<< March 2017 >>

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

2017 COEH-CE Webinar Series: An Overview of Occupational Epidemiology and the Healthy Worker Effect with Erika Garcia, PhD Candidate

Lecture | March 1 | 10:30-11:30 a.m. |  2017 COEH-CE Webinar Series

 Erika Garcia, http://ehs.sph.berkeley.edu/garcia

 Center for Occupational and Environmental Health Continuing Education (COEH-CE) Program

In this webinar, Erika Garcia, a PhD candidate in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, UC Berkeley will provide an overview of occupational epidemiology and the Healthy Worker Effect.

Objectives
On completion of this webinar participants will:
Gain an understanding of the purpose of occupational epidemiology
Become aware of exposure assessment methods in occupational...   More >

$0 Free Webinar, $30 CE Credit

  Enrollment opens January 30. Enroll online or by calling 510-643-7277, or by emailing info@coehce.org by March 1.

The Director’s Cut: Challenges and Delights of Oral History Narratives with Syrian Refugee Women: CMES Visiting Scholars Lecture Series

Lecture | March 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ozlem Ezer, CMES Visiting Scholar

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Graduate workshop to follow.

PopUp Exhibition: Alan Elbaum | Between Magic and Medicine: Karaite Manuscripts at The Magnes

Lecture | March 1 | 12-1 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Alan Elbaum is a second-year medical student at the UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program. While at Berkeley, he is working toward a master's degree in the history of medicine, using manuscripts from the Cairo Genizah. More broadly, Elbaum is interested in the literature and culture of the Jews of Arab lands; historical perspectives on medicine and the social determinants of health; and how...   More >

Mobile Technologies for Health

Lecture | March 1 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310, Banatao Auditorium

 Ida Sim, Professor, UCSF

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Dr. Ida Sim is a primary care physician, informatics researcher, and entrepreneur. She is a Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, where she co-directs Biomedical Informatics at UCSF's Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute. Her current research focuses on the use of mobile apps and sensors to improv

Free

 Free lunch available (limited #s). You must register by the Monday before the event for lunch. Register online

California Countercultures: Pynchon’s Paranoid California with Michael Cohen

Lecture | March 1 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

In 1964, Thomas Pynchon applied for graduate study in the math department at UC Berkeley. Fortunately for world literature, Berkeley rejected Pynchon, who went on to write several of the greatest works of postwar American literature, including The Crying of Lot 49 (1966), Gravity’s Rainbow (1973), Vineland (1990), and Inherent Vice (2009). Though he was rejected by Cal, the Long Island–born...   More >

Free for BAMPFA members, UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, retirees; 18 & under + guardian | $10 Non-UC Berkeley students, 65+, disabled persons | $12 General admission | Event is included with admission

Models of Settlement Systems in Pre-Hispanic and Modern Mesoamerica

Lecture | March 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Mario Castillo, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

This talk details collaborative work on settlement patterns in the Valle de Mezquital, Mexico, with scholars and descendant community members. The first an analysis of regional settlement ecology in the Tula region of Ancient Mesoamerica. The second is a survey of vernacular housing from Mexico's post-revolutionary period. In regards to Tula this presentation will discuss the development of a...   More >

Queer Reparations of Russia’s Periphery: in non-Metropolitan Time and Space

Lecture | March 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Veronika Lapina, Wayne Vucinich Fellow, Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, Stanford University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Guided by the assumption that some spaces more than others produce and are shaped by homophobia, researchers seem to fall into a trap of paranoia, which Eve Sedgwick famously narrated as paying attention only to how systemic oppression functions, thus drifting away from illuminating the ways in which sexuality exhibits itself. Contagious paranoia rearticulates spaces and places - even territories...   More >

The Cost of Color: The Health and Social Consequences of Skin Color for People Today: Charles M. and Martha Hitchcock Lectures by Dr. Nina Jablonski

Lecture | March 1 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Dr. Nina Jablonski, Evan Pugh University Professor of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University

 Graduate Division

Dr. Nina Jablonski will present the Hitchcock lectures on February 28 and March 1, 2017. The second lecture is titled "The Cost of Color: The Health and Social Consequences of Skin Color for People Today" and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

About the lecture
Skin is the primary interface between ourselves and our environment, and changes in the...   More >

Dr. Nina Jablonski

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Tech Talk 1: Tech and the ICC

Lecture | March 2 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 110 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 International Criminal Court Investigator

 Human Rights Center

Join the Human Rights Center for a discussion with an ICC investigator on the use of and potential for open source investigations—the combing of publicly accessible resources like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube—to get legal accountability for war crimes, crimes against humanity and
genocide. This spring, HRC will host three tech events at UC
Berkeley with leading experts in the field speaking...   More >

Rediscovering Clarice Lispector

Lecture | March 2 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Katrina Dodson

 Center for Latin American Studies

Katrina Dodson, translator of The Complete Stories by Clarice Lispector and awardee of Pen Translation Prize discusses “Lispectormania”

A statue of Clarice Lispector and her dog in Rio de Janeiro. Photo by Fernando Frazao/Agencia Brasil

Migrating the Black Body: The African Diaspora and Visual Culture: CRG Thursday Forum Series

Lecture | March 2 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Prof. Leigh Raiford, African American Studies); Prof. Heiki Raphael-Hernandez, University of Maryland

 Center for Race and Gender

The Center for Race & Gender Thursday Forum Series presents...

Migrating the Black Body: The African Diaspora and Visual Culture
A roundtable with Prof. Leigh Raiford, African American Studies) and Prof. Heiki Raphael-Hernandez, University of Maryland

Migrating the Black Body explores how visual media-from painting to photography, from global independent cinema to Hollywood movies, from...   More >

Queer Potentialities: on Space and Communities

Lecture | March 2 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 1000 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

THU MAR 2, 5-6:30 pm. Queer Urbanisms, a student-led initiative at UC Berkeley’s Architecture department, invites you to a talk by Olivier Vallerand.

