<< January 2018 >>

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Five Tables of XXS (Extra Extra Small) Art

Presentation | January 4 | 4-7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

This edition of Five Tables features tiny art—nothing larger than 5 x 5 inches: engravings by the Kleinmeister or Little Masters of the first half of the sixteenth century in Germany—Heinrich Aldegrever, Albrecht Altdorfer, and Hans Sebald Beham; delicate New Year’s woodblock prints by Shinsai and Shunman; Mieko Shiomi’s conceptual card game Fluxus Balance, and more!

Friday, January 5, 2018

Andean Studies Conference, Day 1: Institute for Andean Studies

Conference/Symposium | January 5 | 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. | 160 Kroeber Hall

 John Rick, President, Institute for Andean Studies

 Institute of Andean Studies

The Institute of Andean Studies was the vision of John H. Rowe (1918–2004), who founded it in 1960.

$40 Early registration, $10 Student early registration, $60 Registration after Jan 1 and at the door, $20 Student registration after Jan 1 and at the door

  Register online or by calling 5106847930, or by emailing instituteofandeanstudies@gmail.com

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | January 5 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for...   More >

Saturday, January 6, 2018

Andean Studies Conference, Day 2: Institute for Andean Studies

Conference/Symposium | January 6 | 8:30 a.m.-10 p.m. | 160 Kroeber Hall

 John Rick, President, Institute for Andean Studies

 Institute of Andean Studies

The Institute of Andean Studies was the vision of John H. Rowe (1918–2004), who founded it in 1960.

$40 Early registration, $10 Student early registration, $60 Registration after Jan 1 and at the door, $20 Student registration after Jan 1 and at the door

  Register online or or by emailing instituteofandeanstudies@gmail.com

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Genetically encoding new chemistries to read and write eukaryotic biology

Seminar | January 9 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Abhishek Chatterjee, Department of Chemistry, Boston College

 College of Chemistry

Over the last decade, site-specific incorporation of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins in living cells has emerged as an enabling technology for biological research. Our group focuses on further development and application of this technology to understand and manipulate biological processes associated with mammalian cells. Two particular problems that we are currently addressing...   More >

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Introduction to Botanical Art Class with Catherine Watters

Workshop | January 11 – 12, 2018 every day | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden | Canceled

 Botanical Garden

This two-day class will introduce you to the fascinating world of Botanical Art. Catherine Watters will teach you to observe, measure and draw plants in great detail and with botanical accuracy. Students will work with graphite, colored pencil and watercolors. All levels are welcome.

$190, $175 members

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

From STEM to STEAM: Exploring E&O Opportunities with BAMPFA

Presentation | January 11 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 2155 Center Street, Berkeley, CA 94720

 Lynne Kimura, Collections Engagement Associate, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)

 Coalition for Education and Outreach

This session features a behind-the-scenes visit to the acclaimed Berkeley Art Museum, which curates many exhibits that draw connections between art and science.

 Space is limited. RSVP is required for admission to the museum. RSVP by emailing Dan Zevin at dzevin@ssl.berkeley.edu by January 5.

From STEM to STEAM: Exploring E&O Opportunities with BAMPFA

Presentation | January 11 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum, 2155 Center Street

  , Berkeley, CA 94720

 Lynne Kimura, Collections Engagement Associate and Academic Liaison at the Berkeley Art Museum Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)., Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Coalition for Education and Outreach

This session features a behind-the-scenes visit to the acclaimed Berkeley Art Museum, which curates many exhibits that draw connections between art and science.

 Space is limited. RSVP is required for admission to the museum. RSVP by emailing Dan Zevin at dzevin@ssl.berkeley.edu by January 5.

EHS 201 Biosafety in Laboratories

Course | January 11 | 1:30-3:30 p.m. | 182 Dwinelle Hall | Note change in location

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This training is required for anyone who is listed on a Biological Use Authorization (BUA) application form that is reviewed by the Committee for Laboratory and Environmental Biosafety (CLEB). A BUA is required for anyone working with recombinant DNA molecules, human clinical specimens or agents that may infect humans, plants or animals. This safety training will discuss the biosafety risk...   More >

Friday, January 12, 2018

10th Annual CEND Symposium: Confronting Persistent Epidemics

Conference/Symposium | January 12 | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | 245 Li Ka Shing Center

 Stacey Schultz-Cherry, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Andrew Mehle, University of Wisconsin- Madison; Jonathan Yewdell, NIAID/DIR; Alfred Andama, Makerere University; Barbara Valent, Kansas State University; Nick Talbot, University of Exeter; Sophien Kamoun, The Sainsbury Laboratory; Thierry Diagana, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research; Kimberley Seed, University of California, Berkeley; Andy Camilli, Tufts University

 CEND (Center for Emerging & Neglected Diseases)

Introduction to Botanical Art Class with Catherine Watters

Workshop | January 11 – 12, 2018 every day | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden | Canceled

 Botanical Garden

This two-day class will introduce you to the fascinating world of Botanical Art. Catherine Watters will teach you to observe, measure and draw plants in great detail and with botanical accuracy. Students will work with graphite, colored pencil and watercolors. All levels are welcome.

