<< February 2017 >>

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Deepnets and Tools to Boost Human Creativity

Lecture | February 1 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310, Banatao Auditorium

 Gary Bradski, CTO, Arraiy.com

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Gary Bradski is CTO at Arraiy.com, which is building a computer vision and deep learning platform to provide customers new abilities to capture and understand the visual world. Bradski co-founded Industrial Perception, a company that developed perception applications for industrial robotic application (since acquired by Google in 2012) and has worked on the OpenCV Computer Vision library, as well...   More >

Free

 Free lunch at UC Berkeley if you register by the Monday before the talk (lunches limited). Register online

Big Ideas: On the Left Edge: California's Renegade Tradition with Iain Boal

Lecture | February 1 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Iain Boal is a social historian of science and technics, affiliated with the University of California and Birkbeck College, London. He is one of the founders of the Retort Collective, an association of radical writers, teachers, artists, and activists, which has existed in the Bay Area for the past two decades. Boal coauthored Afflicted Powers: Capital and Spectacle in a New Age of War along with...   More >

Free for BAMPFA members, UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, retirees; 18 & under + guardian | $10 Non-UC Berkeley students, 65+, disabled persons | $12 General admission

Persistent Places or Occupying Wild Open Spaces?: Alternative Pathways to 'Neolithization' in the Prehistory of the Near East

Lecture | February 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Dr. Lisa Maher, Assistant Professor, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

With a specific focus on eastern Jordan, the Epipalaeolithic Foragers in Azraq Project explores changing hunter-gatherer strategies, behaviors and adaptations to this vast area throughout the Late Pleistocene. In particular, we examine how lifeways here compare to surrounding areas and what circumstances drew human and animal populations to the region. Integrating multiple material cultural and...   More >

The US, China, and Cross-Strait Relations

Lecture | February 1 | 12:15 p.m. | Women's Faculty Club, Lounge

 Hung-Mao Tien, President, Institute for National Policy Research, and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Taiwan

 T.J. Pempel, Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Hung-mao Tien, President, Institute for National Policy Research, and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Taiwan, will speak about cross-Strait relations under the new U.S. administration.

Hung-Mao Tien is President and board chairman, Institute for National Policy Research, and former R.O.C. Minister of Foreign Affairs; Representative (Ambassador) to the United Kingdom, and Presidential Advisor.

Creating a Meaningful Life for Yourself and the World

Lecture | February 1 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Prof. Clair Brown's talk draws from her book Buddhist Economics to discuss how we can create a sustainable, equitable economy for all people.

Global warming and global inequality are interrelated problems that we must solve if we want future generations to enjoy life. Buddhist Economics addresses how to move from an economy driven by consumption and "more is better" to an economy that...   More >

Chern Lectures: Lecture 2 : Rigidity of black holes

Lecture | February 1 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Sergiu Klainerman, Princeton University

 Department of Mathematics

The gravitational waves detected recently by LIGO were produced in the final phase of the inward spiraling of two black holes before they collided to produce a more massive black hole. The experiment is entirely consistent with the so-called Final State Conjecture of general relativity, according to which general solutions of the initial value problem approach asymptotically, in any compact...   More >

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Respect: A Developmental Science Approach to ‘Wise' Behavior Change in Adolescence

Lecture | February 2 | 12:15-1:30 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 David Yeager, Department of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin

 Center on the Developing Adolescent

In this presentation he will discuss a conceptual framework for more effective behavior change interventions in adolescence through the use of developmental-science informed approaches. This builds on a series of studies he and his colleagues have conducted focusing on the challenges and limitations in many traditional approaches to behavior change in adolescences—particularly school-based...   More >

Gots’udi ní̜dé Dene xedə́ t’áodéʔa: Indigenous Language Resilience in Canada: Thomas Garden Barnes Lecture in Canadian Studies

Lecture | February 2 | 3-5 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Dr. Keren Rice, University of Toronto

 Canadian Studies Program (CAN))

The 2017 Thomas Garden Barnes Lecture in honor of the founder of the Canadian Studies Program will be delivered by internationally renowned linguist and Order of Canada Recipient Dr. Keren Rice of the University of Toronto. 3 PM, Thursday February 2, 2017. 223 Moses Hall, University of California, Berkeley.

Gots’udi ní̜dé Dene xedə́ t’áodéʔa:...   More >

Chern Lectures: Lecture 3 : The problem of stability

Lecture | February 2 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Sergiu Klainerman, Princeton University

 Department of Mathematics

The gravitational waves detected recently by LIGO were produced in the final phase of the inward spiraling of two black holes before they collided to produce a more massive black hole. The experiment is entirely consistent with the so-called Final State Conjecture of general relativity, according to which general solutions of the initial value problem approach asymptotically, in any compact...   More >

NOT a Theology of the New Testament

Lecture | February 2 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220

 Dale B. Martin, Woolsey Professor of Religious Studies, Yale University, and Danforth Visiting Professor of Theology, St. Louis University

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two centuries, scholars have attempted to derive orthodox Christian theology by reading the New Testament. They have, however, insisted that any contemporary theology be based on historical-critical exegesis of the ancient text, taking the meaning relevant for today from what scholars decide was the meaning intended by the original author or understood by the original audience....   More >

Professor Philipp Bleek at the Berkeley Forum: Disarming Syria’s Chemical Weapons and Lessons for Reducing Threats Elsewhere

Lecture | February 2 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 110 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 The Berkeley Forum

After Syria’s government breached the international norm against using chemical weapons in 2013, a U.S.-led international coalition pressured the Assad regime to disarm one of the world’s last remaining chemical weapons arsenals. How Washington laid the diplomatic, technical, and procedural groundwork that enabled this modest but important accomplishment, in the context of a broader conflict that...   More >

  Buy tickets online

Friday, February 3, 2017

Security talk: Keren Elazari -- The Cyber-Circus -- What The Rise of Hacking Everyday Things Means for All of Us

