<< January 2018 >>

Friday, January 12, 2018

LinkedIn Profile Tips to Advance Your Career

Lecture | January 12 | 12-1 p.m. |  Online

 Jolie Miller, Sr. Manager of Business Content, LinkedIn Learning

 UC Berkeley Extension

Does your LinkedIn profile tell your story? Are you using LinkedIn effectively to help get you where you want to be? Do you know the new features and settings that can help you expand your network and get noticed by the right recruiters at the right time? Make sure you don't miss any career-building opportunities in the new year by making the most of your profile.

Join this interactive...   More >

  Register online

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Plant Domestication in the Near East and Notes on the Modern Human Condition

Lecture | January 16 | 5-6 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Avi Gopher, Professor, Tel Aviv University; Shahal Abbo, The Levi Eshkol School of Agriculture, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 Archaeological Research Facility

The major issue pertaining to Near Eastern plant domestication by archaeologists is: which model best reconstructs plant domestication? On the one hand, the protracted-autonomous (non-centered) model, thriving in Near Eastern Neolithic studies in the past decade, emphasizes three major aspects of domestication: (a) a long, protracted process that was (b) geographically autonomous (non-centered)...   More >

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Between Books and Rifles: Palestinian School Girls Talk Back

Lecture | January 17 | 12-2 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Lawrence D. Biele Chair in Law at the Faculty of Law-Institute of Criminology and the School of Social Work and Public Welfare, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Race and Gender

Based on three interrelated theoretical frameworks—institutional racism, settler colonialism and security and biblical reasoning- what Professor Shalhoub-Kevorkian defines as security theology- the presentation will examine the invasion of the girl child body and space in Occupied East Jerusalem (OEJ).

Persistent Bias Among Local Election Officials

Lecture | January 17 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | 210 South Hall

 D. Alex Hughes

 Information, School of

An audit study of the 2016 election confirms ethnic bias by local election officials.

Disability and the Dissident Body: Ancient Jewish Resistance to Empire

Lecture | January 17 | 4-6 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Julia Watts Belser, Associate Professor of Jewish Studies in the Theology Department,Georgetown University.

 Disability Studies Research Cluster, HIFIS

Ancient Jewish accounts of the Roman conquest of Jerusalem use disability to reckon with charged questions about power, violence, and resistance. Bringing feminist disability studies to bear on rabbinic Jewish narrative, this lecture argues that disability affords the rabbis a complex symbolic discourse with which to grapple with the power of God and the brutality of empire.

Age of Anxiety: Anticulture and Autoethnography in the Mystery of Edwin Drood

Lecture | January 17 | 4-6:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife

 James Buzard, Professor, MIT

 Department of English, 19th Century and Beyond British Cultural Studies Working Group, Florence Green Bixby Chair in English

Notwithstanding Dickens’s unprecedented choice of an English cathedral town as the primary setting for his final work, The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1870) gives many indications that it remains committed to the autoethnographic project that the author had most extensively undertaken in Bleak House (1852). This talk examines Drood’s adaptations of the model in the altered conditions of the later...   More >

Embeddings for Everything: Search in the Neural Network Era

Lecture | January 17 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Dan Gillick

 Information, School of

Dan Gillick proposes a new kind of internet search engine based on neural networks.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

From Communism to Authoritarianism via Democracy. The Puzzle of Political Transformations in East Central Europe

Lecture | January 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Grzegorz Ekiert, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Government, Harvard University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Institute of International Studies

During the first two decades after 1989, countries of East Central Europe experienced a swift and successful democratization process and a relatively painless transition to a market economy. Consolidation of liberal democracy and working market economy opened the door to their accession to the NATO and the European Union. By 2004, it seemed that these countries became “normal” European...   More >

The Royal Alcazar of Seville

Lecture | January 18 | 4-6 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

The UC Botanical Garden is pleased to host author and scholar, Mervyn Samuel for an illustrated lecture on the palace and gardens of the Royal Alcázar of Seville, the oldest royal residence in Europe still used for its original purpose. The talk will showcase the historical context of the Alcázar going back to Roman times and the influence of the Islamic presence in Spain. After 1492 Seville, and...   More >

