<< April 2017 >>

Saturday, April 1, 2017

Michael Pollan and Simon Sadler in Conversation

Lecture | April 1 | 1 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Journalist and best-selling author Michael Pollan is joined by noted architectural and urban historian Simon Sadler to discuss the history and new use of psychedelics for therapeutic purposes, the subject of Pollan’s new book and an area illuminated by Sadler’s investigation of the philosophy he calls “hippie holism.” The conversation also touches on the counterculture pursuit of “evolved...   More >

Free for BAMPFA members, UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, retirees; 18 & under + guardian | $10 Non-UC Berkeley students, 65+, disabled persons | $12 General admission

Monday, April 3, 2017

War Is Coming: Between Past and Future Violence in Lebanon

Lecture | April 3 | 12-2 p.m. | Kroeber Hall, Gifford Room, 221

 Sami Hermez, Northwestern University in Qatar

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Department of Anthropology

From 1976 to 1990, Lebanon experienced a long war involving various national and international actors. The peace agreement that followed and officially propelled the country into a "postwar" era did not address many of the root causes of war, nor did it hold main actors accountable. Instead, a politics of "no victor, no vanquished" was promoted, in which the political elite agreed simply to...   More >

1924: The Year of Peace? Photography, Publics, and Weimar Republic Pacifism

Lecture | April 3 | 4-5 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Jonathan Long, Professor of German and Visual Culture at the University of Durham (UK)

 Institute of European Studies

In the early years of the Weimar Republic a range of new polities, collectives, and publics grew up within the newly-formed democratic state. This created conditions for new forms of political action and address. In this lecture, two case studies – Ernst Friedrich’s book War against War! and John Heartfield’s photomontage Ten Years On – are the starting point for an exploration of the ways in...   More >

From Anti-fascism to Anti-Zionism to Undeclared War: The West German Left, the East German Regime and Israel 1949-1989

Lecture | April 3 | 4:30-6:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Jeffrey Herf, Distinguished University Professor, History, University of Maryland, College Park

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Center for Jewish Studies, Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israel Studies

After Nazism and the Holocaust the East German government became a fierce opponent of the state of Israel, one that it denounced as a “spearhead” of US imperialism. Beginning in the 1960s and continuing to the end of the Cold War, the East German Communists combined hostile propaganda with military training and delivery of weapons to the Arab states at war with Israel and to the Palestine...   More >

Undergraduate Lecture Series (Math Monday): Elliptic curves and Hilbert's 10th problem

Lecture | April 3 | 5-6 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Shelly Manber, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

ATC Lecture – Tiffany Chung “Remapping History: The Unwanted Population”: Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium

Lecture | April 3 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Barbo Osher Theater | Canceled

 Tiffany Chung

 Center for New Media , Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Global Urban Humanities

EDIT: THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED. Tiffany Chung will discuss her comparative study of forced migration through the current global refugee crises, most notably the ongoing Syrian humanitarian crisis, and the post-1975 Vietnamese mass exodus...   More >

ARCH Lecture: Keith Krumwiede

Lecture | April 3 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

MON, APR 3, 6:30PM. Following the Admitted Student Open House, CED Alum Keith Krumwiede, will present on his new publication &quot;Atlas of Another America&quot;.

“Mediating Reality: The New Role of Visual Journalism,” Richard Koci Hernandez: ATC Lecture

Lecture | April 3 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive | Canceled

 Richard Koci Hernandez

 Berkeley Center for New Media

The image-sphere is upon us. Images have surpassed words and visuals now play a central role in shaping conversation. But the advent of new technologies bring with it challenges for journalism and how we tell true stories in the age of virtual reality. What is visual truth when viewed in virtual or augmented worlds? What are the dangers and opportunities when journalists craft these digital...   More >

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

The Yugoslav Gulag: The Goli otok (Barren Island) Labor Camp, 1949-1956

Lecture | April 4 | 4-6 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Martin Previsic, Assistant Professor of History, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

The Goli otok (Barren island) labor camp was one of the best kept secrets in Tito’s Yugoslavia. During the Tito-Stalin split of 1948, over 13,000 genuine and alleged Stalin supporters were incarcerated and subjected to harsh treatment. Violence and hard labor were used in order to politically “re-educate” inmates. Several methods used in the camps, including a complex system of fictional...   More >

Duterte’s Violent “Right” Populism in the Philippines

Lecture | April 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Mark Thompson, Professor of Politics, City University of Hong Kong

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Since his election, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has launched a violent crackdown on drugs. For many Filipinos, this state violence has created a sense of political order amidst weak institutions. Duterte's “right” populism shows similarities to illiberalism elsewhere in Southeast Asia but differs from “rich world” right populism represented by Trump and the European far right.

Mark Thompson

The Robbins Collection Center's Lecture in Islamic Law: Is Islamic Law "Religious" Law?

Lecture | April 4 | 5-7 p.m. | 170 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Mohammad Fadel, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

 Robbins Collection Center

Mohammad Fadel, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Toronto, will give a public lecture on Islamic Law.

"Digital Doomsday: A Perspective from the Pathology Called Europe," Jan De Vos

Lecture | April 4 | 5-6 p.m. | Moffitt Undergraduate Library, 340, BCNM Commons

 Jan De Vos

 Berkeley Center for New Media

Allegedly, no reflection, knowledge nor theory are needed in the business of shaping the onlife self – let the data, algorithms and bots do the work!

In this talk probe the pitfalls that theory and criticism should avoid in this era of the digitalization of (inter)subjectivity. I argue that a critical history of digitalization needs in the first place a critical history of subjectivity. I go...   More >

Recursive Archaeology: An ontological approach to anthropomorphic ceramics from first millennium CE northwest Argentina: ARF Spring Lecture

Lecture | April 4 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Benjamin Alberti, Professor, Framingham State University

 Archaeological Research Facility

The question driving this talk is how to understand anthropomorphism in archaeological material, particularly in three-dimensional artefactual form.

Dr. Benjamin Alberti

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Improving Solar Energy Delivery to Homes

Lecture | April 5 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310, Banatao Auditorium

 Cindi Choi, Senior Director, Global Strategy & Business Development, SunPower

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Cindi Choi is the Senior Director, Global Strategy & Business Development at SunPower.