Lecture | February 3 | 1-2:45 p.m. | 132 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Keren Elazari

 Center for Technology, Policy & Society, Berkeley Center for Law & Technology (BCLT), Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israel Studies

In 2017, cybersecurity is about the trust people place in “everyday” things like baby monitors, cars, insulin pumps and anything in between, and researchers are eager to demonstrate just how untrustworthy these can be. Amid media frenzy, stunt hacks, Internet‐of‐Things attacks and high‐profile disclosures, can friendly hackers help industry build safer products? Welcome to the...   More >

Traffic Estimation and Control in an Era of Mixed Human Piloted and Automated Vehicles

Lecture | February 3 | 4-5 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Dan Work, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: This talk will explore some new directions in estimation and control when the traffic stream is composed of a mix of human piloted and autonomous vehicles. The first part of the talk investigates the problem of modeling and estimating traffic streams in this mixed setting. A connection between the generalized Aw Rascle Zhang model and two-class traffic motivates the choice to model the...   More >

Chern Lectures: Lecture 4 : The problem of collapse

Lecture | February 3 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Sergiu Klainerman, Princeton University

 Department of Mathematics

The gravitational waves detected recently by LIGO were produced in the final phase of the inward spiraling of two black holes before they collided to produce a more massive black hole. The experiment is entirely consistent with the so-called Final State Conjecture of general relativity, according to which general solutions of the initial value problem approach asymptotically, in any compact...   More >

Cartooning the Landscape: Art, Nature and Consciousness

Lecture | February 3 | 6-8 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden, Garden Conservancy

This presentation will take us on an optical sweep of the iconic landscapes of history and illustrate their interrelationship with art, nature and consciousness. Professor Sullivan will discuss his lifelong commitment to drawing, garden history and environmental awareness, and through the medium of the sequential narrative, he will share with the audience tools that will help us envision the...   More >

$15, $10 UCBG and Garden Conservancy members, UC Berkeley Staff, Students and Faculty are Free

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Paz Encina: Artist Talk

Lecture | February 5 | 4:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

In this illustrated lecture, Paz Encina discusses her installation work and the importance of site specificity for both her artwork and her films. She will also address the complexities of using the Archive of Terror in Paraguay—the unique and horrific archive kept by the Stroessner dictatorship of its "state terrorism"—from which she has drawn materials for her film and art practices, resulting...   More >

Free for BAMPFA members, UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, retirees; 18 & under + guardian | $10 Non-UC Berkeley students, 65+, disabled persons | $12 General admission

Monday, February 6, 2017

Diversified Farming Systems Roundtable with V. Ernesto Méndez

Lecture | February 6 | 4-5:15 p.m. | 112 Hilgard Hall

 Berkeley Food Institute, Center for Diversified Farming Systems

This presentation critically examines the integration of Agroecology and Participatory Action Research (PAR), as a promising approach to address current agrifood system issues.

Visiting smallholder farms in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Photo credit: Martha Caswell

Regents' Lecture - Paz Encina: Politics and Aesthetics in Paraguay Today

Lecture | February 6 | 5-7 p.m. | 5125 Dwinelle Hall

 Paz Encina

 Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Chancellor's Office, Regents' Lectureship Program

Paz Encina, a Paraguayan artist, filmmaker, humanist, and committed intellectual, UC Regents’ Lecturer of 2017.

ATC Lecture — Pamela and Richard Kramlich, “Collecting the Uncollectible”: Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium

Lecture | February 6 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Barbo Osher Theater

 Pamela Kramlich, New Art Trust; Richard Kramlich, New Art Trust

 Center for New Media

Since the 1960s, artists have been actively working with film and video, and media art has become one of the most important forms of contemporary art over the last twenty years. So why is media art still so rarely collected by private collectors and museum curators?

Based in San Francisco and Napa, the Kramlich Collection is recognised internationally as one of the most pioneering and...   More >

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

ACA and its Replacement: Effects on the Nongroup Insurance Market and Exchanges

Lecture | February 7 | 12:40-2 p.m. | 714C University Hall

 William Dow, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Endowed Chair in Health Policy and Management, University of California Berkeley

 Health Policy and Management

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) reformed the individual insurance market and the Trump administration now wants to undo some reforms and make other changes. Drawing on a survey of California individual insurance market enrollees both in Covered California and outside the exchange, we analyze plan selection behavior and adverse selection. Results inform potential changes such as dropping the...   More >

Agribusiness from the Ashes: Land Governance Reform and Racialized Armed Territories in Burma

Lecture | February 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Kevin Woods, Ph.D. candidate, Environmental Science, Policy & Management, UC Berkeley

 Joshua Muldavin, Professor of Human Geography, Sarah Lawrence College

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

The presentation demonstrates how contemporary land governance reform in Burma, despite excitement on the opportunity for a “fresh start,” is borne out of legacies of war, racialized subjects, and state territorial politics.

Reviving Virgil in Turkish

Lecture | February 7 | 5 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Professor Ekin Öyken, Istanbul University

 Department of Classics

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Hellenistic Historiography in the Wake of Alexander the Great: AHMA Noon Colloquium

Lecture | February 8 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Erich Gruen, UC Berkeley

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

The AHMA Noon Colloquium is a series of informal papers presented at noon in 7205 Dwinelle Hall.

Revealing Social Relationships and Intersectional Identities in a Pre-Columbian Muisca Community Through Diet and Activity (Sabana de Bogotá, Colombia AD 1000-1400)

Lecture | February 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Melanie Miller, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

The Muisca cultural group occupied a large Andean territory around the Sabana de Bogotá (Colombia) for at least 800 years before the Spanish arrived in 1536-37. Historically, the Muisca have been portrayed as a classic chiefdom society, with an emphasis on social rank and hierarchy as a primary aspect of Muisca social life. Highly stratified societies are characterized by differentiation between...   More >

Software Engineering with Machine Learning

Lecture | February 8 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310, Banatao Auditorium

 Peter Norvig, Director of Research, Google

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Peter Norvig is a Director of Research at Google Inc. Previously he was head of Google's core search algorithms group, and of NASA Ames's Computational Sciences Division, making him NASA's senior computer scientist. He received the NASA Exceptional Achievement Award in 2001.