$190, $175 members

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

MENA Salon: Protests in Iran

Workshop | January 12 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

As people across the world planned to ring in the New Year, cities across Iran erupted in the largest wave of protests the country has seen in almost a decade. The unrest, which has carried on into 2018, has prompted a number of debates. Who are the main actors? What are the protesters’ demands? Whom do they target? How are these demonstrations different from the 2009 Green Movement? Will they...   More >

Saturday, January 13, 2018

FAMILY PROGRAM: Trees and Birds

Workshop | January 13 | 10-11 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Visit the botanical art exhibit "Celebrating Trees", take a tree walk, learn about nests and the winter birds of the Garden. Using materials from the garden, make a mini nest of your own to take home!

$15 Adult/Child, $12 Member Adult/Member Child

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Monday, January 15, 2018

Analysis and PDE Seminar: Concentration of eigenfunctions: Averages and Sup-norms

Seminar | January 15 | 4-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Jeffrey Galkowski, Stanford University

 Department of Mathematics

In this talk, we relate microlocal concentration of eigenfunctions to sup-norms and sub-manifold averages. In particular, we characterize the microlocal concentration of eigenfunctions with maximal sup-norm and average growth. We then exploit this characterization to derive geometric conditions under which maximal growth cannot occur. This talk is based on joint works with Yaiza Canzani and John...   More >

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Evolution of Gliding in Lizards: Interview with Erik Sathe, Department of Integrative Biology

Presentation | January 16 | 9-9:30 a.m. | Barrows Hall, Radio broadcast, ON-AIR ONLY, 90.7 FM

 Erik Sathe, PhD Candidate, Department of Integrative Biology; Tesla Monson, Department of Integrative Biology

 KALX 90.7 FM

Join us for the first new episode of The Graduates this spring semester as we speak with biologist Erik Sathe about his work on lizard locomotion.

The Graduates, featuring graduate student research at Cal, is broadcast every other Tuesday on KALX 90.7 FM and online.

Erik Sathe

New biological findings which were revealed by imaging studies based on chemical probes

Seminar | January 16 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Kazuya Kikuchi, Osaka University

 College of Chemistry

One of the great challenges in the post-genome era is to clarify the biological significance of intracellular molecules directly in living cells. If we can visualize a molecule in action, it is possible to acquire biological information, which is unavailable if we deal with cell homogenates. One possible approach is to design and synthesize chemical probes that can convert biological information...   More >

CRISPR Critters: Policy Choices for Non-Human Applications of Genome Editing

Seminar | January 16 | 12-1 p.m. | 115 Energy Biosciences Building

 Alta Charo, Alta Charo Prof of Law and Bioethics, University of Wisconsin

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Development Lunch: "Socio-Economic Status and Attention Capture" and "Friend-Based Targeting"

Seminar | January 16 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Claire Duquennois; Matthew Olckers

 Department of Economics

3-Manifold Seminar: Organizational meeting

Seminar | January 16 | 12:40-2 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Ian Agol, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

We'll discuss some topics that I hope to consider this semester, including a continuation of the discussion of computational complexity of 3-manifold invariants from last semester, and Kronheimer-Mrowka's work on instanton homology for webs, as well as anything of interest to participants in the seminar.

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Adsorption, Contact, and Adhesion at Elastic and Capillary Interfaces

Seminar | January 16 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Joelle Frechette, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins

 College of Chemistry

This presentation will first discuss the dynamic (and thermodynamics) of attachment of nanoparticles to fluid interfaces. We will look at the case where the nanoparticles are in dynamic equilibrium between the interface and a bulk phase and compare their adsorption to that of surfactants. We will demonstrate that the adsorption of nanoparticles competes with the attachment of amphiphilic ions...   More >

Thematic Seminar: Number Theory: Random Groups from Generators and Relations

Seminar | January 16 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Melanie Matchett Wood, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 Department of Mathematics

We consider a model of random groups that starts with a free group on n generators and takes the quotient by n random relations. We discuss this model in the case of abelian groups (starting with a free abelian group), and its relationship to the Cohen-Lenstra heuristics, which predict the distribution of class groups of number fields. We will explain a universality theorem, an analog of the...   More >

Davis Projects for Peace $10K award application deadline: 10k Grant Award Opportunity

Deadline | January 16 | 5 p.m. |  International House

 International House

Projects for Peace is an initiative open to UC Berkeley undergrads to design grassroots projects for the summer of 2018 - anywhere in the world - which promote peace and address the root causes of conflict among parties.