$20 / $15 UCBG Member

  Register online

The Future of Humans: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution

Lecture | January 18 | 4:30-6 p.m. |  Hertz Concert Hall

 Dr. Jennifer Doudna, Executive Director, Innovative Genomics Institute

 Dr. Siddartha Mukherjee, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine Division of Hematology/Oncology, Columbia University

 Innovative Genomics Institute

In honor of UC Berkeley’s 150th Anniversary year, the Innovative Genomics Institute is presenting a free lecture. Berkeley biochemist Jennifer Doudna will join oncologist Sid Mukherjee to discuss unprecedented advancements in gene editing and the effect new technologies will have on the future of humanity.

The significance of Dr. Doudna's research is difficult to overstate. It has led to what...   More >

 Registration required on Evenbrite site. NOTE: Sign-up does not guarantee a seat. Entrance will be first come, first served with printed or electronic ticket in hand.


  Registration opens December 8. Register online or by calling Jennifer Bevington at 510-664-7579 by January 18.

Talking to Gods: Ainu Artifacts in the Hearst Museum

Lecture | January 18 | 6-8 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Christopher Lowman, UC Berkeley, Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

The Ainu, the Indigenous people of northern Japan, traditionally use uniquely carved prayer sticks and highly-prized lacquer bowls to send prayers and offerings to their many gods. These sacred objects have made their way into museum collections, but their stories are seldom straightforward: they are entwined with ongoing Ainu cultural change, the desires of collectors, and the ways in which...   More >

Friday, January 19, 2018

Traffic Congestion Control: A PDE backstepping perspective

Lecture | January 19 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Miroslav Krstic, UC San Diego

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: Control of freeway traffic using ramp metering is a "boundary control" problem when modeling is approached using widely adopted coupled hyperbolic PDE models of the Aw-Rascle-Zhang type, which include the velocity and density states, and which incorporate a model of driver reaction time. Unlike the "free traffic" regime, in which ramp metering can affect only the dynamics downstream of...   More >

The Art of Handmade: A Zapotec Weaver in the 21st century

Lecture | January 19 | 5-7 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Porfirio Gutierrez

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Join us for the closing lecture of the inaugural exhibit People Made These Things: Connecting with the Makers of Our World. Weaver Porfirio Gutiérrez will speak about his work as an artist and the work of his community to preserve the use of plant and insect dyes, techniques that stretch back more than 1,000 years in the indigenous Zapotec tradition. This talk will open a three day series of...   More >

  RSVP online

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Science at Cal Lecture- Visualizing Biological Molecules: Understanding Life’s Principles

Lecture | January 20 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Eva Nogales, Molecular and Cell Biology


Assemblies of biological macromolecules (proteins, DNA, RNA) are the functional units of cells and ultimate the whole organism. Visualizing these macromolecules, in different functional states, provides unique information on how they work and how they fail in the diseased state, and therefore can guide us in the design and improvement of therapies. But their extremely small size makes...   More >

Visualizing macromolecules with electron microscopy

Monday, January 22, 2018

MENA After ISIS: A Talk by Richard Atwood

Lecture | January 22 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Richard Atwood

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

A talk by Richard Atwood on the Middle East and North Africa after ISIS.

Richard Atwood is multilateral affairs director and head of the New York office of International Crisis Group (ICG). He represents ICG at the United Nations, and his work focuses on engaging UN agencies and member states around issues related to transnational threats, peace operations, and political transitions. He...   More >

Visualizing the World: Storytelling with Images from the Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism: Arts + Design Mondays at BAMPFA

Lecture | January 22 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Edward Wasserman, Dean, Graduate School of Journalism, UC Berkeley; Richard Koci Hernandez, Associate Professor for New Media, Graduate School of Journalism, UC Berkeley; Monica Lam, Producer, KQED Newsroom; Ken Light, Professor and curator of the Center for Photography, Graduate School of Journalism UC, Berkeley

 Arts + Design

While at the J-School, students have produced outstanding, award-winning documentaries, photography and innovative multi-media projects. These works cover every topic from public health, immigration, human rights, and politics with still and moving imagery from around the world, dramatic personal narratives and visual design of data. The works use 360 video, drone photography, animation and more....   More >

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Metropolitan Migrations and Interwar Vietnamese Culture

Lecture | January 23 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Charles Keith, Associate Professor of History, Michigan State University

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This talk will explore the close ties between Vietnamese migration to France and interwar Vietnamese culture and, as such, the importance of these migrations for postcolonial Vietnam.