Free

 Free lunch at UC Berkeley if you register by the Monday before the talk (lunches limited). Register online

The Future of Sensory Perception

Lecture | February 8 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Scientists and other sensory explorers are developing powerful new technologies that can change, enhance and perhaps expand the limits of what we can perceive.

Kara Platoni is a science reporter based in Oakland, California and teaches at UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism.

Open Space Design in the Public Realm

Lecture | February 8 | 6:30-7:45 p.m. | 505 UC Berkeley Extension (SF Campus at 160 Spear St.)

 Neil Hrushowy, City Design Group

 UC Berkeley Extension

The public realm is much more than a utilitarian system of connections to get from here to there. It is where people walk, meet, and where they socialize. It is where they take in the views, where they see what merchants have to offer, and where they come to know their neighborhood and their fellow citizens.

In this presentation, Neil Hrushowy, Manager of San Francisco's City Design Group will...   More >

  Register online

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Dominance and friendship during the transition to adulthood in male chimpanzees

Lecture | February 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Aaron A. Sandel, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan

 Institute of Human Development

Strong social bonds, or “friendships,” play an important role in primate behavior. These bonds feature prominently in the lives of adult male chimpanzees. Male chimpanzee friends form coalitions, share food, join each other on territorial border patrols, and help each other as they attempt to rise in the dominance hierarchy. Despite the importance of friendship and dominance rank in adulthood,...   More >

Gun Fight: The Battle Over The Right To Bear Arms in America

Lecture | February 9 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 110 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Prof. Frank Zimring, Berkeley Law

 Prof. Adam Winkler, UCLA Law

 Human Rights Center, Human Rights Program, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Graduate School of Journalism, Public Health, School of

UCLA Law Professor and author Adam Winkler discusses the future of the Second Amendment under the Trump Administration and his acclaimed book Gun Fight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America, which probes four centuries of America’s fixation on gun rights. Winkler argues that guns—not abortion rights, race, or religion—are at the heart of America’s cultural divide. Discussing the...   More >

  RSVP online

The Political Crisis in Brazil: What Is at Stake for Public Policies?

Lecture | February 9 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Carlos Milani

 Center for Latin American Studies

Carlos Milani will examine the current crisis in Brazil, its causes, and its impact on future public policies.

Bad Transitions after Free Elections: 32nd Annual Colin and Elsa Miller Lecture

Lecture | February 9 | 5-7 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room

 Leszek Balcerowicz, Professor of Economics and Former Chairman of the National Bank of Poland and Former Deputy Prime Minister of Poland, College of Europe

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Professor of Economics at the Warsaw School of Economics (WSE), former Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, former President of the National Bank of Poland (NBP). He is the architect of Poland’s economic reforms initiated in 1989; he has been at the center of Poland’s economic and political life since the fall of communism in Poland in 1989. Author of more than 100 publications on...   More >

Linked Reading: Mapping a Global Renaissance with 53,829 Texts

Lecture | February 9 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 127 Dwinelle Hall

 James Lee, University of Cincinnati

 Department of English

This talk adapts digital methods to redefine our understanding of a squarely humanistic problem: the history of race in Shakespeare’s era. If we only read Shakespeare’s plays, the Renaissance world looks fairly small, tracing a map that would include political adversaries like France, Spain, and Holland and a distant imagination of Italy and the Ottoman Empire. However, if we expand our textual...   More >

DCRP Lecture: Atul Pokharel, Planning for Fairness

Lecture | February 9 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

THU, FEB 9, 5:00pm. Atul Pokharel will discuss the possibilities and limits of community infrastructure governance.

No Mercy Here: Gender, Punishment, and the Making of Jim Crow Modernity: Prof. Sarah Haley, University of California, Los Angeles

Lecture | February 9 | 5:30-8 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Multicultural Community Center

 Center for Race and Gender

Center for Race & Gender presents the Spring 2017 Distinguished Guest Lecture


No Mercy Here: Gender, Punishment, and the Making of Jim Crow Modernity
Prof. Sarah Haley, University of California, Los Angeles

Introduction by Prof. Nikki Haley, African American Studies

Thursday, February 9, 2017
5:30pm - reception; 6pm - 8pm - lecture & discussion
Multicultural Community Center, MLK...   More >

No word in vain: Reading Plato's dialogues (again): Sather Classical Lectures

Lecture | February 9 | 8:30 p.m. |  Alumni House

 Mary Margaret McCabe, King's College London

 Department of Classics

The opening lecture in the 2017 Sather series "Seeing and Saying: Plato on Virtue and Knowledge"

Friday, February 10, 2017

An Introduction to Seed Propagation

Lecture | February 10 | 10-11 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Come learn about seed basics, seed treatment, sowing, and aftercare. After an overview of seed propagation of the Garden Collection, Susan Malisch, Garden Propagator, will share general information and tips for starting your own successful seedlings at home. The workshop includes a hands-on seed activity.

$20, $10 members

  Register online or by calling 510-664-9841, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu

Jacobs Design Conversations: Kate Sofis

Lecture | February 10 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Kate Sofis

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

SFMade CEO Kate Sofis will speak at Jacobs Hall.