HTNM Lecture with Kavita Philip, "The Pirate Function"

Lecture | March 2 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Moffitt Undergraduate Library, 340, BCNM Commons

 Kavita Philip, University of California Irvine

 Center for New Media

Pirates who threaten to invert power relations through appropriating things less tangible than ships and bodies have become a growing concern for the managers of twenty-first-century economic globalization. Appropriating, modifying and sharing a range of less concrete but equally crucial objects, intellectual property “robbers” today traffic in images, music, and software. Although business...   More >

Donner ce que l'on n'a pas:: Les gestes paradoxaux du 'Testament'

Lecture | March 2 | 5-7 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 4229 - French Department Library

 Jacqueline Cerquiglini-Toulet, Professor Emerita of the University of Paris-Sorbonne

 Department of French

Grappling with Cure

Lecture | March 2 | 5-7 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Tilden Room

 Eli Clare, Author, Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure

 Public Health, School of

Join writer and activist Eli Clare as he grapples with this knot of contradictions, maintaining that neither an anti-cure politics nor a pro-cure worldview can account for the messy, complex relationships we have with our body-minds.

  Register online

Lives of the Great Languages: Cosmopolitan Languages in the Medieval Mediterranean: 2017 Marie G. Ringrose Graduate Lecture

Lecture | March 2 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Karla Mallette, University of Michigan

 Department of Italian Studies, Department of English, Department of Ethnic Studies, Department of Geography, Department of Linguistics, Near Eastern Studies, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Medieval Studies Program, The Program in Romance Languages and Literatures, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The Ringrose Lecture, begun in 1998, features a distinguished scholar in some aspect of Italian Studies chosen by a committee of UCB graduate students, who also organize and run the event. The lecture is one of many department activities made possible by the generous contributions of Marie G. Ringrose, a UCB alumna.

Rereading Glaucon's challenge: Plato's distinctions in goodness: Sather Classical Lectures

Lecture | March 2 | 6 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Mary Margaret McCabe, King's College London

 Department of Classics

The fourth lecture in the 2017 Sather series "Seeing and Saying: Plato on Virtue and Knowledge"

Drawn from Water: An American Poet, an Ethiopian Family, an Israeli Story

Lecture | March 2 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Dina Elenbogen

 Center for Jewish Studies, Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israel Studies, Near Eastern Studies

What do we mean by home? In Drawn From Water, American Jewish writer Dina Elenbogen explores her thirty-year friendship with Ethiopian Jewish immigrants in Israel as they struggle in a new country while dealing with her own desire to join them there.

  RSVP online

Friday, March 3, 2017

Jacobs Design Conversations: Barry Katz

Lecture | March 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Barry Katz

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Professor, author, and IDEO fellow Barry Katz will speak at Jacobs Hall.

Anti-Corruption Laws in Latin America: Lunch Talk with Matt Schreiber, Law '85

Lecture | March 3 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 132 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Matt Schreiber, Juniper Networks

 Berkeley Journal of International Law

Join the Berkeley Journal of International Law at this special lunch talk featuring Matt Schreiber (Boalt Hall '85), the Director of Legal Affairs, Americas, and Assistant General Counsel of Juniper Networks (and former BJIL alumnus). Matt is an expert on international anti-corruption practices in Latin America. He will share with us current developments in compliance, anti-bribery, and...   More >

Multi-Camera Localization and Mapping for Autonomous Vehicles

Lecture | March 3 | 4-5 p.m. | 240 Bechtel Engineering Center

 Steve Waslander, University of Waterloo

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Multi-Camera Localization and Mapping for Autonomous Vehicles

Lecture | March 3 | 4-5 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Steve Waslander, University of Waterloo

 Institute of Transportation Studies


Monday, March 6, 2017

DCRP Lecture: Summer Gray

Lecture | March 6 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

MON, MAR 6, 11:00am in 112 Wurster Hall. Please join us for, &quot;Holding Back the Tide: Coastal Infrastructure, Resilience, and Justice in Guyana and the Maldives,&quot; a lecture by Dr. Summer Gray

Europe at a Crossroads

Lecture | March 6 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Ruth Jacoby, Former Ambassador of Sweden

 Institute of European Studies, Consulate-General of Sweden

Europe has arrived at a challenging juncture in its history, economics and politics. There is Brexit, growing right-wing, populist and anti-European movements in Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, but also in core EU-countries such as the Netherlands, Germany, and France, as well as in the Nordic countries. Growth is still sluggish after the financial crisis in 2008-9, unemployment is high, and...   More >

A Psychologist's Exile from Fascism: Renata Calabresi from Italy to New York

Lecture | March 6 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Patrizia Guarnieri, Professor of Cultural and Social History, University of Florence

 Department of History, Department of Psychology

Fascism and the racial laws of 1938 dramatically changed the scientific research and the academic community. Guarnieri focuses on psychology, from its promising origins to the end of the WWII. Psychology was marginalized in Italy both by the neo-idealistic reaction against science, and fascism (unlike Nazism) with long- lasting consequences. Academics and young scholars were persecuted because...   More >

Strindberg — In Photographic Images

Lecture | March 6 | 4-6 p.m. | 6415 Dwinelle Hall

 Björn Meidal, Uppsala University

 Department of Scandinavian

Björn Meidal is a professor of Comparative Literature at Uppsala University.