Free

 Free lunch available (limited #s). You must register by the Monday before the event for lunch. Register online

Austria and Migration: The Current Refugee Crisis in Historical Perspective

Lecture | April 5 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Dirk Rupnow, Dirk Rupnow, Head of the Institute for Contemporary History, University of Innsbruck & Distinguished Visiting Austrian Chair Professor at Stanford University

 Institute of European Studies

Migration is the single biggest challenge for European countries and the European Union today. It is closely linked to questions of (national) identity, social pluralism, and diversity. The talk focuses on Austria as an example and puts the current so-called „refugee crisis“ in the context of the broader history of the postwar Austrian Republic. It discusses the status of migration in the...   More >

California Countercultures: Art/Politics/Aesthetics (notes from the field) with Stephanie Syjuco

Lecture | April 5 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Working primarily in sculpture and installation, her projects leverage open-source systems, shareware logic, and flows of capital, in order to investigate issues of economies and empire. Most recently she has been engaged in the research and dissemination of fabric banners, sharing imagery and slogans patterns for protest

Admission to this lecture is free.

  Buy tickets online

PopUp Exhibition: Ira Fink on El Lissitzky’s Had Gadya: Context and Meaning

Lecture | April 5 | 12-1 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Alongside a distinguished career in college and university planning, Ira Fink has assembled a significant research collection of books on synagogue architecture and Jewish ceremonial art. A graduate of UC Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design and a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, Dr. Fink’s family collection includes one of the few surviving sets of the eleven lithographs of...   More >

Sacred Founders: Women, Men, and Gods in the Discourse of Imperial Founding, Rome through Early Byzantium: Townsend Book Chat with Diliana Angelova. Intro by Thomas Laqueur.

Lecture | April 5 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Sacred Founders argues that from the time of Augustus through early Byzantium, a discourse of "sacred founders” helped legitimate the authority of the emperor and his family. Introduction by Thomas Laqueur.

Codex Painting Practices and Technological Traditions in Ancient Mesoamerica: Non-Invasive Scientific Analyses of Pre-Hispanic and Early Colonial Pictorial Manuscripts

Lecture | April 5 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Davide Domenici, Assistant Professor, University of Bologna, Department of History and Cultures

 Archaeological Research Facility

Non-invasive scientific analyses recently performed by the European mobile laboratory MOLAB on a number of pre-Hispanic and early colonial pictorial Mesoamerican manuscripts allowed us to chemically characterize their material compositions, significantly deepening our knowledge of Mesoamerican codex painting practices. Davide Domenici, a Mesoamericanist from the University of Bologna (Italy)...   More >

Learning from Legends: Ronn Guidi in conversation with Margaret Jenkins

Lecture | April 5 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94705

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Oakland Ballet Company founder Ronn Guidi in conversation with Margaret Jenkins of the Margaret Jenkins Dance Company as OLLI @Berkeley celebrates local legends of the Fourth Age (80 and above) who continue to lead their diverse disciplines.

Writing and Thinking in Two+ Languages: Interview with Adriana Lisboa

Lecture | April 5 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Award-winning Brazilian novelist and poet Adriana Lisboa speaks in conversation with Professor Candace Slater (Spanish & Portuguese) about the work of writing and translation.

View from the Top: Dan Rasky: Lessons Learned from Disrupting the Civilian Aerospace Industry

Lecture | April 5 | 4-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium, 3rd floor

 Dan Rasky, Senior Scientist, Founder & Chief, Space Portal Office, NASA

 College of Engineering, American Nuclear Society student chapter

Antinoupolis, yesterday and today

Lecture | April 5 | 5:30 p.m. | Doe Library, 101 (Morrison Library)

 Rosario Pintaudi, Director, Excavations of the Istituto Papirologico “G. Vitelli” (Università degli Studi di Firenze) at Antinoupolis, Università di Messina/Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana

 Center for the Tebtunis Papyri

In this illustrated lecture, Professor Pintaudi will discuss the history and current excavations of Antinoupolis, the magnificent city (later a provincial capital) that the Emperor Hadrian founded in Middle Egypt near the site at which his favorite Antinoos drowned in AD 130. Professor Pintaudi has been excavating at the site for nearly two decades.

Master of Development Practice Spring Lecture 2017: Water, Food Supply and Disease Control in Africa, Southeast Asia and California

Lecture | April 5 | 6:30-7:30 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Vince Resh, Professor, University of California Berkeley

 College of Natural Resources, Master of Development Practice

Discover the challenges, successes and lessons learned by one of UC Berkeley’s most preeminent proponents of local and global sustainability.

For four decades Professor Vincent Resh has brought state-of-the-art science to critical policy decisions in California and around the globe. Professor of Aquatic Ecology and Entomology, Professor Resh has published nearly 400 research articles and...   More >

Professor of Aquatic Ecology and and Entomology

ARCH Lecture: Michael Maltzan

Lecture | April 5 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, APR 5, 6:30pm Michael Maltzan will present as part of the Spring 17 ARCH Lecture series in 112 Wurster.

Thursday, April 6, 2017

The History of Higher Education in California: Big Data Approach

Lecture | April 6 | 10-11:30 a.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Zach Bleemer

 Library

In his talk, Zach Bleemer will discuss how he has used data science - thousands of computer-processed versions of annual registers, directories, and catalogs - to reconstruct a near-complete database of all students, faculty, and courses at four-year universities in California in the first half of the 20th century, including the UC system. Visualizations of this database display the expansion of...   More >

LECTURE: Alvar Aalto and the International Modern Movement

Lecture | April 6 | 12-1 p.m. | 104 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

THU, APR 6, NOON. Please join us for a talk by Dr. Ylimaula, Professor in Architectural History and Restoration Studies and Director of the Doctoral Programme in Architecture at the University of Oulu, Finland. Open to the public.

Global Health Inequalities, Justice and Governance: A Lecture by: Dr. Jennifer Prah Ruger

Lecture | April 6 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 545 Li Ka Shing Center

 Dr. Jennifer Ruger, Amartya Sen Professor of Health Equity, Economics, and Policy, University of Pennsylvania

 Public Health, School of, School of Public Health (Bioethics), Center for Global Public Health, Thelma Shobe Endowed Chair for Ethics and Spirituality in Health at UCSF

Dr. Jennifer Prah Ruger is the Amartya Sen Professor of Health Equity, Economics, and Policy in the School of Social Policy & Practice at the University of Pennsylvania. Her talk will build on the work of Amartya Sen, and address health inequalities.

$0

 Tickets can ONLY be reserved via the eventbite link. Buy tickets online

Europe: A Literary History (1559-1648)

Lecture | April 6 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Warren Boutcher, Queen Mary University of London

 Department of Italian Studies, Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography, Bancroft Library, Designated Emphasis in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, Department of English, Romance Languages and Literatures, Department of Spanish & Portuguese

Presented by the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography.