Data Carpentry: Training to Enable More Effective and Reproducible Research

Lecture | February 10 | 1:10-2:30 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Although petabytes of data are now available, most scientific disciplines are failing to translate this sea of data into scientific advances. The missing step between data collection and research progress is a lack of training for scientists in crucial skills for effectively and reproducibly managing and analyzing large amounts of data. Already faced with a deluge of data, researchers themselves...   More >

On Dwelling in the Linguacene: Where Hypomnesic Monolingualism to Reactionary Multilingualism

Lecture | February 10 | 3-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 (Classroom side)

 David Gramling, Assistant Professor of German Studies, University of Arizona

 Berkeley Language Center

TBD

Coordinated Decentralized Optimal Control for Connected and Automated Vehicles

Lecture | February 10 | 4-5 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Andreas Malikopoulos, University of Delaware

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: Recognition of the necessity for connecting vehicles to their surroundings is gaining momentum. In this “new world” of massive amounts of data from vehicles and infrastructure, what we used to model as uncertainty (noise or disturbance) for traffic becomes extra state information in a much higher-dimensional vector. Connected and automated vehicles provide the most intriguing...   More >

Monday, February 13, 2017

Local Governments and the Challenge to Autocratic Nationalism in Poland

Lecture | February 13 | 12-2 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Anthony Levitas, Visiting Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs, Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, Brown University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Following the collapse of the Berlin Wall, and while the whole world held its breath to see if “shock therapy” in Poland would collapse under its own weight, Polish state-builders embarked on an almost equally radical, but largely overlooked, program of local government reform. These reforms gave subnational governments, and particularly large cities, control over more than a third of all public...   More >

The Peripheral Iconoclast: The Rise of Ibsen in the American Theatre

Lecture | February 13 | 4-6 p.m. | 6415 Dwinelle Hall

 Svein Henrick Nyhus, University of Oslo

 Department of Scandinavian, Institute of European Studies

Henrik Ibsen’s breakthrough in the American theatre is characterized by controversy and contradiction. In 1902 the influential critic William Winter dismissively named him the “Bard of Bacteria”. In 1906, the year of his passing, William Dean Howells praised Ibsen as a classic. How did this Norwegian playwright, coming from the European periphery, manage to become a leading figure in the American...   More >

Undergraduate Lecture Series (Math Monday): Reflection groups, wallpaper groups, and orbifolds

Lecture | February 13 | 5-6 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Richard E. Borcherds, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

This talk will describe how to classify things like the 18 archimedean solids and the 17 wallpaper groups using orbifolds.

Global Production Networks and Global Labour: Perspective from the South

Lecture | February 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), Large Conference Room

 Ashim Roy, New Trade Union Initiative

 UC Berkeley Labor Center, Institute for South Asia Studies

Join us for a talk with Ashim Roy, the founding general secretary of the New Trade Union Initiative in India and currently serves as the vice president. Roy is a national labour leader and has been in the labour movement for over 30 years. Roy is on the International Steering Committee of Asia Floor Wage Alliance.

A talk with Ashim Roy, New Trade Union Initiative, India

Lecture | February 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), Large Conference Room

 Ashim Roy, New Trade Union Initiative; Anannya Bhattacharjee, Coordinator of the Asia Floor Wage Campaign

 UC Berkeley Labor Center, Institute for South Asia Studies

Join us for a talk with Ashim Roy, the general secretary of the New Trade Union Initiative in India. He will be accompanied by Anannya Bhattacharjee, coordinator of the Asia Floor Wage Campaign.

Body, Intellect, Resistance: Mark Greif and Linda Williams in Conversation

Lecture | February 13 | 6:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Townsend Center for the Humanities, Arts + Design

Mark Greif is author of Against Everything and associate professor of literary studies at the New School for Social Research. Linda Williams is author of Hard Core: Power, Pleasure and the Frenzy of the Visible and professor emeritus of Rhetoric and Film & Media at UC Berkeley

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Mukulika Banerjee | The Social Imaginaries of Democracy: Scandal, Competition and Cooperation

Lecture | February 14 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Mukulika Banerjee, Associate Professor in Social Anthropology and Director, South Asia Centre, LSE

 Lawrence Cohen, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies and Professor of Anthropology and of South & Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Anthropologist, Dr. Mukulika Banerjee

Early detection and prevention in children at risk of future criminal behaviour

Lecture | February 14 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 240 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Stephanie van Goozen, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK and Department of Clinical Child and Adolescent Studies, Leiden University, NL

 Institute of Human Development

Abstract
Antisocial behavior committed by youngsters is an issue of concern. Although most research focuses on identifying specific contextual or social factors that impinge on the developing child, there is a growing consensus that child-specific (i.e., genetic, temperamental) factors contribute importantly to the development and persistence of serious antisocial behavior. We have shown (a)...   More >

Darwinian Sensualities: Havelock Ellis, Sexual Inversion, and Late Nineteenth-Century Evolutionary Theory

Lecture | February 14 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Rodolfo John Alaniz, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Department of History

Sexual inversion, as a nineteenth-century biological concept, signified a completely new understanding of sexual attraction, beauty, and gender. While many historians have assumed that “sexual inversion” was another word for “homosexuality,” these terms represent two distinct ways of viewing human behavior.

The Art of Indonesian Batik

Lecture | February 14 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Dalmini, Kebon Indah batik cooperative

 Daniel Gundlach, The Language of Cloth

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Consulate General of the Republic of Indonesia San Francisco

Batik, meaning the technique of applying wax to cloth and dyeing it, is practiced in many parts of the world but is particularly associated with Java, Indonesia where the craft has been practiced for centuries and where it has reached levels of great artistry. This event will review how batik is made, stressing the traditional methods.

Hagan un Trencito: Siguiendo los Pasos de la Memoria Cumbianchera en Chile: With author Antonia Mardones-Marshall

Lecture | February 14 | 4-5:30 p.m. |  2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies)

 Antonia Mardones-Marshall

 Center for Latin American Studies

Antonia Mardones-Marshall will highlight how Cumbia challenges the idea of what is "Chilean" by presenting some of the ethnic and national tensions that have arisen from its popularization.