Materialised Knowledge in Renaissance Art and Science: The Production and Representation of Flemish Scientific Instruments

Lecture | March 6 | 5 p.m. | 308A Doe Library

 Koenraad Van Cleempoel, Faculty of Architecture in Hasselt University (Belgium)

 Institute of European Studies

Scientific instruments of the renaissance period well represent the concept of "materialised knowledge." They are carriers of ideas as well as very elegant and refined objects. The lecture will discuss astrolabes, globes, sundials and armillary spheres with a particular emphasis on the Flemish context: between c. 1525 and c. 1580 the university city of Louvain became Europe's most important...   More >

An Evening of Russian Poetry with Kirill Medvedev (in Russian)

Lecture | March 6 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Kirill Medvedev, Poet, Translator, Political Activist, and member of rock group Arkadii Kots

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Slavic Literature "Kruzhok", Townsend Center for the Humanities

Kirill Feliksevich Medvedev is a Russian poet, translator, and political activist, as well as member of the rock group Arkadii Kots. Join Medvedev for a reading of his poems and a general discussion on the current political climate in Russia. Born in Moscow, Medvedev’s work delves fiercely into the political apathy of contemporary Russian society and especially the country’s cultural...   More >

LAEP Lecture: Maurice Cox

Lecture | March 6 | 6-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

MON, MAR 6. 6PM, 112 Wurster, Join LAEP for &quot;WHY BLACK LANDSCAPES MATTER&quot; with Maurice Cox, Planning Director for the City of Detroit.

ATC Lecture — Tanya Zimbardo, “Black Sun: Reflections on Otto Piene and Aldo Tambellini”: Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium

Lecture | March 6 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Barbo Osher Theater

 Tanya Zimbardo, SFMOMA

 Center for New Media

Otto Piene, The Proliferation of the Sun, 1966-67, 2014 at Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin; photo: Jasmine Powell
Tanya Zimbardo is a contemporary art curator based in San Francisco. As the assistant curator of media arts at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), Zimbardo is currently curating the exhibitions Runa Islam: Verso and New Work: Kerry Tribe and co-curating Nam June Paik and...   More >

Arts + Design Mondays: Black Sun: Reflections on Otto Piene and Aldo Tambellini, with Tanya Zimbardo

Lecture | March 6 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Tanya Zimbardo is a contemporary art curator based in San Francisco. As the assistant curator of media arts at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), Zimbardo is currently curating the exhibitions Runa Islam: Verso and New Work: Kerry Tribe and co-curating Nam June Paik and Soundtracks. Zimbardo has organized and co-organized exhibitions and select screening programs at SFMOMA. Current...   More >

Admission to this lecture is free.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Calibrating the Chinese Citizen: Propaganda, E-Petitioning and Big Data-Driven Governance

Lecture | March 7 | 12 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Christian Göbel, Chinese Politics and Society, Institute of East Asian Studies, University of Vienna

 Kevin O'Brien, Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In China, the majority of city-level governments has set up websites
where citizen petitions and government responses can be reviewed by the general public. What is the political logic guiding the establishment of such open petitioning websites? Analyzing policy documents, government websites and open petitions, this paper argues that open petitioning websites represent a form of calibration of...   More >

online petitioning website

Developing and Testing a New Measure of Organizational Readiness for Implementing Change

Lecture | March 7 | 12:40-2 p.m. | 714C University Hall

 Bryan Weiner, PhD, Professor of Global Health and Health Services, University of Washington

 Health Policy and Management

Organizational readiness is said to be critical for successful change implementation. But, what is organizational readiness and how do you measure it? This talk will describe how organizational readiness has been conceived and measured in health services and other fields. A research program to systematically develop and test a theory-based, reliable, valid, and brief measure of organizational...   More >

Trumping Progress on Global Climate: What's in the cards?

Lecture | March 7 | 4-6 p.m. | 50 Birge Hall

 Professor Max Auffhammer, Professor, Agricultural and Resource Economics

 Interdisciplinary Studies Field Major (ISF)

Professor Max Auffhammer will discuss the global ramifications of the Trump Administration on climate change. This lecture is one of a series of guest lectures as part of ISF 198.5 "The 2016 US Election in Global Context: A semester-long teach-in".

Alliances In The Indo-Pacific: A Practitioner's Perspective

Lecture | March 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Vice Admiral Robert L. Thomas, Jr.

 Institute of International Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

Vice Adm. Robert Thomas graduated from the University of California with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. He holds a Master of Science in National Security Studies from the National War College.

As a career submarine officer, Thomas has served on fast-attack submarines operating in both U.S. Pacific Command and U.S. Central Command theaters of operation. His assignments included USS...   More >

Till We Have Built Jerusalem: Architects of a New City

Lecture | March 7 | 6-8 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Warren Room

 Adina Hoffman, Essayist, Critic, and Biographer

 Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israel Studies

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

PopUp Exhibition: Rachel Deblinger on the Holocaust in the Age of Digital History

Lecture | March 8 | 12-1 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Rachel Deblinger is the Director of the Digital Scholarship Commons at the UC Santa Cruz University Library. Dr. Deblinger received a PhD in History from UCLA, with a dissertation titled ‘In a world still trembling’: American Jewish philanthropy and the shaping of Holocaust survivor narratives in postwar America (1945-1953). This work revealed how American Jews first came to know stories about...   More >

California Countercultures: Experimental Art and Subjectile Space with Dena Beard

Lecture | March 8 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Dena Beard, The Lab

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Dena Beard, executive director of The Lab since 2014, has led the organization through a rehabilitation of its facility and is inaugurating a new program of commissioned artistic projects with Ellen Fullman, Jacqueline Gordon, Dora García, and Brontez Purnell. Beard was formerly assistant curator at BAMPFA, where she organized exhibitions with D-L Alvarez, Lutz Bacher, Anna Halprin, Desirée...   More >

Admission to this lecture is free.