Join us for Dr Boutcher’s lecture, followed by a round table discussion with UC Berkeley faculty:

Ivonne de Valle, Spanish & Portuguese
Timothy Hampton, French and Comparative Literature
Victoria Kahn, English and Comparative Literature
Ignacio Navarrete, Spanish & Portuguese
Diego Pirillo, Italian Studies

Thomas Blom Hansen | Urban Theory goes South: On the Historicity of Space and Urban Imagination in South Asia

Lecture | April 6 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Thomas Blom Hansen, Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor in South Asian Studies; Professor in Anthropology; Director of Center for South Asia, Stanford University

 Lawrence Cohen, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies and Professor of Anthropology and of South & Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

Talk by Stanford anthropologist and leading contemporary commentator on religious and political violence in India, Dr. Thomas Blom Hansen.

Dangerous Belief? Xin 信 in Occult Anecdotes in Tang and Song China: Berkeley Public Theology Lecture

Lecture | April 6 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room 220

 Robert Hymes, Carpentier Professor of Oriental Studies, Columbia University

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Robert Hymes received his B.A. from Columbia College (1972), and his M.A. (1976) and Ph.D. (1979) from the University of Pennsylvania. His work so far has focused on the social and cultural history of middle period and early modern China, drawing questions and sometimes data from cultural anthropology as well as history, and using the methods of the local historian to study elite culture, family...   More >

ERG Annual Lecture: Arlie Hochschild: Pollution, the Political Divide and the Possibility of Common Ground

Lecture | April 6 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Arlie Hochschild, Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley Sociology Department

 Energy and Resources Group

TITLE: Pollution, the Political Divide and the Possibility of Common Ground

ARLIE RUSSELL HOCHSCHILD is one of the most influential sociologists of her generation. She is the author of nine books, including The Second Shift, The Time Bind, The Managed Heart, and The Outsourced Self. Three of her books have been named as New York Times Notable Books of the Year and her work appears in sixteen...   More >

Friday, April 7, 2017

Jacobs Design Conversations: Elisa Giaccardi

Lecture | April 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Elisa Giaccardi

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Professor and designer Elisa Giaccardi will speak at Jacobs Hall.

Why the Berlin Painter? On Painting in the Dark: AHMA Noon Colloquium

Lecture | April 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 François Lissarrague, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

The AHMA Noon Colloquium is a series of informal papers presented at noon in 7205 Dwinelle Hall.

Translation as Communication across Languages and Cultures

Lecture | April 7 | 3-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 (Classroom side)

 Juliane House, Hellenic American University

 Berkeley Language Center

TBD

Airport Capacity Prediction Using Machine Learning and its Applications

Lecture | April 7 | 4-5 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Sreeta Gorripaty, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: Air traffic managers and flight operators are faced with challenging decisions due to the uncertainty in capacity stemming from variability in weather, demand and human factors. Accurate airport capacity predictions are necessary to develop efficient decision-support tools for air traffic control and for planning effective traffic management initiatives. Capacity of an airport can be...   More >

Fact, Fiction, Data: Theory and Method in the Historiography of the Novel

Lecture | April 7 | 4-6 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 4229 - French Department Library

 Françoise Lavocat, Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle Comparative Literature

 Nicholas Paige, Professor, UC Berkeley - French Department

 Department of French

Ramachandra Guha | India at Seventy - A Historian's Report Card: The Inaugural Bhattacharya Lecture on the "Future of India"

Lecture | April 7 | 6-8 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Ramachandra Guha, Indian historian and Author

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Bhattacharya India Fund at UC Berkeley

Ramachandra Guha delivers the inaugural lecture in this newly established lecture series on the Future of India.

Black Life: Lynice Pinkard

Lecture | April 7 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Programmed by Chika Okoye and David Brazil

Join pastor, author, and community activist Lynice Pinkard for a lecture and conversation entitled “Our Usable Past.” Pinkard examines historical, cultural, and movement moments to reveal the particular gifts that New World Africans have brought and continue to bring, and explores the dialectical tensions between suffering and hope, sorrow and...   More >

Free for BAMPFA members, UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, retirees; 18 & under + guardian | $10 Non-UC Berkeley students, 65+, disabled persons | $12 General admission Event is included with admission

Monday, April 10, 2017

Kicking out the Rogues: Should Federations be Able to Expel Member States?

Lecture | April 10 | 12-1 p.m. |  Moses Hall

 Eva Marlene Hausteiner, Political Theory, University of Bonn

 Institute of European Studies, San Francisco Eric M. Warburg Chapter of the American Council on Germany

When, if at all, should members get expelled from a federation? While accession to or secession from a federal union – such as the United States – has long been the issue of heated debates, only recently have the federal center’s sanctions on members in violation of common rules and laws become an issue. How should, for example, the EU treat countries in violation of the rule of law? In her talk,...   More >

Diversified Farming Systems Roundtable with Matt Liebman

Lecture | April 10 | 4-5 p.m. | 112 Hilgard Hall

 Berkeley Food Institute, Center for Diversified Farming Systems

The development of modern, industrial agriculture has been characterized by large reductions in biological diversity, both across landscapes and within farming systems. Loss of biodiversity is particularly evident in the U.S. Corn Belt.

Dostoevsky And The Riddle Of The Self

Lecture | April 10 | 4-6 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 Dwinelle Hall Berkeley Language Center

 Yuri Corrigan, Boston University

 Department of Comparative Literature

Undergraduate Lecture Series (Math Monday): Quantum sets

Lecture | April 10 | 5-6 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Mariusz Wodzicki, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

A set is generally considered to be the simplest structure of Mathematics. Every set comes disguised under a number of other structures, however. While exploring some of them, we shall encounter what I propose to call “quantum sets”, by analogy with “quantum groups”.

ARCH Lecture: Kazuyo Sejima

Lecture | April 10 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Zellerbach Hall

 Kazuyo Sejima, SANAA

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), College of Environmental Design

MONDAY, APRIL 10, ZELLERBACH HALL -- Ms. Sejima, founding partner of SANAA, will lecture on her work. This lecture is presented with the Center for Japanese Studies and the UC Regents Lectures Program.