Cover image from Hagan un Trencito. (Image courtesy of Ceibo Producciones.)

Tech Policy Forecast: Digital Privacy and Net Neutrality under the Trump Administration: A talk by Heather West, Senior Policy Manager, Mozilla

Lecture | February 14 | 5-6:15 p.m. | 250 Goldman School of Public Policy

 Heather West, Mozilla

 Center for Technology, Policy & Society

Co-Sponsored by the Center for Technology, Policy & Society and Technology Applications in Public Policy at the Goldman School for Public Policy.

Heather is Senior Policy Manager at Mozilla, prior to which she has worked at the intersection of policy and cyber-security at Google and CloudFare, Inc. In 2014, she became Forbes 30 under 30 for her influential role as policy-to-tech translator and...   More >

  RSVP online

Pierluigi Serraino - The Creative Architect: Inside the Great Midcentury Personality Study

Lecture | February 14 | 7-8:30 p.m. | 210 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

TUE FEB 14 7-8:30pm. Pierluigi Serraino discusses an unknown episode in the annals of modern architecture and psychology.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Tearing Down the Deep Learning Performance Wall

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310, Banatao Auditorium

 Greg Diamos, Senior Researcher, Baidu

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Greg Diamos is a senior researcher at Baidu’s Silicon Valley AI Lab (SVAIL). Previously he was on the research team at NVIDIA. Greg holds a PhD from the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he contributed to the development of the GPU-Ocelot dynamic compiler, which targeted CPUs and GPUs from the same program representation. His PhD thesis pioneered execution models for heterogeneous...   More >

Free

 Free lunch available (limited #s). You must register by the Monday before the event for lunch. Register online

Knowing Plants in Cuneiform Cultures: Revisiting R.C. Thompson's “Dictionary of Assyrian Botany”

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall

 Eduardo Escobar, PhD Candidate, Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

 Near Eastern Studies

This talk will consider what R.C Thompson's 1949 "Dictionary of Assyrian Botany" might look like in the twenty-first century. Scribal investigations of plants covered a wide range of scholarly genres in cuneiform cultures, from lexical lists, to materia medica, and glassmaking recipes. I will address the perennial challenge of identifying modern plant species in ancient texts, and suggest new...   More >

Syria: Spaces of War: CMES Visiting Scholars Lecture Series

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall | Note change in date

 Sofia Shwayri, CMES Visiting Scholar

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The uprisings that swept North Africa from late 2010 thru early 2011 reached Syria, to the surprise of many including President Bashar Al-Assaad, in March 2011. Al-Assaad, was convinced that his country would never experience such a widespread public show of dissent. Differing from those other uprisings, Syrians could not claim their own Tahrir Square in Damascus, as the long standing state of...   More >

Civil Rights Movement Photography and Its Legacies, with Leigh Raiford

Lecture | February 15 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

This talk explores what role photography—as document, as art, and as surveillance—played in the modern civil rights movement and how the medium continues to shape our memories of the "Second Reconstruction."

Free for BAMPFA members, UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, retirees; 18 & under + guardian | $10 Non-UC Berkeley students, 65+, disabled persons | $12 General admission | Event is included with admission

Queer(ing) Frontier Identities: Tracing Cultural Brokering at 19th century Fort Davis, Texas

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Katrina Eichner, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

This presentation focuses on the cultural slippage that occurs in frontier zones where competing worldviews create conditions for alternative, innovative, and layered performances of intersecting identities.

PopUp Exhibition: Elizabeth Rynecki on Moshe Rynecki’s Lost Art Legacy

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Elizabeth Rynecki is the great-granddaughter of the late Polish-Jewish artist, Moshe Rynecki (1881-1943), who perished in the Holocaust. Her memoir, Chasing Portraits: A Great-Granddaughter’s Quest for Her Lost Art Legacy, was published in 2016 and immediately reviewed in the New York Times. For many years after his death, Moshe Rynecki’s family believed that most of his oeuvre—circa eight...   More >

The Builders Association: Performance and Media in Contemporary Theater: Townsend Book Chat with Shannon Jackson

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Shannon Jackson discusses her recent co-authored book on the Builders Association, a New York-based multimedia theater company that creates original productions based on stories drawn from contemporary life.

States of Altered Consciousness

Lecture | February 15 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Non-ordinary or altered states of consciousness provide rich sources of information relevant to better understanding the connections between mind and reality.

David Presti has taught neurobiology, psychology, and cognitive science at UC Berkeley for more than 25 years.

Post and Trauma: The Use of Social Media by Sexual Assault Victims

Lecture | February 15 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Hadar Dancig-Rosenberg and Anat Peleg

 Information, School of

How can online social media communities support and empower victims of sexual violence?

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Views of the Women's Liberation and Feminist Movements of the 1970s and 1980s: Selections from the Cathy Cade Photograph Archive

Lecture | February 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Cathy Cade, documentary photographer

 Bancroft Library

Introduced to documentary photography's power as she participated in the Southern Freedom Movement of the 1960s, Cathy Cade went on to document several activist movements through her photography. Cade will speak on her experiences with social justice causes, featuring highlights drawn from her extensive photograph archive now housed at The Bancroft Library.

Development Perspectives: Fireside chat with the Director General of the World Agroforestry Center

Lecture | February 16 | 12-1:15 p.m. | 311 Wellman Hall

 Tony Simons, World Agroforestry Center

 International and Executive Programs at the College of Natural Resources, Master of Development Practice

Dr. Tony Simons, the Director General of the World Agroforestry Center (ICRAF), will be giving a talk about the future of international development and career opportunities for students. There will be pizza and salad, so students are encouraged to arrive on time at 12:00PM.