Venkat Srinivasan | Thirteen Ways of Looking at Institutional History: Building Varying Digital Narratives from Interconnected Science Archives

Lecture | March 8 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Venkat Srinivasan, Visiting Researcher, National Centre for Biological Sciences in Bangalore, India

 Adnan Malik, Curator for South Asian Collections, UC Berkeley Library

 Institute for South Asia Studies, South/Southeast Asia Library | UC Berkeley Library, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk about a digital science archive experiment that connects archival material, journalistic work, and scientific research.

The European Union’s response to radical right-wing populism

Lecture | March 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Ludvig Norman, Uppsala University

 Institute of European Studies

The rise of radical right-wing populism is often regarded as one of the most serious challenges to European democracy and European political cooperation. In recent years, extreme nationalist parties have accumulated considerable support in European elections. In some EU member states, most notably Poland and Hungary, governments are increasingly challenging liberal democracy, taking steps towards...   More >

Computational Imaging for 3D Gigapixel Microscopy

Lecture | March 8 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310, Banatao Auditorium

 Laura Waller, Associate Professor, EECS, UC Berkeley

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Laura Waller leads the Computational Imaging Lab, which develops new methods for optical imaging, with optics and computational algorithms designed jointly. She holds the Ted Van Duzer Endowed Professorship and is a Senior Fellow at the Berkeley Institute of Data Science (BIDS),

Free

 Free lunch available (limited #s). You must register by the Monday before the event for lunch. Register online

Hidden Hitchcock: Townsend Book Chat with D.A. Miller

Lecture | March 8 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

In Hidden Hitchcock, D.A. Miller does what seems impossible: he discovers what has remained unseen in the movies of this best-known of filmmakers.

Where the Heart Is: Thoughts on Home and Contemporary Encampments at the Albany Bulb

Lecture | March 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Annie Danis, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

A former landfill turned informal public space and long-term encampment, “the Bulb” had been home to dozen of residents in an informal settlement from the late 1980s until the summer of 2013. After legal battles with the city all residents were evicted and a number of projects to document and aid the fractured community began. One such project was the Archaeology of the Albany Bulb, which...   More >

View from the Top: Martin Anstice: Innovation-Driven Leadership Sustaining a High- Performance Organization

Lecture | March 8 | 3-4 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium, 3rd floor

 Martin Anstice, President and CEO, Lam Research

 College of Engineering, College of Chemistry

Islam and Christianity in Competition: Armenian Martyrdoms of the Late 12th Century

Lecture | March 8 | 4-6 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Sergio La Porta, Haig and Isabel Berberian Professor of Armenian Studies, California State University, Fresno

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

On October 24, 1170, a Muslim convert to Christianity called Joseph was martyred by the Turkish Atabeg of Azerbaijan for apostasy in the city of Duin. Joseph’s martyrdom is just one of a series of martyrdoms from the second half of the twelfth century preserved in Armenian synaxaria and homiliaries. This presentation will argue that rather than reflect a climate of religious persecution and...   More >

Digital Wedges: Pedagogy, Visualization, and the Cuneiform Script

Lecture | March 8 | 5 p.m. | 356 Barrows Hall

 Eduardo Escobar, UC Berkeley

 Arts & Humanities, Letters & Science Division of

Cuneiform, the world’s oldest writing system, provides an incredible dataset for the computational analysis of ancient knowledge. This talk consists of two parts. First, I describe the pedagogical potential of a collaborative tool that analyzes cuneiform texts for their most frequently used signs; second, I show how network analysis can aid in visualizing, contextualizing, and disambiguating some...   More >

Artist’s Talk: Erica Deeman

Lecture | March 8 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Join the artist of Silhouettes to explore the legacy of the portrait, physiognomy, and people’s desire to read the face.

Free for BAMPFA members, UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, retirees; 18 & under + guardian | $10 Non-UC Berkeley students, 65+, disabled persons | $12 General admission

Chester W. Nimitz Memorial Lecture: Alliances in the Indo-Pacific; A Practitioner's Perspective

Lecture | March 8 | 7 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Vice Admiral Robert L. Thomas, USN (Ret.), Former Director, Navy Staff

 Military Sciences Program (ROTC)

The Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz Memorial Lectureship annually brings to the University of California at Berkeley a distinguished scholar, professional military person or government official for a series of lectures on specific national security subjects. The Lectureship provides a better and fuller understanding and awareness of national security concerns in the light of geopolitical balance,...   More >

ARCH/AIA East Bay Lecture: Amale Andraos

Lecture | March 8 | 7:30-9 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

MAR 8, 7:30pm** Amale Andraos, Dean of the Columbia University GSAPP, will lecture here on his work. This lecture is co-presented with the AIA East Bay. **Please note the late start time.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Redefining Japaneseness: Japanese Americans in the Ancestral Homeland

Lecture | March 9 | 2-5 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall

 Dr. Jane H. Yamashiro, Author

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), The Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies Program

Lecture and Book Signing with Dr. Jane H. Yamashiro
Introduction by Michael Omi


Redefining Japaneseness chronicles how Japanese American migrants to Japan experience
both racial inclusion and cultural dislocation while negotiating between the categories of Japanese and “foreigner.” Drawing from extensive observations and interviews with Japanese Americans who are...   More >

DiPerna Lecture: Regularity and asymptotics of solutions to the porous medium equation

Lecture | March 9 | 4-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Herbert Koch, Bonn University

 Department of Mathematics

The porous medium equation is one of the simplest equations describing the propagation of gas in a porous medium. Its most striking feature is the propagation of the front, which is the boundary of the area filled by gas. Many questions about its regularity are open.

