<< Thursday, April 05, 2018 >>

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Loss of Functional Motivation in Language Change

Workshop | April 4 – 5, 2018 every day | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Department of Linguistics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) Munich

Our goal is to address cases of language change where formerly transparent functional motivations for a structural pattern become obsolete, while the pattern itself survives. We identify this class of phenomena as loss of functional motivation. LoFuM seems to be prevalent in all subsystems of the linguistic system: phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.

 Attendees must RSVP to hyman@berkeley.edu

The Past is Present:: Virtuality, Archaeology, and the Future of History

Conference/Symposium | April 5 | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 Banatao Auditorium

 Center for New Media , Archaeological Research Facility

Past is Present symposium is an interdisciplinary event bringing together scholars, students, technology innovators, and cultural heritage workers in conversation about new methods and tools which are shaping their work. Over the course of three days (April 4-6), the Berkeley Center for New Media will provide a venue for an international group to explore critical issues of new technologies.

$0

  Register online

Latinos and the Environment Summit

Conference/Symposium | April 5 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. |  David Brower Center

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 College of Natural Resources/Center for Latino Policy Research

Welcome to Latinos and the Environment Initiative. Our initiative was started as a way of bringing together Latinos whose work, interest, and research focus on the environment. We seek to create a network and bridge policy, organizing, and research.

The Past is Present: Virtuality, Archaeology, and the Future of History

Conference/Symposium | April 5 | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. |  Sutardja Dai Hall

 College of Environmental Design

With rapid advances in modern documentation and interpretive technologies such as scanning, visualization, and Virtual and Augmented Reality, how must our study of the past and its material legacy adapt?

Writing Research Proposals

Workshop | April 5 | 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Erica Whitney, Berkeley Research Development Office

 Berkeley Research Development Office

In this workshop, we will explore techniques and best practices for writing a research proposal from the beginning (the specific aims/objectives) to the middle (the research design and methods) to the very end (supplementary documents).

Robots on the Edge: Intelligent Machines, Industry 4.0 and Fog Robotics

Panel Discussion | April 5 | 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. |  UC Santa Cruz, Silicon Valley Campus

 3175 Bowers Avenue, Santa Clara, CA 95054

 Ken Goldberg, Professor of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research, UC Berkeley, CITRIS and the Banatao Institute; Juan Aparicio, Head of Research Group Advanced Manufacturing Automation, Siemens Corporation

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Please join us for the CITRIS Silicon Valley Forum, a new monthly series from CITRIS and the Banatao Institute. Our second panel of the Spring 2018 series invites Ken Goldberg, Professor of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research and Juan Aparicio, Head of Research Group Advanced Manufacturing Automation at Siemens to discuss Robots on the Edge: Intelligent Machines, Industry 4.0, and Fog...   More >

ESPM Seminar Series - Albert Ruhi

Seminar | April 5 | 12-1 p.m. | 132 Mulford Hall

 Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM)

ESPM Assistant Professor, Albert Ruhi, will share his talk, "Rivers of the Anthropocene: responses of freshwater communities to novel flow regimes"

This event is open to the public.
Please join us in 139 Mulford Hall at 11:30 for coffee.

In an effort to reduce waste, please bring a reusable mug.

Oliver E. Williamson Seminar

Seminar | April 5 | 12-1:30 p.m. | C325 Haas School of Business

 David Vogel, Berkeley

 Department of Economics

The Oliver E. Williamson Seminar on Institutional Analysis, named after our esteemed colleague who founded the seminar, features current research by faculty, from UCB and elsewhere, and by advanced doctoral students. The research investigates governance, and its links with economic and political forces. Markets, hierarchies, hybrids, and the supporting institutions of law and politics all come...   More >

IB Seminar: Multicomponent and Multimodal Signals in Ant Communication

Seminar | April 5 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building | Canceled

 Bert Hölldobler, Arizona State University

 Department of Integrative Biology

Seminar 217, Risk Management: The Securitization and Solicited Refinancing Channel of Monetary Policy

Seminar | April 5 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Speaker: Rupal Kamdar, UC Berkeley