Ireland - The EU - Brexit

Lecture | February 16 | 12:30-2:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Mark Bevir, Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeleyh; Colum Hatchell, Vice Consul, Consulate General of Ireland in San Francisco

 Institute of European Studies

This conversation hosted by the Irish Studies Program at U.C. Berkeley will focus on the possible effects of Brexit on the future of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Watching the World Go By

Lecture | February 16 | 1:10-2 p.m. | 103 Mulford Hall

 Robert Simmon, Planet

 Geospatial Innovation Facility

The GIF and the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ) host a weekly Geolunch seminar series offering interesting talks, group discussion, and show-and-tells all involving geospatial theory, research, and application. Geolunch is open to everyone.

Theorizing Race, Gender and Citizenship in Black Europe: Issues, Debates and Frameworks, Inside and Outside the Academy: CRG Thursday Forum Series

Lecture | February 16 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Prof. Stephen Small, African American Studies

 Center for Race and Gender

The Center for Race & Gender Thursday Forum Series presents...

Theorizing Race, Gender & Citizenship in Black Europe: Issues, Debates and Frameworks, Inside & Outside the Academy
Prof. Stephen Small, African American Studies

Scholarly research at universities across Europe on the sociology and political economy of gender and intersectionality focuses inordinately on white women. Most...   More >

DCRP/IURD Lecture: Diane Davis

Lecture | February 16 | 5-7 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

THURS FEB 16, 5:30pm, 112 Wurster Hall. Join DCRP and IURD on 2/16 for &quot;Modernist Planning and the Foundations of Urban Violence &quot;, a lecture by Diane Davis

Bangladeshi Lawyer and Human Rights Activist, Sara Hossain delivers the Chowdhury Center Distinguished Lecture for 2017

Lecture | February 16 | 5-7 p.m. | Hearst Field Annex, D37 (Blanche du Bois Room)

 Sara Hossain, Lawyer at the Supreme Court of Bangladesh and an honorary executive director of Bangladesh Legal Aid and Services Trust (BLAST)

 Angana Chatterji, Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People's Rights and Visiting Research Anthropologist at the Center for Race and Gender, UC Berkeley

 The Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies, Blum Center for Developing Economies, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People's Rights at Center for Race and Gender, Department of English, Human Rights Center

A lecture by Bangladeshi Lawyer and Human Rights Activist, Sara Hossain.

The wandering "we": Sather Classical Lectures

Lecture | February 16 | 6 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Mary Margaret McCabe, King's College London

 Department of Classics

The second lecture in the 2017 Sather series "Seeing and Saying: Plato on Virtue and Knowledge"

Smart Nation: A Blueprint for Modern Armenia

Lecture | February 16 | 8-10 p.m. |  Vasbouragan Hall

 51 Commmonwealth Ave., San Francisco, CA 94118

 Sassoon Grigorian, Head of Public Policy, Australia and New Zealand, Salesforce

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

At a critical juncture in its history, this book explores the challenges and opportunities for Armenia, with clear public policy recommendations.

Armenia is a Smart Nation, it has one of the highest literacy rates globally, it is a recognised world leader in the strategy game of chess, Armenians have been credited with many innovations and inventions used today, and its future success will in...   More >

Friday, February 17, 2017

The Union of Intersections (UoI) Method for Interpretable Data-Driven Discovery and Prediction: Data Science Lecture Series

Lecture | February 17 | 1:10-2:30 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

This talk will introduce the core concepts of UoI, summarize theoretical results on its properties, and demonstrate its superiority for linear regression, classification, random forests, and non-negative matrix factorizations. These results suggest UoI could improve interpretation and prediction in data-driven discovery across scientific fields.

Bending the Energy, Environmental, and Safety Curves Through Transportation Automation and Electrification

Lecture | February 17 | 4-5 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Costa Samaras, Carnegie Mellon

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: The combination of vehicle automation and electrification has the potential to fundamentally change the transportation sector. Vehicle crashes, traffic congestion, air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, energy consumption, and other negative externalities associated with driving could significantly diminish. However, travel may increase with these vehicles, pollution could be...   More >

Lyric, Tragedy and History in Horace, Odes 2.1

Lecture | February 17 | 5 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Stephen Harrison, Professor of Latin Literature, University of Oxford

 Department of Classics

Saturday, February 18, 2017

The Fast Radio Burst: An evolving cosmic mystery

Lecture | February 18 | 11 a.m. | 131 Campbell Hall

 Casey Law, Astronomy

 Science@Cal

Ten years ago, astronomers discovered a brief bright blast of radio waves that appeared to come from outside our galaxy. The first interpretation argued for a new class of extragalactic object called a “Fast Radio Burst” (FRB). Could it be a truly new object, such as a cosmic string or an as-yet unseen class of compact object?

Very Large Array

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

DCRP Lecture: Andrea Roberts

Lecture | February 21 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 106 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

TUE, FEB 21, 11:30am. Please join us for a lecture by Dr. Andrea Roberts about the Texas Freedom Colonies founded by former salves in Texas after the Civil War.

Implementation and Impacts of LEAN Redesigns in Primary Care

Lecture | February 21 | 12:40-2 p.m. | 714C University Hall

 Dorothy Hung, PhD, MA, MPH, Associate Scientist, Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute

 Health Policy and Management

Despite rapid adoption of LEAN as a strategy for improving efficiency and quality, there is a lack of research on its effects in healthcare organizations. The goal of this presentation is to describe key contextual factors affecting frontline acceptance of Lean redesign in primary care clinics. System-wide impacts of Lean intervention on a diverse range of performance metrics will also be...   More >

The Russian Challenge In The Next Four Years

Lecture | February 21 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room | Note change in location

 Dr. Eugene Rumer, Senior Fellow and Director, Russia and Eurasia Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

 Institute of International Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Eugene Rumer is a senior fellow and the director of Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia Program.

Rumer’s research focuses on political, economic, and security trends in Russia and former Soviet states, as well as on U.S. policy toward that region.