We encourage applicants to use their creativity to design projects and employ innovative techniques for engaging project participants in ways that focus on conflict...   More >

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

No Bioengineering Seminar today

Seminar | January 17 |  Stanley Hall

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Seminars will begin on Wednesday, January 24.

i4Y Child Marriage and Youth Empowerment Group Speaker Series: Balancing Reproductive Rights and Protections from Child Marriage: Insights from developmental science

Seminar | January 17 | 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 401 University Hall

 Ahna Suleiman, Center on the Developing Adolescent

 Innovations for Youth (i4Y)

Balancing Reproductive Rights and Protections from Child Marriage - Insights from developmental science

Policies aiming to protect children from early marriage can often be in direct tension with efforts to ensure adolescents' reproductive rights. Minimum age of marriage and the age at which young people can access contraceptive and reproductive health services vary widely globally and are...   More >

[CANCELED] Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "The Perfect Defense: Bacterial Persister Cell"

Seminar | January 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Kim Lewis, Northeastern University

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Our laboratory studies persister cells and uncultured bacteria. Persisters are dormant variants of regular cells which are tolerant to antibiotics and responsible for recalcitrance of biofilm infections. Using transcriptome analysis, cell sorting and whole genome sequencing we are identifying genes responsible for persister formation.

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research and Finding a Mentor Workshop

Workshop | January 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research

If you are thinking about getting involved in undergraduate research, this workshop is a great place to start! You will get a broad overview of the research opportunities available to undergraduates on campus, and suggestions on how to find them.

We will also let you know about upcoming deadlines and eligibility requirements for some of...   More >

Deportation Discretion: Tiered Influence, Minority Threat, and ‘Secure Communities’ Deportations: Juan Pedroza M.P.A, Stanford University

Colloquium | January 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 2232 Piedmont, Seminar Room

 Juan Pedroza, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, Stanford University

 Population Science, Department of Demography

A lunch time talk and discussion session, featuring visiting and local scholars presenting their research on a wide range of topics of interest to demography.

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR: Jeffrey Kelly "Enroute migrant birds do not surf a green wave across the US"

Seminar | January 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 Grinnell-Miller Library

 Jeffrey Kelly

 DS421 Program and Museum of Vertebrae Zoology

Sponsored by DS421. MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library.

Aversion to Emotional Insurance: Costly Reluctance to Hedge Desired Outcomes

Colloquium | January 17 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Carey K. Morewedge, Professor, Boston University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

We examine whether people reduce the impact of negative outcomes through emotional hedging—betting against the occurrence of desired outcomes. We find substantial reluctance to bet against the success of preferred U.S. presidential candidates and Major League Baseball, National Football League, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball, and NCAA hockey teams. This reluctance is...   More >

Last Stands? Art, Memory, and Public Space

Panel Discussion | January 17 | 1-2:30 p.m. |  Downtown Oakland Senior Center

 200 Grand Avenue, Oakland, CA 94610

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

For decades, a painting of Custer’s defeat at Little Big Horn has been on display at the Veterans’ Memorial Building in downtown Oakland. Does the painting glorify genocidal 19-century domestic policies, depict the comeuppance of an arrogant US general at the hands of Lakota warriors... or both?   More >

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Quasi-isometries: What are they and why do we care?

Seminar | January 17 | 2-3 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Ruth Charney, Brandeis University

 Department of Mathematics

In this talk I will introduce the notion of a quasi-isometry and discuss the fundamental role it plays in geometric group theory.

Probabilistic Operator Algebra Seminar: Infinitely divisible distributions in free probability

Seminar | January 17 | 2-4 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Takahiro Hasebe, University of Hokkaido

 Department of Mathematics

Free infinitely divisible distributions (FID) distributions were introduced by Voiculescu. Recently many classically infinitely divisible distributions have been shown to be FID too, the first highly nontrivial one being the normal distribution found by Belinschi, Bozejko, Lehner and Speicher in 2011. Also several subclasses of FID distributions have been introduced and studied. I will try to...   More >

Number Theory Seminar: The cohomology of local Shimura varieties

Seminar | January 17 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Jared Weinstein, Boston University

 Department of Mathematics

This is joint work with Tasho Kaletha. The local Langlands correspondence predicts that representations of a reductive group G over a p-adic field are related to Galois representations into the Langlands dual of G. A conjecture of Kottwitz (as generalized by Rapoport and Viehmann) asserts that this relationship appears in a precise way in the cohomology of "local Shimura varieties", which were...   More >

Electrolyte engineering toward a high-capacity, reversible lithium-oxygen battery/The Sudden Death Phenomena in Na-O2 Batteries

Colloquium | January 17 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 Colin Burke, Ph.D. student in the McCloskey Group

 Jessica Nichols, Ph.D. student in the McCloskey Group

 Department of Chemical Engineering

Applied Math Seminar: A Variational Functional in Simulations of Statistical Mechanics

Seminar | January 17 | 4-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall | Note change in location

 Yantao Wu, Princeton University

 Department of Mathematics

In this talk, I advertise for a convex variational functional from statistical mechanics, which is particularly suitable for obtaining the free energy of high-dimensional order parameters from simulational sampling. In the numerical minimization of this variational functional, sampling difficulties related to ergodicity break-down are often alleviated. Two applications will be given. The first...   More >

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): Boundaries of groups

Seminar | January 17 | 4-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Ruth Charney, Brandeis University