$3 General Admission

  Tickets go on sale April 1. Buy tickets online

ARCH Lecture: Kazuyo Sejima

Lecture | April 10 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Zellerbach Hall

 College of Environmental Design

MONDAY, APRIL 10, ZELLERBACH HALL -- Ms. Sejima, founding partner of SANAA, will lecture on her work. This lecture is presented with the Center for Japanese Studies and the UC Regents Lectures Program. Tickets $3, available on April 1.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Antisocial Computing: Explaining and Predicting Negative Behavior Online

Lecture | April 11 | 9:40-11 a.m. | 202 South Hall

 Justin Cheng

 Information, School of

New computational methods for understanding and predicting antisocial behavior and misinformation in online communities.

Blind Love, Romanticism, and Rousseau’s Julie

Lecture | April 11 | 12-2 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 4229 - French Department Library

 Alexandra Schamel, Visiting Scholar, Universität Munich

 Comparative Literature, French Studies Program, Institute of European Studies

The lecture examines to what extent Rousseau’s epistolary novel Julie ou la Nouvelle Héloïse modifies the visual paradigm of eighteenth-century anthropology, as seen in Rousseau’s ideology of substantial nature, by introducing dynamics which produce obscurité, an unattainable dimension of inwardness. The argument leads to the proposal that the subject’s strategies of hiding, masking and...   More >

Why Vikings, Frozen and Kahoot are Important for Norway’s Future – and What Norway can Learn from Silicon Valley

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Gro Dyrnes, Regional Director Americas, Director San Francisco and Silicon Valley, representing Norway in the Nordic Innovation House Board and in VisitNorway

 Institute of European Studies

The discussion over the last years in Norway has been centered around value creation “after oil”. This presentation will discuss advantages and challenges in Norway’s innovation system and culture and will also compare this to the Silicon Valley ecosystem and mentality.

Gro Dyrnes was formerly the Chief of Staff, Regional Director for Western Europe and the Nordics and IT-director, in...   More >

Blind Love, Romanticism, and Rousseau’s Julie

Lecture | April 11 | 12-2 p.m. | 4229 Dwinelle Hall

 Alexandra Schamel, Universität Munich, Dept. of Comparative Literature, French Studies & IES Visiting Scholar

 Institute of European Studies, Department of French

The lecture examines to what extent Rousseau’s epistolary novel Julie ou la Nouvelle Héloïse modifies the visual paradigm of eighteenth-century anthropology, as seen in Rousseau’s ideology of substantial nature, by introducing dynamics which produce obscurité, an unattainable dimension of inwardness. The argument leads to the proposal that the subject’s strategies of hiding, masking and...   More >

When Death Comes, He Steals the Infant: Children and Mortuary Practice on the Giza Plateau: AHMA Noon Colloquium

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Jessica Kaiser, UC Berkeley

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

The AHMA Noon Colloquium is a series of informal papers presented at noon in 7205 Dwinelle Hall.

Annual Martin Meyerson Faculty Research Lectures

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Thomas W. Laqueur

 Academic Senate

Thomas W. Laqueur
Helen Fawcett Distinguished Professor of History

How Dogs Make Us Human

100 Years Later: The Lynching of Grandpa Crawford

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | D-37 Hearst Field Annex

 College of Environmental Design

TUE, APR 11, 4:00pm. Using her family’s painful story as a lens through which we can examine our nation’s history, US History Scholar Doria Dee Johnson will describe how past injustices propelled her from the role of daughter to genealogist to activist to

Making Fit, Pricing Air: High-Rises Explode Across Phnom Penh

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Sylvia Nam, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, UC Irvine

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This talk examines pent-up expertise and upward pressures on land prices that have generated the market dynamics leading to the expansive rollout of condominium towers in Phnom Penh. The speaker received her Ph.D. in City & Regional Planning from UC Berkeley.

Sylvia Nam

100 Years Later: The Lynching of (Grandpa) Anthony Crawford: Has racial difference ended or simply evolved?

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Hearst Field Annex, Room D-37

 Doria Dee Johnson, Public Historian and Activist

 The On The Same Page Program, Equity and Inclusion, Vice Chancellor, College of Environmental Design, Department of African American Studies, Fannie Lou Hamer Black Resource Center, Department of Sociology

Doria Dee Johnson’s great-grandfather was lynched in South Carolina in 1916. Using her family’s painful story as a lens through which we can examine our nation’s history, Johnson will describe how past injustices propelled her from the role of daughter to genealogist to activist to scholar, and now international human rights and restorative justice agent.

 The talk and reception are free and open to all UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, and community members.

Public historian and activist Doria Dee Johnson

Neighbourhood Perceptions of the Ukraine Crisis: From the Soviet Union into Eurasia?

Lecture | April 11 | 4:30-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Katarzyna Stoklosa, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Public Management, Centre for Border Region Studies, University of Southern Denmark, Sønderborg; Jussi Laine, Assistant Professor of Multidisciplinary Border Studies at the Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland; James Scott, Professor of Multidisciplinary Border Studies at the Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland; Gerhard Besier, Director, Sigmund Neumann Institute (Berlin, Dresden, Flensburg); Steen Bo Frandsen, Head of Centre for Border Region Studies, University of Southern Denmark, Sønderborg

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Recent events in Ukraine and Russia and the subsequent incorporation of Crimea into the Russian state, with the support of some circles of inhabitants of the peninsula, have shown that the desire of people to belong to the Western part of Europe should not automatically be assumed. Discussing different perceptions of the Ukrainian-Russian war in neighbouring countries, this book offers an...   More >

“Advancing Human Rights in a Rightward World: Challenges for International Institutions and Civil Society”: A Talk By: NAVANETHEM PILLAY

Lecture | April 11 | 5-7 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Goldberg Room

 Center for Race and Gender, Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Human Rights Center, International and Area Studies (IAS)

“Advancing Human Rights in a Rightward World: Challenges for International Institutions and Civil Society”

A Talk By: NAVANETHEM PILLAY
United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 2008-2014 and Judge of the International Criminal Court, 2003-2008

Opening Remarks: PAUL ALIVISATOS, Vice Chancellor for Research and Samsung Distinguished Professor of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, UC,...   More >

CALIFORNIA Live! A Dream Denied? The Immigrant Experience in the Campus Community

Lecture | April 11 | 7-9:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Robert D. Haas ’64, Chairman-Emeritus, Levi Strauss & Co.; Saira Hussain ’09, J.D. ’13, Staff Attorney, Asian Law Caucus; Meng So ’10, M.A, Director, Undocumented Student Program, UC Berkeley; Seth Grossman, Chief of Staff, University of California President Janet Napolitano; Valeska Castaneda-Puerto ’16, Program Manager, Student Support, Cal Alumni Association

 Diane Dwyer ’87, Veteran Bay Area journalist, Dwyer Media Consulting

 Cal Alumni Association

Join the Cal Alumni Association as we present our first CALIFORNIA Live! event of 2017 — an exciting panel discussion, “A Dream Denied? The Immigrant Experience in the Campus Community.”