 Center for Risk Management Research

I document the “securitization and solicited refinancing channel,” a novel transmission mechanism of monetary policy and its heterogenous regional effects. The mechanism predicts that mortgage lenders who sell their originations to Government Sponsored Enterprises or into securitizations no longer hold the loan’s prepayment risk, and when rates drop, these lenders are more likely to signal to...   More >

Econ 235, Financial Economics: Topic Forthcoming

Seminar | April 5 | 1-2 p.m. | 597 Evans Hall

 Nick Sander, UC Berkeley; Yingge Yan, UC Berkeley

 Department of Economics

ISF 110 - Free Speech in the Public Sphere: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Course | January 16 – May 3, 2018 every Tuesday & Thursday | 2-3:30 p.m. | 102 Wurster Hall

 Division of Undergraduate Education

In this spring 2018 class, we shall take up the nature of public speech from Socrates' public dissent to social media messaging today. The course reading will combine classic philosophical statements about the value of free, subversive and offensive speech; histories of the emergence of public spheres; and sociologies of technologically-mediated speech today.

Rome Behaving Badly: Appian’s Critique of Roman Imperialism: CTP Distinguished Lecturer's Seminar

Seminar | April 5 | 3 p.m. | 479 Bancroft Library

 Brian McGing, Regius Professor of Greek, Trinity College Dublin

 Center for the Tebtunis Papyri

The 2nd century AD Greek historian, Appian of Alexandria, is usually thought of as “above all, an ardent admirer of Rome” (Oxford Classical Dictionary). Although he says admiring things about the overall Roman imperial achievement, Appian is at times fiercely critical of Roman behavior in his coverage of Rome’s conquests during the Republican period. Some of this he may get from his...   More >

Biology of Bedtime: Understanding Circadian Rhythms and Sleep

Seminar | April 5 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Amita Sehgal, University of Pennsylvania

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Statistical inference of properties of distributions: theory, algorithms, and applications

Seminar | April 5 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, HP Auditorium, 306 Soda Hall

 Jiantao Jiao, Ph.D. Candidate, Stanford University

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Modern data science applications frequently involve pipelines of exploratory analysis requiring accurate inference of a property of the distribution governing the data. This talk will focus on recent progress in the performance, structure, and deployment of near-minimax-optimal estimators for a large variety of properties in high-dimensional and nonparametric settings.

Bodies of Knowledge: Race, Power, and Pedagogy

Colloquium | April 5 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 140 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues

All You Need is Love: “Benevolent Whiteness” and Love Language as Colonial Violence
Natalee Kēhaulani Bauer, PhD

The Latino Male Teacher: Discursive Formations, the Pressure to Perform, and the Possibility of Disidentification
Michael Singh, School of Education

Mathematics Department Colloquium: Combinatorics of the asymmetric simple exclusion process

Colloquium | April 5 | 4-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Sylvie Corteel, CNRS and Universite Paris Diderot, and Miller Professor

 Department of Mathematics

The asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) is an interacting particle system introduced in 1970 by Frank Spitzer in Interaction of Markov Processes. Many articles have been published on it in the physics and mathematics literature since then, and it has become a paradigm in modeling and analyzing non-equilibrium traffic systems. In this talk, I will show that beautiful combinatorics emerge...   More >

Intro to California Taxes

Workshop | April 5 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | International House, Sproul Rooms

 Berkeley International Office(BIO))

A representative from the California Tax Franchise Board will present on how to determine your California state tax residency and complete your nonresident alien tax forms. Collect your tax report forms (W-2 and/or 1042-S forms and/or 1099) and follow along as they take you through a step-by- step example for filing your state tax return.

*Complete your federal tax return via GTP before...   More >

Literary Criticism: A Political History

Panel Discussion | April 5 | 6-8 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler Hall

 Stephen Best, Associate Professor, Berkeley English; Catherine Gallagher, Professor Emerita, Berkeley English; David Marno, Associate Professor, Berkeley English; Namwali Serpell, Associate Professor, Berkeley English; Joseph North, Assistant Professor of English, Yale English

 Department of English

Is literary criticism political?

Can it be?

Should it be?

People in today's literature departments often assume that their work is politically progressive, especially when compared with the work of early- and mid-twentieth-century critics. In Literary Criticism: A Concise Political History, Joseph North argues that when understood in relation lo the longer arc of the discipline, the...   More >