 Department of Mathematics

Boundaries of hyperbolic metric spaces have played an important role in the study of hyperbolic groups. We will discuss an analogous boundary for arbitrary finitely generated groups, called the Morse boundary, and present a recent theorem showing that in many cases, the Morse boundary determines the group up to quasi-isometry. (Joint work with M. Cordes and D. Murray)

ERG Colloquium: Ted Parson: Climate Engineering: Benefits, Risks, Governance Challenges

Colloquium | January 17 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 126 Barrows Hall

 Ted Parson, Professor of Environmental Law, UCLA

 Energy and Resources Group

DESCRIPTION:
Climate engineering (CE)—intentional, global-scale modification of the environment to offset some of the effects of elevated greenhouse gases—appears able to reduce climate-change risks beyond what is possible with mitigation and adaptation alone, including enabling integrated climate-response strategies that reduce risks in ways not otherwise achievable.

From stopping times to “spotting” times : a new framework for multiple testing

Seminar | January 17 | 4-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Aaditya Ramdas, UC Berkeley

 Department of Statistics

Modern data science is often exploratory in nature, with hundreds or thousands of hypotheses being regularly tested on scientific datasets. The false discovery rate (FDR) has emerged as a dominant error metric in multiple hypothesis testing over the last two decades. I will argue that both (a) the FDR error metric, as well as (b) the current framework of multiple testing, where the scientist...   More >

Job Market Seminar: "Interpreting Signals in the Labor Market: Evidence from Medical Referrals"

Seminar | January 17 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Heather Sarsons, Harvard Economics

 Department of Economics

Field(s): Labor, Behavioral, Development, Personnel Economics

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Curators’ Talk: Lawrence Rinder and Kathy Geritz on Way Bay

Panel Discussion | January 18 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Navigate the evocative installation of Way Bay with BAMPFA Director and Chief Curator Lawrence Rinder and Film Curator Kathy Geritz, two of the exhibition's cocurators. Rinder discusses associative, poetic groupings of artworks as well as individual selections, while Geritz illuminates some of the moving-image works on view.

Seminar 217, Risk Management: Concrete examples of trend analyses and forward-looking modelling in Swiss Re's underwriting

Seminar | January 18 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Speaker: Matthias Weber, Swiss Re

 Center for Risk Management Research

- In insurance, underwriting performance is a function of exposures, losses relative to exposures and premiums relative to exposures. Getting losses and loss trends right (--> cost of goods sold) is critically important. A small estimation mistake typically has a large impact on the bottom line.
- Swiss Re is determining loss relevant trends using advanced analytics, often in collaboration with...   More >

Job Market Seminar: "Bootstrap Inference for Propensity Score Matching"

Seminar | January 18 | 12:40-2 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall | Note change in time

 Karun Adusumilli, London School of Economics and Political Science

 Department of Economics

Field(s): Econometrics, Applied Econometrics

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | January 18 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for...   More >

Thematic Seminar: Geometry: New Techniques for Zimmer's Conjecture

Seminar | January 18 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 David Fisher, Indiana University

 Department of Mathematics

Lattices in higher rank simple Lie groups are known to be extremely rigid. Examples of this are Margulis' superrigidity theorem, which shows they have very few linear represenations, and Margulis' arithmeticity theorem, which shows they are all constructed via number theory. Motivated by these and other results, in 1983 Zimmer made a number of conjectures about actions of these groups on compact...   More >

Employer Panel: How to Connect with Recruiters at Career Fairs for International Students

Career Fair | January 18 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Career Center (2440 Bancroft Way), Blue and Gold Room

 Berkeley International Office(BIO)), Career Center

The 2018 Spring Career Fair and many other career fairs are approaching quickly! Find more details in your Handshake and take these opportunities to demonstrate your passion, knowledge, and relevant experience for your dreamed opportunities.

Employer representatives will share international students’ tips on how to prepare for a career fair, how to navigate through the companies and deliver...   More >

Friday, January 19, 2018

Qigong with Director Eric Siegel

Workshop | January 19 | 10-11 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Join UCBG Director, Eric Siegel, for a morning practice in Qigong (pronounced cheegong), a form of meditative exercise with repeated movements, gently stretching the core and limbs and building body awareness.

Free with Garden Admission

  Register online

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research and Finding a Mentor Workshop

Workshop | January 19 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research

If you are thinking about getting involved in undergraduate research, this workshop is a great place to start! You will get a broad overview of the research opportunities available to undergraduates on campus, and suggestions on how to find them.

We will also let you know about upcoming deadlines and eligibility requirements for some of...   More >

Cryo-EM Visualization of Microtubules to Understand Their Regulated Dynamics: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | January 19 | 1-2 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Prof. Eva Nogales, UC Berkeley / LBNL, Biochemistry

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

Visualizing macromolecular assemblies, in different functional states, provides unique information on how they work in the cell and how they fail in the diseased state, and therefore can guide us in the design and improvement of therapies. But their small size and sensitivity to radiation makes visualization of biological molecules challenging and requires employment of highly specialized...   More >

MENA Salon: Austerity and Unrest in Tunisia

Workshop | January 19 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Tunisia is often said to be the Arab Spring’s only success story, yet the new year has been marked by economic peril and political uncertainty. In this week’s MENA Salon we will discuss the recent unrest in Tunisia, and whether or not the government is fulfilling obligations set out under its post-Revolution constitution.

