<< November 2017 >>

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Arts and Science in a Public Learning Laboratory: Arts + Design Wednesdays at BAMPFA

Lecture | November 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Theo Watson, Partner/Creative Director, Design IO; Eric Siegel, Director, University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley

 Arts + Design

Science and art were not always considered separate disciplines, and many argue that the reintegration of art and science will foster new, more responsive, more humane, and more inclusive practices in both fields. Theo Watson will present his work at the intersection of art and science, followed by a dialogue with Eric Siegel.

Biography
Theodore Watson is an artist, designer and experimenter...   More >

Some Assembly Required: Using pXRF to Reconstruct the Production History of a Proto-Corinthian Helmet

Lecture | November 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Jesse Obert, University of California, Berkeley Department of History

 Archaeological Research Facility

This paper will present new conclusions about the development of ancient Greek military equipment and a deeper understanding of ancient Mediterranean metalsmithing. In the summer of 2017, I studied a Proto-Corinthian helmet at the Hearst Museum, object 8-4597, with an X-Ray Florescence (pXRF) spectrometer. Although ancient historians and classical archaeologists often cite object 8-4597, very...   More >

The Politics of Secularism: Religion, Diversity, and Institutional Change in France and Turkey

Lecture | November 1 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Murat Akan, Associate Professor of Political Science and International Relations, Boğaziçi University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Join the CMES for a book talk by Murat Akan, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations at Boğaziçi University.

AEI's Arthur Brooks: How the Competition of Ideas Can Reunite the Country

Lecture | November 1 | 1-2 p.m. | Bancroft Hotel, Great Hall

 2680 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94705

 Arthur Brooks, American Enterprise Institute

 Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost

Dr. Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute, will blend social science, philosophy, and history to offer a better vision for American political discourse – and practical, actionable tactics that each of us can use to help heal the competition of ideas in this country.

This is an event for Berkeley students only. RSVP at https://ucbevents.wufoo.com/forms/r1cvpu3f0pubt1m/

Climate Change: The Defining Health Challenge and Opportunity of the 21st Century: A Lancet Countdown Event

Lecture | November 1 | 5-7 p.m. | David Brower Center, Goldman Theater and Wolf Gallery

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Gina Solomon, Deputy Secretary for Science and Health, California Environmental Protection Agency; Rachel Morello-Frosch, Professor, UC Berkeley; John Balmes, Professor, UC Berkeley and UCSF; Hector De La Torre, Member, California Air Resources Board

 Linda Rudolph, Director, Center for Climate Change and Health, Public Health Institute

 Public Health, School of, Berkeley Energy and Climate Institute, Public Health Institute

On October 31, the Lancet Countdown will release its first annual report tracking climate change and health indicators across five key domains. Our panelists will discuss the implications of the report and California’s role as the U.S. leader in climate change mitigation policy.

  Register online

The Knowledge of/about Migrants: Preconceptions. Misconceptions. Limits.

Lecture | November 1 | 6-9 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Armin Nassehi, LMU Munich

 Julie Weise, University of Oregon

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West

30 years after opening its doors in the US capital, the German Historical Institute Washington (GHI) is expanding its operations to the Pacific Coast. Please join us for the opening event of GHI West. Armin Nassehi's keynote is the first in a series of annual Bucerius lectures funded by the ZEIT-Stiftung Ebelin und Gerd Bucerius, one of the major German private foundations active in the field of...   More >

  RSVP online or by calling Heike Friedman at 510-643-4558, or by emailing Heike Friedman at events-west@ghi-dc.org

ARCH Lecture: Amanda Williams

Lecture | November 1 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, NOV 1, 6:30pm. Amanda Williams is a visual artist who trained as an architect.

Zaytuna College Lecture Series with Dr. William Barylo: Muslims in the West: Embodying the Change

Lecture | November 1 | 7-9 p.m. | Zaytuna College, Sanctuary

 2401 Le Conte Ave., Berkeley, CA 94709

 Dr. William Barylo, Sociologist, Film-Maker, Author, Light Inc.

 Graduate Theological Union

Zaytuna College invites you to their upcoming Lecture Series, occurring on Wednesday evenings from 7:00pm - 9:00pm at 2401 Le Conte Ave. Berkeley, CA 94709 throughout the Fall semester with renowned speakers such as UC Berkeley Anthropology Professor Laura Nader, Political Science Professor Steven Fish, CAIR Director Zahra Billoo, Stanford Comparative Literature and Classical Arabic Professor...   More >

Thursday, November 2, 2017

Genealogies of Syrian Ba‘thism: Michel ‘Aflaq and Modern Arab Intellectual History

Lecture | November 2 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Max Weiss, Princeton University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Join the CMES for a lecture by Max Weiss, Associate Professor of History and Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. He studies the social, cultural, and intellectual history of the modern Middle East. His research interests include transformations of law and society, religious culture, history of ideas, and the translation of contemporary Arabic literature into English. Raised in southern...   More >

Bringing Atzlán and Borinquen to Chicago: Mexican and Puerto Rican Art in the City from 1968 to the Age of Trump

Lecture | November 2 | 2-4 p.m. |  UC Berkeley Center for Latino Policy Research

 2547 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Marc Zimmerman, Professor Emeritus in Latin American and Latino Studies at the University of Illinois Chicago, and in World and Hispanic Culture and Literature at the University of Houston

 Department of English, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, UC Berkeley Center for Latino Policy Research

Mexican and Puerto Rican Art in the City from 1968 to the Age of Trump

The End of Loyalty: The Rise and Fall of Good Jobs in America

Lecture | November 2 | 4-6 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), IRLE Director's Room

