<< Wednesday, February 21, 2018 >>

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Evidences (both Archaeological and Textual) for Long-Distance Trade Networks and Weighted Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Near Eastern Bronze Age (1950-1750 BCE)

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Adam Anderson, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Berkeley Digital Humanities

 Archaeological Research Facility

Archaeology in the Middle East or Near East has a long and illustrious history, with more than 150 years of scholarship. From the 1840s onward western archaeologists like Sir Austen Henry Layard made early discoveries of textual artifacts in the heart of Mesopotamia, and awoke a deep curiosity in deciphering the beginnings of human history. Unfortunately, these discoveries inadvertently...   More >

Decolonial and Deimperial Crossings: An Inter-Asian Feminist Genealogy

Lecture | February 21 | 12-2 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Laura Kang, Professor of Gender & Sexuality Studies, English and Comparative Literature, UC Irvine

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Race and Gender, Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

Part of the Feminist Studies and Decolonial Epistemologies Lecture Series

This talk recalls and retraces the inter-Asian network of feminist mobilizations against Japanese sex tourism and U.S. military prostitution in the early 1970s. The work of attending to the discrepant yet linked histories of imperialist sexual violence, military dictatorship, and neocolonial exploitation of Asian women’s...   More >

Small States and Secondary Actors in the Cold War: Entanglements Between Europe and Latin America

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Albert Manke, GHI West

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West. Pacific Regional Office of the Germany Historical Institute Washington DC, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

What kind of relations could small states and secondary actors establish with each other during the Cold War? To which extent were they able to overcome ideological boundaries and/or superpower dominance? Based on archival research in Cuba and the Czech Republic and extensive exchange with colleagues specialized on Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe, Albert Manke will provide an...   More >

A Talk with Jacob Gaboury

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Jacob Gaboury, Assistant Professor of Film & Media, University of California, Berkeley

 Arts + Design

Jacob Gaboury is a historian of digital media, studying the ways people have imagined, developed, and used digital images over the past seventy years. His forthcoming book is titled Image Objects (MIT Press, 2018), and offers a material history of early computer graphics and visual simulation. He is currently Assistant Professor of New Media History and Theory in the Department of Film & Media at...   More >

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: Peter Sahlins: 1668: The Year of the Animal in France

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Professor of History Peter Sahlins explores the “animal moment” in and around 1668, in which French authors, anatomists, painters, sculptors, and especially the young Louis XIV turned their attention to nonhuman beings.

Why Is the Information Revolution So Scary?

Lecture | February 21 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Jeffrey K. MacKie-Mason

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

A look at information and its discontents with University Librarian and Chief Digital Scholarship Officer Jeff MacKie-Mason.

Imperfect immunity: estimation and epidemiological implications

Lecture | February 21 | 3-4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Joseph A. Lewnard, PhD

 Public Health, School of

The persisting burden of vaccine-preventable infections underscores challenges associated with the imperfect immune response elicited by many vaccines. I introduce statistical problems undermining causal inference of imperfect vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, motivating the use of models to account for the natural history of infectious agents. I next describe ongoing work applying such models...   More >

The North Korean Quagmire and the Moon Jae-in Government: Nukes, Humanitarian Assistance, and Prospects for Inter-Korean Relations

Lecture | February 21 | 3 p.m. | Barrows Hall, 8th Floor Social Science Matrix

 Chung-in Moon, Distinguished University Professor at Yonsei University John Linton, Director, International Health Care Center, Severance Hospital of Yonsei Medical School; John Linton, Director, International Health Care Center, Yonsei University Severance Hospital

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Berkeley APEC Study Center, Social Science Matrix, Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

With the ongoing crisis over North Korean nuclear weapons, questions of humanitarian assistance to North Korea have fallen by the wayside. Prof. Chung-in Moon will talk about the Moon Jae-in government’s policy towards North Korea. Prof. John Linton will talk about about overall humanitarian conditions in...   More >

Looking Around, Rather Than Ahead: Design at the Periphery of Contemporary High Tech Development

Lecture | February 21 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Sarah Fox

 Information, School of

How technology design can help us understand different social phenomena.

Reconfiguration of Ceramic Production and Trade in China at the Threshold of Global Trade: An Archaeological Perspective

Lecture | February 21 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Li Min, UCLA

 Tang Center for Silk Road Studies

Taking archaeological ceramics from production, transportation, and consumption sites during the 13th to 17th century, this paper examines the changing configuration of ceramic production and trade on Chinese coast during the critical transition from the Asiatic Trade Network to the beginning of early global trade. I will explore how potter communities in China linked to emerging maritime...   More >

The Gallery and the Archive: Contemporary Artists Work with The Magnes Collection

Lecture | February 21 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Join David Wilson, Greg Niemeyer and Nicki Green, three contemporary artists who, in recent years, have interacted with The Magnes Collection and contributed to exhibitions that intersect new works with art and artifacts from the collection itself, in a conversation about art, creativity, archives, and memory, moderated by Francesco Spagnolo.

David Wilson, an artist based in Oakland, worked...   More >

Philippe Pirotte and Niklaus Largier in Conversation

Lecture | February 21 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Senior Adjunct Curator Philippe Pirotte, who organized Agony in Effigy: Art, Truth, Pain, and the Body, is joined in conversation by UC Berkeley professor of German and comparative literature Niklaus Largier, whose recent work explores the relation between bodily ascetic practices and the literary imagination. The discussion will expand and deepen the literary and cultural context for the...   More >

The City Will Never Be the Same: Lost Radical Cultures in San Francisco's Montgomery Block: A talk with journalist Hiya Swanhuyser

Lecture | February 21 | 7-9 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), IRLE Director's Room

 Hiya Swanhuyser, https://hiyaswanhuyser.wordpress.com/

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, California Studies Association, Townsend Center for the Humanities

When it was built in 1853, the “Monkey Block”was probably the largest and most important office building in the Far West. But as the commercial center of the city moved south, the building became occupied by bohemian artists, writers, and cultural radicals. Bay Area journalist Hiya Swanhuyser will discuss her new book, The City Will Never Be the Same: Lost Radical Cultures in San Francisco's...   More >