Recommended reading available here: http://cmes.berkeley.edu/mena-salon/

How to Email a Professor to Get a Positive Response: Workshop

Workshop | January 19 | 3-4 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Do you need to email a professor you've never met before to ask for their help, but you don't know where to start? Have you ever written a long email to a professor, only to receive no response, or not the one you hoped? If so, this workshop is for you! We will discuss how to present yourself professionally over email to faculty and other professionals ...   More >

Making Web Archiving Work for Streaming Media: Archiving the Websites of Contemporary Young Composers

Seminar | January 19 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Howard Besser

 Information, School of

Howard Besser is a professor of cinema studies and senior scientist for digital initiatives at New York University.

Mathematics Department Colloquium: Complex multiplication, from Abel to Zagier

Colloquium | January 19 | 3:10-4 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall | Note change in date, time, and location

 Jared Weinstein, Boston University

 Department of Mathematics

According to Hilbert, the theory of complex multiplication, which brings together number theory and analysis, is not only the most beautiful part of mathematics but also of all science. "Complex multiplication" refers to a lattice in the complex numbers (or an elliptic curve) which admits endomorphisms by a ring larger than the integers. We will begin with Kronecker's "Jugendtraum" – the use of...   More >

Imagining Sculpture in China

Colloquium | January 19 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Winnie Wong, Rhetoric, UC Berkeley

 Stanley Abe, Art, Art History, and Visual Studies, Duke University

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

There was no such thing as sculpture in China until the early twentieth century. Sculpture is a specifically European category of Fine Art which we apply to figural objects from many places. But sculpture did not exist in most of the world, certainly not in China, until the European term was applied on a global scale. The presentation will be a reflection about a book in progress—a picture...   More >

Metal-Organic Framework Liquids, Gels and Glasses

Seminar | January 19 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Tom Bennett, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge

 College of Chemistry

Crystalline solids dominate the field of metal−organic frameworks (MOFs),1 with access to the liquid and glass states of matter usually prohibited by relatively low temperatures of thermal decomposition. Recently, I have demonstrated the melting three dimensional MOFs belonging to the zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) family, of chemical composition Zn(Im)2 (Im – C3H3N2].2 The mechanism...   More >

Thematic Seminar: Probability Theory: Rare Behavior in Models of Random Geometry

Seminar | January 19 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Shirshendu Ganguly, University of California, Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Models of random geometry have long been investigated in contexts such as the internet, fluid flow in porous media, and interface dynamics in statistical physics. To develop a refined understanding of such models, one often needs to study not only typical fluctuation theory but also the realm of atypical events. In this talk we describe such a program for two classical models of random geometry:...   More >

Job Market Seminar: "A Sieve-SMM Estimator for Dynamic Models"

Seminar | January 19 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Jean-Jacques Forneron, Columbia Economics

 Department of Economics

Field(s): Econometrics, Macroeconometrics, Industrial Organization

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Weekend Workshop 2017-2018: Early Literacy

Workshop | January 20 | 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. |  Tolman Hall

 Graduate School of Education

Young children have fantastic imaginations and are amazing storytellers. Workshops will support primary classroom teachers to support students to understand how their oral composition skills connect to the writing process. Teachers will experience lessons that connect the creative aspects of writing and the mechanics of writing.

Zapotec Natural Dye Workshop: with Porfirio Gutiérrez

Workshop | January 20 | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Porfirio Gutierrez

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Natural materials have been used to produce dyes and colorants throughout much of human history. in Oaxaca, the way of learning has been passed down from generation. Join master dyer and weaver Porfirio Gutiérrez to learn about the rich history of the craft in its cultural context, to make a range of richly colored dyes using natural colorants derived from the indigo, cochineal, and wild marigold...   More >

 Must be 15 years of age and older to participate.

$50 Workshop Registration

  Tickets go on sale December 21. Buy tickets online or or by emailing pahma-programs@berkeley.edu

Sunday, January 21, 2018

Lichen Dye Workshop

Workshop | January 21 | 10 a.m.-3 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

This class and workshop will provide an overview and history of lichen dyes followed by information on the methodologies of creating lichen dye baths. We will heat up some dyes and add fiber samples (provided). While the dye lichens are doing their work, Shelly will lead class participants on a walk in the surrounding area to look for lichens in the Garden. We will learn some common lichen...   More >

$85 / $75 Garden Members

 Sold out.