Prior to joining Carnegie, Rumer was the national intelligence officer for Russia and Eurasia at the U.S. National Intelligence Council from 2010 to...   More >

Czeslaw Milosz, T.S. Eliot, and the Generative Canon: a talk by Peter Dale Scott, with introduction by Robert Hass

Lecture | February 21 | 5:30 p.m. | D37 Hearst Field Annex

 Peter Dale Scott; Robert Hass

 Department of English

T.S. Eliot and Czeslaw Milosz, both great but idiosyncratic poets, can be closely compared but also contrasted. Milosz was deeply indebted to Eliot’s notion of the poet’s relationship to the “ideal order” of the past. But Milosz (who unlike Eliot believed himself to be guided by a daimonion or inner voice) also revived the belief of Blake and Whitman in the responsibility of poets to break with...   More >

AIA Lecture - Embodying the Goddess: Revealing the practice of tattooing in ancient Egypt

Lecture | February 21 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Anne Austin, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Egyptology, Stanford University

 AIA San Francisco Society

While tattooing is an increasingly popular topic of study, it is rarely discussed in the past owing to the infrequent identification of tattoos in human remains. This is particularly true in dynastic Egypt, where physical evidence of tattooing is limited to a set of three female Middle Kingdom mummies discovered nearly a century ago. However, during the recent research with the mission of the...   More >

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Seven Modes of Uncertainty: Townsend Book Chat with Namwali Serpell

Lecture | February 22 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Namwali Serpell’s book Seven Modes of Uncertainty asserts that literary uncertainty is crucial to ethics because it pushes us beyond the limits of our experience.

PopUp Exhibition: Jeremiah Lockwood on the Lost and Found Art of Cantorial Music

Lecture | February 22 | 12-1 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Jeremiah Lockwood’s music career began with over a decade of apprenticeship to the legendary Piedmont Blues musician Carolina Slim, playing in the subways of New York City. He also trained under his grandfather Cantor Jacob Konigsberg and performed in his choir. Jeremiah’s band, The Sway Machinery, seeks inspiration from diverse realms of experience related to the cultural geography of New York...   More >

Biomedical Instrumentation:: How do we measure what we want to measure, when and where we want it

Lecture | February 22 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310, Banatao Auditorium

 Dan Fletcher, Professor, Bioengineering, UC Berkeley

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Dr. Dan Fletcher is Purnendu Chatterjee Chair in Engineering Biological Systems in the Bioengineering Department at UC Berkeley, where his research focuses on the biophysics of cell movements and the cytoskeleton and development of biomedical devices. Recent work from his laboratory

Free

 Free lunch available (limited #s). You must register by the Monday before the event for lunch. Register online

California Countercultures: Hippie Modernism with Greg Castillo

Lecture | February 22 | 12 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

An alternative cultural geography rooted in a new way of seeing the world can be extrapolated from the counterculture artifacts exhibited in Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia. “The cybernetic eye,” according to Whole Earth Catalog impresario Steward Brand, saw beyond a fragmented reality to perceive holistic systems. Rejecting the social systems inherent in cash transactions, the...   More >

 Admission to this lecture is free

Living in a Gender Creative World

Lecture | February 22 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Dr. Diane Ehrensaft will call on her work at the UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Child and Adolescent Gender clinic and share information about the gender affirmative model, which recognizes the complex interplay of nature, nurture, and culture that go into any one person's gender development.

Everyone Loses: The Ukraine Crisis and the Ruinous Contest for Post-Soviet Eurasia

Lecture | February 22 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Samuel Charap, Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia, International Institute for Strategic Studies

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Institute of International Studies

Disorder erupted in Ukraine in 2014, involving the overthrow of a sitting government, the Russian annexation of the Crimean peninsula, and a violent insurrection, supported by Moscow, in the east of the country. This crisis has yielded a ruinous outcome, in which all the parties are worse off and international security has deteriorated. The upshot has been systematic losses for Russia, the West,...   More >

Bowen Lectures: Lecture 1 : Galois representations and automorphic forms - an introduction to the Langlands program

Lecture | February 22 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 50 Birge Hall

 Michael Harris, Columbia University

 Department of Mathematics

Automorphic forms are functions on a class of homogeneous spaces that arise naturally in geometry and number theory and that enjoy particularly strong symmetry properties (the simplest non-trivial example is the circle). Galois representations are efficient ways of packaging meaningful information about solutions to polynomial equations; the cohomology of algebraic varieties provides a rich...   More >

Cleverness and Drive, or the Cybernetic Fantasy of Value: R.S. Hunt's "Two Kinds of Work"

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall

 Seb Franklin, Lecturer in Contemporary Literature, King's College London

 The Program in Critical Theory

In January 1951, R.S. Hunt—a British technical editor and former chemist without any university degree or diploma—sent a manuscript titled “Two Kinds of Work” to the mathematician Norbert Wiener, who did not read it. Hunt’s manuscript promises to “put metaphysics within the scope of physics.” And it claims to do so by making “such quantities as beauty, virtue, and happiness,” as well as all...   More >

Ankhi Mukherjee | Unseen City: Travelling Psychoanalysis and the Urban Poor

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Ankhi Mukherjee, Professor of English and World Literatures in the Faculty of English and a Tutorial Fellow at Wadham College, University of Oxford

 Poulomi Saha, Assistant Professor of English, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of English, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Ankhi Mukherjee, Professor of English and World Literatures in the Faculty of English and a Tutorial Fellow at Wadham College, University of Oxford

Theoretically Speaking Series — Finding Hay in Haystacks: The Power and Limits of Randomness

Lecture | February 22 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  David Brower Center

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Avi Wigderson, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

Is the universe inherently deterministic or probabilistic? Perhaps more importantly, can we tell the difference between the two?