 Rick Wartzman, Director, KH Moon Center for a Functioning Society

 James Lincoln, Haas School of Business; David Levine, Haas School of Business

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment

Once, big companies took responsibility for their workers’ wellbeing, with high pay and reliable benefits. But as precarious work expands and pensions dwindle, many workers no longer feel that their employers are looking out for them. Author Rick Wartzman follows four corporate giants – General Electric, General Motors, Kodak, and Coca-Cola – through the twentieth century’s booms and busts,...   More >

  RSVP online

Serge Lang Undergraduate Lecture: When the precision of mathematics meets the messiness of the world of people

Lecture | November 2 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall | Note change in date

 Keith Devlin, Stanford

 Department of Mathematics

Almost all mathematicians are attracted to the subject by its certainty and precision. It’s one of the most finely sharpened blades in the human cognitive armory. It rules supreme in many parts of Physics and Engineering. It is almost as precise when applied to the activities of large populations of living creatures, including humans, though the precision then is a statistical one that applies...   More >

Nandini Sundar | Hostages to Democracy - India at 70: The Indo-American Community Lecturer at UC Berkeley for 2017

Lecture | November 2 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) | Note change in location

 Nandini Sundar, Professor of Sociology, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi University

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Master of Development Practice, Department of Sociology, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People's Rights at the Center for Race and Gender, Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law, and Justice, South Asian Law Students Association

Lecture by noted social anthropologist and Professor of Sociology in the Delhi School of Economics, Dr. Nandini Sundar.

How Everything Became War And The Military Became Everything

Lecture | November 2 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Rosa Brooks, Georgetown University

 Institute of International Studies

Rosa Brooks is one of the nation’s top experts on national security and the changing nature of warfare. Her most recent book, How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything, was a New York Times Notable Book of 2016. A journalist and a law professor at Georgetown University, Brooks -- the daughter of left-wing anti-war activists and the wife of a US Army Special Forces officer --...   More >

Making as Research | Artist Talk and DIY Couture Fashion Lab with Angie Wilson

Lecture | November 2 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | 126 Dwinelle Annex

 Angie Wilson

 Arts Research Center

Angie Wilson mines seismic cultural shifts and the subtleties of consciousness in her textile-based sculpture and installations. She will be discussing current and recent projects including Protest Curtains, collaborative projects resisting racism, xenophobia and inequality, as well as her woven meditations on space and time.

How Christians Think: A Conversation with Marvin Olasky at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | November 2 | 6-7 p.m. | 102 Wheeler Hall

 Marvin Olasky, WORLD Magazine

 The Berkeley Forum

At a time of heightened political anxiety, the line that sets apart religion and politics is rarely defined. As WORLD Magazine Editor-in-Chief and a former advisor to President George W. Bush, Dr. Marvin Olasky has been at the forefront of interpreting world events through a Christian lens. On this 500th anniversary of the Reformation, Dr. Olasky will discuss the importance of understanding how...   More >

Free

  Buy tickets online

Astronomy Night at UC Berkeley

Lecture | November 2 | 7-9:30 p.m. | 131 Campbell Hall

 Steve Croft, SETI

 Department of Astronomy

Join us for our monthly Astro Night series at UC Berkeley! This month, come learn all about the search for intelligent life in the Universe. After, you are invited on our rooftop for stargazing and a grew view of the city!

Doors to Campbell Hall open at 6:30pm, and lecture is on a first-come, first-serve basis. Feel free to come and go during stargazing.

 Talk is aimed at a high school science level.

Friday, November 3, 2017

“I am a Parrot”: Socialization into Literacy and Epistemic Ideologies through Rote Learning in India

Lecture | November 3 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 33 Dwinelle Hall

 Usree Bhattacharya, University of Georgia

 Berkeley Language Center, Center for Ethnographic Research

Pervasive in rural and poorer schools in India, rote practices have received widespread criticism in educational literature for constraining the learning of English as well as educational content (e.g., Annamalai, 2004; Bhattacharya, 2013; Mohanty, 2008). Less studied, however, has been how rote practices 1) shape what students in such schools construct as learning, and 2) inform how they see...   More >

Jacobs Design Conversations: Silvia Lindtner, "The Promise of Making: Desiring Alternatives, Hacking Capitalism and Prototyping Inequality"

Lecture | November 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

University of Michigan assistant professor Silvia Lindtner will speak at Jacobs Hall as part of the Jacobs Design Conversations series.

The Ambassador's Story: Henry Morgenthau, the Armenian Genocide, and the Problem of Humanitarian Intervention: The Gerald D. and Norma Feldman Annual Lecture

Lecture | November 3 | 4 p.m. |  Bancroft Hotel

 2680 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Margaret Lavinia Anderson, Professor of History Emerita, University of California, Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, Department of History

Ambassador Morgenthau's Story (1918) depicts the horros visited on the Armenian people by the Young Turk regime, as well as author Henry Morgenthau's own efforts to thwart the genocide and alert the world. A Critical reading of his memoir and of German diplomatic documents suggest his story was less straightforward. What Morgenthau really said and did in 1915 raises questions about what a state...   More >

Optimal Coordination of Connected and Autonomous Cars in Smart Cities

Lecture | November 3 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Ardalan Vahidi, Clemson University

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Connectivity and autonomy of cars and roadside infrastructure is expected to transform urban transportation. For instance, cooperation between intelligent cars and intersection control units can harmonize traffic flow, increase energy efficiency, and enhance safety and passenger comfort.