In this lecture I will explain old and new results and open questions. Caffarelli devised a scheme for proving regularity of...   More >

Staging Grounds: Camp and the Asian Female Body in Contemporary Dance

Lecture | March 9 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 44B Dwinelle Hall

 Martha Nguyen Donohue

 Center for Race and Gender, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Department of Ethnic Studies, The Institute of International Studies Interdisciplinary Faculty Program on Gender and the Transpacific World

Maura Nguyen Donohue shares her choreographic focus on the site of the Asian body as a staging ground for complex cultural, racial, and gendered projections in American culture by discussing her 2011 dance work, strictly a female female. She will share how the deployment of a camp aesthetic allows her to destabilize gender norms and traditional concert dance audience/performer relationships....   More >

States of Apology: The Culture of Commemoration: CRG Thursday Forum Series

Lecture | March 9 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

STATES OF APOLOGY: The Culture of Commemoration

Sexual Slavery and the Memorialization of Comfort Women
Amandu Su, English

Politics of Reconciliation in South Korean War and Peace Memorial Museums
Kristen Sun, Ethnic Studies

The Pilgrimage: Interethnic Coalitions and Cross-Race Solidarity at Former Sites of Japanese American Confinement
Desirée Valadares, Architecture

Excavating a Sacred Outcropping at Northwest Saqqara: The Ramesside Tomb of Isisnofret

Lecture | March 9 | 5-6 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall

 Nozomu Kawai, Associate Professor, Kanazawa University (Japan)

 Near Eastern Studies

A Japanese mission has been excavating at a remote rocky outcropping to the North-west of the major cemetery in Saqqara since 1991. The team has discovered several important archaeological remains at the site. In this lecture, some major highlights will be represented and the most recent work in the Ramesside tomb of Isisnofret led by Nozomu Kawai will be discussed in detail.

Nozomu Kawai...   More >

Ramesside tomb of Isisnofret

The Prison Church: Historical, Theological and Ethnographic Perspectives

Lecture | March 9 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Jason Sexton, Lecturer, Cal State Fullerton

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Jason Sexton is a Lecturer in the Honors Program at Cal State Fullerton, where he teaches a variety of interdisciplinary courses. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of St. Andrews, and has written widely in the areas of California studies, prison studies, religious studies, and contemporary theology...   More >

Plato's lexicon of logos: Sather Classical Lectures

Lecture | March 9 | 6 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Mary Margaret McCabe, King's College London

 Department of Classics

The fifth lecture in the 2017 Sather series "Seeing and Saying: Plato on Virtue and Knowledge"

ARCH Lecture: James Carpenter “Light in the Public Realm”

Lecture | March 9 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

THURS., MAR 9, 6:30pm, 102 Wurster -- At the intersection of art, engineering and architecture “Light in the Public Realm” will explore James Carpenter’s focus upon the phenomenological qualities of light as a central organizing principle of the public re

Palestine...it is something colonial

Lecture | March 9 | 6:30-9 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Ethnic Studies Library, 30 Stephens Hall

 Dr. Hatem Bazian

 Center for Race and Gender

Eastwind Books of Berkeley, The Ethnic Studies Library at UC Berkeley, and The Center for Race and Gender at UC Berkeley present



Palestine...it is something colonial
Dr. Hatem Bazian Book Launch Discussion

March 9, 2017
6:30pm - 9pm

Ethnic Studies Library
30 Stephens Hall
UC Berkeley

Registration

Professor Hatem Bazian (UC Berkeley) provides a decolonial analysis of...   More >

Friday, March 10, 2017

Katherine Schofield | The Place of Pleasure: Music in Mughal Thought and Society, 1593–1707

Lecture | March 10 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room)

 Katherine Butler Schofield, Senior Lecturer in Music, King's College London

 Munis Faruqui, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Studies, the University of California, Berkeley.

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative

A talk by Katherine Butler Schofield, cultural historian and ethnomusicologist whose work focuses on South Asia.

From Morphology to Structuralism: Goethe, Levi-Strauss, and the Sciences of the Concrete

Lecture | March 10 | 2-4 p.m. | Barrows Hall, 802 (Social Science Matrix)

 Michael Saman, Independent Scholar

 Townsend Center Working Group on Form and Formalism, Linguistic Anthropology Working Group

This talk addresses the core “epistemological attitude” that Lévi-Strauss says connects his work with Goethe’s, and, proceeding from this, traces out salient parallels between the interpretive paradigms and anthropological methods of both thinkers.

Transportation as a Language: Mobility management of China’s urban billion

Lecture | March 10 | 4-5 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Jinhua Zhao, MIT

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: The rapid urbanization and economic growth in China uniquely characterize her transportation challenges and corresponding solutions. Extraordinary growth calls for extraordinary measures. Boldness in both infrastructure development and policy design seems commonplace in China’s transportation arena. This talk, however, will present the subtleties in these bold designs through three...   More >

Dillenberg Lecture Series Presents: Pseudo-Arabic as a Marker of Christian Identity in Middle Byzantine Art and Architecture

Lecture | March 10 | 5-7 p.m. |  Doug Adams Gallery

 2465 Le Conte Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94709

 Alicia Walker, Associate Professor, Department of History of Art, Bryn Mawr College

 Center for the Arts & Religion at the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

"Things" can help us understand social identities, relationships, and practices in the medieval world, especially in situations where textual documentation is minimal or completely absent. This paper explores how pseudo-Arabic motifs on medieval Christian buildings and objects materialized social identities and spiritual authority among monastic communities across the eastern Mediterranean,...   More >

Working Group in Ancient Philosophy: Plato’s Butcher

Lecture | March 10 | 5-7 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Verity Harte, Yale University

 Townsend Working Group in Ancient Philosophy

Aaron Shurin and Kevin Killian

Lecture | March 10 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Aaron Shurin, professor/ writer; Kevin Killian, writer

 Sunnylyn Thibodeaux, author

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Aaron Shurin is the author of twelve books of poetry and prose, most recently The Skin of Meaning, and is professor emeritus at the University of San Francisco MFA in Writing program.