$20 CAA Member, $10 Current Student or Young Cal Alumni (Classes of 2006-2016), $25 General Admission

 View Free Live Streaming Event: https://californialiveonline.eventbrite.com. Register online or by calling David Smith at 510-900-8256, or by emailing David Smith at david.smith@alumni.berkeley.edu

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Howison Lectures in Philosophy

Lecture | April 12 | TBA Moses Hall

 Gisela Striker, Harvard University

 Department of Philosophy

Invisible Hands: Townsend Book Chat with Jonathan Sheehan

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Invisible Hands traces the rise in eighteenth-century Europe of a belief in self-organization—such that large systems, whether natural or human-made, are seen as capable of creating their own order, without any need for external direction.

Beyond the American Era in the Middle East: An Evolving Landscape of Turbulence: CMES Visiting Scholars Lecture Series

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Waleed Hazbun, CMES Visiting Scholar, American University of Beirut

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Lecture by Waleed Hazbun, Associate Professor of Political Studies at American University of Beirut and CMES Visiting Scholar.

The Digital Dilemma and the Future of Archaeological Publication: Stories from the Gabii Excavation

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Matt Naglak, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Classical Art and Archaeology

 Archaeological Research Facility

In the past month, the first major publication of the Gabii Project excavation was released, a large-scale international archaeological initiative led by Nicola Terrenato and the University of Michigan since 2009. What makes this publication unique is its entirely digital nature, where the standard textual narrative is intricately combined with the 3D recording and reconstruction inherent to our...   More >

USAID Learning Lab

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310, Banatao Auditorium

 Ticora Jones, Chief, Global Development Lab, USAID

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Ticora Jones is the Chief of Higher Education Solutions Network, Global Development Lab - ‎USAID

---------
Free and open to the public. Register online by Monday for a free lunch at UC Berkeley. The CITRIS Research Exchange Seminar Series is a weekly dialogue highlighting leading voices on societal-scale research issues. Each one-hour seminar starts at 12pm Pacific time and is hosted...   More >

Free

 Free lunch at UC Berkeley if you register by the Monday before the talk (lunches limited). Register online

California Countercultures: Diggers, Communes, and Counterculture and the Death of Hope with Peter Coyote

Lecture | April 12 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Get an inside view on the counterculture from Peter Coyote, an acclaimed actor, Emmy Award–winning narrator of documentary films, and author.

Admission to this lecture is free.

Reconsidering and Re-Framing Taiwan and its History: Aborigines, Colonial Rulers and Democratization

Lecture | April 12 | 12 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 J. Bruce Jacobs, School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University, Australia

 Wen-hsin Yeh, History, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Although Chinese, such as Chiang Kai-shek and Mao Zedong, insisted that Taiwan had been part of China since time immemorial, in fact both only claimed Taiwan as a part of China in 1942. Genuine historical research (as opposed to political “historical” research) demonstrates that no permanent Han Chinese communities existed in Taiwan until after 1624, when the Dutch arrived and imported Han...   More >

Brexit and its Aftershocks: Reimagining British Politics

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Matt Beech, Director of the Centre for British Politics at the University of Hull (UK) and Visiting Scholar at the Center for British Studies in the Institute for European Studies

 Institute of European Studies

The United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union undoubtedly poses an existential problem for the EU. It is also likely that the institutions of the oldest and most stable multi-nation state will require reform in the post-Brexit era. In other words, the aftershocks of Brexit will probably necessitate a reimagining of British politics in each nation and region of the United Kingdom. At...   More >

Learning from Legends: Bill Somerville in conversation with Margaret Jenkins

Lecture | April 12 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94705

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Philanthropist Bill Somerville in conversation with Margaret Jenkins of the Margaret Jenkins Dance Company as OLLI @Berkeley celebrates local legends of the Fourth Age (80 and above) who continue to lead their diverse disciplines.

A Report from the Front Lines of Abortion Care: Lunch Talk with Julie Burkhart

Lecture | April 12 | 12:45-2 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Room 110

 Julie Burkhart, Trust Women Foundation

 If/When/How: Lawyering for Reproductive Justice

Please join the Berkeley Law chapter of If/When/How: Lawyering for Reproductive Justice for a lunch event with Julie Burkhart. Ms. Burkhart has opened abortion clinics in Kansas and Oklahoma, two of the states most hostile to reproductive health care access. She worked closely with Dr. George Tiller, an abortion provider in Kansas who was murdered for his work in 2009. Ms. Burkhart will share her...   More >

if/when/how presents Julie Burkhart

Lecture | April 12 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 110 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Law, Boalt School of

Please join the Berkeley Law chapter of If/When/How: Lawyering for Reproductive Justice for a lunch event with Julie Burkhart. Ms. Burkhart has opened abortion clinics in Kansas and Oklahoma, two of the states most hostile to reproductive health care access. She also worked closely Dr. George Tiller, an abortion provider in Kansas who was murdered for his work in 2009. Ms. Burkhart will share her...   More >

At the Edge of the Nation: The Southern Kurils and the Search for Russia’s National Identity

Lecture | April 12 | 4-6 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Paul Richardson, Lecturer, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

This paper takes up the issue of the remote and beguiling Southern Kuril Islands in order to explore divergent and contradictory ideas, convictions, and beliefs on what constitutes “national” identity in post-Soviet Russia. These islands – which are administered by Russia but claimed by Japan – present us with unique insights into the ways in which competing territorial visions of the nation are...   More >

Data Science and User Research at Facebook: The Two Cultures and the Hacker Way

Lecture | April 12 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 210 South Hall

 Danny Ferrante and Umer Farooq, Facebook

 Information, School of

Insight from data science director Danny Ferrante and user research manager Umer Farooq.

Critical Theory in Times of Crisis Working Group | Historical Gestures in the Cinematic Present | A Talk by Noa Steimatsky

Lecture | April 12 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Noa Steimatsky, Visiting Associate Professor of Italian Studies, UC Berkeley

 The Program in Critical Theory

In the flexible realms of cinematic time and movement, in oceans of contingent detail and the overwhelming expressivity of bodies and gestures—does history risk drowning in sensory response, in ritualistic absorption, in pleasure or in shock? The experience of presentness of the screened, time-based moving image can be maneuvered and intensified in ways that cut across a range of articulations,...   More >

Strange Alliances: Demons, Exorcists, and the Fight against Unbelief in Eighteenth-Century Italy

Lecture | April 12 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Federico Barbierato, University of Verona

 Department of Italian Studies, Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography, Bancroft Library, Designated Emphasis in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies

Presented by the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography.