Monday, January 22, 2018

Integration of guided experiential skill application into attention regulation training yields generalized improvements in cognitive functioning

Seminar | January 22 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Sahar Yousef, Silver Lab

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Improvement of cognitive function is of great value to many aspects of society. However, identifying robust procedures for training cognitive processes in a generalizable way remains elusive. Here we present a novel attention regulation training paradigm that incorporates skill application in multiple learning environments. We hypothesized that our training procedure would enhance...   More >

Combinatorics Seminar: Combinatorics of the Selberg integral

Seminar | January 22 | 12-1 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Jang Soo Kim, Sungkyunkwan University

 Department of Mathematics

In 1944, Selberg evaluated a multivariate integral, which generalizes Euler's beta integral. In 1980, Askey conjectured a $q$-integral version of the the Selberg integral, which was proved independently by Habsieger and Kadell in 1988. In this talk, we focus on the combinatorial aspects of the Selberg integral. First, we review the following fact observed by Igor Pak: evaluating the Selberg...   More >

Econ 235, Financial Economics: Job Market Seminar

Seminar | January 22 | 12:30-2 p.m. | C125 Haas School of Business

 Anastassia Fedyk, Harvard

 Department of Economics

Joint with Haas Finance Seminar

Data Driven: Truckers and the New Workplace Surveillance

Colloquium | January 22 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall

 Karen Levy, Assistant Professor of Information Science, Associated Faculty at Cornell Law School, Cornell University

 Social Science Matrix

This talk examines how electronic monitoring systems in the U.S. trucking industry are used to compel truckers' compliance with legal and organizational rules. New regulations will require truckers' time to be monitored by digital systems, hard-wired into the trucks themselves, which remove much of the flexibility on which truckers have historically relied.

Probabilistic Operator Algebra Seminar: Boolean probability basics

Seminar | January 22 | 2-4 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Jorge Garza Vargas, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

With the introduction of free independence by D.V. Voiculescu, it became clear that in the framework of non-commutative probability there are other notions of independence different than that of (classical) independence. In 1997, R. Speicher defined a notion of universal product for which he showed that there are three types of independence. In the category of unital algebras the tensor and free...   More >

Differential Geometry Seminar: A polyhedron comparison theorem for 3-manifolds with positive scalar curvature

Seminar | January 22 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Chao Li, Stanford

 Department of Mathematics

We establish a comparison theorem for polyhedra in 3-manifolds with nonnegative scalar curvature, answering affirmatively a dihedral rigidity conjecture by Gromov. For a large collection of polyhedra with interior non-negative scalar curvature and mean convex faces, we prove that the dihedral angles along its edges cannot be everywhere less or equal than those of the corresponding Euclidean...   More >

Shuttle Catalysis – a Conceptual Blueprint for Reversible Functional Group Transfer

Seminar | January 22 | 3-4 p.m. | 775 Tan Hall

 Prof. Bill Morandi, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung

 College of Chemistry

Catalytic reversible reactions, such as alkene metathesis and transfer hydrogenation, have had an auspicious impact on the molecular sciences. This presentation will describe our efforts to develop related “shuttle catalysis” reactions for the functionalization and defunctionalization of organic compounds.1-5 These reactions avoid the use of toxic reagents (e.g. HCN, CO) through the reversible...   More >

Seminar 208, Microeconomic Theory: No Meeting

Seminar | January 22 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 639 Evans Hall

 Department of Economics

Panel Discussion Honoring San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee

Panel Discussion | January 22 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Room 105

 Erin Dineen, Berkeley Law

 Law, Boalt School of

The Bay Area and the Berkeley Law community lost one of its shining lights when Mayor Ed Lee passed away. Mayor Lee was a graduate of Berkeley Law (Class of 1978). His career was dedicated to public service and he made an enormous difference in so many people’s lives and in the Bay Area.

On Monday January 22nd, we will be holding a panel discussion about Ed Lee’s contributions and legacy. We...   More >

Understanding rare events in models of statistical mechanics

Seminar | January 22 | 4-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Shirshendu Ganguly, UC Berkeley

 Department of Statistics

Statistical mechanics models are ubiquitous at the interface of probability theory, information
theory, and inference problems in high dimensions. In this talk, we will focus on
sparse networks, and polymer models on lattices. The study of rare behavior (large deviations)
is intimately related to the understanding of such models. In particular, we will
consider the rare events that a sparse...   More >

Understanding rare events in models of statistical mechanics

Seminar | January 22 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Shirshendu Ganguly, UC Berkeley

 Department of Statistics

Statistical mechanics models are ubiquitous at the interface of probability theory, information
theory, and inference problems in high dimensions. In this talk, we will focus on
sparse networks, and polymer models on lattices. The study of rare behavior (large deviations)
is intimately related to the understanding of such models. In particular, we will
consider the rare events that a sparse...   More >

Thematic Seminar: Numerical Methods: Machine Learning at Facebook

Seminar | January 22 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Mark Tygert, Facebook

 Department of Mathematics

Machine intelligence for processing big data sets is big business. A mathematician's point of view has led to (1) effective large-scale principal component analysis and singular value decomposition, and (2) theoretical foundations for convolutional networks (convolutional networks underpin the recent revolution in artificial intelligence).