Kevin Killian, one of the original New Narrative writers, has written three novels, a book of memoirs, forty-five plays, four books of stories, and three books of poetry.

Programmer Sunnylyn Thibodeaux is the...   More >

Free for BAMPFA members, UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, retirees; 18 & under + guardian | $10 Non-UC Berkeley students, 65+, disabled persons | $12 General admission Event is included with admission

Saturday, March 11, 2017

Hippie Modernism Forum: Liberated Territories

Lecture | March 11 | 1 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

From People’s Park to Black Panther Oakland, the notion of liberated territories shaped counterculture politics and their radical geographies. Anthony Raynsford, Bonnie Ora Sherk, and Lisa Uddin explore this heritage and its relevance for contemporary social engagement. Moderated by Sean Burns.

Free for BAMPFA members, UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, retirees; 18 & under + guardian | $10 Non-UC Berkeley students, 65+, disabled persons | $12 General admission Event is included with admission

Sunday, March 12, 2017

The Honorable J. Clifford Wallace Lecture Series: The Ups and Downs of Religious Freedom

Lecture | March 12 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Room 295

 Michael W. McConnell, Richard and Frances Mallery Professor of Law Director, Constitutional Law Center, Stanford Law School

 Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean and Jesse H. Choper Distinguished Professor of Law, University of California, Berkeley

 Jesse Choper, Earl Warren Professor of Public Law (Emeritus), University of California, Berkeley

 Frederick Gedicks, Guy Anderson Chair and Professor of Law, Brigham Young University

 Stephen Sugarman, Roger J. Traynor Professor, University of California, Berkeley

 Law, Boalt School of

Monday, March 12, 2017
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Warren Room 295, Berkeley Law

RSVP IS REQUIRED
RECEPTION IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING
https://berkeleylaw.wufoo.com/forms/michael-mcconnell/

Monday, March 13, 2017

Spinoza's Tragic Resources

Lecture | March 13 | D37 Hearst Field Annex

 Russ Leo

 Department of English

Sponsors: Department of English; Townsend Center for the Humanities; Program in Critical Theory; Medieval Philosophy Working Group;The Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Russ Leo is an Assistant Professor of English at Princeton University. He has a PhD from Duke University, with certificates in Feminist Studies and Interdisciplinary Medieval and Renaissance Studies. He is completing...   More >

DCRP Lecture: Jan Whittington

Lecture | March 13 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

MON, MAR 13, 11:00am in 112 Wurster Hall. Please join us for, &quot;Infrastructure, global challenges, and market forces in a digital era: research and action through collaboration and community engagement,&quot; a lecture by Dr. Jan Whittington.

Will Geert Wilders Become the New Dutch Prime Minister? The Upcoming General Elections in the Netherlands

Lecture | March 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Jeroen Dewulf, Institute of European Studies

 Institute of European Studies

On March 15, 2017, the citizens of the Netherlands will elect a new parliament and a new government. In this lecture, we will analyze the different parties and party leaders participating in these elections and discuss the latest projections of the election results. Of particular interest to the rest of Europe are the chances of Geert Wilders, leader of the populist Freedom Party, becoming the...   More >

290 Speaker Series: Experience and Transformation in an Imperial Capital

Lecture | March 13 | 2-4 p.m. | Kroeber Hall, Gifford Room

 Alexei Vranich

 Department of Anthropology

The aerial photograph of the World Heritage city of Cusco, Peru reveals a regular geometric distribution of city blocks in the middle of the city. Generations of architects, archaeologists and historians have correlated the present geometry of the city with the distribution of the major pre-Columbian Inca compounds, streets and open spaces. Furthermore, a number of intensive architectural surveys...   More >

Diversified Farming Systems Roundtable with Amélie Gaudin

Lecture | March 13 | 4-5 p.m. | 112 Hilgard Hall

 Berkeley Food Institute, Center for Diversified Farming Systems

We will highlight some of the underlying biophysical mechanisms and propose approaches for agroecosystems researchers to monitor and assess resilience that consider the unique characteristics and goals of intensive agricultural systems.

Spinoza's Tragic Resources

Lecture | March 13 | 5-7 p.m. | D37 Hearst Field Annex

 Russ Leo, Assistant Professor of English, Princeton University

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Leo will present his research on the intersections between poetic and philosophical experiments in Anglo-Dutch contexts across the 1650s, 60s, and 70s, particularly the ways one might place Milton and Spinoza in conversation. This involves attention to Spinoza's contributions to literary culture in Amsterdam and the Netherlands at large, as well as his debts to poets and poetics. For instance,...   More >

Spinoza's Tragic Resources

Lecture | March 13 | 5-7 p.m. | D37 Hearst Field Annex

 Russ Leo, Assistant Professor of English, Princeton University

 The Program in Critical Theory

Russ Leo’s lecture, “Spinoza’s Tragic Resources,” will present his research on the intersections between poetic and philosophical experiments in Anglo-Dutch contexts across the 1650s, 60s, and 70s—particularly the ways in which one might place Milton and Spinoza in conversation. This involves attention to Spinoza's contributions to literary culture in Amsterdam and the Netherlands at large, as...   More >

Undergraduate Lecture Series (Math Monday): The ubiquity of Dynkin diagrams

Lecture | March 13 | 5-6 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Ben Wormleighton, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Dynkin diagrams are certain graphs that naturally appear in a startling number of places across math where they often parameterise objects of geometric interest possessing some ‘finiteness’ conditions. I’ll demonstrate two of my favourite such situations in detail as well as make mention of many more in order to convince you that my title is justified.