Join us for Dr Barbierato’s lecture, followed by a round table discussion with UC Berkeley faculty:

Thomas Dandelet, History
Diego Pirillo, Italian Studies
Jonathan Sheehan, History

Co-sponsored by the Bancroft Library, the Department of Italian Studies, and the Renaissance and Early Modern Studies Designated...   More >

Applied History And The Uses (And Misuses) Of The Past

Lecture | April 12 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Dr. Fredrik Logevall, Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs and Professor of History, Harvard Kennedy School

 Institute of International Studies

Fredrik Logevall is the Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs at Harvard University, where he holds joint appointments in the Kennedy School of Government and the Department of History. He is the author or editor of nine books, most recently Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam (Random House, 2012), which won the Pulitzer Prize for History and...   More >

Cicero’s De Officiis – Stoic Ethics for Non-Stoics: Howison Lectures in Philosophy by Gisela Striker

Lecture | April 12 | 5:10 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Gisela Striker, Walter C. Klein Professor of Philosophy and the Classics, Emerita, Harvard University

 Graduate Division

Gisela Striker will present the Howison lecture on April 12, 2017 at 5:10 pm. Her lecture, titled "Cicero’s De Officiis – Stoic Ethics for Non-Stoics" is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

About the Lecture
Professor Striker will show how the Stoic philosopher Panaetius, on whose work Cicero based his own treatise, actually presented what might be seen as a...   More >

Gisela Striker

The Case Against the Supreme Court: Uci Law Dean Erwin Chemerinsky at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | April 12 | 6-7:15 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Hass C230

 ERWIN CHEMERINSKY, Founding Dean of UCI Law School

 The Berkeley Forum

Although UC Irvine School of Law Dean Erwin Chemerinsky has always regarded the law as “the most powerful tool for social change,” in recent years he has become a notable critic of the Supreme Court. In light of current events such as Obergefell v. Hodges, the 2015 case that legalized same-sex marriage, and the unsuccessful nomination of Chief Judge Merrick Garland, the Supreme Court has come...   More >

Thursday, April 13, 2017

EU State aid investigation into Apple's tax arrangement with Ireland

Lecture | April 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Helena Malikova, CFA, case manager with the Directorate General for Competition of the European Commission (EC) and EU Fellow at UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies

In August 2016 the European Commission requested Ireland to claim EUR 13 billion in unpaid taxes from Apple. Helena Malikova will present the European Commission's investigations under EU State aid rules into tax arrangements of companies and explain the Commission's recent decision in the Apple case. Apple’s case has raised numerous issues in the public debate such as: Why did EU chose to tackle...   More >

Roots of the Mongolian State: Genghis Khan's Survival and Pragmatism as Related in the Secret History of the Mongols

Lecture | April 13 | 4 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Robert Bedeski, Professor Emeritus, University of Victoria , Canada; Affiliate Professor, University of Washington (Jackson School of International Affairs); Honorary Doctorate, Mongolia Academy of Science

 UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

The year 1206 marked the beginning of the first Mongol State. Its genesis was overseen and led by Genghis Khan, whose conquests remain a formidable historical series of events. The Secret History narrates his biography as a tale of surviving repeated life threats and overcoming major enemies. From this history, I have extracted an existential framework to explain how he survived in a...   More >

Chingghis Khan

Vandals, Looters, Protestors, and Police: Consumer Culture and Street Politics Collide in Berlin, 1914-1945

Lecture | April 13 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Molly Loberg, Associate Professor of History at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, Austrian Marshall Foundation

After the First World War and 1918 Revolution, political partisans and commercial entrepreneurs took to the streets of Berlin and fought for the attention of crowds with posters, light displays, parades, traffic obstructions, and violence. New freedoms had transformed city streets into the primary medium of communication, lens of perception, and stage of action for both political and economic...   More >

We Have Two Hands: Coping with the Present While Building Toward the Future of College Opportunity

Lecture | April 13 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium,Sutardja Dai Hall

 Michael S. McPherson, President, Spencer Foundation

 Center for Studies in Higher Education

If we were to start today to provide high-quality early education to every disadvantaged child and then follow that through with effective education through the elementary and secondary years, letting success build on success, we could in twenty years provide a much firmer grounding for equal college opportunity than we have now. But of course we can’t wait twenty years. Young people are...   More >

A Critical Theory of Justice

Lecture | April 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 220 Stephens Hall

 Rainer Forst, Professor of Political Theory and Philosophy, Goethe Universität

 The Program in Critical Theory

In this lecture, Forst will reflect on some of the basic issues for a critical theory of justice. What are the basic normative concepts for such an approach, and does it proceed by way of immanent critique? What kind of social realism is required for it to be sociologically grounded? What notion of emancipation is driving it?

Rainer Forst is Professor of Political Theory and Philosophy at...   More >

HTNM Lecture with Eden Medina, "Technology and Forensic Evidence Chilean Human Rights Investigations": History and Theory of New Media Lecture Series

Lecture | April 13 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Eden Medina, Indiana University, Bloomington

 Center for New Media

In 1991, Chilean forensic scientists began the exhumation of 126 skeletons from Patio 29, a plot in the General Cemetery where the military ordered the burial of hundreds the disappeared and executed. The exhumations began shortly after Chile returned to democracy and provided proof of the human rights crimes that had taken place during the Pinochet dictatorship. By 2002, the Chilean government...   More >

Breathing New Life Into Ancient Instruments: Ocarinas of Mesoamerica

Lecture | April 13 | 5:30 p.m. | Badè Museum of Biblical Archaeology, Pacific School of Religion, Holbrook Hall

 1798 Scenic Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94709

 Jose Cuellar, Professor Emeritus of Latina/Latino Studies, San Francisco State University

 Badè Museum of Biblical Archaeology

The Badè Museum is proud to host Dr. Jose Cuellar, Professor Emeritus of Latina/Latino Studies at San Francisco State University for an evening discussion and demonstration of ancient musical instruments from Mesoamerica.In 2012, Dr. Jose Cuellar was awarded the prestigious Hrdy Curatorial Fellowship by Harvard University’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology to research and record a...   More >

Friday, April 14, 2017

Can You Sing the Brabançonne? The Politics of Linguistic Nationalism in Belgium

Lecture | April 14 | 9-10 a.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Christopher R. Jackson, Ph.D., De Anza College