This talk takes a closer look at some of these potentials. In one experimental case study, we demonstrate...   More >

The Mongols and the Changing Patterns of Indian Ocean Connections

Lecture | November 3 | 5-7 p.m. |  Alumni House

 Tansen Sen, NYU Shanghai

 Tang Center for Silk Road Studies, Mongolia Initiative, Institute for South Asia Studies

In the thirteenth century, the expansion of Mongol forces under Genghis Khan and his descendants resulted in the formation of a vast Eurasian empire stretching from the Korean peninsula to central Europe. Despite the eventual fragmentation of this Mongol empire into four contending khanates, the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries witnessed unprecedented interactions between polities and...   More >

Saturday, November 4, 2017

Lecture by Patricia Berger: A Crisis of Faith: Chen Hongshou’s Buddhist Paintings

Lecture | November 4 | 1-2:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Art historian Patricia Berger explores Chen Hongshou’s enigmatic Buddhist paintings, which offer a glimpse into a cataclysmic moment in Chinese history. Followed by a discussion with Robert Sharf.

Monday, November 6, 2017

Dalí's Origins: Drawings and Paintings from the Cusí Collection

Lecture | November 6 | 12-1 p.m. | 5125 Dwinelle Hall

 Jordi Falgàs, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí

 Institute of European Studies, Department of Spanish & Portuguese

Joaquim Cusí was a friend of Salvador Dalí’s father and he became an enthusiastic supporter of the young artist. Mr. Cusí was a successful pharmacist with no training in art, and yet he was the first one to purchase numerous paintings and drawings from Dalí’s earliest exhibitions. The works acquired by Mr. Cusí were not seen again on display during his lifetime, and scholars were never allowed to...   More >

New Research in Oral History: Shanna Farrell: Bay Area Cocktails: An Oral History of Culture, Community and Craft

Lecture | November 6 | 12-1:15 p.m. | Bancroft Library, 267 -- Oral History Center Conference Room

 Shanna Farrell, Oral History Center, The Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley

 Oral History Center

An American invention, the cocktail fluctuated in popularity following Prohibition and had firmly taken root in the culinary landscape by the 1990s. The Bay Area played a significant role in reviving it—as much as New York and London. From the distillers who pioneered craft spirits and Alice Waters’ revolutionary take on simple, fresh food at Chez Panisse to the bartenders who cared enough to...   More >

When Conflicting Racisms Converge: Race, Nation and Segregation: Lecture with Rebecca Herman

Lecture | November 6 | 4 p.m. | 2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies), Conference Room

 Rebecca Herman

 Center for Latin American Studies

During World War II, workers from across Latin America and the Caribbean traveled to the Panama Canal to work on defense construction projects for the U.St. When they arrived, they encountered a binary system of segregation. that did not accord with their racial constructs and identities. This talk will consider how race, nation and segregation divided Allies engaged in a purported war for democracy.

The Gatun Locks of the Panama Canal in 1936. (Photo by E.O. Goldbeck/Library of Congress.)

The Power of Writing with Abandon: a Talk by Grant Faulkner

Lecture | November 6 | 5-7 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Grant Faulkner, Executive Director, National Novel Writing Month

 Department of English

Grant Faulkner, executive director of National Novel Writing Month, will discuss his new book, Pep Talks for Writers, and how writers must dive in, banish their inner editors, and take creative risks by writing with abandon. Come ready to write with abandon!

LAEP Lecture: Ferdinand Ludwig

Lecture | November 6 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Monday, Nov 6, 6:00PM, Wurster Auditorium

We Must Conjure Our Gods Before We Obey Them

Lecture | November 6 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  BAMPFA

 Michael Rock, 2x4 Inc.

 Department of Architecture

Michael Rock, acclaimed designer, educator, and author talks about the pervasive influence of design in contemporary life. He is a founding partner and creative director 2x4 Inc., a multi-disciplinary design studio in New York City, and Director of the Graphic Architecture Project at the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation

We must conjure our Gods before we obey them: Arts + Design Mondays at BAMPFA

Lecture | November 6 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Michael Rock, Designer, 2x4, New York

 Arts + Design

Design has become so elastic it is applied universally from chromosomes to climate change. We design spoons and tables and rooms and houses and computer programs and cities and power grids and national identities and international treaties and defense systems and, when all else fails, military campaigns. If design is anything that is planned and brought to fruition by human ingenuity, we’ve...   More >

Chasing the Shadows of the Past in Late Ottoman Argos

Lecture | November 6 | 8-9 p.m. |  Alumni House

 Jonathan M. Hall, University of Chicago

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

If there is one sentiment that is common to nearly all the accounts written by European travelers to the Peloponnesian town of Argos during the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries, it is one of profound disappointment and shock at the lack of visible remains of a city whose fame had been so lauded in antiquity. Inevitably, perhaps, imagination filled the void that autopsy was unable to...   More >

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

The Russian Revolution and Soviet Durability

Lecture | November 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Lucan Way, Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Institute of International Studies

The Soviet Union was one of the most durable authoritarian regimes in modern history. It not only endured 74 years, but survived multiple and severe crises -- from massive popular unrest in 1921 to deadly purges in the 1930s to the invasion of Germany in 1941. Professor Way argues that such robustness can be traced to the regime's origins in violent, revolutionary struggle. A history of violent...   More >

Slow Accretion: Producing Harm in Ulaanbaatar’s Air Pollution Crisis

Lecture | November 7 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Chisato Fukuda, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 Franck Billé, Program Director, Silk Road Center, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Public Health, School of

What counts as evidence of harm for those living in the midst of air pollution? Over the past two decades, air pollution has become a seasonal disaster in Ulaanbaatar, prompting widespread concerns about its harms to human bodies and the environment. These concerns have promoted various investments to document air pollution’s effects, from monitoring technologies, to interactive pollution maps,...   More >

Pollution

Launching Undocumental: a talk and reception

Lecture | November 7 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Goldberg Room