Charles Keith

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

A Talk with Craig Baldwin

Lecture | January 24 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Craig Baldwin, Other Cinema/ATA Gallery

 Arts + Design

Craig Baldwin is a San Francisco filmmaker and curator of the Other Cinema at the ATA media gallery in San Francisco. One of the last underground art spaces in the SF mission.

Craig Baldwin is a filmmaker and curator whose interests lie in archival retrieval and recombinatory forms of cinema and performance. He is the recipient of several grants, including those from the Rockefeller...   More >

Reawakening Ancient Salish Sea Basketry

Lecture | January 24 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Ed Carriere, Master Basketmaker, Suquamish Elder

 Dale Croes, Washington State University

 Archaeological Research Facility

Ed Carriere and Dale Croes have been working with the U of Washington Burke Museum to replicate 2,000 year old waterlogged archaeological basketry found in the early 1960s from along the Snoqualmie River near Seattle.

Croes and Carriere

ARCH Lecture: Mabel O. Wilson

Lecture | January 24 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, JAN 24, 6:30pm. The Spring 2018 Howard A. Friedman Visiting Professor will talk about an advocacy project that asks architects and allied fields to better understand how their practices connect to migrant construction workers who build their designs.

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Immigration of European Highly Skilled Workers to Germany: Intra-EU Brain Circulation or Brain Drain/Gain?

Lecture | January 25 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Céline Teney, University of Bremen, Germany

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

Based on a unique representative survey and semi-structured interviews of non-German EU physicians working in Germany, Céline Teney will investigate whether intra-EU highly skilled immigrants who exert a profession suffering from an acute EU labour shortage constitute the manifestation of an integrated European labour market – conceptualized as brain circulation – or whether they contribute to...   More >

Photobears: Nanoscribe Seminar: 3D printing by two-photon polymerization sets new standards in micro- and nanofabrication

Lecture | January 25 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | Cory Hall, 400 Hughes Room

 Dr. Benjamin Richter, Nanoscribe GmbH


The world’s fastest commercially available 3D printer with sub-micrometer resolution andare used to fabricate microstructures for numerous application areas such as photonics, cell biology, micromechanics, microoptics and microfluidics. With casting and molding techniques, the structures made of photo resist can be transferred into other materials like metals, silicon, ceramics or...   More >

DiPerna Lecture: On the long-term dynamics of nonlinear dispersive evolution equations

Lecture | January 25 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Wilhelm Schlag, University of Chicago

 Department of Mathematics

We will give an overview of some of the developments in recent years dealing with the description of asymptotic states of solutions to semilinear evolution equations ("soliton resolution conjecture"). New results will be presented on damped subcritical Klein-Gordon equations, joint with Nicolas Burq and Genevieve Raugel.

Milton and the Syntax of Faith

Lecture | January 25 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 220 Geballe Room

 Linda Gregerson, Caroline Walker Bynum Distinguished University Professor of English Language and Literature, University of Michigan

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, Katharine Bixby Hotchkis Chair in English, James D. Hart Chair in English

In Book 11 of the Confessions, Augustine attempts to contemplate the mystery of time and, in particular, the temporal embeddedness that makes human beings particularly unqualified to comprehend eternity...

Note: Gregerson will also be offering a poetry reading at 2pm in 300 Wheeler Hall on the 25th.   More >

Linda Gregerson

Artist Talk with Anicka Yi: Sensing as Research

Lecture | January 25 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, 3rd Floor

 Anicka Yi

 Arts Research Center

Artist Anicka Yi will talk about her work and artistic practice as it relates to synthetic biology, bio engineering, extinction, and bio fiction.