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

EHS 201 Biosafety in Laboratories

Course | January 23 | 9:30-11:30 a.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This training is required for anyone who is listed on a Biological Use Authorization (BUA) application form that is reviewed by the Committee for Laboratory and Environmental Biosafety (CLEB). A BUA is required for anyone working with recombinant DNA molecules, human clinical specimens or agents that may infect humans, plants or animals. This safety training will discuss the biosafety risk...   More >

Iron(III)-Catalyzed Carbonyl-Olefin Metathesis and Oxygen Atom Transfer

Seminar | January 23 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Corinna Schindler, Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan

 College of Chemistry

The metathesis reaction between two unsaturated organic substrates is one of organic chemistry’s most powerful carbon-carbon bond forming reactions. The catalytic olefin-olefin metathesis reaction has led to profound developments in the synthesis of molecules relevant to the petroleum, materials and pharmaceutical industries. These reactions are characterized by their use of discrete
metal...   More >

BSAC Technology Seminar - Single Crystal Diamond as a Material for Micro- and Nanosystems

Seminar | January 23 | 12-1 p.m. | 540 Cory Hall

 Prof. Niels Quack, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)

 Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center

The extraordinary properties of single crystal diamond provide great promise for nanosystems. Our group has developed methods to sculpture nanostructures into high purity monocrystalline diamond substrates grown by CVD. We combine reactive ion etching and multi-directional focused ion beam milling for the fabrication of freestanding optical disc resonators at the microscale.

  RSVP online by January 22.

Women on Africa's constitutional and supreme courts: When, where, and why?

Colloquium | January 23 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Alice Kang, Associate Professor, Political Science and Ethnic Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 Center for African Studies

This is a meeting of the weekly colloquium for the Center for African Studies.

Alice Kang

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Seminar 218, Psychology and Economics: "The Biases of Others: Projection Equilibrium in an Agency Setting"

Seminar | January 23 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Stephanie Wang, University of Pittsburgh

 Department of Economics

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | January 23 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for...   More >

RNA/Protein Liquids: Lighting up intracellular phase space

Seminar | January 23 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Clifford Brangwynne, Princeton University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Design Field Notes: Sara Cinnamon

Seminar | January 23 | 4-5 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

LUNAR technical lead Sara Cinnamon will speak at Jacobs Hall, sharing perspectives from her time in grad school at MIT to running her own startup in consumer healthcare to joining a world-class design firm.

Organization, Hydration, Ion Speciation, and Inherent Electric Fields at Water Surfaces

Seminar | January 23 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Heather Allen, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio State University

 College of Chemistry

We investigate ions and lipids at aqueous surfaces to better understand their complexation and speciation to then inform on atmospheric aerosol, cloud, and marine surface processes. The underlying driving forces for surface activity of bare aqueous surfaces with salts such as iron, magnesium, calcium and sodium chlorides are one class that is explored with aqueous surface selective experimental...   More >

Thematic Seminar: Applied Mathematics: Nonlinear Fluid-Structure Interaction with Fiber-Reinforced Soft Composites: A Unified Mathematical Framework for Mathematical Analysis and Computation

Seminar | January 23 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Suncica Canic, University of Houston

 Department of Mathematics

Fiber-reinforced structures arise in many engineering and biological applications. Examples include space inflatable habitats, vascular stents supporting compliant vascular walls, and aortic valve leaflets. In all these examples a metallic mesh, or a collection of fibers, is used to support an elastic structure, and the resulting composite structure has novel mechanical characteristics preferred...   More >

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Understanding Secondary Organic Aerosol Thermodynamics, Mixing State and Phase with Models, Mimics, and Microfluidics

Seminar | January 24 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 575 McCone Hall

 Cari Dutcher, Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota

 College of Chemistry

Atmospheric aerosols are one of the major contributing factors to our climate, yet are a leading source of uncertainty in climate modeling. This uncertainty arises from the intricate nature of aerosol particles: these particles are complex microenvironments, which can contain multiple interfaces due to internal liquid – liquid phase partitioning and the external vapor – liquid surface. Aerosol...   More >

No MVZ Lunch Seminar

Seminar | January 24 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 Grinnell-Miller Library

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

Drivers of infectious disease dynamics: Quantifying the impact of demography and climate: Ayesha Mahmud PhD

Colloquium | January 24 | 12-1 p.m. | 2232 Piedmont, Seminar Room

 Ayesha Mahmud PhD, Rockefeller Foundation Planetary Health Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University

 Population Science, Department of Demography

A lunch time talk and discussion session, featuring visiting and local scholars presenting their research on a wide range of topics of interest to demography.

“Revealing the Dynamic Roles of Splicing and Translation in Gene Regulation”

Seminar | January 24 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Liana Lareau, University of California, Berkeley

 Bioengineering (BioE)

A single genome produces the huge diversity of cells and tissues needed to make a human by regulating gene expression to turn on and off the right genes at the right times. The final, post-transcriptional steps of gene expression — RNA processing and translation — are essential to the proper outcome. My goal is to understand what the cell achieves by adding extra layers of regulation at these...   More >

Towards artificial general intelligence: Brain-inspired CAPTCHA breaking and Atari playing

Seminar | January 24 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Miguel Lázaro-Gredilla, Vicarious, Inc.

