<< Saturday, January 20, 2018 >>

Saturday, January 20, 2018

SENYAS: Deaf culture and life with Filipino Sign Language in Manila: Film and Discussion

Film - Documentary | January 20 | 2-4 p.m. | Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley Disability Lab, Hearst Field Annex (HFA) Room D-1

 Soya Mori; Maria Tanya de Guzman

 UC Berkeley Disability Studies

UC Berkeley Disability Studies will be screening SENYAS, a documentary short film about deaf culture, life, and Filipino Sign Language. Filmed in Metro Manila, it follows the life of a Deaf woman. The film will be followed by short presentations and discussion between Prof. Soya Mori who is a Visiting Scholar at UCB and Ms. Maria Tanya de Guzman who is a Pinay Deaf leader in the Bay Area. ...   More >

The Wizard of Oz

Film - Feature | January 20 | 3:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

What better activity for a Saturday afternoon in winter than a trip down the Yellow Brick Road together with Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Cowardly Lion, and the Tin Woodsman? In a 35mm print that shows off its jewel-like colors and unforgettable music, this true classic has delights to beckon little munchkins and Auntie Ems alike to the theater (just don’t bring your little dog, too). The Wizard...   More >

One Day in the Life of Andrei Arsenevich

Film - Feature | January 20 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Chris Marker has crafted a cinematic psalm to Andrei Tarkovsky in this absorbing documentary on the aesthetics, evocations, and sensibilities of one of the greatest cinema stylists of all time. Marker’s cinema essay transports the viewer into Tarkovsky’s films and uses two video shoots—a visit to the settings of The Sacrifice (screening January 12 and 28), and a video edited on Tarkovsky’s...   More >

Outrage

Film - Feature | January 20 | 8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

“Events in crisis are laid out like cards on a table at the opening of a Lupino film,” wrote Action. This one opens with a signature telegraphed image—a coffee cup slides down a factory lunch counter, pushed by the hand of a rapist. In Outrage, Lupino dissects a rape and its aftereffects from the point of view both of the victim and her unwitting victimizers—the morbid, voyeuristic, “guilty”...   More >