Arts + Design Mondays: Art, Activism, and Freedom in the American Carceral State, with jackie sumell

Lecture | March 13 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 jackie sumell

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Reflecting on her service with prisoners indefinitely held in solitary confinement—most notably Herman Wallace, a political prisoner with whom she collaborated for twelve years—jackie sumell asks us to confront our unconscious desire for revenge and our addiction to the narrative of victory. Drawing from the teachings of Black Panthers, Herman Wallace, and Albert Woodfox, sumell challenges us to...   More >

Admission to this lecture is free.

ARCH Lecture: Jan Knippers “Biological Design and Integrative Structures”

Lecture | March 13 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

MON MAR 13, 6:30pm. Prof. Jan Knippers from the University of Stuttgart Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design (ITKE) will present a lecture on &quot;Biological Design and Integrative Structures&quot;.

On Jewish Heresy: Korah in the Midrash

Lecture | March 13 | 7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Professor David Biale, Emanuel Ringelblum Distinguished Professor of Jewish History, UC Davis

 The Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Chair in Jewish Studies, Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

The 2017 Taubman Lectures
Lecture 1 (Mon, March 13: Rabbinizing Heresy: Korah in the Midrash
Lecture 2 (Weds, March 15): The Afterlives of Baruch Spinoza and Shabbetai Zvi
Lecture 3 (Thurs, March 16): Gershom Scholem, Hannah Arendt and the Boundaries of Modern Heresy

David Biale is the Emanuel Ringelblum Distinguished Professor of Jewish History at UC Davis.

  RSVP online

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

That Other Irish Literature: The Best Books in Irish 1893-2016

Lecture | March 14 | D37 Hearst Field Annex

 Department of English

A lecture by Philip O’Leary, Professor of English, Boston College

Two Views on Education in the Nordic Countries: Computers and Learning in Danish Schools Inequality in Finnish Education  

Lecture | March 14 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Jeppe Bundsgaard, Professor of Education, Aarhus University, Copenhagen; Veronica Salovaara, Doctoral Student in Sociology, University of Helsinki

 Institute of European Studies

Denmark is among the countries with most widespread use of computers in K-9, with positive attitudes both from teachers and politicians toward the use of computers. Jeppe Bundsgaard will discuss the Danish situation, including the challenges that (still) exist.

Veronica Salovaara, who has been working in different comparative European and Nordic research projects, analyzes how inequality is...   More >

The Perfect Dictatorship: China in the 21st Century

Lecture | March 14 | 12-2 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Rachel Stern, Berkeley School of Law

 Stein Ringen, Green Templeton College, University of Oxford

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Professor Ringen will presents his book, The Perfect Dictatorship: China in the 21st Century. The Chinese political economy is like no other system known to man, now or in history. This book explains how the system works and where it may be moving.
- What are the intentions and priorities of the Chinese leaders?
- What kind of leader is Xi Jinping, where is he leading China and how radically is...   More >

Red Globalism: The 'Other' Europe, Decolonization and African Heritage

Lecture | March 14 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Paul Betts, Professor of Modern European History at St Antony's College, University of Oxford

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

The study of the Cold War has undergone fundamental transformation in recent years. While most of the scholarship on superpower confrontation has given way to wider notions of a global Cold War, comparatively little attention has been accorded to trans-continental interactions between smaller states, such as the relationship between Eastern Europe and its socialist partners in Africa and Asia....   More >

Islamophobia Across the Atlantic: Trump, Europe's Far Right, and the Place of Civil Society: CRG Thursday Forum Series

Lecture | March 14 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Dr. Farid Hafez

 Center for Race and Gender

Islamophobia Across the Atlantic: Trump, Europe's Far Right, and the Place of Civil Society
Dr. Farid Hafez, Islamophobia Research & Documentation Project

This talk discusses the emergence of Islamophobia in Europe and the USA and its specific role in party politics. It discusses the announcement and introduction of Trump's anti-Muslim policies at the backdrop of precedent policies in Europe....   More >

Rita Chattopadhyay | Women, Crime, and Retribution: An Ancient Indian Perspective

Lecture | March 14 | 4-6 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 341 (DSSEAS Library)

 Rita Chattopadhyay, Professor, Department of Sanskrit, Jadavpur University, Kolkata

 Robert P. Goldman, Professor of Sanskrit, South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Catherine and William L. Magistretti Chair in South and Southeast Asian Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies

A talk by Dr. Rita Chattopadhyay, Professor in the Department of Sanskrit at Jadavpur University, Kolkata.

Mecca's Perspective as Symbolic Form

Lecture | March 14 | 5-7 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall

 Avinoam Shalem, Riggio Professor of the History of the Arts of Islam, Columbia University

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

The “Sacred” and the “Holy” (haram in Arabic and, to some extent, al-quds or al-muqaddas), are Semitic words (see Herem and Kadosh in Hebrew) denoting the act of separation, parting, or setting aside, and imply the apparent human faculty of setting distinctive borders between holy and profane zones. Constrained to time, these spaces become chronotopes. But,...   More >

3 Truths About Trumpism: with Abby VanMuijen

Lecture | March 14 | 7-8:30 p.m. | Wurster Hall, 210 - Environmental Design Library Atrium

 Abby VanMuijen

 Library

Abby VanMuijen (UC Berkeley Landscape Architecture graduate) teams up with Ananya Roy again to produce one of the most cogent commentaries about the recent election and it’s aftermath. This six-minute animated video expresses in words and images a concise critique of “Trumpism” and some of the narratives that enable it. Abby will discuss the process of developing the content and images which can...   More >

Abby VanMuijen, 3 Truths About Trump

Lecture | March 14 | 7-8:30 p.m. | 210 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Aby VanMuijen (B.A. Urban Studies '12) discusses teaming up UCLA Professor of Urban Planning and Social Welfare Ananya Roy on a biting animated commentary about Trump.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

California Countercultures: Poetry and Protest with Ishmael Reed

Lecture | March 15 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Ishmael Reed is a poet, novelist, essayist, playwright, songwriter, public media commentator, lecturer, and publisher. His recent publications include The Complete Muhammad Ali, his latest nonfiction work; the essay collection Going Too Far: Essays About America’s Nervous Breakdown; his tenth novel, Juice!; and New and Collected Poems, 1964–2007. In 2013, his seventh play, The Final Version,...   More >

Admission to this lecture is free.