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Abstract: Compositionality, generalization, and learning from a few examples are among the hallmarks of human intelligence. In this talk I will describe how Vicarious combines these ideas to create approaches to CAPTCHA breaking and Atari game playing that improve on the state of the art. Both of these tasks have indeed been tackled before, using respectively Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs)...   More >

Econ 235, Financial Economics: Job Market Seminar

Seminar | January 24 | 12-1:30 p.m. | C330 Haas School of Business

 Yueran Ma, Harvard

 Department of Economics

Joint with Haas Finance Seminar and Real Estate Seminar

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Regulation of vitamin 6 homeostasis "

Seminar | January 24 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Zack Zheng-Hui He

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

My lab is interested in utilizing a combination of cell, molecular, biochemical and genetic approaches to understand how cells communicate during plant growth and development.

Gender and Race Gatekeeping

Colloquium | January 24 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Michelle "Mikki" Hebl, Professor, Rice University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

In this talk, Mikki will discuss the role of gatekeepers in preventing indviduals, often women and members of underrepresented groups, from attaining their potential. Mikki will review some of her programmatic research on subtle discrimination and will then provide some of her most recent studies and data on gender and race gatekeeping.

Pronunciation Tips Workshop

Workshop | January 24 | 1-2 p.m. | International House, Auditorium

 Berkeley International Office(BIO))

Take advantage of this opportunity to learn practical tools for improving your American-English pronunciation. This workshop will be taught by a professional ESL instructor from the English Studies Institute. Please register here: https://tinyurl.com/yakfjz8d

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): An introduction to fibered 3-manifolds and the Thurston norm

Seminar | January 24 | 2-3 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Michael Landry, Yale University

 Department of Mathematics

We will introduce Thurston's norm on the second homology of a 3-manifold, and some associated constructions including branched surfaces and Agol’s veering triangulation.

Optically probing the neural basis of perception

Seminar | January 24 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Hillel Adesnik, University of California, Berkeley, Molecular and Cell Biology

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

ERG Colloquium: Diego Ponce De Leon Barido: Demand-side, User-centered, Sustainable Decarbonization in Resource Constrained Environments

Colloquium | January 24 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 126 Barrows Hall

 Diego Ponce De Leon Barido, Recent ERG PhD Graduate, Energy and Resources Group

 Energy and Resources Group

DESCRIPTION:
Future growth in urbanization will mainly occur in cities of the rising south. UN Habitat reports that in the past decade, the urban population in emerging economies grew on average 1.2 million people per week. By 2050, it is expected that seven out of ten people will be living in cities. Accompanying urbanization, information and communication technologies have also seen...   More >

Ice-nine and the Origins of Frank-Kasper and Quasicrystal Phases in Diblock Copolymer Melts

Colloquium | January 24 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 Frank Bates, University of Minnesota

 Department of Chemical Engineering

Block polymers have captured the interest of scientists and engineers for more than half a century. In general, the phase behavior of diblock copolymers, the simplest category of such self-assembling macromolecules, has been accepted as thoroughly understood. Recent experiments with low molecular weight diblock copolymers have revealed remarkable phase complexity in the limit of asymmetric...   More >

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): Taut branched surfaces which span fibered faces

Seminar | January 24 | 4-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Michael Landry, Yale University

 Department of Mathematics

Let \(M\) be a closed hyperbolic 3-manifold with a fibered face \(\sigma\) of the unit ball of the Thurston norm on \(H_2(M)\). If \(M\) satisfies a certain condition related to Agol’s veering triangulation, we can construct a taut branched surface in \(M\) spanning \(\sigma\). This partially answers a 1986 question of Oertel, and extends an earlier partial answer due to Mosher.

Thematic Seminar: Partial Differential Equations: On the Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture in General Relativity

Seminar | January 24 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Sung-Jin Oh, Korea Institute for Advanced Study

 Department of Mathematics

An intriguing feature of the explicit charged (Reissner-Nordstrom) or spinning (Kerr) black hole spacetimes is the existence of a regular Cauchy horizon, beyond which the Einstein equation loses its predictive power. The strong cosmic censorship conjecture of Penrose is a bold claim that, nevertheless, such a pathological behavior is nongeneric.

In this lecture, I will give a short introduction...   More >

The Business of Disaster: Colonial and Neoliberal Governance in Post-Maria Puerto Rico

Panel Discussion | January 24 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | 221 Kroeber Hall

 Vincanne Adams, Professor, Joint UCSF/UC Berkeley Program in Medical Anthropology; Cathy Kennedy, Registered Nurse and Vice President, National Nurses United; Javier Arbona, Professor, American Studies and Design, UC Davis

 Berkeley Center for Social Medicine, California Nurses Association/National Nurses United

The ongoing catastrophe following Hurricane Maria’s landfall on Puerto Rico in September reminds us that disasters are never merely natural. The enduring colonial relationship between the United States and Puerto Rico and the market-driven nature of governmental relief efforts are both critical to understanding the current crisis.