 Institute of European Studies, European Union Center

A new sort of nationalism seems to be on the rise in Europe and the United States, one based on racial and religious differences. How does this differ from the “old nationalism” of Europe? How did nationalism originally arise in a bilingual country such as Belgium? What is the future of nationalism in Belgium, and has English become the unofficial language of Brussels? Chris Jackson will...   More >

Modeling the Impact of Major Technological and Infrastructural Changes on Travel Demand

Lecture | April 14 | 4-5 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Feras El Zarwi, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Monday, April 17, 2017

Ashley Hunt, "Degrees of Visibility"

Lecture | April 17 | 12:30-2 p.m. | Moffitt Undergraduate Library, Rm. 340 - BCNM Commons

 Ashley Hunt

 Berkeley Center for New Media

Artist and activist Ashley Hunt is interested in how images, objects, maps, writing and performance can engage social ideas and actions, including those of social movements, daily life, the exercise of political power, and the disciplinary boundaries that separate our art worlds from the larger worlds in which they sit. His work looks to structures that allow people to accumulate power, and those...   More >

The Way Of The Strangers: Encounters With The Islamic State

Lecture | April 17 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Graeme Wood, National Correspondent for The Atlantic

 Institute of International Studies

Tens of thousands of men and women have left comfortable, privileged lives to join the Islamic State and kill for it. To them, its violence is beautiful and holy, and the caliphate a fulfillment of prophecy and the only place on earth where they can live and die as Muslims. The Way of the Strangers is an intimate journey into the minds of the Islamic State’s true believers. From the streets of...   More >

Freeze, Die, Come to Life. The many paths to immortality in post-Soviet Russia

Lecture | April 17 | 2-4 p.m. | 221 Kroeber Hall

 Anya Bernstein, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and of Social Studies, Harvard University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Anthropology

Through practices such as cryonics and plans to build ro, botic bodies for future "consciousness transfer," the Russian transhumanist movement has engendered competing practices of immortality as well as ontological debates over the immortal body and person. Drawing on an ethnography of these practices and plans, I explore controversies around rehgion and secularism within the movement as well as...   More >

Why does everybody want to see “Skam”? Identity and Gender in a Norwegian TV Serial

Lecture | April 17 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Lars Rune Waage, University of Stavanger

 Department of Scandinavian

Join the Department of Scandinavian for a talk by Lars Rune Waage, University of Stavanger.

Cultural Criticism in the Age of YouTube: Tiffany Shlain and Rolla Selbak, moderated by George Strompolos

Lecture | April 17 | 6:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Townsend Center for the Humanities, Arts + Design

Tiffany Shlain is a filmmaker, founder of the Webby Awards, and co-founder of the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences. Rolla Selbak is writer and director of the film Three Veils; creator of the web series Kiss Her I’m Famous and Grrl’s Guide to Filmmaking. George Strompolos is founder and CEO of the YouTube network Fullscreen

Arts + Design Mondays: Cultural Criticism in the Age of YouTube, with Tiffany Shlain and Rolla Selbak

Lecture | April 17 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Emmy-nominated filmmaker Shlain is founder of the Webby Awards and cofounder of the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences. Selbak is a filmmaker whose credits include the film Three Veils and the Web series Kiss Her I’m Famous. Moderated by George Strompolos.

Admission to this lecture is free.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

China and Global Governance: What Have We Learnt So Far?

Lecture | April 18 | 12:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Yves Tibergien, Director of the Institute of Asian Research, University of British Columbia

 Kevin O'Brien, Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

How disruptive is the rise of China to the global order? Is China acting as a disruptor, a systematic stabilizer, or global governance innovator? At a time of new global systemic risks and demands, fundamental power shift, and global institutional erosion, China’s actual global behaviour exhibits a high degree of diversity. Yves Tiberghien maps out this behavior across domains...   More >

Yves Tibergien

The future of fMRI in cognitive neuroscience

Lecture | April 18 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Professor Russell Poldrack, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

Professor Russ Poldrack from the Department of Psychology at Stanford University will speak in the Cognitive Neuroscience colloquium series.

"Shocking the Conscience of Mankind”: The Language of Transgression Before and After the Holocaust

Lecture | April 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Dirk Moses, Professor of Modern History at the University of Sydney

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies

This lecture questions the comforting story of progress that dominates academic and public understandings of mass criminality and international order. Widely regarded as a breakthrough in international law and morality, the genocide concept, modeled on the Holocaust, has transformed the “language of transgression” by making massive hate crimes the ultimate violations: motivated by ideologically...   More >

Speaking Amongst Ourselves: Democracy and Law: Tanner Lectures on Human Values by Seana Valentine Shiffrin

Lecture | April 18 | 4:10-6:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Seana Valentine Shiffrin, Professor of Philosophy, Pete Kameron Professor of Law and Social Justice, University of California, Los Angeles

 University of California, Berkeley

Seana Valentine Shiffrin will present a three day lecture series with commentary by Niko Kolodny, Richard R.W. Brooks, and Anna B. Stilz. This event will be held on April 18, 19, & 20, 2017. The first day's lecture is titled "Democratic Law." The second day's lecture is titled "Common and Constitutional Law: A Democratic Legal Perspective." Free and open to public. No tickets required.

Making Religious Peace: A Historical Perspective

Lecture | April 18 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Wayne Te Brake, Professor of History Emeritus, Purchase College, State University of New York

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Between 1529 and 1651 six major clusters of religious war engulfed Europe. Most of these wars ended in some form of political compromise, but even in the exceptional cases religious war eventually yielded to religious peace. Though historians traditionally focus on the wars, this presentation will focus on the broad and durable pattern of religious peace that followed.

Today, with headlines...   More >

“Queer Unhistoricism” and the Reception of Ancient Greece

Lecture | April 18 | 5 p.m. | 308A Doe Library

 Dr Dan Orrells, King's College London

 Department of Rhetoric

AIA Lecture - Early Hellenistic royal ideology in the marine thiasos of the neorion on Delos

Lecture | April 18 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Kristian L. Lorenzo, Monmouth College

 Archaeological Institute of America - San Francisco Society

In Greek mythology the most important thiasos, or procession of individuals dancing and singing in honor of a god, was that of Dionysios and his followers or just his followers. Its aquatic counterpart, the marine thiasos, included Poseidon (sometimes), Nereids and Tritons accompanied by both mythical and real marine creatures. Demetrios Poliorketes built the neorion on Delos to house a dedicated...   More >

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Character: A Concept That Does Not Stand Still

Lecture | April 19 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Carlos Reis, University of Coimbra

 Institute of European Studies

This lecture starts with recent studies on the theory of the character as an unstable narrative category that is subject to transformations determined by the historical contexts in which it is represented. Nineteenth-century fiction reveals different concepts and performances of literary characters, in some cases foreshadowing its dynamic treatment; this treatment is confirmed by developments...   More >

California Countercultures: San Francisco Search and Destroy with V. Vale

Lecture | April 19 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Punk perspectives from V. Vale, a San Francisco cultural historian, writer, and keyboard player, and the founder of Search & Destroy and RE/SEARCH.