 Joel Sati, Undocumental; Ramona Naddaff, UC Berkeley Rhetoric Department; Khaled Alrabe, Human Rights Center; Meng So, Undocumented Student Program; Michael Conti, Define American

 Human Rights Center

Join us for the launch of Undocumental, an interdisciplinary and intersectional publication focused on "illegalization." The event will feature a Q&A with founder and executive director Joel Sati and members of the Undocumented editorial staff. We'll also hear brief introductory remarks from Khaled Alrabe, director of the Immigration Initiative at the Human Rights Center; Ramona Naddaff,...   More >

"How to Work a Look"--a lecture by Madison Moore

Lecture | November 7 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife

 Madison Moore, ERC Postdoctoral Scholar, King's College, London

 Department of English, Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies

How to Work a Look explores the relationships between queerness, spectacular style and resistance. The colloquial phrase “working a look” highlights the queer practice of using fashion to critique restrictive societal norms. For queer, trans and nonbinary people of color, style is resistance, a...   More >

Naisargi Dave | Life is Queerer Than a Chessboard: On Cows, Violence, and Love in Contemporary India

Lecture | November 7 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Naisargi N. Dave, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto

 Lawrence Cohen, Professor of Anthropology and of South & Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of Anthropology, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People's Rights

A talk by anthropologist and scholar of queer activism and animal rights in India Dr. Naisargi N. Dave.

Waste Reduction Speaker Panel: Hosted by Food@Haas

Lecture | November 7 | 6-8 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Spieker Forum in Chou Hall

 Dan Kurzrock, Regrained; Komal Ahmed, Copia; Nick Peters, DrawDown; Dylan Brody, Imperfect Produce

 Haas School of Business

This is a Haas class, anyone who is not enrolled but wants to attend the class is welcome to join but will be asked to leave if we run out of seating capacity in the room (due to fire code).

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Overlapping Forms: Linking Material Culture and Environmental Knowledge

Lecture | November 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Daniel Niles, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature

 Archaeological Research Facility

This presentation examines different forms of environmental knowledge, the role of this knowledge in cultural persistence through time, and its consequent significance to the intellectual challenges of the Anthropocene. The paper describes the activity of a master charcoal-maker in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, who works in a landscape recognized by the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture...   More >

Community Curating and the Maker Movement: Arts + Design Wednesdays at BAMPFA

Lecture | November 8 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Dale Dougherty, Founder and CEO, Maker Media; Eric Siegel, Director, University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley; Sherry Huss, Vice President, Maker Media; Co-creator, Maker Faire

 Arts + Design

From its inception in San Mateo California in 2006, Maker Faire has grown into a global phenomenon, a living exhibition of creativity, technology, and “do it yourself” culture that now thrives in over 130 cities throughout the world. The curation of each Maker Faire uses a community-building approach to support the participation of new makers. This decentralized approach to curation has helped to...   More >

The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children: Townsend Book Chat with Alison Gopnik

Lecture | November 8 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Alison Gopnik argues that the familiar 21st century picture of parents and children is profoundly wrong—it's not just based on bad science, it's bad for kids and parents, too.

Friends Don’t Let Friends Deploy Black-Box Models: The Importance of Intelligibility in Machine Learning for Bias Detection and Prevention

Lecture | November 8 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Rich Caruana, Microsoft Research

 Information, School of

In machine learning often a trade-off must be made between accuracy and intelligibility: the most accurate models usually are not very intelligible (e.g., deep nets and random forests), and the most intelligible models usually are less accurate (e.g., linear or logistic regression). This trade-off often limits the accuracy of models that can be safely deployed in mission-critical applications...   More >

Kashmiri Women in Resistance: Indian Occupation and Silenced Histories

Lecture | November 8 | 4:30-6:15 p.m. | 132 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Huma Dar; Idrisa Pandit

 Unlearning India

A conversation about the agency of Kashmiri women in resisting the violence of Indian occupation.

Combinatory Digital Poetics in Electronic Literature and Film

Lecture | November 8 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 127 Dwinelle Hall

 Scott Rettberg, Professor of Digital Culture, University of Bergen, Norway

 Berkeley Center for New Media, Digital Humanities at Berkeley

Aleatory and combinatory poetic methods have been an ongoing concern of the avant-garde stretching back to the early 20th century, and have crystallised as one of the main threads of practice in electronic literature. Scott Rettberg will discuss how an interest in combinatory poetics reflected first in projects such as the poetry generators “Frequency,” “Tokyo Garage,” and “After Parthenope”...   More >

Cosmic Knowledge and the Long-term Strategy of the Human Race: The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Distinguished Lecture in Astronomy

Lecture | November 8 | 6-8 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Sandra Faber, Professor Emerita of Astronomy & Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz

 Department of Astronomy

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Harjant Gill | On North Indian/Punjabi Masculinities: A Screening followed by Discussion with the Filmmaker

Lecture | November 9 | 5-7:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Harjant S. Gill, Documentary Filmmaker and Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Towson University

 Karen Nakamura, Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society - Disability Studies cluster, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People's Rights

A evening with Prof. Harjant S. Gill, an Indian documentary filmmaker who teaches visual anthropology at Towson University. His films explore topics related to gender, sexuality, religion and belonging in India and among Indians in diaspora.

