<< Wednesday, February 27, 2019 >>

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Rope-A-Dope Politics and the Erosion of Democratic Norms

Lecture | February 27 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Markus Hinterleitner, Institute of European Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies

Many advanced democracies are currently characterized by a norm-eroding politics, which manifests itself in increased levels of populism and blame generation. The erosion of norms is a potentially far-reaching challenge for democracy. In his lecture, Markus Hinterleitner conceptualizes the process of political norm erosion capturing the interactions of norm violators and norm defenders with the...   More >

Markus Hinterleitner

Curating a Decolonial Guide to Hawai‘i: The Detours Project

Lecture | February 27 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Vernadette Vicuña Gonzalez, Associate Professor of American Studies, Honors Program Director, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies

The "Detours" project takes seriously the power of form, and the reading practices and publics produced by the genre of the guidebook, which manifest the fantasy of Hawai‘i as an exotic island destination for the consumption of tourists. "Detours" deliberately perverts the guidebook to produce alternative narratives, tours, itineraries, mappings and images of the islands as well as concrete...   More >

The Use of Ancient DNA to Understand Human History

Lecture | February 27 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Rasmus Nielsen, Professor, Department of Integrative Biology and Department of Statistics, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

I this talk I will discuss the use of ancient DNA in anthropological research. I will start by discussing some of our work on the discovery of interbreeding between modern humans and Neanderthals and the causes of the Neanderthal extinction. I will then move into a discussion of several different studies we have been involved with on analyzing human remains.

Unscripted: The Visuality of Monumental Scripts in Ptolemaic Egypt

Lecture | February 27 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall

 Emily Cole, PhD, Postdoctoral Scholar, Center for the Tebtunis Papyri at The Bancroft Library

 Near Eastern Studies

The Egyptian language is visually associated with its iconic Hieroglyphs. However, by the Ptolemaic period (332-30 BCE), the later form of Egyptian known as Demotic, which employed a different script, was commonly used in daily life. Hieroglyphs retained a prominent position and could imbue an inscription with prestige, but the multicultural shift of the Egyptian population by this period led to...   More >

Rohini Pande | Women and Work in India

Lecture | February 27 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Rohini Pande, Rafik Hariri Professor of International Political Economy, Harvard Kennedy School

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Blum Center for Developing Economies

Talk by Political Economist, Prof. Rohini Pande

Maggie Nelson: Songs of Care and Constraint: Townsend Center Una's Lecture 2019

Lecture | February 27 | 5 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Maggie Nelson, a 2016 MacArthur Fellow, is the author of numerous works of nonfiction and poetry, including The Argonauts, an autobiographical account that received the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism. Her Una's Lecture is titled "Songs of Care and Constraint."

Photo of Maggie Nelson