Admission to this lecture is free.

Revising Our Ethics?: A Report and Open Discussion on Revising the SAA Ethics Principles

Lecture | April 19 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Dr. Meg Conkey, Professor Emerita, Member Committee on Ethics, SAA, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

This presentation will present a short history of establishing ethics by the SAA, and where the COE is at this point in the revisions process. Input from the audience is desired!

Berkeley Ethics Bowl team 2013

On Suicide Bombers: CMES Visiting Scholars Lecture Series

Lecture | April 19 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Fatima Mojaddedi, UC President's Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Lecture by Fatima Mojaddedi, UC President's Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology.

Rogue Archives: Digital Cultural Memory and Media Foundations: Townsend Book Chat with Abigail De Kosnik

Lecture | April 19 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Rogue Archives examines the rise of self-designated archivists—fans, pirates, hackers—who have become practitioners of cultural preservation on the Internet, building freely accessible online collections of content.

PopUp Exhibition: Barbara Goldstein on Jewish Family Values in 19th-century Anti-Semitic Literature

Lecture | April 19 | 12-1 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Barbara Goldstein is a historian of European fascism. She received her PhD from the University of Vienna, Austria with a dissertation devoted to newsreel films created by the Austrian Police between 1929-1938 as part of governmental fascist propaganda campaigns.One of Goldstein’s focuses and special interests is in historic administrative structures and “infamous people” in the early-modern...   More >

Learning from Legends: Bella Feldman in conversation with Margaret Jenkins

Lecture | April 19 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94705

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Artist and sculptor Bella Feldman in conversation with Margaret Jenkins of the Margaret Jenkins Dance Company as OLLI @Berkeley celebrates local legends of the Fourth Age (80 and above) who continue to lead their diverse disciplines.

From Theory to Practice: Empowering Users to Make Privacy Decisions in Mobile Environments

Lecture | April 19 | 1:10-2:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Serge Egelman

 Information, School of

How can your phoneâs operating system help you make smart decisions about personal privacy?

Acting Globally: Memoirs of Brazil’s Assertive Foreign Policy

Lecture | April 19 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Ambassador Celso Amorim

 Center for Latin American Studies

Amorim will discuss his new book, Acting Globally: Memoirs of Brazil’s Assertive Foreign Policy.

Celso Amorim is Brazil’s longest-serving foreign minister (1993-1994; 2003-2010). He was also Minister of Defense from 2011 to 2014. In 2009, Foreign Policy magazine referred to him as the “world’s best foreign minister.”

Authoritarian Soft Power? Russia, International Cyber Conflict, and the Rise of “Information Warfare”

Lecture | April 19 | 4-6 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Jaclyn Kerr, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Center for Global Security Research, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Institute of International Studies

In the lead-up to the November 2016 U.S. presidential election, the American media audience was barraged by a surprising display of confidential information and correspondence stemming from hacked private and organizational emails and other records, most notably from the Democratic National Committee (DNC).  After months of speculation concerning Russian involvement in the hacking which led to...   More >

Conveying Climate Change: New Media Art, Science, and Activism

Lecture | April 19 | 4-5 p.m. | 250 Sutardja Dai Hall

 DJ Spooky, aka Paul Miller

 Center for New Media

DJ Spooky, aka Paul Miller, is hosting the March for Science in Washington DC on April 22. A large group of scientists are protesting the Trump Administration’s politicized deletion of data from many Federal Agencies, such as NASA and the EPA, and the overall lack of engagement with data about Climate Change.

DJ Spooky’s discussion will highlight the need for artists and creatives to engage...   More >

Pauline Sperry Undergraduate Lecture: Where Number Theory Meets Network Optimization

Lecture | April 19 | 4-5 p.m. | Evans Hall, 60 Evans

 Elena Fuchs, UC Davis

 Department of Mathematics

In the early 70’s, the concept of “expander graphs” was introduced as an optimal model for networks of arbitrary size. Back then, it was not even known whether such graphs exist or not. Today, we not only know that they exist, but have seen their importance come up in a great spectrum of fields in mathematics and computer science. In this talk, we will explore what these graphs are and give...   More >

At Scale and under Pressure: How Social Media Moderate, Choreograph, and Censor Public Discourse

Lecture | April 19 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Tarleton Gillespie

 Information, School of

How should social media police inappropriate speech and anti-social behavior?

Speaking Amongst Ourselves: Democracy and Law: Tanner Lectures on Human Values by Seana Valentine Shiffrin

Lecture | April 19 | 4:10-6:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Seana Valentine Shiffrin, Professor of Philosophy, Pete Kameron Professor of Law and Social Justice, University of California, Los Angeles

 University of California, Berkeley

Seana Valentine Shiffrin will present a three day lecture series with commentary by Niko Kolodny, Richard R.W. Brooks, and Anna B. Stilz. This event will be held on April 18, 19, & 20, 2017. The first day's lecture is titled "Democratic Law." The second day's lecture is titled "Common and Constitutional Law: A Democratic Legal Perspective." Free and open to public. No tickets required.

Attention to Detail: A Conversation with Don Carson

Lecture | April 19 | 6-7:15 p.m. |  UC Berkeley Campus

 Don Carson, Former Disney Imagineer and Designer

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation, ImagiCal

Ever wondered how imagination becomes reality with the beloved attractions at Walt Disney theme parks? Want to understand how design influences how we have come to perceive “The Happiest Place on Earth?” Join us Wednesday, April 19th at 6:00 pm as we host former Senior Show Designer for Walt Disney Imagineering, Don Carson. He has directed projects like Splash Mountain, Mickey’s Toontown, and...   More >

  Buy tickets online

ARCH Lecture: Adam Nathaniel Furman

Lecture | April 19 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED., APRIL 19 -- Adam Nathaniel Furman, the Architecture Foundations 2016 &quot;New Architect&quot;, will discuss his practice and research.