Sheryl-Ann Simpson: Planning for Citizenship

Lecture | November 9 | 5-7 p.m. | Wurster Hall, 112 Auditorium

 Sheryl-Ann Simpson, Department of City & Regional Planning, College of Environmental Design

 Department of City and Regional Planning

Sheryl-Ann Simpson is an Assistant Professor in the Landscape Architecture & Environmental Design unit at the University of California, Davis. She examines the relationships between states and citizens, and explores variety of urban issues, including immigration, housing, and urban health. The connective thread in Simpson’s work is an interest in the voices, experiences, and ideas of individuals...   More >

The Future of the EU after Brexit: Implications for Transatlantic Relations from a German Perspective

Lecture | November 9 | 5-7 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Jana Puglierin, Alfred von Oppenheim Center for European Policy Studies at the German Council on Foreign Relations

 Institute of European Studies, The San Francisco Eric M. Warburg Chapter of the American Council on Germany

This presentation will cover the future of the European integration process after the German elections with a focus on the role of Germany, Franco-German relations, the implications of Brexit on the cohesion of the EU-27, the common security and defense policy, and the impact of this process on transatlantic relations from the German point of view.

Dr. Jana Puglierin is head of the Alfred...   More >

Can Nature Save Us? Stories from the Natural World

Lecture | November 9 | 7-8:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 M. Sanjayan, PhD, Chief Executive Officer, Conservation International

 College of Natural Resources

2017 Horace M. Albright Lecture in Conservation

At a time when humanity’s demands on the natural world have never been greater, Dr. M. Sanjayan’s keynote address highlights nature’s essential role in creating a livable future for people everywhere.

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Forced into Genocide

Lecture | November 12 | 1-3 p.m. |  St. Vartan Armenian Apostolic Church

 +650 Spruce Street, Oakland, CA 94610

 Adrienne G. Alexanian, Educator and daughter of Yervant Alexanian

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program, AGBU-Silicon Valley, AGBU-YPNC, St. Vartan Cultural Committee

Forced into Genocide is the riveting memoir of Yervant Edward Alexanian: an eye-witness to the massacre and dislocation of his family and countrymen in Ottoman Turkey during World War I. Incredibly, Alexanian experienced the Armenian Genocide as a conscript in the Turkish army. His memoir is a one-of-a-kind "insider's account," documenting the Genocide's astonishing cruelty, but also its...   More >

Monday, November 13, 2017

Salim v. Mitchell and Jessen: Legal Accountability for Torture in US Courts

Lecture | November 13 | 12:45-2 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Warren Room, 295 Boalt Hall

 Paul Hoffman, Schonbrun Seplow Harris & Hoffman LLP

 Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law

This lecture has been cancelled due to illness. We hope to reschedule for January 2018.

Towards Knowledge-Based Decision Support System using Propositional Analysis and Rhetorical Structure Theory

Lecture | November 13 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Cláudio Gottschalg-Duque, University of Brasilia

 Information, School of

The project's leading objective is to develop a natural language interface for knowledge-based decision support system (KBDSS) using rhetorical structure theory (RST) and propositional analysis. KBDSS is a system that provides specialized expertise (problem-solving) stored as facts, rules, procedures, or in similar structures that can be directly accessed by the user. The idea is to develop an...   More >

Devin Griffiths: The Ecology of Form

Lecture | November 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Devin Griffiths, Assistant Professor of English, University of Southern California

 Department of English

Based on Professor Griffiths's new book project, this talk is sponsored by the 19th Century and Beyond British Cultural Studies working group and the Florence Bixby Chair.

"Antifa: The History and Theory of Anti-Fascism”

Lecture | November 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Mark Bray, Dartmouth College

 Department of Spanish & Portuguese

MARK BRAY is a historian of human rights, terrorism, and political radicalism in Modern Europe who was one of the organizers of Occupy Wall Street. He is the author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook and Translating Anarchy: The Anarchism of Occupy Wall Street. His work has appeared in the Washington Post, Foreign Policy, Critical Quarterly, ROAR Magazine, and numerous edited volumes. He is...   More >

What is history?: the life and times of water hyacinth

Lecture | November 13 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Reading Room

 Anna L. Tsing, Professor of Anthropology, UCSC Department of Anthropology

 Department of Anthropology

2017 Distinguished Lecture: Anna L. Tsing

Re-Assemblage (Theory, Practice, Form): Arts + Design Mondays at BAMPFA

Lecture | November 13 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Bill Brown, Deputy Provost for the Arts and Karla Scherer Distinguished Service Professor in American Culture, University of Chicago

 Arts + Design

Brown excavates relations between assemblage theory in the social sciences and assemblage practice, focusing on the ways that assembly (in the visual, plastic, and discursive arts) can complicate and clarify the theoretical conversation. He assembles the work of Robert Rauschenberg, William Burroughs, Noah Purifoy, Theaster Gates, Rina Banerjee, and Tan Lin into a conversation that is newly...   More >

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

America's Next War and How to Prevent It

Lecture | November 14 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Dr. Paul Stares, Council on Foreign Relations

 Institute of International Studies

Paul B. Stares is the General John W. Vessey Senior Fellow for Conflict Prevention and director of the Center for Preventive Action at the Council on Foreign Relations. The author or editor of nine books on U.S. security policy and international relations as well as a regular commentator on current affairs, Dr. Stares has worked at leading think tanks and universities in the United States,...   More >

The Troubled Waters of Transformation: Shipyard Labor in East Central Europe from Late to Post Socialism

Lecture | November 14 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Ulf Brunnbauer, Director, Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, University of Regensburg

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Institute of European Studies

Practitioners of East European labor history are at risk of falling into deep depression. Under state-socialism, industrial workers were apparently let down by regimes that claimed to rule in their name. After the end of communist rule, many workers experienced large-scale dispossession because of deindustrialization and the emerging hegemony of neo-liberalism. In my talk, which is based on the...   More >

Causal Inference in the Age of Big Data: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | November 14 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Jas Sekhon, Professor of Political Science & Statistics

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Creative Solutions for Social Innovation: A View from Africa

Lecture | November 14 | 5-7 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Wells Fargo Room

 Center for African Studies, Center for Social Sector Leadership

Join us for a panel discussion and networking on Creative Solutions for Social Innovation: A View from Africa with three award-winning technology entrepreneurs who are driving social change and impact in Africa. The entrepreneurs, who are recipients of the King Baudouin African Development Prize, will share their innovative solutions to improve the lives of local communities through access to...   More >

$0

  Register online

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

CANCELLED! ARCH Lecture: Mary-Ann Ray

Lecture | November 15 |  Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

CANCELLED! WED, NOV 15. Please note: This lecture has been CANCELLED!