Ayer Memorias: Archaeological Evidence of Land-Use Patterns at the Pueblo de Abiquiú

Lecture | March 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Alexandra McCleary, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

This paper will discuss the most recent excavations in the Genízaro Pueblo de Abiquiú, NM. Abiquiú, as one of the oldest and most successful Genízaro land grants, is a key area for better understanding the history of Indo-Hispanic settlements in Northern New Mexico. Three distinct sites were excavated, representing domestic, defensive, and agricultural contexts. The paper will go over the...   More >

PopUp Exhibition: Adam Naftalin-Kelman on the History of Berkeley Hillel

Lecture | March 15 | 12-1 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Rabbi Adam Naftalin-Kelman is the Executive Director of Berkeley Hillel. Upon completing his undergraduate degree at the University of Rhode Island, he initially worked in the financial sector as a business consultant. He later pursued a Rabbinic degree from the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies in Los Angeles, and was ordained in 2005. Before serving as the Executive Director of Berkeley...   More >

Sustainable Mobility in Medellin

Lecture | March 15 | 12-2 p.m. | 305 Wurster Hall

 Institute of Urban & Regional Development

Dr. Carlos Gaitan will talk on the transformation of Medellin's transport system and how the city worked toward social and environmental sustainability.

Growing Wikipedia Across Languages via Recommendations

Lecture | March 15 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310, Banatao Auditorium

 Leila Zia, Research Scientist, Wikimedia Foundation

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Leila Zia joined the Wikimedia Foundation in February 2014 as part of the Research and Data team.

Free

 Free lunch available (limited #s). You must register by the Monday before the event for lunch. Register online

Territories of the Soul: Queered Belonging in the Black Diaspora: Townsend Book Chat with Nadia Ellis

Lecture | March 15 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Territories of the Soul draws upon queer and affect theory to explore structures of belonging experienced by the black diasporic subject.

Police and Guns in the Age of Concealed Carry: with University of Arizona sociology professor Jennifer Carlson

Lecture | March 15 | 3-4:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, Social Science Matrix (8th floor)

 Jennifer Carlson, University of Arizona

 Human Rights Center

Police officers have long been sought-after allies for gun control advocates, but a 2017 Pew
Report finds that police favor gun rights over gun control by a 3-1 margin. These poll data might
lead many to wonder–wouldn’t permissive gun laws put police at a disadvantage? The University of Arizona’s Jennifer Carlson has conducted extensive interviews with both law enforcement officers and gun...   More >

  RSVP online

Theatre of the Car

Lecture | March 15 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Wendy Ju

 Information, School of

The advent of autonomous vehicles is exciting and alarming. Their success will depend on the driver-vehicle interaction.

Linguistic and ethnographic sound recordings from early twentieth-century California: Optical scanning, digitization, and access

Lecture | March 15 | 5-7 p.m. | 356 Barrows Hall

 Andrew Garrett, UC Berkeley

 Arts & Humanities, Letters & Science Division of

UC Berkeley is the repository of an American cultural treasure in over 2,500 early twentieth-century wax cylinder recordings of Native American speech and song. Some are the only known recordings of a language; many are the only known recordings of particular songs or stories; all are invaluable for scholarly research and the broader purposes of cultural and linguistic revitalization. Previous...   More >

Wild Robots: Bodies and Signs

Lecture | March 15 | 5-6 p.m. | Moffitt Undergraduate Library, BCNM Commons, Rm. 340

 Ian Ingram

 Berkeley Center for New Media

On Wednesday, March 15, Ian Ingram, a Los Angeles-based artist will be a body of his work on the influence of animal behavior in building technology.

Ian Ingram is a Los Angeles-based artist who builds mechatronic and robotic objects that borrow facets from animal morphology and behavior, from the forms and movements of machines, and from our stories about animals. The resulting works–often...   More >

The Sixth Annual Mario A. Del Chiaro Lecture: Traders and Refugees: Contributions to Etruscan Architecture

Lecture | March 15 | 5:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Nancy A. Winter, Distinguished Senior Researcher, The Ancient Mediterranean Studies Program, The University of California, Santa Barbara

 UC Berkeley's Del Chiaro Center for Ancient Italian Studies

Author Talk by Jun Kamata: Native Americans: An Intimate View from Afar

Lecture | March 15 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Ethnic Studies Library - Room 30

 Jun Kamata, Associate Professor, ASIA University (Tokyo)

 Ethnic Studies Library

Jun Kamata has published eight books in Japan and will talk about his latest publications: one focused on Native Americans and the other on minorities in the US. He will also discuss his exhibit of 25 photographs on display in the Ethnic Studies Library.

On Jewish Heresy: The Afterlives of Baruch Spinoza and Shabbetai Zvi

Lecture | March 15 | 7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Professor David Biale, Emanuel Ringelblum Distinguished Professor of Jewish History, UC Davis

 The Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Chair in Jewish Studies, Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

The 2017 Taubman Lectures
Lecture 1 (Mon, March 13: Rabbinizing Heresy: Korah in the Midrash
Lecture 2 (Weds, March 15): The Afterlives of Baruch Spinoza and Shabbetai Zvi
Lecture 3 (Thurs, March 16): Gershom Scholem, Hannah Arendt and the Boundaries of Modern Heresy

David Biale is the Emanuel Ringelblum Distinguished Professor of Jewish History at UC Davis.

  RSVP online