, University of Toronto

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Lecture details forthcoming.

Ruth Marshall received her DPhil in Politics from Oxford University, and joined both the Department for the Study of Religion and Political Science in 2008, after having spent 8 years living and researching in West Africa.

From chan to Chan: Meditation and the semiotics of visionary experience in medieval Chinese Buddhism

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Eric Greene, Yale University

 Center for Buddhist Studies

In this talk Eric Greene argues that a distinguishing feature of “early Chan” discourse relative to mainstream Chinese approaches to “Buddhist meditation” (chan)was the rejection of the semiotic potential of visionary meditative experiences. Drawing from early Chan texts, contemporaneous non-Chan meditation manuals, and recently discovered stone inscriptions from Sichuan, he suggests that one way...   More >

Geeta Anand | Reporting from India: Reflections on a Decade with the WSJ and NYT

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Geeta Anand, Journalist; Visiting Faculty, UC Berkeley School of Journalism

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies; Associate Professor in the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of Political Science, Institute of International Studies

A lecture by journalist and former foreign correspondent for The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal in India, Geeta Anand.

The Column Monument in Bīsāpūr - a Roman Design for Sāpūr I?

Lecture | February 22 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall

 Anahita Mittertrainer, Ph.D Candidate, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich

 Near Eastern Studies

One of the most curious findings of the early Sasanian cities in Fars (modern southwest Iran) is the Roman style column monument of Bīsāpūr, which was discovered by Roman Ghirshman, the excavator of Bīsāpūr, in winter 1935/36. The monument was set up in the center of the city at the crossroads of the two main axes and consisted originally probably of two columns...   More >

Fas: A Law with No Gods: Sather Lecture #3

Lecture | February 22 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall | Note change in time and location

 Maurizio Bettini, Università degli Studi di Siena

 Department of Classics

SOLD OUT - The Science of Cannabis: The Ethnobotany of Cannabis

Lecture | February 22 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Cannabis has been in cultivation for millennia and used as a medicine, food, and for hemp fiber. This program will look at the historical uses of cannabis and how we might explore those uses in future research.

$30 / $25 UCBG Members / $15 Current students

 SOLD OUT.