Botanical Names Demystified

Lecture | November 15 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Do plant names ever seem intentionally obscure and hard to remember? Do you wonder how they got their names and why? This program will break down botanical nomenclature, looking at some of the most common Greek and Latin vocabulary and the rules for plant naming. We will also examine the ways that names reflect politics, patronage, and advances in the science of botany.

Free with Garden Admission

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Life and Labor in the Industrial Frontier: Archaeology of the Samuel Adams Limekilns, Santa Cruz, California

Lecture | November 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 David Hyde, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Beginning in the 1850s a lime extraction and processing industry took root in Santa Cruz County, California, supplying the American West Coast with a critical construction and manufacturing material. Over the subsequent 70 years, the industry shifted from being comprised of number of independently owned and operated operations to being monopolized by a single regional conglomerate. Throughout...   More >

What is Adabiyāt?: Forging Persian Literature and Its Domain (1860-1920)

Lecture | November 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall

 Aria Fani, PhD Candidate, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

 Near Eastern Studies

What is literature? Posing this fundamental question allows me to critically delve into the conceptual history of literature in Persian in the mid-nineteenth and the early-twentieth centuries. In a way, this is a story of how a literary discourse was formed and later became an institution, casting its epistemic shadow over all modes of literary and cultural production in the Persian-speaking...   More >

Curating and Collecting Across Media: Arts + Design Wednesdays at BAMPFA

Lecture | November 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Aebhric Coleman, Director, Kramlich Collection

 Arts + Design

In Curating and Collecting Across Media, Aebhric Coleman will discuss collecting and curating artwork that mixes media forms across visual art objects, film, performance, and new technologies.

Biography
Aebhric Coleman is Director of Kramlich Collection, a collection of art by Richard and Pamela Kramlich recognized as one of the most important private international collections of media,...   More >

Women in the Red Army, 1941-1945

Lecture | November 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Oleg Budnitskii, Professor of History, and Director, International Center for the History and Sociology of World War II and Its Consequences, National Research University - Higher School of Economics, Moscow

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

During the years of the Great Patriotic War about 500,000 women were called up to serve in the Red Army. In the Second World War, the Soviet Union was not the only country to enlist women in the military. But the Soviet experience was unique in the fact that a significant number of women served in combat units. Female pilots and snipers attained the greatest fame. Some women served as tank crew...   More >

Octavio Paz, Mexican Politics, and the Media: Lecture with Priscila Dorella

Lecture | November 15 | 4 p.m. | 2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies), Conference Room

 Priscila Dorella

 Center for Latin American Studies

The writing of Mexican poet Octavio Paz (1914-1998) reflects a constant engagement with social questions of his time. His ideas about the role of intellectuals, politics, and the media are expressed in poems, essays, radio programs, and television. In this lecture, Professor Dorella will present some of the controversies that were generated by Paz’s political position in the media.

American Identity in the Age of Trump: Jefferson Memorial Lecture featuring George Packer

Lecture | November 15 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 George Packer, Staff Writer, The New Yorker Magazine

 Graduate Division

George Packer will present the Jefferson lecture on Wednesday, November 15, 2017, in conjunction with the observance of Constitution Day. The lecture, entitled "American Identity in the Age of Trump," will be held in the Chevron Auditorium of International House and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

George Packer

The Good Neighbor: Addressing Global Poverty in an Age of Xenophobia

Lecture | November 15 | 6-7 p.m. | David Brower Center, Tamalpais Room

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94607

 William Easterly

 Goldman School of Public Policy

The fight against global poverty is connected to the contentious issue of migration from poor to rich countries. The connection of the war on poverty to the war on terror perpetrates a stereotype of poor people as violent, unintentionally fueling xenophobia and restrictions on migration. The good news is that economic ideas are the best antidote to xenophobia, opening the door again to migration...   More >

The Clean Energy Emergency: with Daniel Kammen

Lecture | November 15 | 6:30-7:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Master of Development Practice

Professor Dan Kammen, a global thought leader for clean energy and energy access, reflects on lessons learned from three decades on the frontlines of the clean energy debates and what those lessons portend for the future of global energy and the planet.

Zaytuna College Lecture Series with Professor Alexander Key: Language Between God and the Poets

Lecture | November 15 | 7-9 p.m. | Zaytuna College, Sanctuary

 2401 Le Conte Ave., Berkeley, CA 94709

 Professor Alexander Key, Professor, Stanford University

 Graduate Theological Union

Zaytuna College invites you to their upcoming Lecture Series, occurring on Wednesday evenings from 7:00pm - 9:00pm at 2401 Le Conte Ave. Berkeley, CA 94709 throughout the Fall semester with renowned speakers such as UC Berkeley Anthropology Professor Laura Nader, Political Science Professor Steven Fish, CAIR Director Zahra Billoo, Stanford Comparative Literature and Classical Arabic Professor...   More >

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Native Claims Across Nations: Indigenous Land Ownership in Mexican and U.S. California, 1840-1860

Lecture | November 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Julia Lewandoski, doctoral candidate, History, UC Berkeley

 Bancroft Library

The vast majority of indigenous Californians never received land promised to them after Mexico secularized California's missions in 1834. Drawing mainly from land case files in The Bancroft Library, Julia Lewandoski will trace the stories of those who did receive grants from Mexico in the 1840s. These communities used legal systems to gain and keep land after California became a U.S. state in 1850.