Force Majeure, 2017, Plexiglas, aluminum, agar, bacteria, refrigeration system, LED lights, glass, epoxy resin, powder coated stainless steel, light bulbs, digital clocks, silicone, and silk flowers, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the artist.

Friday, January 26, 2018

Hoarding the American Dream: Author Talk with Richard Reeves

Lecture | January 26 | 1-3 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Richard Reeves, Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution

 Cybelle Fox, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley Sociology; Paul Pierson, Professor, UC Berkeley Political Science

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society

We know about the one percent. The ultra-rich. The billionnaire class. But author Richard Reeves writes it’s the upper middle class that matters most. Those top twenty percent of earners are becoming more effective at passing wealth to their children, and – through zoning laws, schooling, occupational licensing, college application procedures, and the allocation of internships – more effective at...   More >

  RSVP online

Commute Time Quality: Exploring the role of mode and other factors using the UC Davis Campus Travel Survey

Lecture | January 26 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Susan Handy, UC Davis

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: Workers worldwide spend a significant share of their time each week getting to and from work. With a finite number of hours in a day, workers are clearly affected by their amount of commute time, but their well-being is also likely to depend on their quality of commute time. Building on recent work on subjective well-being in the transportation field, we use data from an annual survey...   More >

Working Group in Ancient Philosophy: Virtue and the Technê Analogy in Plato's Charmides

Lecture | January 26 | 5-7 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Voula Tsouna, UCSB

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Saturday, January 27, 2018

Career Clinic: Finding A New Career Direction: Steps to Finding Work You Love

Lecture | January 27 | 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | UC Berkeley Extension (Golden Bear Center), Room 204

 Rebecca Andersen, Career Services at the UC Berkeley Information School; RuthAnn Haffke, UC Berkeley School of Public Health

 UC Berkeley Extension

Do you feel like you are in a rut in your career and long to do something that feels more fulfilling, even if you have no idea what that might be? Do you know you're in the wrong job but feel stuck by fear or self-doubt when you think about trying to make a change?

This workshop is tailored to help you find direction and outline steps to find (and achieve!) work you love.

In advance of the...   More >

$40 $40 plus Strengthfinder Assessment

  Register online

Duane Deterville: The Future Blackwards: Afrifuturism and Black Visual Culture

Lecture | January 27 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Artist, writer, and visual culture scholar Duane Deterville delivers a presentation on the emergence of Afrifuturism (Deterville’s preferred spelling of what culture critic Mark Dery called “Afro-futurism”) and its manifestations in various media. Afrifuturism is the creation of speculative futures based in the black experience and advanced technology. Deterville details the origins of the...   More >

Monday, January 29, 2018

In a Field of Patriarchy: Gender Politics and Freedom Dreams During the United Farm Worker Movement: Book Talk with Assistant Professor Christian Paiz

Lecture | January 29 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), Director's Room

 Christian Paiz, Ethnic Studies Department

 UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education

Absent in farmworker historiographies are the voices of farmworker women who speak of patriarchal and racialized exploitation in post World War II California. For many, patriarchal power originated in domestic violence, strict gender roles and autonomy-denying social conditions. Using original oral interviews, this presentation foregrounds the patriarchal relations within the Mexican farmworker...   More >

Comics as Feminist Intervention: The reading and making of 'Lissa: a graphic novel about medical promise, friendship, and revolution

Lecture | January 29 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 204 Wheeler Hall

 Sherine Hamdy, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Irvine

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies

'Lissa' debuted as the first book in a new series of ethnoGRAPHICs, combining anthropological insight with comics form.