Humanity has pondered the meaning and utility of randomness for millennia. There is a remarkable variety of ways in which we utilize perfect coin tosses to our advantage: in statistics, cryptography, game theory, algorithms, gambling... Indeed, randomness seems...   More >

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Bowen Lectures: Lecture 2 : Attaching Galois representations to automorphic forms, and vice versa - recent progress

Lecture | February 23 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Michael Harris, Columbia University

 Department of Mathematics

Most of the Galois representations whose properties can be studied are obtained by analyzing the cohomology of Shimura varieties, and of the moduli spaces (stacks) of shtukas, which are families of vector bundles over curves over finite fields with extra structure.

Ayesha Siddiqa | Pakistan: Civil-Military Relations in a Changing Domestic, Regional and Global Environment

Lecture | February 23 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room)

 Ayesha Siddiqa, Independent political and defence analyst

 Munis Faruqui, Associate Professor in the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative

Talk by Independent political and defense analyst from Pakistan, Ayesha Siddiqa/

Religious Realignments in the Trump Era

Lecture | February 23 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Daniel Steinmetz-Jenkins, Berkeley Postdoctoral Fellow in Public Theology, UC Berkeley

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

The success of populist movements in Western Europe and the United States has created conditions for the formation of new coalitions between religious groups and political ideologies that once stood hostile to each other. We are now experiencing a convergence between the political views of conservative Evangelicals in the United States and so called traditionalists in Russia.

Beyond Coverage: After the ACA

Lecture | February 23 | 5-7 p.m. | 150 University Hall

 Shannon Brownlee, Senior Vice President, Lown Institute

 Public Health, School of, Graduate School of Journalism

Join Shannon Brownlee, a nationally known writer and essayist, for a discussion about the national conversation we need once we are done talking about the Affordable Care Act.

  Register online

The Wheel of Time: Tibetan Thoughts on the Buddha’s Anno Nirvanae: 2017 Khyentse Lecture

Lecture | February 23 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Professor Leonard van der Kuijp, Harvard University

 Center for Buddhist Studies

Although fairly long in coming, the Christian calendar began with the year in which Jesus was allegedly born. And Dionysius Exiguus (6thc.) was the first to introduce the notion of A[nno]D[omini], the birth year of the Christ. Famously, the British monk Bede (672‑735) went so far as to deduce in his De temporum ratione of 725, an elaboration of his earlier Liber de temporibus of 703, that...   More >

Parsing vision: Sather Classical Lectures

Lecture | February 23 | 6 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Mary Margaret McCabe, King's College London

 Department of Classics

The third lecture in the 2017 Sather series "Seeing and Saying: Plato on Virtue and Knowledge"

Friday, February 24, 2017

Dissertation Talk: Dan Calderone: Models of Competition for Smart Cities: Routing Games, Mean-field Games, and Varying Population Preferences

Lecture | February 24 | 9-10 a.m. | Cory Hall, 521 Hogan Room

 Dan Calderone

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Competition underlies much of the complexity of modern transportation systems and correctly modeling the incentives that transportation users face is critical in designing the smart cities of tomorrow. In the past century, classical routing games have proved a powerful tool in modeling competition in transportation. In this talk, we explore several extensions of routing games to model scenarios...   More >

Engineering at the Intersection of Productive Efficiency, Ideology, and Ethical AI in Wikipedia: Data Science Lecture Series

Lecture | February 24 | 1:10-2:30 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Aaron Halfaker, Wikimedia Foundation; University of Minnesota

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

I'll introduce "ORES," an open AI platform designed to enable Wikipedia's technologists to enact alternative ideological visions and to enable researchers to easily perform audits. I'll share some lessons that we've learned maintaining a large-scale generalized AI service and discuss a call to action to critical algorithms researchers to take advantage of this platform for their studies.

Engineering at the Intersection of Productive Efficiency, Ideology, and Ethical AI in Wikipedia

Lecture | February 24 | 1:10-2:30 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Aaron Halfaker, Principal Research Scientist, Wikimedia Foundation; Senior Scientist, University of Minnesota

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Wikipedia has become a dominant source of reference information for more than half a billion people every month. Through its improbable rise to popularity, this "free encyclopedia that anyone can edit" has become a synecdoche for open production communities online. In order to operate at massive scales (~160k edits per day), Wikipedians have embraced algorithmic technologies that bring efficiency...   More >

Multicopter Dynamics and Control: Surviving the complete loss of multiple actuators and quickly generating trajectories

Lecture | February 24 | 4-5 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Mark Mueller, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: Flying robots, such as multicopters, are increasingly becoming part of our everyday lives, with current and future applications including personal transportation, delivery services, entertainment, and aerial sensing. These systems are expected to be safe and to have a high degree of autonomy. This talk will discuss the dynamics and control of multicopters, including some research...   More >

Synaesthetics: Sound, Image, and Materialism: part of Syncing... Subject, Media, Society Conference

Lecture | February 24 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room

 Christoph Cox, Hampshire College

 Department of German

The “sonic turn” in the arts, humanities, and social sciences has prompted a reconsideration of the relationship between sound and image in media today. Semiotic issues of representation and signification have given way to materialist considerations of affect, force, and intensity. Along these materialist lines, the neurological condition of synaesthesia has become a prominent figure for thinking...   More >

Bowen Lectures: Lecture 3 : An idiosyncratic survey of open problems

Lecture | February 24 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Michael Harris, Columbia University

 Department of Mathematics

This final lecture will focus on a few questions in the Langlands program that may be on the verge of solution, and on other questions that at present appear completely out of reach.

Working Group in Ancient Philosophy: The Immortality Argument in Republic X

Lecture | February 24 | 5-7 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Tad Brennan, Cornell University

 Townsend Working Group in Ancient Philosophy

Denise Dresser: Why Mexico Fell Apart, and How to Fix It

Lecture | February 24 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Denise Dresser

 Center for Latin American Studies

Denise Dresser will speak on why Mexico fell apart, how to fix it, & U.S.-Mexico relations in the Trump era

Denise Dresser. (Photo by Paco Diaz.)