Benjamin Siegel | Hungry Nation: Food, Famine, and the Making of Modern India

Lecture | November 16 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Benjamin Siegel, Assistant Professor of History, Boston University

 Institute of International Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

Benjamin Siegel is a historian of modern South Asia, with particular interests in the politics and economic life of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh in global contexts. His first book project, Hungry Nation: Food, Famine, and the Making of Modern India (Cambridge University Press, 2018), interrogates the ways in which problems of food and scarcity has structured Indian citizens’...   More >

Precarity and Dependence in the "Sharing" Economy

Lecture | November 16 | 4-6 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), IRLE Director's Room

 Juliet Schor, Professor of Sociology, Boston College

 Ruth Berins Collier, Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley; Annette Bernhardt, Director, Low-Wage Work Program, The Labor Center at IRLE

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, The Scholars Strategy Network

The sharing economy debuted to grand claims about its ability to change the world for the good--it would encourage social connection, use assets more efficiently, and be better for the environment. For earners on platforms, it promised flexibility, freedom and the ability to become a "micro-entrepreneur." Ten years in, the reality is far more complex. In this talk, Schor discusses her...   More >

  RSVP online

Phoebe's Cast Collection: Two Millennia of Copies and Replicas at the Hearst Museum

Lecture | November 16 | 6-8 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

This talk will provide an introduction to UC Berkeley's collection of nearly 300 casts of Greek and Roman sculptures from the Classical period - examining both how these plaster copies were made from original sculptures in Europe, and how they travelled to California at the turn of the 20th century. This will be contextualized within a larger discussion of the copying tradition, starting in the...   More >

Cripping the Renaissance: Lamentation, Consolation, and Disability in Cervantes and Milton: a talk by Elizabeth B. Bearden

Lecture | November 16 | 6-8 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Elizabeth B. Bearden, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 Department of English, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Program in Disability Studies

"In this talk, I focus on works by two disabled authors of the early modern period: Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra and John Milton. I propose that these authors draw on the art of consolation—particularly Petrarch’s De Remediis and the Psalms—to depict the lows and highs of their lived experience of disability. Furthermore, they employ transgressive reappropriation when responding to ablist...   More >

Friday, November 17, 2017

The Moral Imperative of Better School Quality Measures

Lecture | November 17 | 10-11:30 a.m. | 2515 Tolman Hall

 Jack Schneider, Assistant Professor, College of the Holy Cross

 Graduate School of Education

Today, parents and policymakers can access school- and district-level data in historically unprecedented quantities. Yet available information largely consists of student standardized test scores, which offer a limited picture of school performance and often indicate more about student demography than about educational practice. Consequently, such data may produce a distorted picture of school...   More >

Postindustrial Language Socialization

Lecture | November 17 | 3-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 (Classroom side)

 Elinor Ochs, UCLA

 Berkeley Language Center

*Message form Claire Kramsch*
Foreign language teachers are used to seeing themselves as teaching language acquisition (SLA), not language socialization (LS). Success in second language acquisition is developing full command of the linguistic and communicative aspects of language, whereas for language socialization it is acculturation and blending into a speech community. However, in both cases,...   More >

How Ride-Sharing Technology is Impacting Transportation in Africa: The case of Uber in Nairobi

Lecture | November 17 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Kagure Wamunyu, OxfordUniversity

 Institute of Transportation Studies


Saturday, November 18, 2017

Science at Cal Lecture - How to Find a Habitable Planet

Lecture | November 18 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Courtney Dressing, Astronomy Department

 Science@Cal

Several decades of ground- and space-based investigations have revealed that our galaxy is teeming with planetary systems and that Earth-sized planets are common. Dr. Dressing will review our understanding of small planets and then chart a path towards the detection and characterization of habitable planets orbiting nearby stars.

Relative sizes of Kepler habitable zone planets discovered as of 2013 April 18. Except for Earth, these are artists' renditions. Image: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech

Monday, November 20, 2017

Denise Dresser: Mexico's 2018 Presidential Election: Democracy in Danger?

Lecture | November 20 | 6 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 220 (Geballe Room)

 Denise Dresser

 Center for Latin American Studies

Denise Dresser is a political analyst, columnist, and academic who writes for Reforma and Proceso, and teaches at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM). She is currently a visiting scholar at the Center for Latin American Studies at UC Berkeley. Dresser is the author of numerous publications on Mexican politics and U.S.-Mexico relations and was recently named one of the 50 most...   More >

The University of Guanajuato during Mexico’s Flag Day, 2017. (Photo by Ingrid Truemper.)

Hit Parade: Music as Public Knowledge: Arts + Design Mondays at BAMPFA

Lecture | November 20 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Josh Kun, Professor of Communication and American Studies and Ethnicity, University of Southern California

 Arts + Design

What does music tell us about the sustainability and precarity of publics? How can we use music— rehearsed, recorded, archived-- to engage histories of erasure and displacement while imagining new forms of community and collaboration? My talk will explore these ideas through my project “Hit Parade: Live in San Francisco” (for the SFMOMA/SFPL Public Knowledge series) which combines archival...   More >

Monday, November 27, 2017

The Acquisition and the Consequences of Gender Stereotypes about Intellectual Ability

Lecture | November 27 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Lin Bian, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

Intellectual giftedness is culturally associated with men rather than women. I will describe a line of research that investigates the acquisition and the consequences of this “brilliance = men” stereotype. With respect to acquisition, I will present evidence that, by the age of 6, girls are already less likely than boys to believe that members of their gender are “really, really smart.” Next, I...   More >

On the History of Religions and the Study of Islam

Lecture | November 27 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room 220

 Travis Zadeh, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, Yale University

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Islam plays a powerful role in American public discourse. Across this often contentious landscape, numerous voices can be heard defining and contesting the nature of Islam. This lecture addresses the place and history of Islam in the modern academic study of religion in light of discursive structures that are designed to contain and delimit the meaning of Islam.

Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask (70 min screening followed by Q and A): Arts + Design Mondays at BAMPFA

Lecture | November 27 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Isaac Julien, Artist and Filmmaker; Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor of Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley

 Arts + Design

Biography
Isaac Julien is an accomplished filmmaker and video installation artist, well-known for films like Looking for Langston, a poetic treatment of gay black poet Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance. His multi-screen installations and accompanying photographic works for museums and galleries explore fractured narratives of memory and desire, often uniting elements from dance,...   More >

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Solomon Darwin | Empowering the Bottom of the Pyramid with Open Innovation Business Models

Lecture | November 28 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Solomon Darwin, Executive Director Garwood Center for Corporate Innovation, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Dr. Solomon Darwin, the Executive Director of the
Garwood Center for Corporate Innovation at the Haas School of Business, on his current research on Smart Villages and working with the government of India.

Birdmania: Author Talk and Book Signing

Lecture | November 28 | 6-8 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

There is no denying that many people are crazy for birds. Packed with intriguing facts and exquisite and rare artwork, Birdmania showcases an eclectic and fascinating selection of bird devotees who would do anything for their feathered friends.

In addition to well-known enthusiasts such as Aristotle, Charles Darwin, and Helen Macdonald, Brunner introduces readers to Karl Russ, the pioneer of...   More >

Free with Garden admission; books available for purchase

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Hail Paths and Springs: An Ontological Study of Indigenous Engagements in the Lake Titicaca Basin

Lecture | November 29 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Christine Hastorf, Director, Archaeological Research Facility, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Jewell Soriano

 Archaeological Research Facility

This project is gathering ethnographic information of how contemporary dwellers talk about, engage with, and conceive of their landscape.

Alumni Panel of Curators Across Disciplines: Arts + Design Wednesdays at BAMPFA

Lecture | November 29 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Patricia Cariño Valdez, Curator and Director of Public Programs, ICA, San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art; René de Guzman, Director of Exhibition Strategy and Senior Curator of Art, Oakland Museum of California; Deena Chalabi, Barbara and Stephan Vermut Associate Curator of Public Dialogue, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

 Arts + Design

Three alumni curators from different organizations explore the process of curating objects, new technologies, and public experiences with different goals and in varied locations. Speakers will also discuss their Berkeley education and share ideas for further collaboration with the university and with Berkeley students.

Grappling with goodness in infancy and childhood

Lecture | November 29 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Arber Tasimi, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

A fundamental question in cognitive science is how people weight and integrate competing considerations when deciding how to act. One of the most important everyday arenas of such conflict is the clash between moral considerations and self-interest––the familiar tension between wanting to do good and wanting to do well. In this talk, I will explore how children's judgments and memories reflect an...   More >

What is Putinism?

Lecture | November 29 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Steve Fish, Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Institute of International Studies

Professor Fish will gives his insights on the concept of "Putinism."

Karabo Poppy Moletsane and Ashara Ekundayo in Conversation

Lecture | November 29 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Karabo Poppy Moletsane talks about her new Art Wall project with cultural strategist and curator Ashara Ekundayo.

Zaytuna College Lecture Series with Dr. Khadija Harsolia: Captivity, Confinement and Resistance in Mudejar and Morisco Literature

Lecture | November 29 | 7-9 p.m. | Zaytuna College, Sanctuary

 2401 Le Conte Ave., Berkeley, CA 94709

 Dr. Khadija Harsolia, UC Riverside

 Graduate Theological Union

Zaytuna College invites you to their upcoming Lecture Series, occurring on Wednesday evenings from 7:00pm - 9:00pm at 2401 Le Conte Ave. Berkeley, CA 94709 throughout the Fall semester with renowned speakers such as UC Berkeley Anthropology Professor Laura Nader, Political Science Professor Steven Fish, CAIR Director Zahra Billoo, Stanford Comparative Literature and Classical Arabic Professor...   More >

Silence and Sanctuaries

Lecture | November 29 | 7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

“For decades Nathaniel Dorsky has been making works of rare and sometimes startling beauty” (New York Times). He presents his latest, Abaton and Elohim, along with two hand-painted films by Stan Brakhage.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

States of Exception and Sudden Democracies in 20th Century Germany

Lecture | November 30 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Kathleen Canning, University of Michigan

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West

This talk is an extended think piece on the forging of democratic sensibilities as states of exception collapsed and democratic political forms were improvised and invented in 20th century Germany. The focus will be on 1918-19 with comparative reflections on 1945-48. In approaching democracy as a political form defined by recurrent crises of representation, I am interested in how democratic...   More >

Maya Tudor | Nationalism as a Democratic Resource: Comparing India and Pakistan at 70

Lecture | November 30 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room)

 Maya Tudor, Associate Professor of Government and Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government Fellow, St. Hilda's College, Oxford University

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, Department of Political Science

Dr. Maya Tudor, Associate Professor of Government and Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government Fellow, St. Hilda's College, Oxford University

State-Building And Political Development In US Foreign Policy

Lecture | November 30 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Dr. Francis Fukuyama, Freeman Spogli Institute

 Institute of International Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Francis Fukuyama is Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University, and the Mosbacher Director of FSI's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. He is professor (by courtesy) of political science.

Dr. Fukuyama has written widely on issues in development and international politics. His book, The End of History...   More >