Indexical Ambivalence

Lecture | January 29 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Auditorium

 Kris Paulsen, Associate Professor at Ohio State University

 Berkeley Center for New Media, History and Theory of New Media Lecture Series

Interfaces are boundaries and dividing lines. They are surfaces that maintain the distinction between discrete portions of matter and space, but they also create the site for their encounter and interaction. The interface is a place where opposites touch: here and there, now and then, I and you, actual and virtual, true and false. Screens make for particularly troubling interfaces, for they enact...   More >

Indexical Ambivalence with Kris Paulsen

Lecture | January 29 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Auditorium

 Kris Paulsen

 History and Theory of New Media Lecture

Kris Paulsen is Associate Professor in the Department of History of Art and the Film Studies Program at The Ohio State University. She will be discussing the telepresence, touch, and art at the interface.

Indexical Ambivalence with Kris Paulsen: Arts + Design Mondays at BAMPFA

Lecture | January 29 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Kris Paulsen, Associate Professor, Department of History of Art and the Film Studies Program, The Ohio State University

 Arts + Design

Interfaces are boundaries and dividing lines. They are surfaces that maintain the distinction between discrete portions of matter and space, but they also create the site for their encounter and interaction. The interface is a place where opposites touch: here and there, now and then, I and you, actual and virtual, true and false. Screens make for particularly troubling interfaces, for they enact...   More >

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Preterm birth in California: The association with coal and oil power plant retirements

Lecture | January 30 | 3-4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Joan Casey

 Public Health, School of

Much of my work has relied on spatial data to study the relationship between environmental hazard exposures and health outcomes during the perinatal period, including links with fossil fuel extraction activities (i.e., natural gas fracking) and use (i.e., coal power plants). While coal and oil electricity generation has declined, coal still accounted for 30% of U.S. electricity in 2016. Coal and...   More >

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

A Talk with Barbara Hammer

Lecture | January 31 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Barbara Hammer, Visual Artist and Filmmaker

 Arts + Design

Barbara Hammer is a pioneering Bay Area feminist and Lesbian Experimental filmmaker. Hammer has made dozens of films on women's issues gender roles, lesbian relationships and aging.

Barbara Hammer, Visual Artist and Filmmaker

Pioneering visual artist and filmmaker Barbara Hammer, has a multiple praxis for the past 40 years with resonating impact on young artists today. Her work was...   More >

The Palatine East Pottery Project: The Study and On-Line Publication of 20 Tons of Pottery from Downtown Rome

Lecture | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 J. Theodore Peña, Professor, University of California, Berkeley Classics

 Archaeological Research Facility

During the period 1989-1996 the American Academy in Rome undertook the excavation of large mid- to late-imperials structure located at the foot of the northeast slope of the Palatine Hill in downtown Rome. The speaker is in charge of the study and publication of the ca. 20 metric tons of Roman-period pottery recovered in the course of this project. The assemblage, what spans most of the first...   More >

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: Richard Cándida Smith: Improvised Continent: Pan-Americanism and Cultural Exchange

Lecture | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Illuminating the story of how cultural exchange programs brought many of the most important Latin American artists and writers to the United States, Richard Cándida Smith explores Pan-American cultural exchange in the twentieth century.

Cosmopolitanism and Belonging: Craig Calhoun, President, Berggruen institute

Lecture | January 31 | 4-6 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall

 Craig Calhoun, President, Berggruen institute

 Social Science Matrix

Social Science Matrix is honored to welcome Craig Calhoun, President of the Berggruen Institute, for the Social Science Matrix Distinguished Lecture, to be delivered on January 31 from 4-6pm. A reception will follow Space is limited; RSVP to attend.

  RSVP online by January 28.

Craig Calhoun, President, Berggruen Institute

“Does This Vehicle Belong to You?” Processing the Language of Policing for Improving Police-Community Relations

Lecture | January 31 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Dan Jurafsky

 Information, School of

A linguistic analysis of policy body-camera data from traffic stops reveals race-based differences. How can the findings improve police-community relations?

Innocence and Violence: The Theology of a Gun Culture

Lecture | January 31 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Dominic Erdozain, Freelance Writer

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Gun rights are typically identified with the Second Amendment – a legal, indeed constitutional, prerogative. This lecture argues that they are better understood as part of a culture and a belief system, centering on ideas of innocence and legitimate violence.